Grand Years with Frank Morris

Number of blogs returned: 1 to 10 records of 264

Great Britain/Great War: Magic taste of freedom – women stepped into a man’s world!

FRANK MORRIS

COLLECTOR CHECKING THE TICKET OF A BRITISH SOLDIER AT LONDON’S VICTORIA STATION.

THE TWO WOMEN SHOW WHAT DRIVING A TRAM IS ALL ABOUT. THEY’RE LEARNING TO TAKE UP THE POST LEFT BY MEN WHO ARE SERVING WITH THE ALLIED FORCES.

A LOT OF WOMEN JOINED WITH THE NURSE MOVEMENT AS VOLUNTEER NURSES AND CARERS FOR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.

ON THE HOME FRONT, MILLIONS OF MEN WENT OFF TO FIGHT FOR THEIR COUNTRY’S NORMALITY!

The workplace beckoned for the women they had left behind. The dramatic implications for their status in society was awesome.

As millions of men were shipped to the front line, the women they left behind were engaged in important work, sometimes it was very dangerous, to work on the home front.

The terrible death of a young woman showed that it wasn’t only the battlefield where lives were being put on the line.
During the First World War, many women became volunteer nurses and carers for wounded soldiers returning home.

They were directed to stately properties which had been converted into hospitals or convalescent homes.

THERE WERE RUMBLINGS OF THE WAR YEARS, OF COURSE! BUT WITHOUT WARNING, THE FAMOUS LUSITANIA WAS TORPEDOED OFF THE IRISH COAST, KILLING AMONG THE PASSENGERS, 128 AMERICANS. SHE SANK IN MINUTES. IT IS ADVISED THAT MANY OF THE PASSENGERS HAD BEEN SAVED.

After severe rumblings, America finally stepped into the fray in 1917.

America was drawing closer and closer to the war in Europe. German’s resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare brought about a break in diplomatic relations between that country and America in February, 1917.

It was only a matter of time before the American people would demand a declaration of war against the Central Powers of Europe.

On April 6, l917, the declaration of war was made and America doughboys were soon on their way “over there”.
President Wilson had spent almost three years trying to stay out the conflict.

Germany, in American eyes, was the villain after news of atrocities in Belgium in 1914. In addition was the sinking of the British passenger liner, the Lusitania, in l915. Which killed 128 Americans.

“It’s a war to end all wars that would make the world safe for democracy”.

With America, came the start of a new newspaper, The Stars & Stripes, which would lift the lid on a number of issues about the war.

Great Britain’s/Great War: The Yank’s start a newspaper that worth its weight in gold!

FRANK MORRIS

THE FIRST EDITION OF THE STARS & STRIPES FOR 1918. IT HELP RAISED A LOT OF WAR ISSUES.  AS WAR ROLLS ON, THE STARS & STRIPES WILL BE A FAMILIAR CATCH-CRY.

The most treasured newspaper of any war from 1915 onwards was Stars and Stripes. Experts say it’s hailed as the most popular, most quoted, and most ambitious of the service newspapers around since World War II.

Meanwhile, there was an interesting array of service newspapers and magazines produced all over the world -- Yank, SEAC, Parade, Battle Dress, Victory and so on – S&S origins actually date from the Great War.

Media historian Michael Anglo said these news outlets “provided a safety valve for the vast hordes of civilians in uniform who were enmeshed in the military machine.”

The first of issue of The Stars and Stripes was produced in Neufchateau, France, on February 8, 1918. The idea that the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) published its own newspaper was promoted by an articulate but aggressive young officer, Guy T. Viskniskki.

START THE PROJECT

Viskniskki, a press officer and censor, backed up his proposal with the fact the he had organised and managed the 80th Division Training Camp weekly, The Bayonet. When the General Staff finally acquiesced to his plan, Viskniskki unearthed enough newsprint to start to project.

His next move was to find linotype machines and stereotyping equipment and suitable premises. He did. He organised the printing at the Paris plant of the London newspaper, The Daily News. Viskniskki’s position as editor was curtailed after a few issues.

He was eventually succeeded by an “editorial council”, which was headed by Harold Ross, who later co-founded the New Yorker magazine. Some of the other luminaries included Alexander Woolcott (drama) and Grantland Rice (sport).

BRITISH EDITION

The paper, which was “greatly prized” by the infantry and officers alike, continued to be published in France for the next sixteen months. It was shifted to Washington, lock, stock and caboodle to operate as “an independent weekly”.

Since its beginning, S&S has been part of every theatre of war on every front. The paper made its first appearance in North Africa as a four-page weekly in December, 1942. This edition carried a special message from the US Commander of the European Forces, General Eisenhower.

The General emphasised, once again, the importance of home news to the soldiers.
Special editions, weekly and then daily, covered the Mediterranean and Italy; and a British edition appeared in 1942, hard on the heels of the first US troops arriving in Ireland.

As the wars rolled on, “Stars and Stripes forever” has been a familiar catchcry.

ABOUT THE STARS & STRIPES …

OFFICIAL! THE AMERICAN NEWSPAPER, THE STARS AND STRIPES, FIRST MADE ITS APPEARANCE IN THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR OF I861-65. IT HAS BEEN PUBLISHED PERIODICALLY EITHER AS A WEEKLY OR A DAILY. IT WAS REVIVED AS A WEEKLY IN 1918 AND DISCONTINUED IN 1919. IT WAS SET UP AGAIN IN 1942; AND A PACIFIC EDITION IN 1945. --FM.


Britain’s War Years in vivid, glorious colour!

YOU CAN LEAD A HORSE TO WATER … BUT ALL THEY WANT TO DO IS GET OUT OF THE MUDDY HELL THEY’RE IN. LADEN WITH MUNITIONS, THESE TWO HORSES STRUGGLE THROUGH THE MUD NEAR YPRES, BELGIUM, DURING THE FIRST WAR WORLD IN 1917. THEY WERE CARRYING ARTILLERY SHELLS FOR ALLIED TROOPS FIGHTING IN THE BATTLE OF PASSCHENDAELE. ASSORTED ANIMALS WERE USED IN THE TRENCHES, THOUSANDS DIED. THIS IMAGE WAS ORGINALLY SHOT IN BLACK AND WHITE. COMPUTER SOFTWARE WAS PUT TO THE TEST. OUT SPRINGS A FORGOTTEN BRITAIN IN GLORIOUS COLOUR. SOURCE: WEEKEND MAGAZINE, ENGLAND.


YOUR DOG: Scorpio dogs show great strength of character

FRANK MORRIS

I’M A MASTER OF LOT OF THINGS EXCEPT MY NAME.

My owner keeps telling me that I am a master of things so I should behave myself all the time. Then she uttered those painful words … “Come on, Dog-dog!”

I just look at her.

My owner turns her sweet blue eyes and starts to mutter some indecipherable lines to me. She smile. I take it they were decent.

My imagination took over.

I started to roll around like a sick parrot! I felt dreadful just to think of it. My eyes turned red; my paws started to burn; my red-setter head was just about to fall off!

She, my owner, fibbed. All I did was roll around and got up. There’ll nothing wrong with that.

She bent down and patted me. “That’s a nice Dog-dog”. She’s done it again. I looked up at her with a courteous, kindly, merciful gaze and I began to have a deeply felt and sincere liking for her.

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REMEMBER THE 1960s …
1960 WAS THE CENTENARY OF THE MELBOURNE CUP. THE RAZZ-A-MATAZZ PROMOTION OF THE CUP BROUGHT 100,000 PEOPLE TO FLEMINGTON FOR THE FIRST TIME SINCE 1949. THE CENTENARY CARNIVAL WAS DUBBED, “THE FESTIVAL OF FASHIONS, FLOWERS & FAVOURITES”. TULLOCH WAS THE FAVOURITE, BUT HE WAS SO COMPLEX IN CHARACTER THAT ON THE FIELD HE WAS HARD TO HANDLE. MEANWHILE, HI JINX AND HOWSIE FINISHED FIRST AND SECOND, WITH ILUMQUH WHO RAN THIRD.
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Scorpios are supposed to forgive and forget about a minor name, Dog-dog. If I’d grown to a full-size red-setter, with paws as long a human hand, I would have trampled her into the ground. No kidding.

But now, as I up to her, looking doe-eyed at the look she gives back to me, I almost whimper in shame.

But no, I went to her like a gallant knight; I treated her like I would any female, I came and sat beside her. She bent and mouthed those words, “Good dog, Dog-dog”.

I cringed.

Scorpio is a water sign symbol representing power, I thought. The dog born under it will have great strength of character and have a sting in his tail. Sounds interesting, I thought.

Power makes you formidable. As I grow older, I spend my time pursuing but one ambition: complete self-mastery.

I would go to great lengths to stretch my powers of endurance. I can be an affectionate creature. But, I still have a prickly exterior. Some red-setters are like that.

I’m glad I am a red-setter with square head, impressive height, and unbounding red hair swaying in the wind.
I am the ‘king’ of the dog fraternity. I just wish my female owner would have named me anything but Dog-dog!


ACTION HORSES: Australia’s most intelligent cutting horses!

JULIE SKERRETT      Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

ACTION HORSES ARE BUILT FOR, SKILL, INTELLIGENCE AND LIGHTNING FAST REFLEXES!

Cutting horses are the fastest growing equines in Australia. Their sport also carries considerable prize-money for doing what they do best – cutting. But beware of the cost, it can be jaw-breaking as well; and it can send you broke.

Deep down, it’s the love of the sport rather the hopes of riches that keep its aspirants faithful.

Developed from work practices, the sport still occupies a large part in Australia and other parts of the world.

In the absence of fences, gates and yards, several horsemen hold the herd while one or two riders separate out chosen individuals.

Skilled horses and riders are needed, but the saving in time and the less cattle stress is considerable. As a sport, cutting was first seen in Australia … in which one beast was cut out from the mob in the holding yard or “camp”.

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REMEMBER THE 1960s …
A USSR PATRIOTIC SONG, HOW SPACIOUS IS MY COUNTRY, WAS FADED-DOWN ON RADIO, AND A SIMPLE ANNOUNCEMENT THAT SHATTERED FOREVER MAN’S ANCIENT ISOLATION ON EARTH: “THE WORLD’S FIRST SPACESHIP VOSTOK (EAST), WITH A MAN ON BOARD, HAS BEEN LAUNCHED ON APRIL 12, 1961 … IS ON A ROUND-THE-WORLD ORBIT”. THE USSR CAME TO A HALT. STREETCARS AND BUSES CAME TO A STOP. PASSENGERS, FACTORY WORKERS AND SCHOOL KIDS WERE LISTENING. MAJOR YURI GARARIN, THE FIRST COSMONAUT, WAS WHIRLING ABOUT THE EARTH AT 18,000 MILES A HOUR. HE WENT INTO HISTORY AS THE FIRST MAN IN SPACE.
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The selected beast is usually held apart from the mob for some minutes to demonstrate the skill of the horse and rider. The points tally allocated for the “cut out” make up is 20 per cent of the total camp draft score.

