HUMOUR! Ace reporter beats police to the punch in murder mystery!

ACE REPORTER: MASON KNIGHT KNEW WHICH STRINGS TO PULL!

FRANK MORRIS

Ace reporter Mason Knight had just finished solving the “Mr Boots” scandal when the phone rang. He stopped it. It rang again. “Knight,” he answered. It was the editor. “Yes, sir.” The editor prattled on. He caught three words – “luxury, murder and Checkert Point” the suburbs where the rich and famous live.

He was the first media person there. “Mmmm! So, this was what the Checkert country house looks like,” he said in a mumble. The late Sir Henry Checkert bought the land on which the 500 abodes were built nearly 40 odd years ago.

By the time he ‘investigated’ the Checkert country house there were dozens of media people, cops and Coroner Lewing and Sheriff Tom. The Ace Reporter knew both of them so he followed them inside to the living room.

No other reporter or media person would have realised how to go about things, except Mason Knight; he knew everything. The day was developing into a heady time for the Ace Reporter.

This room was like a ‘mini casino’ with all the mod cons of a happy existence. Just away from them, was Caroline Checkert’s body lying on the couch as if she were asleep, clad only in her lingerie, socks and riding shoes.

WHERE WAS THE HORSE?

The Ace Reporter went over and studied a deep gash showing near the base of her skull, not forgetting the cuts and bruises on her arms. He stood up. “I know who did it,” he thought to himself.

More the half of the media contingent had departed; half was waiting outside.

Coroner Lewing sighed and turned away from the body. “I’m out of breath. Open the widows, get me a little air,” the Coroner quickly found a classic French chair. Mason walked through to the French doors which opened out on the front lawn.

The Ace reporter noticed one important facet of the case: Caroline had been moved to the house. The stepmother, the heiress to all of Checkert Park, came downstairs and walked onto the landing.

Before she uttered a word, the Ace reporter asked. “Where was the horse, Mrs Checkert?  ”Mrs Checkert walk passed him, admittedly, to front him.

“Caroline was always crazy about riding. Her father actually built this style of country house so she could have horses. She wasn’t afraid of anything. This same horse had thrown her before, but she laughed and called him Bronco.

BRONCO HAD BOLTED

 “When she didn’t come home for lunch, I became worried and went looking her. I found her over by that big tree opposite the gate to the meadow …”

Ace Reporter: “But did you move Caroline …” She carried on.

“She was unconscious. Bronco must have bolted and thrown her off. I managed to half-carry, half-drag her the house. I took off her sweater and jodhpurs and tried to revive her; then I called the doctor. Thank you.” She was rattled.

Ace Reported: “This is no accident. Let me explain it!”

The three men stepped on to the lawn.

Ace Reporter: “When I went to the French doors they were already unlocked. I take it that route was the way the in. The stepmother said she “half-carried, half-dragged” Caroline to the house. That is a chargeable offence. The stepmother said she removed the girl’s sweater and jodhpurs. In order to remove them, the shoes must be taken off first. A fact the stepmother overlooked.”

“Where was Bronco, the steed?” inquired the Sheriff.

“As Bronco got nearer to big tree he stopped, dead, and Caroline was ditched on the gravel. She was alive then. Bronco continued to run. The damage was done later,” said the Ace reporter.

As they about turned, they spotted Bronco in one of the paddocks, chewing away, not a care in world. The police went in and charged Mrs Checkert with murder.

The Ace Reporter went to his car and phoned through his story. He looked around the Cherkert’s property and imagined what Mrs Checkert would be thinking. He was ecstatic.

Pictures. The one and only. Mason Knight – he looked over the dead corpse and knew it was murder. Bronco bucked: Once the Bronco ditched his rider he gallops off.


NEXT … The adventures of Blackie Rabbit continued: If you recall, Blackie has been kidnapped by a gruesome fellow who claimed to be a pal of his. But as time gets nearer to the ‘unmasking’ of this nifty fellow a pleasant surprise was waiting to happen. COMING IN JULY.


FIRST EMPIRE GAMES: DECIMA NORMAN BECAME FIRST GOLDEN GIRL OF THE TRACK.

EMPIRE GAMES: OUR FIRST GOLDEN GIRL WAS WITH US 80TH YEARS AGO

FRANK MORRIS

“The most memorable in the history of sport in Australia,” shouted the Sydney Morning Herald. It was the day of days at which Australia had a shining star of the Empire Games, the first “golden girl” of the track, Decima Norman, from Western Australia.

“She was the forerunner,” said Ian Heads, “to Marjorie Jackson, Betty Cuthbert, Marlene Mathews and Raelene Boyle. She was the first of the golden girls.”

Enthused the Sydney Mail: “No more stirring spectacle has ever been witnessed on the Sydney Cricket Ground ... the Governor of NSW received a message from the King … the playing of bands, the releasing of a thousand pigeons, and the sending up of a myriad of coloured balloons – this launched the Empire Games of 1938.”

BOOK NOW

The Sydney Mail continued: “Never has the peace-time spirit of Empire been more gloriously represented in Australia. Six hundred men and women, representing 14 countries are competing for the highest sporting honours to be gained in the Empire.

“But they are doing far more than that. That are demonstrating to the world the virility of those sentimental ties and feelings of good fellowship that link the far-flung units of the British people …”

The world and Australia can look forward to the Commonwealth Games to be held in Queensland in 2018.