Generally, Australian stock horses are used for cutting.

The skill of the horse alone, working almost entirely unaided, is judged; and it calls for exceptional intelligence and powers of concentration, and well as swift acceleration and lightning reflexes.

No other breed fits these criteria as does the American Quarter Horse. The horse’s selective breeding has concentrated and emphasized these traits.

The Quarter Horse, with its sturdily muscled hind-quarters and moderate height (14.2 to 15 hands) gives them the fast take-off necessary in sprinting races over a quarter-mile (400 metres), from which the breed takes its name.

Muscling and movement is the thing.

The same heavy muscling in chest and rear make it possible for rapid spinning motions necessary in a good cutting horse. The horse’s intelligent forward-facing eyes, set wide apart in a short broad head, fix their intent gaze on the beast in a fierce concentration not observed in any other breed.

Just as remarkable is the Quarter Horse trained for flexibility and rapidity of movement. A Quarter Horse can achieve a true pivot in the hind feet.

The forelegs, meanwhile, plunge rapidly from side to side following the movements of the unhappy steer. A young untrained Quarter Horse of approved lines can cost many thousands of dollars and take years to train.

However, you can obtain a great deal of pleasure by just becoming a spectator at the cutting events.

SOURCE: If you’re interested in becoming a member contact: Admin@ncha.com.au

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REMEMBER IN THE 1960s …
ALAN JAY LERNER AND FREDERICK LOEWE, NOW THE BEST WRITER-COMPOSER TEAM IN AMERICAN MUSICAL THEATRE, WITH LERNER THE LIBRETTIST AND LOEWE THE COMPOSER. BOTH MEN ARE INTERSELY AMBITIOUS. LOEWE SAID, “I’M A GENIUS”. THEY ALREADY PROVED THEMSELVES WORTHY OF A KING, HERE LIES KING ARTHUR, APPEARED ON THE STAGE OF BROADWAY’S MAJESTIC THEATER, ON DECEMBER 3, 1960. THEY BELTED OUT: MY FAIR LADY, BRIGADOON, PAINT YOUR WAGON, CAMELOT AND MANY OTHERS.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 15 November 19

Great Britain/Great War: Heir to the Austrian throne, and wife, shot dead

FRANK MORRIS

ARCHDUKE FERDINAND, HIS WIFE, AND FAMILY.

ARCHDUKE FERDINAND AND HIS WIFE LIE IN STATE AFTER THE ASSASSINATION. THE DEATH OF FERDINAND SHATTERED ANY HOPE OF A UNITED EUROPE.

ARCHDUKE FERDINAND HEIR PRESUMPTIVE TO THE AUSTRIAN EMPIRE, ONCE THE MOST DANGEROUS SEAT IN POWER POLITICS. IT WAS THE ROAD TO WAR.

When the Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the thrones of Austria and Hungary, and Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were motoring in an open car across the bridge in Sarajevo, Bosnia, people from all sides of the street came out to meet them.

And to top it off, it turned into a fine and bright sunny day.

Gavrilo Princip, who could have been part of the flock of people who gathered to watch the Archduke and the Duchess, stepped out on the road, facing the automobile – and halted.

The car automatically slowed down. Princip fired his pistol twice at Ferdinand’s chest; the first shot missed, and hit the Duchess; the second, well-aimed shot, hit him. He died minutes later.

In all the excitement, the Duchess cried out to the Archduke, “For God’s sake, what has happened to you?” She sank to knees, placing her head in her husband’s lap.

Said an onlooker, “Both assassination attempts and the deaths had taken place within 90 minutes”.

It was June 28, 1914, and the assassination of Fredinand was one of the main causes of World War 1. After a lot of cross-talk between the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Serbia and Bosnia – the Bosnians refused to agree with the contents -- the Empire’s government declared war on July 28.

“Tragically, other countries were drawn into the conflict,” writes Australian historian, Ronald W. Laidlaw, in Mastering Australian History. “The Tsar of Russia and his advisers … mobilised their forces against Austria-Hungary two days later.”

Germany was an ally of Austria-Hungary and France and Britain were allies of Russia. “To attack France,” wrote Laidlaw, “Germany had to march through Belgium.”

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FIGHTING FAMILY …
OF FIVE NIXON BROTHERS WHO WENT TO WAR, FOUR WERE WOUNDED, ONE WAS KILLED. ONE BROTHER WAS A TERRITORIAL, ONE A GUNNER, ANOTHER WAS AN AIRMEN. ONE OF THEM DESERTED. EVERY BROTHER WAS SCARRED.
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Britain had a treaty with Belgium but Germany, nevertheless, invaded Belgium on August 4 and Britain declared war.

When the telegram was received in Melbourne in the early hours of August 5, Australia was also at war. Other countries like New Zealand, Canada and USA, eventually, decided to assist the Allies. The Great War had been percolating for many months.

During the arrest and retribution, many were arrested and the remainder were hanged.

Gavrilo Princip, for instance, in order to protect other fellow conspirators, claimed that he was acting alone.

Princip, aged 19, told the examining judge that he regretted killing the Duchess.

When all the cross-blame had dissipated, Princip was one of the individuals who wasn’t hanged.

SOURCE: From Grand Years. But this time a same ending but rewritten.


Britain’s War Years in vivid, glorious colour!

A FACE IN THE CROWD! HE WALKED THROUGH THE BUSY STREET OUTSIDE BUCKINGHAM PALACE. IT’S EDWARD, PRINCE OF WALES, PASSING THROUGH A CROWD OF ONLOOKERS – UNNOTICED – DURING THE FIRST WORLD WAR IN 1914. THE PRINCE IS WEARING AN INFANTRY OFFICER’S UNIFORM OF THE ELITE GRENADIER GUARDS REGIMENT WHO SERVED ON THE WESTERN FRONT. THIS IMAGE WAS SHOT IN BLACK AND WHITE. COMPUTER SOFTWARE WAS PUT TO THE TEST. AND OUT SPRINGS FORGOTTEN BRITAIN IN SPARKLY GLORIOUS COLOUR. SOURCE: WEEKEND MAGAZINE, ENGLAND.


FAMILY HISTORY: English Wills – the “last will and testament” …

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

TRACING YOUR FAMILY TREE AND YOU’VE HIT A BUMPY ROAD? IN A GLOBALISED WORLD, THERE IS A DESIRE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT OURSELVES, THE INDIVIDUALS AND PLACES WHERE WE COME FROM.

HOW TO TRACE YOUR FAMILY TREE AND FIND RELATIVES IN ENGLAND, IRELAND, SCOTLAND AND WALES BY USING THE INTERNET. GO TO THE RIGHT PLACES JUST LIKE THE ONES WE POINT OUT HERE. NOW, SINCE THE PEACE TREATY HAS BEEN SIGNED BY ALL THE NATIONS IN 1919. IT’S ABOUT TIME YOU RESEARCHED THE WORLD WAR 1 FILES TO SEE IF ANY RELATIVES SURVIVED.

Most people are familiar with the phrase “last will and testament”. It shows the distinction made between land, which cannot be moved, and other goods, which can. The will covers the disposal of estates and property, and the testament deals with movable goods, chattels and money.

A history of wills can be a complex business.

Until 1858, when a national system was introduced, probate was mainly administrated by church courts. But “peculiars” and some manors also had the right to prove wills. During the Commonwealth period, 1653 to 1660, a government court handled them.

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REMEMBER …
THE FILM, THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, WITH YUL BRYNNER, IS SUPPORTED BY A TRIBE OF LEGENDARY NAMES, AND DIRECTED BY JOHN STURGES. HE IS A MASTER AT OVERSEEING THE WESTERN AND MAKING THEM A HIT OF ALL TIME. REMEMBER GUNFIGHT AT THE OK CORRAL AND LAST TRAIN FROM GUN HILL? BOTH WERE STURGES’ FILMS. WITH THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, THERE ARE NOT MANY STORIES THAT COULD BE ADAPTED TO A WESTERN. RELEASED IN 1962.
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Before 1838, when nuncupative wills became illegal, a statement of how a person wanted to dispose of his or her possessions could be accepted. They were usually dictated when the person was dying and there wasn't enough time to call in a lawyer or someone experienced in writing a proper will.

Although it was witnessed, it was not signed.

Such wills usually start with “Memorandum”, rather than stating that this is the last will and testament, are to be found with the other wills of the court in which they were proved.

What happened to wills before 1858?

The proving of wills was done by a church court, which charged for this service. It’s been estimated that in the 19th century only 5 per cent of people’s estates went through probate, so the family historian must be prepared not find a will.

When they do exist, however, they can supply a great deal of information.

What happened after 1858?

The authenticity and validity of wills were proved by the state system on a national basis. The will was taken to the local probate office, which made its own copy, and then sent another to the Principal Probate Registry in London, now called the Probate Service.

In addition to being the probate office for the south-east of Britain, it also deals with wills that present problems from everywhere in the country and the national scene as well.

The original will was given back to the executor(s) after a note that probate had been granted and was added to it. This conferred on the executor(s) the power to administer the estate.

SOURCE: Family History Made Easy; Kathy Charter; Southwater, an imprint of Anness Publishing Ltd 2004.


MELBOURNE CUP: 1919 – packed crowds returned to the Cup after years of shallow memories!

MAURICE CAVANOUGH       Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

ARTILLERYMAN, STANDS MEAN AND LEAN, KNOWS WHAT TO DO AND WHEN TO DO IT, PARTICULARLY ON THE TRACK. CANCER DIDN’T STOP HIM WINNING THE MELBOURNE CUP.

MANY COMPETENT JUDGES SAID ARTILLERYMAN WAS THE BEST-LOOKING HORSE EVER SEEN ON AN AUSTRALIAN RACE-TRACK!

Racing, in common with most forms of amusement, entered into a boom period in 1919. In a reaction from the austere years of the war, the people spent freely on all forms of diversions.

And the Melbourne Argus put it rather primly, “The desire for pleasure is more noticeable than the will to work”.
On Melbourne Cup day, there was a good deal of argument as to whether Artilleryman or Richmond Main was the colt of the year.

There was a tremendous crowd at Flemington on Cup Day. Officials estimated the figure at more than 105,000 spectators.

The Cup running settled any doubt – Artilleryman scored the easiest victory -- as to which was the better colt.

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RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS ...
THE AUSTRALIAN OLYMPIC TEAM IS A NEVER-ENDING STREAM OF FACES AND MOMENTS THAT STRETCH … FORWARD INTO HISTORY, SHAPING US AS WE HAVE SHAPED THEM. THEY ARE THE AUSTRALIAN OLYMPIC TEAM … THEY ARE THE STARS OF THE SOUTHERN CROSS. TEXT: PART OF A HOMILY PRODUCED BY THE DAILY & SUNDAY TELEGRAPH.
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With Bobby Lewis, the great rider in the saddle, Artilleryman did as was told in the Cup. Lewis has him going kindly about sixth or seventh all the way to the straight entrance; then he gave him his head.

The colt bounded away and scored with ridiculous ease.

Artilleryman was first, an official six lengths, to Richmond Main second and Two Blues, who cut Lucknow out for a place, finished third.

Bobby Lewis scored his third Cup by his win on Artilleryman; and a fourth Cup on Trivalve in 1927.

Lewis learned to ride horses on the common at the Clunes, a small town Ballarat. He was born there in 1878.

He was 10 year old when he rode his firse winner at Clunes. It was 50 years later, in July 1938, that Lewis handed his jockey’s licence.

SOURCE: Melbourne Cup, 1861-1982; the end-piece came from 200 Years of Australian Sport, by Heads and Lester.


RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS …
WOMEN PLAYED A BIG PART IN THE 1956 OLYMPIC GAMES. NOT ONLY AS COMPETITORS BEHIND THE SCENES AS WELL. ONE OF THESE WOMEN WAS LILLIAN NEVILLE. LILLIAN HAD BEEN CONNECTED WITH WOMEN’S ATHLETICS FOR OVER 25 YEARS. SHE WAS A SELECTOR SINCE 1948. SHE FEELS THAT HAVING THE GAMES IN OUR COUNTRY IS A WONDERFUL INCENTIVE. TWO-PART FEATURE COMING IN 2020.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 08 November 19

Great Britain/Great War: Great Britain declares war on Germany!

THE DAILY MIRROR       Adapted BY FRANK MORRIS

HUGE CROWDS, MEN OF ALL AGES, LINE UP AT ONE OF THE RECRUITING CENTRES FOLLOWING THE OUTBREAK OF WAR.

HUGE CROWDS CHEER THEIR MAJESTIES AT THE PALACE. REPLY TO THE BRITISH ULTIMATUM “UNSATISFACTORY”.

Great Britain is in a state of war with Germany.

It was officially stated at the Foreign Office last night (August 4) that Great Britain declared war against Germany at seven o’ clock. The British Ambassador in Berlin has been handed his passport.

War was Germany’s reply to our request that she should respect the neutrality of Belgium, whose territories we were bound in honour and by treaty obligations to maintain inviolate.

Speaking in a crowded and hushed House, the Premier yesterday afternoon made the following statement:
“We have made a request to the German Government that we shall have a satisfactory assurance as to Belgian neutrality before midnight tonight (Tuesday).”

The German reply to our request, it was officially stated last night, was unsatisfactory.

It was reported yesterday evening that Germany had taken the first hostile step by destroying a British mine-layer.

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KING GEORGE V …
AT THIS GRAVE MOMENT … I SEND TO YOU AND THROUGH YOU, TO THE OFFICERS AND MEN OF THE FLEETS, OF WHICH YOU HAVE ASSUMED COMMAND THE ASSURANCE OF MY CONFIDENCE, THAT UNDER YOUR DIRECTION, THEY WILL REVIVE AND RENEW THE OLD GLORIES OF THE ROYAL NAVY …THE SURE SHIELD OF BRITAIN AND OF HER EMPIRE IN THE HOUR OF TRIAL.
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At the present time Germany is in a state of war with Great Britain, France, Russia and Belgium.

It would seem as if Germany, in her ambition to control the destiny of the whole of Europe, was ready to embark on any grandiose scheme of adventure, however precarious her chances.

So far as Great Britain is concerned, her attitude has always been plain, straight-forward and perfectly intelligible.

She was prepared to stand aside from the conflict which has now involved practically the whole of Europe.

But she insisted and had to insist on two things.

These were that Belgium’s neutrality should be respected; and that the German fleet should not bombard defenceless French towns.

Germany tried to bribe us with peace to desert our friend and duty.

But Great Britain has preferred to path of honour.

SOURCE: The Daily Mirror, August 5, 1914.

NEXT WEEK: The assassination of the heir to the throne, Archduke Ferdinand.

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A WORD FROM DOWN UNDER …
WHEN PRIME MINSTER ANDREW FISHER JUMPED ON THE BANDWAGON HE SAID: “AUSTRALIANS WILL STAND BESIDE OUR OWN TO HELP AND DEFEND HER (BRITAIN) TO OUR MAN AND OUR LAST SHILLING”.
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BRITAIN’S WAR YEARS IN GLORIOUS COLOUR …

FOOTBALL FANATICS WERE APLENTY. THEY CAME FROM THE NEAR AND FAR OF THE UNITED ENGLAND. SPECTATORS MAKE USE OF ANY VANTAGE TO WATCH BURNLEY v LIVERPOOL FA CUP FINAL AY CRYSTAL PALACE, LONDON, WON BY BURNLY BY I GOAL, ON APRIL 25, 1914. WAR WAS ONLY FOUR MONTH AWAY. COMPUTER SOFTWARE TEASES OUT THE COLOUR TO MAKE THIS FASCINATING SERIES SPRING VIVIDLY INTO LIFE. THE AGE OF INNOCENCE AND SIMPLICITY – HERE IT IS, FORGOTTEN BRITAIN, IN SPARKLY, GLORIOUS COLOUR. SOURCE: WEEKEND MAGAZINE, ENGLAND.


RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS: The Games in 1904 were not a success. Was it because they were held in conjunction with the World Fair!

FRANK MORRIS

LATE NEWS. THE WINNER OF THE MARATHON WAS LATER DENOUNCED BY OLYMPIC OFFICIALS AS A NON-WINNER.

THE GAMES WERE ORIGINALLY FOR CHICAGO. A MEETING WITH THE MAYORS RULED THAT ST LOUIS WAS HOST CITY OF THE WORLD FAIR AND SO THE QLYMPIC GAMES WERE HELD THERE.

The 1904 Olympic Games in St Louis were described as “the flattest and most drawn out” in the modern Olympic Games era.

That’s why more than half the countries rejected the move in competing for world honours.

Staged between May 14 and October 29, only 496 men – no women – from 10 nations competed.

Neither Britain nor France felt able to send a single competitor. Apart from the US and Canada, the only other countries to take part were Australia, Cuba, South Africa, Germany, Ireland and Greece.

The long programme caused interest to wane in the Games, and there were never more than 5000 spectators at any one session.

According to a recently published history of the Olympics, the Games were originally scheduled to take place in Chicago.

But the IOC, in its wisdom, transferred the Games to St.Louis to be held in conjunction with the Louisiana Purchase Exposition.

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RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS …
WHO WAS THE FASTEST MAN IN THE WORLD IN 1936? HE WAS AN AMERICAN. HIS NAME WAS JESSE OWENS, AND HE REPRESENTED AMERICA IN THE 1936 OLYMPIC GAMES HELD IN BERLIN. HE WON 4 GOLD MEDALS – 100m, 200m, THE BROAD JUMP THE 400m RELAY. THE FIRST TWO MEDALS HE WON, THE SPRINTS, HE SET NEW RECORDS IN BOTH. HE DASHED HOME WITH ASTONISHING PERFORMANCES.
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As a result the Games were in reality of very little importance compared with the exhibition itself.

There was no official accommodation for competitors, except for a “tent camp” in the exhibition park.

The stadium included a grandstand and some scattered buildings used for dressing rooms and administrative offices.

The Games had no international flavour, and there was unbridled rivalry between the American clubs.

Etienne Desmarteau, a Montreal policeman, was the only “foreigner” to win a gold medal. The US scooped the pool by winning 21 of the 22 track events.

But the Games did produce four triple champions.

Archie Hahn, the Milwaukee Meteor, lowered the record for the 200 metres sprint to 21.6 seconds, which was not bettered until 1932.

Fred Lorz of Mohawk, was banned for life after hoaxing his victory in the marathon.

As he entered the stadium to a hero's welcome, it was revealed that Lorz had been disabled by cramps at the 9 mile mark.

He got a lift in a car which broke down so decided to run the last five miles to the finish.

The only Australian to compete was the national schoolboy hurdling and jumping champion Corrie Gardner, from Melbourne Grammar.

Corrie wrote an article for an Australian newspaper from St Louis criticising the direction of the Games organisation and labelling it a as “gigantic fake”.

If Edwin Flack and Corrie Gardner has not competed in the 1896 and 1904 Games, Australia would not “possess its unflawed attendance record”.

SOURCE: Grand Years, 2005.


FOCUS ON CCCCRASHED: Part 1. Road rage from village people who don’t heed the warning

FRANK MORRIS

EARLY CCCCRASH – THE EXAMPLE OF CAR CRASH WHICH TOOK PLACE IN BOWRAL, NSW, 1908. NOTHING EVER CHANGES. CARS HAD BEEN ON THE ROAD ONLY FOR FEW YEARS. PHOTO: SYDNEY MAIL.

WHAT CAUSES A ROAD SMASH? TRY THIS: COMPLACENCY, DRIVER DISTRACTION, CAR SAFETY, ALCOHOL OR DRUG USE, P-PLATERS, RISK-TAKING BEHAVIOURS OR SOME PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA?

It would pay retirement village managers to heed the warning from road accident experts that there are drivers who believe they are still safe and competent behind the wheel but, in reality, they are accidents waiting to happen.

A leading defence driving specialist said the fact that seniors had decades of driving experience behind then, and had never had an accident was a case of “good luck” rather than safe driving skills.

He said, “Some seniors feel insulted that after forty or so years of driving they have to correct their safe driving habits.

“Even though they are quite surprised at how traffic rules have changed. Which only goes to highlight their lack of road safety”.

He said with changing road rules “and the increase in speed and performance of cars” the senior driver is finding it difficult to handle the problem of “road rage” from other motorists.

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POINTS TO REMEMBER …
BEFORE YOU ENTER OR EXIT A PARKING SPOT, TURN YOUR HEAD AND LOOK OVER YOUR SHOULDER – DON’T RELY ON YOUR MIRRORS – TO MAKE SURE YOU CAN DO SO SAFELY.
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”There are many seniors who should not be driving,” he said. “And many more who will be involved in a major accident long before they have to do the Aged Driving Test”.

A study by a prominent care group, revealed that there are people with dementia who were “judged unsafe to drive but continued to do so”.

A rehabilitation specialist at a leading regional hospital described the situation as, “It’s going to be an increasing problem”.

Other studies have shown that less than half of people with dementia give up driving before they are involved in a crash.

According to the driving specialist, a majority of carers fail to act on warning signs until an accident actually happens.

The specialist’s warning: “If you see signs that a person is losing the ability to drive safely, tell the person’s family.

NEXT: CCCCRASHES – They’re waiting to happen. Coming soon.