<< Backpage: Australia’s Greatest Sporting Moments! By Ian Heads; Lester-Townsend Publishing Pty Ltd, Paddington, NSW; Frank Morris.

Frank Morris comment: The British Empire Games was recognised, after several names changes, to the Commonwealth Games in 1970.

Picture: The golden girl. Winner Decima Norman, centre, J. Walker, Australia, and J. Dolson, Canada, third. This is a newspaper photo.         


YES OR NO: IS THE POWERHOUSE STILL ON THE MOVING BLOCK?

POWER HOUSE – A MUSEUM THAT KEPT YOU OCCUPIED FOR 40 YEARS!

When it made its inception, The Powerhouse, Sydney, was shaping up to be one of the 20 top museums in the world. The Powerhouse, which was to open in 1988, is the ‘perfect home’ for over 10,000 of the most diverse objects ever grouped under one roof. This story was run in 1987. – FM.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Sydney will be the home of Australia’s largest Museum complex, The Powerhouse, which is to open in 1988. Developed on international lines, the Museum will be one of the top 20 in the world. It will house one of the most diverse collections ever assembled under one roof.

The site of this exciting project is the Ultimo Power House, which provided energy for Sydney’s trams between 1899 and 1963.

When it closed, its machinery was removed and the building lay idle. In 1979, the NSW Government announced it would become the new and permanent ‘home’ for the collection of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences.
This Museum, over 100 years old, had operated from a relatively small four-story building since the turn of the century.

WORLDWIDE GROWTH

The Museum had collected thousands of items in the areas of transport, technology, costume, ceramics and many others – but with little space. Warehouses were leased to accommodate it. The development of the old Power House as a museum reflects the regeneration of interest in historic Australian buildings.

Its size and strong foundations make it a perfect home for the thousands of objects the Museum can now display. There has been a worldwide growth and expansion of museums, particularly in Europe and North America.

The new museum display methods today encourage the visitor to participate and interact with exhibits. The Powerhouse will be in the forefront of this development with over 100 exhibits: including computer programs, video games, crafts workshops, music performances and science demonstrations each day.

PIONEERING SPIRIT

Never before has such a large and complex task been undertaken by a cultural institution in Australia.

With 10,000 objects to display, details such as their size and placement, temperature and light control, jostle for attention with visitor flow patterns, signage and so on; plus the restaurants, theatres and performance spaces intended for the Museum.

To be diverse, the criteria applied to each exhibition at the Museum has established broad thematic areas under which the 30 exhibitions are grouped.

Exploring the Museum’s history, some of the more memorable items from the former Museum, such as the Strasburg Clock and the Plastic Woman will re-emerge in a new context. Examples of our pioneering achievements and the surprising range of Australian inventions that have been adapted here and overseas are another dimension.

The ordinary lives of Australians are examined in displays on the history of brewing and pubs, and our domestic past which has emanated from the kitchen sink to the coat-hanger.

<< Adapted from article, Power House; East-West Australia inflight magazine on March, 1987.

Frank Morris comments: Under the Baird Liberal Government in 2016, the Powerhouse Museum was to move to Parramatta. Under the new Liberal leader, Gladys Berejiklian, the decision to make the move has not been rescinded yet. Although there is talk about building Powerhouse Museum No 2. We’ll have to wait and see. Today, the Powerhouse is different. The Powerhouse is bigger. Many of the exhibitions are from overseas. You notice so much will have changed.

Pictures: Mighty one. Lego and DC Comic characters feature in a sizeable display. Old site. The Ultimo Power House, which provided energy for trams between up until 1963, was first stage of the Powerhouse Museum.


STRIPPED: THE ROYAL FAMILY SHUNNED DIANA THEY EVENTUALLY DEPRIVED HER OF ROYAL LIFE. “YOU ALWAYS THINK YOU’RE PREPARED FOR EVERYTHING,” SHE TOLD THE BBC’s PANORAMA IN 1995.

REMEMBER WHEN? DIANA, PRINCESS OF WALES, 20 YEARS SINCE HER PASSING

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

She was eventually called “the People’s Princess”. This was the woman who would be chosen to be the wife of England’s future king. Her face revealed a youthful look, and her figure rounded the curves of childhood.

She stepped tentatively toward the cameras, buttoned up in unfashionable schoolgirl blouses, head bowed slightly, eyes raised only to look with touching adoration upon the face of her prince. She could not know – nor could any of us then – what an extraordinary fate lay before her.

When she died on August 31, 1997, under brutal and unforgivable circumstances at age 36, this gentle creature had become the most admired woman in the world.

SMILE AND STARS BLUSH

She cradled children who had lost limbs in wars; she cradled those who been attacked by such silent enemies as cancer and AIDS; and, of course, she nurtured her own two sons, wrapping them in tenderness and surrounding them with joy …

Tall, lean, elegant, with a smile that moved movie stars to blush. Estranged from her husband, shunned by his royal family and eventually stripped of her royal title, Diana became “the people’s princess.”

At home in London, more than 1 million waited, some for as long as four days, to watch her casket wend its way to Westminster Abbey. Two billion more witnessed the funeral on television.

<< Who Weekly Tribute, Collector’s Edition; Diana, Princess of Wales, 1961-1997.

Picture: Parting company. Diana and Charles, holding William and Harry, looks the like the ideal couple out for a stroll. Said Diana: “As the marriage dissolved I had to keep everything together.”

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 04 May 17

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