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POINTS TO REMEMBER …
IF YOU’RE GETTING INTO CAR … CHECK AROUND IT FOR ANY HAZARDS. MAKE SURE, FOR EXAMPLE, THERE ARE NO SMALL CHILDREN OR DOGS NEARBY THAT YOU COULD RUN INTO.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 01 November 19

DRUG RAID: Raid that led her on the journey to faith

CASSIE COOPER as told to Lauren Martin

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

CASSIE COOPER WITH HER ‘REALLY GREAT’ FACILITATOR, SALVATION ARMY CHAPLIN BRIAN RENNIE.

LAST EASTER MARKS A YEAR SINCE CASSIE COOPER FIRST WALKED INTO CHURCH WITH HER DAUGHTER. IT WAS A TURNING POINT IN HER JOURNEY TO FAITH.

My house was raided by police on February 10, 2018. It was a rude awakening from a sixteen year stint in and out of drug abuse.

I was addicted to smoking ice, an addiction unknown to anyone in my family until the police raid. They actually raided my mother’s house because I was living in the shed.

My life had become that bad.

When I woke up the next morning in a prison cell, I was gobsmacked; heartbroken. I just thought about my mum’s heart as to whether it was still beating.

I know what it would have done to her. I would not be here without my mother.

She’s still kept that door open for me, even after her home was raided and the embarrassment that brought her.

That feeling I had that morning in the cell was gut-wrenching. I realised that I’d been caught, and the time had come to learn the really hard part of living; so that I wouldn’t do this ever again.

It was time to change.

Brian Rennie, a Salvation Army court chaplain, was my godsend. I came into contact with him at the courthouse on one of my court dates. Eventually, I received a suspended sentence.

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DREAMS …
“THERE SEEMS TO BE SOMETHING IN DREAM IMAGES THAT REMINDS US OF LANGUAGE … WE HAVE THE FEELING THAT THEY MIGHT MEAN SOMETHING”, SAID THE ENGLISH POET, SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE.
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My solicitor suggested that I see Brian and do the Positive Lifestyle Program (PLP) run by The Salvation Army.

Brian opened doors that I didn’t think could open; he showed me things about myself I didn’t know existed.

Brian is a really great facilitator; he’s really understanding. He’s put up with me, from being a rude drug addict … to what I am now. He has seen quite a transformation.

Last Easter, my daughter asked me where the Easter Bunny came from. I said, “I don’t know.” So I asked my mum if we could go to church at Easter. My daughter just loved it.

It was all for my daughter initially, but in the end I started going to church for myself.

Northlakes Salvation Army is my ‘home away from home’. I feel really welcome. God is working miracles. Brian gave me a Bible; I really love that Bible. I read it every day.

I take it everywhere I go.

SOURCE: This article was adapted from The drug raid that led to faith; Warcry, April 13, 2019.

Below: Easter time Cassie walked into a church -- for the first time; it was the turning point.

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DREAMS …
THE PAST IS ALL ONE TEXTURE, WHETHER FEIGNED OR SUFFERED; WHETHER ACTED OUT IN THREE DIMENSIONS; OR ONLY WITNESSED IN THAT SMALL THEATRE OF THE BRAIN WHICH STAYS BRIGHTLY LIT ALL NIGHT LONG. -- ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON, SCOTTISH WRITER.


GOODBYE JACK: Son John says au revoir to Jack on behalf of the family … “Dad was a man’s man.”

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, JOHN EDEN

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

SURFING LEGEND, BOBBY BROWN, PLOWS DOWN A WAVE WITH A BALANCD, SWEEPING RIGHT HAND TURN. HE WAS A SURFING EXTROVERT. THE YEAR WAS 1964. HE WAS ONE OF JACK’S DISCOVERIES.

“LIFE, GROWING UP WITH DAD, WAS FUN” SAID JOHN.

Welcome to this celebration of Dad’s life. I would like to say a few words on behalf of Mum, Adam, Michelle, Danielle and myself.

Life, growing up with Dad, was fun. Surfing, fishing and his crazy friends.

Dad used to have a motorbike and a MG. The motorbike, a white Triumph I believe, had a sidecar with roof racks.

Dad was a man’s man.

In an era of “toxic masculinity” … he taught me respect for women, but not to be afraid to be a man.

He surrounded himself with colourful strong men: my uncles and his surfing mates: Scott Dillon, Midget Farrelly and The four amigos/musketeers – Dad, Reg Millar, Norm Robins and Frank Morris.

I am a third generational fisherman and I have fond memories of bogging black nippers with dad and uncle Bill; and to go fishing the next day -- crabbing and prawning at night.

We used to do surfing safaris to find new surfing spots.  I remember one trip to Spot X where we surfed all day and then slept on the beach on tarpaulins.

Another time Uncle Tony came on a surfing safari, and collected a mountain of lobsters, which we boiled on the beach and ate with bread and butter.

Dad was smart, practical and a trailblazer.

Dad self-taught himself photography.

There used to be these amazing conversations about aspects of his craft. I remember that he would go on and on about “the mysteries of light.”

He used to tell us to “take lots of pictures, and photograph everything: not just the surfers, but the beaches, the people, shops and even signs.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
PART OF JACK’S TRIBUTE TO THE UNFORGETTABLE AND INDOMITABLE BOBBY BROWN: “BOBBY LIVED AND SURFED TO THE MAX. I FIRST MET HIM WHEN HE ABOUT ELEVEN. AT AGE 13, HE WAS THE FIRST TO NOSE RIDE AT CRONULLA. RIDING THE POINT, HIS SURFING PROWESS BECAME LEGENDARY.”
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In a time when no-one wants to go to a museum; when Dad’s Surfing exhibition was on there would be lines out the doors. I’m told that many a time, old surfers would find themselves in a picture and marvel.

When mum got onto the National Gallery, a historian came out and had a look at Dad’s stuff. They took the collection because it was social commentary, a photographic record of the sixties onwards; it was all there.

Some of Dad’s collection is in the Maritime Museum, too.

I remember a time when he had to photograph mirrors. He had to invent a way of using flashes to do it.

He put together the first surfing magazine, Surfabout, with Frank Morris.

Dad had an earthy practical wisdom: Know what you like son; don’t confuse lust for love; be high on life son, not drugs.

He was also good with his hands and made many things. He was an upholsterer.

Dad loved to talk. Tracks magazine described Dad in the following way:  “Jack can talk under six foot of wet cement ...he’s a human time machine...”

The one time he was silent was the time Jack met John Denver. Eddie, his son-in-law, had obtained tickets to the John Denver concert.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
SURFABOUT REVISITED FITTED THE PERTH MUSEUM’S GOAL – PROMOTING ITS HISTORY COLLECTION … ON THIS OCCASION, WE HAVE CAUGHT “THE WAVE OF SUCCESS”, WRITES THE MUSEUM. THE EXHIBITION WAS A CHANCE TOO GOOD TO MISS. “THE STUNNING BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS BY SURF GURU, JACK EDEN, HAD NOSTALGIA, STYLE AND WIDE APPEAL”.
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Dad had a great time and then Eddie took him to the VIP area to meet the great singer. All dad could say was, “Hello John,” and then his lower jaw just hung open.

No surfing stories, not another word came out apparently. A first for Dad.

Dad the ballet partner.

Michelle told me an interesting story recently. She learned ballet from a young age. She reminded me that Dad used to be her dance partner in the pas de deux.

Dad received many honours from the surfing community including being inducted into the Surfing Hall of Fame. My kids, after that, called him “Poppy the Legend”.

Dad was a strong family man.

We Eden’s love family. Even if we don’t see each other regularly, we will do anything for family.

Barbara, my wife, and I encouraged favourite aunties and uncles for our kids as a safety net.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
VALE. BOBBY BROWN, ONE OF NATURE’S GENTLEMEN, A MR NICE GUY OF SURFING IN AUSTRALIA. TRAGICALLY, BOBBY WAS KILLED IN A DISPUTE OVER A BILLIARD TABLE AT HIS LOCAL HOTEL. HE WAS AGED 20.
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Dad was one of 16 kids and used to tell this story over and over: apparently one day the local Catholic priest knocked on the door, saw all the kids and said, “Ah, you must be good Catholics!”

Grandfather Eden replied, “No, we are Passionate Protestants.”

Dad was a family man.

Dad was an honourable man.

Dad was wise, clever and full of fun.

Dad was an example to us kids and his many friends of how to be a real man, father and true friend.

We would also like to thank the wonderful nurses from the Parkinson’s association who were always just a phone call away and were so helpful and comforting to mum.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
THE LAST WORD! AS A SURF-STARVED SIXTIES “GREMMIE”, WROTE LEGENDARY SURFER ANDREW MACKINNON, I COULDN’T WAIT FOR SURFABOUT TO HIT THE NEWSAGENT STANDS. I WROTE TO JACK EDEN JUST TO SEE IF HE WOULD PUBLISH MY LETTER OF THANKS. TO MY SURPRISE – HE DID!
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Lastly, we kids want to honour Mum.

Mum and Dad were married for over 60 years. We all remember that part of the wedding vows that reminds us to remain in “sickness and in health.”

Well, Mum modelled how to keep your wedding vows. For twenty years Dad had Parkinson’s disease and Mum met every challenge resolutely and bravely. Thank you Mum.

Finally …

THE SURFER

Waves churn,
the lone surfer stares,
searching for that one.
Perfection.
Of wind and water
that will carry him
as his board,
glides along
the watery plain
towards his destiny …
Thank you.

SOURCE: Jack Eden was buried on Friday, October 4, 2019. Jack’s coffin was at St Andrews Church, Sans Souci, draped in the Union Jack flag, with a mini-mini surfboard, white flowers and navy blue cap.

Below: Jack and part of beloved Surfabout Revisited Collection in 1997.


RIVETS THE DOG …

THE END


WALT DISNEY: Final! The secret life of Walter

JIM HOKERMAN       Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

REMEMBER WHAT I SAID …

“I DON’T WANT A FUNERAL,” SAID WALT. “I WANT PEOPLE TO REMEMBER ME ALIVE”.

One of the things about life that used to bug Walt Disney was death. Walt hated the idea of dying. “Dad never goes to a funeral if he can help it”, daughter Diane once revealed.

“If he has to go to one, it plunges him into a reverie which lasts for hours after he’s home”. Obviously, Walt was figuring something out.

“I don’t want a funeral”, said Walt. “I want people to remember me alive”.

Accordingly, when Disney died in December, 1966, his funeral service wasn’t announced until it was all over. No details, including disposition of the body, were ever released.

All that the Los Angeles Times was able to discover was that the ‘secret rites’ had been conducted at Forest Lawn Cemetery – a theme park with a “Mausoleum of Freedom” for dead soldiers …

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ABOUT WALT DISNEY …
ALL EMPLOYEES ARE GRADUATES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WALT DISNEY WHERE THEY HAVE STUDIED WALT DISNEY TRADITIONS ONE AND TWO. THEY LEARNED, IN THE WORD OF ONE CAMPUS DIRECTIVE, “TO ENJOY THINKING OUR WAY”.
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It’s not nice to “kill off Santa Claus”, so most cynics figured that the decision to downplay Disney’s funeral was simply good business.

Romantics believed that Disney, with a late interest in cryogenics, had had himself frozen like a TV dinner. He was destined to sleep on a cushion of liquid nitrogen until some Prince Charming appeared with a cure for the big C.

Meanwhile, Disney’s corporate heirs continued to act as though their master were still alive.

When Walt died, he was drawing up plans for a city – cash free, climate controlled, and vacuum cleaned.

It was a space-age pyramid of dwellings where 20,000 or so lucky Alices could live inside his Magic Kingdom for the rest of their lives.

SOURCE: Adapted from Jim Hokeman’s The secret life of Walter Disney, published in Nation Review, May 31, 1979.

Below: TIME Magazine and Walt Disney. Most of the American and international press, radio and television—magazines – got caught up in the Disney frenzy. 

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ABOUT WALT DISNEY …
“I BELIEVED THAT EVERY CONCEPTION IS IMMACULATE”, HE TOLD A STAFF MEMBER, AND HE OPENED DUMBO (1941) WITH A SQUARON OF STORKS FLYING OVER FLORIDA TO “DELIVER BABIES” OF EXPECTANT CIRCUS ANIMALS.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 25 October 19

WALT DISNEY: Part 4. The secret life of Walter

JIM HOKERMAN        Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

THE THREE MUSKETEERS, GERMAN-STYLE. THEY DON’T KNOW WHAT THE’RE IN FOR …

DER FUHRER’S FACE CARTOON WON AN OSCAR AND, IN ADDITION, SPIKE JONES’S RECORDING OF THE SOUNDTRACK SOLD A MILLION AND A HALF COPIES.

In a ghost-written magazine article of the mid 1930s, he complained that “Mr A Hitler, the Nazi old thing, says Mickey’s silly. Imagine that! Well, Mickey is going to save Mr A Hitler from drowning one day. Just wait and see if he doesn’t. Then won’t Mr A. Hitler be ashamed!”

However, by the time he made The New Spirit (1942), the first of the government-sponsored propaganda and training films that virtually subsidised the Disney studio during World War 2; Walt did decide to let the “Nazi old thing” drown.

He demonstrated his distaste by showing the swastika “flushed away in a vortex of dark, swirling water”.
The next year saw Education for Death (with Hitler playing Prince Charming to Hermann Goering’s mountainous Sleeping Beauty) and Disney’s greatest piece of agitrop, Donald in Nutzi Land.

Also known as Der Fuhrer’s Face, the cartoon won an Oscar; while Spike Jones’s recording of the soundtrack sold a million and half copies.

In a dour comment on the mock flatulence of the song’s chorus, Richard Schickel remarked, “Even in wartime (the Disney studio) found a way to state its belief in the location – the seat as it were – of human emotions”.

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DEAD TIRED …
MORE AMERICANS ARE LOSING SLEEP OVER THE STATE OF THE UNITED STATES NATION UNDER PRESIDENT TRUMP AND OTHER PERSONAL FINANCIAL CONCERNS. INADEQUATE SLEEP IS ASSOCIATED WITH UNHEALTY LIFESTYLES AND NEGATIVELY IMPACTS HEALTH AND SAFETY. COMING: DEAD TIRED -- STARTS IN THE NEW YEAR.
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What is particularly interesting about Der Fuhrer’s Face is Disney’s visualisation of “Nutzi Land”. Donald’s room is plastered with swastika wallpaper, he sleeps in swastika pyjamas between swastika sheets.

His alarm clock keeps time with swastika numerals.

It’s as though the Disney artists were rehashing the 2000 Snow White products that helped pull the toy industry through the recession of 1937.

Even nature is not immune to the totality of “Nutzi Land”. Outside Donald’s widow we see that trees and hedges have been shaped into swastikas.

Such an improvement may never have occurred to Hitler. But a decade or so later the bushes of Disneyland would be carefully trimmed to resemble Mickey, Donald and Dumbo.

SOURCE: Adapted from The Secret life of Walt Disney by Jim Hokerman, Nation Review. May 31, 1979.

NEXT: Final. “I don’t want a funeral,” said Walt. “I want people to remember me alive”.

Below: One of the posters for Education for Death, in which Hitler play Prince Charming.

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DEAD TIRED …
THE CYCLE OF WORRY AND INSOMNIA: THE MORE YOU WORRY ABOUT NOT SLEEPING THE MORE YOU WORRY ABOUT GOING TO BED AND, MORE LIKELY, CONTINUE TO EXPERIENCE INSOMNIA. EXPECTATIONS ARE, WHAT CONSTITUTE A GOOD NIGHT’S SLEEP, AND THIS MAY ALSO CONTRIBUTE TO THIS VICIOUS CYCLE. DEAD TIRED – STARTS IN THE NEW YEAR.
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RIVETS THE DOG …

RIVETS WAS A POPULAR STRIP BACK IN THE 50s. RIVETS WAS SYNDICATED TO CHUCKLER’S WEEKLY, A MAGAZINE PRODUCED BY THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPH FOR THE YOUNGER SET. CHUCKLER’S WEEKLY STARTED IN 1954 AND ENDED IN 1960.

CONTINUED.


THE JACK EDEN STORY: Final. Jack’s photographs “catch the mood” of a nation in the sixties

FRANK MORRIS

A SERIES OF PHOTOS, WHICH WERE TAKEN BY JACK, WAS A LESSON IN LENSMANSHIP. ONE IN PARTICULAR, WITH GARY BIRDSALL, LEANING AGAINST THE DOOR OF HIS SMALL CAR, WITH A BOARD DANGLING FROM THE BOOT.

WHEN THE FIRST MAGAZINE WAS PUBLISHED “THE RESPONSE KNOCKED EVERYBODY FOR SIX,” SAYS JACK. “EVEN THE DISTRIBUTORS”.

A perfect combination, from which have come photographs that have transcended the realms of living history and become prized works of art.  Eden has been lauded worldwide for his superb back-lit photography.  It gave Surfabout “a California feel,” according to a leading surfer/writer.

The inaugural issue of Surfabout hit the streets in August 1962.  It was produced in response to the growing popularity of longboards, which both preceded and then followed Midget Farrell’s world title victory in 1964.
There was no publication “uniquely Australian” for the grommets.

Surfabout’s first print run was 10,000, which evaporated in a week.  A newsagent in Surfer’s Paradise reported selling 150 copies in a day.   “They went like hot cakes,” the vendor said.  Surfing was hot and the magazine-starved masses, both hardcore surfers and weekend warriors, literally devoured the ink from the pages!

Says Eden: “The response knocked everybody for six – even the distributors.  They had never seen anything like it. The first issue broke all records so we increased the next issue to 18,000 copies.”

Where did the name Surfabout spring from?

Eden ponders the question for a moment.  “It took many hours of deliberation before we came up with the idea of adapting the aboriginal term ‘walkabout’ for the magazine title.  So Surfabout it became.”

(The name was later hijacked by a top American company as the title for the first major Australian pro surfing event.)
The debut issue of Surfabout, in keeping with the origins of the title, was emblazoned with aboriginal motifs which certainly made it look different to other magazines on the newsstands.

This was long before indigenous cultures became the vogue. The cover design is simple, uncluttered and unpretentious; the content is an unaffected, uncomplicated presentation of the new sport of surfboard riding.
Surfabout is a historic magazine in other ways too.

True, it was beaten to the post as Australia’s first surfing magazine by a few months, but Surfabout made up for it in myriad other ways.

Predicted, as early as 1965, that the Australian surfing scene would spawn a multi-billion dollar industry-boards, male and female fashion, accessories and so on.

A Surfabout editorial said: “The growth … has been one of notable achievement … there is now a competitive drive (and) the tempo has trebled its pace and shows no sign of diminishing.”

Reflects Eden: “We gave our readers their money’s worth and more.  I believe that is the reason the magazine is so well remembered after all this time.”

The debut issue of Surfabout sold for five shillings and sixpence – 55 cents in today’s currency.  (Later issues were four shillings and sixpence.)

The same issue, as a collectible two years ago, fetched $400!

*At that time there was a popular magazine called Walkabout, which will be fondly remembered. It’s safe to say that it also had a great influence on the outcome.

The Jack Eden Surfabout Revisited Collection began its national tour at the Perth Museum in August 1964.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
EDEN CAPTURED COUNTLESS IMAGES ON AN ARRAY OF DIFFERENT CAMERAS. HE LOOKED LIFE IN THE EYE. THIS NEW LIFE WAS BOUND IN THE CLASSICAL SHAPE OF YOUNG SURFERS, SOME TO BECOME SPORTING LEGENDS, IN WHICH CAN BE DESCRIBED AS AN IRRESPRESSIBLE PERIOD IN OUR HISTORY.
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SOURCE: Adaption from Jack Eden’s Surfabout Revisited Collection edited by Frank Morris, published in 1997.

Below: The Surf, the first in the world, published in 1917. Then came “Surfing Sixties” brigands. Coming soon. 


THOMAS COOK: Final. Thomas’s son took over the reins and  began to visit new places afar!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

THERE WAS A THOMAS COOK OUTLET IN PRACTICALLY EVERY CITY.

FOUNDER THOMAS COOK SAW TRAVEL AS AN ANTIDOTE TO DRUDGERY.

Founder Thomas Cook died in 1892.

John Mason Cook, the son of Thomas Cook, who became manager of Thomas Cook’s first company in Fleet Street, was perhaps the world’s first business traveller -- notwithstanding Marco Polo. Throughout his life he was constantly on the move: appointing agents and negotiating contracts.

And, like today’s businessman, he was more than likely nagged by his family for never being at home. John Cook’s apprenticeship in travel began in 1851.

At 17, he was appointed chief assistant to his father and given the responsibility of taking 165,000 people to the Great Exhibition in London. During his apprentice years he would work for five consecutive night and days at a time, accompanying trains filled with passengers.

This was just a taste of what was to come.

At the beginning of 1865, his father had returned from a trip to North America during which he had agreed with the principal railways for a system of booking to the Paris Exhibition to be held the following year.

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DEAD TIRED …
AN AUSTRALIAN STUDY A FEW YEARS BACK SHOWED THAT ALMOST I IN 5 WORKING ADULTS ARE RUNNING A BIGGER RISK OF DEVELOPING CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE AND DIABETES. UP TO 1.2MILLION AUSTRALIANS SUFFER A RANGE OF SLEEP DISORDERS, FROM INSOMNIA TO SLEEP APNOEA. ARE YOU ONE OF THEM? COMING IN THE NEW YEAR.
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This innovation assisted him in his responsibility of promoting trips to the Exhibition, and indeed to Paris as an attraction in itself. To date his main market had been in the United Kingdom where the return fare Cook’s offered from London to Paris was one pound and a four-day package could be secured for one pound eighty.

In 1868, Cook’s posters advertised North America-to-Paris return fares from twenty-one pound to thirty-one pound fifty. During the four years it took for that side of the business to develop, Cook recorded in his diary that, on average, he was annually away from home for 100 days.

He was travelling between 67,000km and 85,000km a year.

With the company well established Cook began to organise tours further afield and began to take travellers through Europe and into the Holy Land. In 1870, Cook’s was successful in setting up a network that organised tours of Egypt.

In 1871 Thomas formed a partnership with his son and the business was, fittingly, renamed Thomas Cook and Son. This move created even more drive in John Mason; and between 1873 and 1889 he travelled relentlessly, opening up new destinations and establishing new lines of communication.

During these years John Cook spent much of his time interviewing the managers of railways and steamboat companies, particularly in North America, where a big expansion was planned. He was always concerned about getting the best for his clients.

When John died in 1899 and the business was then worth about two millions pound.

Source: Adapted from The Australian 1981.

Below: The gravestone of John Thomas.

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ROAD CCCCRASHED ...
“ROAD RAGE” – IT’S WATING TO HAPPEN. IT WOULD PAY RETIREMENT VILLAGE MANAGERS TO HEED THE WARNING FROM ROAD ACCIDENT EXPERTS THAT THERE ARE SENIOR DRIVERS WHO BELIEVE THEY ARE STILL SAFE AND COMPETENT BEHIND THE WHEEL. BUT, IN REALITY, THEY ARE ACCIDENTS WAITING TO HAPPEN. – FM. ROAD CCCCRASH! STARTS SOON.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 18 October 19

THE JACK EDEN STORY: Part 1. Surfabout magazine photography “caught the mood” of a surfing nation in the sixties!

FRANK MORRIS

THE MIGHTY JACK TAKES TIME OUT TO BE PHOTOGRAPHED WITH HIS FAVORITE SURFBOARD.

JACK EDEN BEGAN CAPTURING SURF IMAGES ON FILM IN 1956. SUDDENLY, THE SIXTIES HAD ARRIVED. JACK, LIKE EVERYONE ELSE, WANTED TO KNOW WHAT MADE THE SIXTIES TICK.

Regarded as the pioneer of surfing photography, Eden clicked his way “through truckloads of film” for his magazine, Surfabout, of which 24 issues were published between 1962 and 1968.

There’s no way he could have realised at the time that these images, which record the innocence, lifestyle and revolutionary surfing styles of this period, would be the focal point of a major national point of a major national Jack Eden’s Photographic exhibition more than 30 years on.

The original negatives had been squirreled away since those halcyon days in the back-room of his studio in Sydney’s south.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
FROM THE MID 1990s, THE JACK EDEN SURFABOUT REVISITED COLLECTION WAS ONE OF THE MAJOR EXHIBITIONS TO RECOGNISE THE INPUT OF JACK’S WORK DURING THE SURFING SIXTIES. IT STARTED IN PERTH AND WENDED ITS WAY ACROSS AUSTRALIA. OVERSEAS, IT WAS SHOWN AT THE TRITAN’S GALLERY, CORNWALL, ENGLAND. – FM.
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Eden has captured the quintessence of Australia and Australians in much the same way as the celebrated Max Dupain “defined Australia” in the 1930s.  Writing in The Australian Magazine, Mike Safe said: “His (Dupain’s) style – from the beach and bush scenes of the thirties…was direct, unadorned and strong.”

Says Eden: “The explosion of interest in the exhibition has been phenomenal.  Suddenly, everybody wants to know more about the sixties.”

Eden has been described as “the photographic biographer” of Australian surfing history.  He regards the sixties as surfing’s golden era.  He captured all the greats from the time and one of them, Midget Farrelly, was the seed from which this critically acclaimed exhibition grew.

Jack explains: “He (Midget) rang me up and said “Jack, don’t you realise that you are the recorder of our (surfing) history?”  At the time I thought Midget was having a go at me.  But that’s how the exhibition got started.”

It’s been said that when you talk to Jack about the sixties you’d better be prepared for a good ear bashing.
Says Tracks magazine: “Jack can talk under six foot of wet cement … he’s a human time machine ready to transport you back to the days when surfers could swim and boards were bloody heavy. (He) suspends your disbelief and you find yourself trimming along the lip of his surf stories.”

Retorts Eden: “Guilty as charged.  I found that it was a happy period.  There was an innocence in those days that is hard to explain.

But, obviously, my photographs have caught the mood, the feeling that people relate to.  We’ve noticed people of all ages, surfers and non-surfers alike, take great pleasure in viewing this record of an era that will never return.

“At the time we were regarded as bums – even though a lot of those bums were the top surfers of their day.  Now many of them are important people such as judges, lawyers and barristers … name it and you’ll find former surfers in the ranks.”

Below: Jack, kneeling in front of a portion of his photographic exhibition, with a protective arm around one of his most talk-about print.

SOURCE: The Jack Eden Story appeared in the Jack Eden’s Surfabout Revisited Collection: A time capsule in print, published in 1997.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
OF THE SURFING SIXTIES, JACK WAS QUITE LITERAL ABOUT THOSE TIMES. “IN THE ERA WE WERE REGARDED AS BUMS. BUT FOR SOME REASON A LOT OF THOSE BUMS WERE TOP SURFERS. IN THEIR DAY THEY WERE PRETTY IMPORTANT PEOPLE. THERE WERE JUDGES, BARRISTERS, LAWYERS, AND BIG BUILDERS’. YOU NAME IT”.


YOUR DOG: Libra in dogs makes them very snappish towards other people yet very understanding

FRANK MORRIS

I DON’T HAVE A NAME. I’M REFERRED TO AS ‘THE DOG’ WHEN IN THE POUND. BUT I SENSED THAT I LIKED IT VERY MUCH.

Let’s cut to the chase. Compared to other carnivorous domesticated hounds of all sizes, many well-bred; I have lived with a few of them! See, I’m a bit of wag tag sort of breed. I’ve got at least three strains in me, but don’t get me wrong, I’m not strange.

Eleven months ago, I was picked at a dog pound by a carer who had just lost his wife. One of his daughter’s was by his side.

“Let’s just name him my little Comfort,” said the carer. He was in his mid-sixties. The daughter agreed. She carried me to the car. After she got in she said, “Maybe I should get a small dog. What do you think? This one is so nice”.
Hmm, said the carer with a smile.

A whole bunch of ladies at the dog shelter treated us extra-well. And I spent my time frolicking around with a bright terrier a bit older than me. He taught me things – lots of things, in fact.

Libras, in the main, are very affectionate, and the carer spotted it. The carer wiggled his fingers and I ran towards him. I looked around at the terrier.

He was dumbfounded. His eyes were glazed over, not because I was going but he was going to lose a friend. I barked my cheery good-byes to him; and was gone.

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YOUR DOG …
WHEN A DOG WANTS TO HANG OUT THE ‘DO NOT DISTURB’ SIGN AS ALL OF US DO NOW AND THEN, HE IS REGARDED AS A TRAITOR TO ALL HIS SPECIES. – ROMONA C. ALBERT.
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As I grew older, the carer always spoke kind words to me. He looked at me and said, “You’re a most elegant little animal”. I followed him around or kept an eye on him, even at play!

Then I fell asleep …

All I recall is the wide spaces. In my dreams, which were humungous, I was down at the park. It was here that I brought out another of my worldly traits; being artistic.

I don’t draw, I don’t paint, I don’t do, aah … but I can do artistic body-shapes on the field.

It was just natural. That’s not say that I also elected to do some damn painstaking practice to boot.

But I dreamed on …

First, the field comes alive with my antics playing catch-the-ball. They never witnessed anything like it.

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YOUR DOG …
WE ARE ALONE, ABSOLUTELY ALONE ON THIS PLANET, AND, AMID ALL THE FORMS OF LIFE THAT SURROUND US, NOT ONE, EXCEPTING THE DOG, HAS MADE AN ALLIANCE WITH US. – MAURICE MATERLINCK.
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The carer tosses the ball into the air, then I jump and let my body perform all the tricks.

On trick is (I call them tricks) that I’m in the air ready to catch the ball in my mouth; next is my front feet, protecting all my body, and showing amazing skill, grabbing the ball, with my shape-wise falling to the ground.

The crowd clapped.

I must have done at least a dozen tricks like this. The best one, I feel, was when I used my tummy to bounce the ball and me catching it with back paws.

It’s hard to believe but I travelled kilometres off the ground and I had a hypnotic view. The crowd loved it. Every artistic trick got the people gaping. Some with horror.

My performances draw people from all walks of life to the field. They expected to see a magnificent show. When it was over, so was the dream. You could see the relief in my face.

On this day, a district inspector came to see if my carer would be interested in a badge for the dog’s home.
“Yes, yes, yes!” said my carer.

As usual, I was sitting by his side. “Come on Comfort, let us get something to drink and eat.

You bet, I thought.

Below: Comfort: true and discreet Libra.


WALT DISNEY: Part 3. The secret life of Walter

JIM HOKERMAN     Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

FUHRER HITLER AND LENI RIEFENSTAHL. TOGETHER THEY PLOT A WAY THROUGH DISNEY’S FOIBLE.

WHEN LENI RIEFENSTAHL HIT HOLLYWOOD SHE ADROITLY PRESENTED HER PSEUDO-DOCO TRIUMPH OF THE WILL, THE FILM FOR WHICH SHE IS KNOWN.

When the Nazi film maker Leni Riefenstahl visited Hollywood in 1938, Disney was the only industry notable to greet her publicly.

Had he been smitten by the vision of totality, that she had so adroitly presented in her pseudo-doco Triumph of the Will (1934), was as controlled an artifice as any of Disney’s cartoons.

Although not everyone is as blunt as Kenneth Anger. (He told an interviewer that ‘Walt Disney was the Hitler of children. ‘He killed their imaginations by programming them with his saccharine prefab fantasies!’).

Anger said “it has more than once been observed that the mania for cleanliness, control and order was a trait that Uncle Walt happened to share with the Nazi dictator”.

Of course, Disney only indulged in the fantasy of mass murder, and it happened just once. Under the pressure of World War 2, but acting as a private citizen, he dreamed up Victory Through Air Power (1943).

It was a long-since suppressed feature-length cartoon that ended with the triumphant obliteration of Tokyo.

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GENTLEMEN OF THE PRESS …
IT’S 1952, AND THE CHURCH IS OVERFLOWING WITH MOURNERS. MORE THAN 200 WAITED OUTSIDE AT THE TOORAK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH FOR THE FUNERAL OF SIR KEITH MURDOCH. PRESENT WERE GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES FROM AUSTRALIA AND OVERSEAS, EVERY METROPOLITAN NEWSPAPER IN AUSTRALIA INCLUDING THE NEWSPAPER UNIONS -- AND FIVE HUNDRED WREATHS WHICH CARPETED THE LAWN. – FM.
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Apparently, the film displayed an alienation worthy of Riefenstahl’s.

A contemporary film reviewer cited the absence of “suffering and dying enemy civilians” underneath its animated explosions and called it “a gay dream of holocaust” that reduced war: it became a “morally simple (matter) of machine-eat-machine”.

But whatever else Walt and Hitler had in common, the Fuhrer (unlike his buddy Benito Mussolini) was not a fan of “Michael Maus”.

Evidently, no mouse could be clean enough for Hitler. He termed Mickey “the most miserable ideal ever revealed” and unsuccessfully attempted to have banned from his Reich.

Hitler’s failure to get rid of Mickey may explain the megalomaniac undercurrent in Disney’s response to this attack on his alter ego.

NEXT: More about the Fuhrer’s Empire and the back-biting over a bevy of anti-Hitler cartoons.

SOURCE: Adapted from The secret life of Walter Disney by Jim Hokerman, in the Nation Review, May 31, May 1979.

Below: A nightmare for the face of Hitler.

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YOUR DREAM …
O GOD, I COULD BE BOUNDED IN A NUTSHELL AND COUNT MYSELF KING OF INFINITE SPACE WERE IT NOT THAT I HAVE HAD BAD DREAMS. – WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, HAMLET.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 11 October 19

THOMAS COOK: Part 1. The man who help build a travel empire!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

THOMAS COOK HIRED A ‘BONE RATTLER’, ONE OF THE EARLY TRAINS, TO GET 570 GUESTS TO A TEMPERANCE MEETING.

THOMAS COOK IS BELIEVED TO BE THE FIRST TRAVEL AGENT TO CASH IN ON NEW ZEALAND AS AN EXOTIC TRAVE DESTINATION!

In the 1800s, US author Mark Twain was perhaps the first international literary luminary to visit and publicise New Zealand. Twain found the “land of superb scenery” irresistible. Twain wrote about the snowy grandeurs, the mighty glaciers and “beautiful lakes.”

“The fiords”, he wrote, “were ‘wonder rivals’ to those found in Norway and Alaska.” After his historical sojourn, Twain expostulated that “our stay had been too brief; still, we are not unthankful for the glimpse which we have had of it.”

Thomas Cook saw travel as an antidote to drudgery. If Mark Twain were alive today he would back every word.
A man of humble beginning, Cook founded an empire that has served travellers throughout the world for the past 174 years. Cook was born in Britain on November 22, 1808, the son of an unskilled labourer who died soon after his birth.

He left school at 10 and worked in market gardening, carpentry and printing. He became interested in the Baptist Church and promoted the temperance movement and non-smoking. When he just turned 33, it dawned on him that he could alleviate the hard work of a person’s life by taking on excursions.

In 1841, he hired a bone-rattler train and took 570 people from Leicester to a temperance meeting at Loughborough in the Midlands. The journey’s success encouraged him to continue these activities. He dedicated himself to the belief that travel could improve the quality of life for everybody.

“Cook has made travel easy and a pleasure,” said Mark Twin. “He will sell you a ticket to any place on the globe, or all of the places and give you all the time you need and much more besides.”

Cook married an hotelier, Marrianne Mason, and had three children: John, Henry and Anne.

John born in 1834, was well-educated; in 1856, he became manager of Thomas Cook’s first company office in Fleet Street, London.

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THE GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
NEWS LIMITED STRIKE IN DECEMBER 1975, OVER POLITICAL BIAS, WAS THE FIRST STOPPAGE IN THE AJA’S HISTORY ATTRIBUTABLE TO A POLITICAL ISSUE -- FM.
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Frank Morris comments: The collapse of the 178 Years old Thomas Cook Group, is believed to be the biggest demise in the travel industry. The publicity that the giant stirred up over its folding was mindful, yet regrettable. The Thomas Cook wrangle will be talked about in decades to come. With 150,000 touring the world shaking their heads about Thomas Cook going broke it is difficult to fathom when you’re stranded in a foreign country. Think about the 22,000 employees worldwide whose jobs are at risk. Believe me, that’s huge. The cessation of Thomas Cook will take years to resolve. But its symbol on their present stores, I Love Thomas Cook, is something the old-guard of family travellers could have uttered.

Below: Up the Nile. Men and woman guests pose in front of the pyramids.

NEXT WEEK: Son caught the travel bug early!

SOURCE: The Australian, 1981.

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THE GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
JOHN NORTON, WHEN HE WAS EDITOR OF THE SYDNEY TRUTH, USED THE TERM ‘WOWSER’ IN PRINT FOR THE FIRST TIME IN 1899. NORTON WAS A PASSIONATE MAN ‘LOVED’ BY THE WORKING CLASS. HE DIED IN 1916. – FM.
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REMEMBER WHEN! Odd news reports in 2013

FRANK MORRIS

APOLOGISE FIRST IF YOU ARE RIGHT!

You all know the depression-era girl Marjorie Bligh? Yes, off course. The real-life Dame Edna, who was about be launched into the US with her biography Housewife Superstar, describes her as “unique.” Marjorie’s tip for a happy marriage: Choose carefully; when it comes to food, be imaginative, original and appreciative; don’t gossip about your partner’s failings; be honest with each other, but not brutal; be kind to each other; nagging never accomplishes anything; always apologise first – even if you are right … Doug Engelbart, the person who laid the foundation for the information superhighway with a computer ‘mouse’, died in July. Engelbart was age 88 … The Herald, Sydney, reviewed the new film of For the Term of his Natural Life, in 1927. The paper was on the side of the cinema-goers, after it was marred by a weak scenario and the “violent and unrestrained” acting, called for “something more subtle”… The new $5.3 million Cardboard Cathedral in Christchurch was supposed to open in February, then Easter, then July, but now it looks like August, reported The New Zealander.

SOURCE: Compiled in 2013.


WALT DISNEY: Part 2. The secret life of Walter      

JIM HOKERMAN from the US

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

WALT LIVED ON A FARM NEAR KANSAS CITY. WHEN HE WAS NINE, HIS FATHER BOUGHT HIM A PAPER ROUTE. AS A RESULT, DISNEY USED TO WAKE UP SWEATING FROM A RECURRING NIGHTMARE.

“GIRLS BORED ME – THEY STILL DO. I LOVE MICKEY MOUSE MORE THAN ANY WOMAN I EVER MET,” WALT DISNEY.

Walt Disney never learned to draw Donald Duck or Pluto. Nor to duplicate the famous signature emblazoned on every one of his products. But his insight into the American collective unconscious was nothing short of mystical.

It was Walt who spotted Annette Funicello dancing in the Burbank Starlight Bowl and knew that she’d be the sex star of The Mickey Mouse Club.

“For a man as intense as Disney in his desire to control his environment,” critic Richard Schickel once observed, “animation was the perfect medium psychologically”.

The quintessential Disney shot occurs at the end of Song in the South, 1946, as photographic reality melts into an idealised cantoonland.

Yet, there was a brief time in Disney’s career when he used the cartoon not to supplant reality but to unmask it.
Although Disney’s temper tantrums might be likened to those of Donald Duck, his later cartoons were only intermittently autobiographical.

He satirized his love of animals by appearing in caricature as the matador in Ferdinand the Bull (1938); and probably identified with the heroine of Cinderella (1950), who spent her days sewing little caps for the birds and pants for the mice.

In 1953 he made the coyly confessional Ben and Me, which attributed Benjamin Franklin’s success to the friendship of another very clever mouse.

In Pinocchio (1940), the masterpiece whose theme song, When You Wish upon a Star, would become the national anthem of Disneyland, of which he was very proud.

Walt brooded over the nature of his art. Was he kindly Geppetto, maker of toy marionettes? Or, the greedy Stromboli, exploiting of puppets on his stage?

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DISNEY’TOON …
IN PINOCCHIO (1940), THE MASTERPIECE WHOSE THEME SONG, WHEN YOU WISH UPON A STAR, WOULD BECOME THE NATIONAL ANTHEM OF DISNEYLAND. – JH.
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Or, the glamourous Blue Fairy, who animated Pinocchio with the gift of life, another?

Or, the cruel proprietor of Pleasure Island, the amusement park where little boys are transformed into braying donkeys? Perhaps, he was Pinocchio himself …

That is the stuff of Disney’s basically childhood fantasies.

His father, Elias Disney, was a hard man, as free with his whippings as he was tight with his money.

When grown up, Walt became rich; he bought himself all the toys and candy he was denied as a child.

He scoured the world for doll furniture, constructing an elaborate electric train set around his house, installing a giant soda fountain in his living room.

Young Disney lived on a farm. When he was nine Elias bought a paper route in Kansas City.

For the next six years dutiful Walt got up each morning at the three-thirty, delivering his father’s papers for no more pay than bed and board. The rest of his life Disney suffered from a recurring nightmare ….

His daughter recounted that “he wakes up sweating and thinking, ‘I’ll have to hurry and get back and leave a paper before dad finds out that I didn’t.’”

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DISNEY’S LIFE …
KENNETH ANGER, THE AUTHOR OF HOLLYWOOD BABYLON, MAINTAINS THAT DISNEY, WHO HAD ONCE BEEN A INVETERATE PRACTICAL JOKER, USED TO OPEN A SMALL, ROUNDED DOOR IN THE WALL – A FAIRYTALE DOOR THAT CREAKED – AND TAKE HIS GUESTS DOWN A WINDING STAIRCASE INTO A DUNGEON FILLED WITH SINISTER RACKS AND IRON MAIDENS … -- JH.
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One of Walt’s major improvements on nature would be to eliminate to biological link between parent and child. Thus, Pinocchio has no mother, Snow White and Cinderella are the victims of evil stepparents, Bambi’s mum gets killed, and Dumbo is forcibly separated from his mother.

He told a staff member that he opened Dumbo (1941) with a squadron of storks flying over Florida to “deliver the babies of expectant circus animals”.

Disney did not consider the absence of sexuality to be any great loss. With a warmth of a computer print-out he once explained his motivation for marriage.

“I realised that I’d need a new room-mate, so I proposed to Lilly”. Late in his life he was quoted as saying, “Girls bored me – they still do.” And later, “I love Mickey Mouse more than any woman I ever met”.

“You could never tell Walt a dirty joke,” said animator Ward Kimball. “Yet, the Disney cosmos was not entirely devoid of eroticism”.

Below: LIFE magazine gives Mickey and Walt a chance to say “howdy”.

SOURCE: Adapted from The Secret life Walter Disney by Jim Hokerman; Nation Review May 31, 1979.

NEXT: Leni Riefenstahl in 1938 visited Hollywood. Disney was the only industry notable to greet her publicly.

 

WALT (KNEELING) FILLING IN SOME OF ASPECTS OF A FILM TO A COUPLE OF BANK DIRECTORS.

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DISNEY’S LIFE …
BY NIGHT, IN HIS BATHROBE, BE ROAMED THROUGHT “THE HAPPIEST PLACE ON EARTH” ALONE. WHEN THE REVEREND BILLY GRAHAM CAME TO BLESS HIS FELLOW WIZARD’S “FANTASY” WALT EXPLODED, “FANTASY? THE FANTASY IS OUT THERE … OUTSIDE THE GATES!”

 

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 04 October 19

VALE: My friendship with Jack Eden who made certain that Surfabout did it first!

FRANK MORRIS

ONE OF THE CLASSIC SHOTS WAS ‘MIDGET’ WINNING THE FIRST WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP AT MANLY IN 1964. PHOTO: JACK EDEN.

HE LITERALLY, AND PHOTOGRAPHICALLY, OPENED THE DOORS ON A BRIGHTER 1960s.

Jack Eden, Australia’s leading surfing photographer and publisher died on Sunday evening from Parkinson’s disease in a Sydney nursing home. He was 88.

Eden, who infused new life into the sixties, found a new way in this “irrepressible period of our history”.

His Surfabout photos exude a timeless quality that is rarely, if ever, found in collections of this genre.

A leading historian said, “The 60’s was a time when all wrongs of society seemed, for brief moment, to be curable”.
Eden, a photo-journalist, started Surfabout Magazine in 1962 at a time when the new guard of surfers were taking over. It was called the Swinging Sixties.

While it missed being the first by only a few months, Surfabout was the first to set the pace for what Jack Eden euphemistically called “the uniqueness” of being an individual.

Yes, it was the age of being free as a bird.

It was the age of more freedom, rock ‘n roll and less demanding friendships – only when it didn’t interact with anything to do with surfing. This was a time when Australia came of age on the waves.

Eden’s camera captured countless images, which infused the new life for surfers into what can only be described as an irrepressible period of our history.
 

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
‘MIDGET’ FARRELLY, 1997: “LUCKILY JACK EDEN CAUGHT MANY OF THE MAJOR PLAYERS OF THIS ERA ON BLACK AND WHITE FILM. HIS PRECISION TRULY CONVEYS THE UNIQUENESS OF A NEVER TO BE REPEATED PIONEER PERIOD IN AUSTRALIA’S SURFING LIFE”.
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The historic debut issue, Surfabout, emblazoned with aboriginal motifs, sold out as it hit the streets. The first print-run evaporated in a week. A newsagent in Surfers Paradise reported selling 250 copies in sixty minutes.

“They went like hot cakes,” a very proud distributor said.

Where did the name Surfabout spring from? I asked him.

Eden pondered the question for a moment. He replied. “It took many hours of deliberation before we came up with the idea of adapting the aboriginal term ‘walkabout’ for the magazine title.

So Surfabout it became.

This was long before indigenous cultures became the vogue. Then, and in later issues, the cover design was simple, uncluttered and unpretentious – most of the illustration was left in on so that readers can get some true maturity of the action.

Surfabout was first:

TO pioneer surfing photography, attracting the best photographs from all over the world. Jack Eden was among the best.

TO attain not only national readership, but a worldwide audience: America’s West Coast, Japan, New Zealand, South Africa, United Kingdom, and so on.

TO pin-up action spreads in duo-tone, to produce full colour front covers, and to feature an illustrated front cover by Archibald Prize contender Helen Dillon.

TO introduce international coverage, to have its photographs and articles republished in newspapers and magazines in Australia and overseas.

Surfabout sold for four shillings and sixpence, 45 cents in today’s currency.

From its pages, came a permanent reminder of who we are and the way we were.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
THIS IS WHAT SURFABOUT SAID ABOUT ‘MIDGET’ FARRELLY IN THE FIRST WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS: “AUSTRALIA’S ‘MIDGET’ FARRELLY GAVE AN EXCELLENT EXHIBITION OF TIGHT, FUCTIONAL SURFING AND HIS SMOOTH DROPS AND TURNS GAINED HIM MAXIMUM POINTS.”
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Frank Morris comments:

Australia hit the scene as a surfing nation sixty years ago. I joined Jack Eden and the team as editor of Surfabout magazine.

I wrote him a screed and said that with “my experience” that the journal could go far. He didn’t answer my letter, he called to my house. I happened to be in. I got the shock of my life. I got the job.

Jack was first to find out that I wasn’t a surfer; I was a writer and newspapers were my specialty. That is what Jack liked.

“We’ve come of age on the waves,” I opined in the second issue of Surfabout. It was one of the first surfing magazines published in Australia and it attracted the best photographs from the world’s top surfing circles.
In many ways, Surfabout was ahead of its time.

To match my flow of editorial, Jack worked literally around the clock.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
JACK EDEN HAS BEEN DESCRIBED AS “THE PHOTOGRAPHIC BIOGRAPER” OF AUSTRALIAN SURFING HISTORY. HE REGARDS THE SIXTIES AS SURFING’S GOLDEN ERA. HE CAPTURED ALL OF THE GREATS FROM THE TIME.
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My opening column, On The Surf-Front, was an editorial on the surf culture, Let’s Keep the Sport Fun.
The second issue, in December 1962, demonstrated a significant number of changes that would be influential in Australian surf magazines.

Inside the thirty-six magazines the masthead carried the sub-heading, ‘Australia’s Premier Surfing Magazine’, and also the features – surfers’ portraits, surfing maps, column from the doyen of overseas surfing writers and a general news spread.

“Jack was now listed as manager and John Morris-Thorne (Frank Morris) was listed as editor.”

With me as editor, I had to make the Surfabout-team happy too. They thought that I had “put the icing on cake”.
When Surfabout was sold in 1965, I did various features for the new publisher. One of the timely articles I penned was on the ‘young’ board industry in Australia and it was going to thrive through “thick and thin”. The rest is history.
And I thank Jack, truly. Our association turned into one of the most joyous friendships – a friendship to last for 57 years.

He was my best mate.

VALE JACK EDEN

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 30 September 19

WALT DISNEY STORY: Part 2. The secret life of Walter

FRANK MORRIS

A SUPER-BIG DREAM COME TO LIFE.

I AM AWAY AT THE MOMENT.  GRAND YEARS WILL RETURN 4 OCTOBER.

THE WALT DISNEY STORY, PART 2, WILL BE PUBLISHED NEXT WEEK.

HERE’S AN INTRODUCTION INTO THE WALT DISNEY STORY, PART 2:

“GIRL’S BORED ME – THEY STILL DO,” SAID WALT DISNEY. “I LOVED MICKEY MOUSE MORE THAN I DO ANY WOMAN WHO EVER LOVED ME.”

WALT COULD NEVER LEARN TO DRAW DONALD DUCK OR PLUTO ... BUT HIS INSIGHT INTO THE AMERCIAN COLLECTIVE UNCONCONCIOUS WAS NOTHING SHORT OF MYSTICAL.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 19 September 19

Walt Disney Story: Part 1. Taking the Mortimer out of Mickey

FRANK MORRIS

IT ALL STARTED WITH A RABBIT …

… AND A MOUSE TOOK ITS PLACE!

On the day his beloved Disneyland amusement park opened in Anaheim, California, in 1955, Walt Disney turned to a group of friends, after he’d taken them on a tour of inspection, and said: “I hope we never lose sight of the fact that this was all started by a mouse.”

But, if it had not been for a dispute over a contract with a film distributor in 1927, Walt’s meal ticket could have been a rabbit instead of a mouse.

Disney at the time was animating a character called Oswald the Rabbit, which was owned by the distributor Charles Mintz.

When the series became successful, Mintz confronted Disney in New York with an ultimatum: accept a new contract at a lower price, or lose the character.

Disney refused to haggle. He and his wife, Lillian, on the train back to Los Angeles, spent night after night trying to come up with another cartoon character to take Oswald’s place.

It was not easy.

Suddenly, Walt recalled his days as a commercial artist in Kansas City, when his studio had been literally a breeding ground for field mice. He only remembered one mouse in particular.

The mouse was a regular intruder, which proved to be quite tame and trusting. Disney and the mouse became the best of friends and he trained it not to stray too far.

The new character, Walt decided, would be a mouse – Mortimer Mouse.

But Lillian thought the name too pretentious, so they both settled on Mickey. From that point, Oswald the Rabbit’s luck had run out, his grave has been dug and would soon be buried and forgotten.

Mickey came on the scene in 1928 in two silent shorts called Plane Crazy and Gallopin’ Gaucho.

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DISNEYTOONS …
IN 1928, PLANE CRAZY WAS THE ‘TOON THAT LAUNCHED MICKEY MOUSE ON THE WAY TO MEGA-STARDOM. HE FLEW INTO PEOPLE’S HEARTS ON HIS JERRY BUILT AIRSHIP WITH A RUBBER BAND MADE OUT OF DACHSHUND. MICKEY WAS A SUCCESS.
IN 1928, STEAMBOAT WILLIE, THE ‘TOON THAT A MILLION-PLUS FILMGOERS DECIDED THEY WERE IN LOVE WITH MICKEY MOUSE -- FOREVER. MICKEY TURNED A BUNCH OF PIGS, GOATS AND COWS INTO MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. WHATSMORE, FOR THE FIRST TIME, MICKEY EVEN SANG. – JH AND FM.
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But it wasn’t until he appeared in the sound cartoon Steamboat Willie, which opened in New York on November 18 of the same year that Mickey was on his way to mega-stardom.

The Mickey phenomenon grew. He became a national passion. He helped build an empire.

Today, Mickey might be middle aged, and a little bit grey in the whiskers, but he still bright and perky. He’s changed little since his creation over 90 years ago.

In his book, Mickey Mouse: Fifty Happy Years, David Bain wrote: “There is something most appealing about this mouse.

“There is an intrinsic quality that reaches across time and through artificial, human-made barriers, such as culture and nationality, to enter into the hardest of the hard-hearted and produce a smile.”

American journalist Jim Hokerman, wrote: “When Disneyland opened in 1955, it was with one inescapable stipulation.

“Before being born again within the confines of the Magic Kingdom, each guest had to pass through an idealised version of the Marceline, Missouri, in Main Street, where Walt believed he’d spent his happiest years.”

Disney used to say, “To the people in Marceline, I’m like God”.

SOURCE: The original syndicated story was written in 1988.

Next: His insight into the American collective unconscious was nothing short of mystical.

Below: The crowd hustle into Disneyland on opening day.

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ARTBEAT …
FORMER PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH DISSCUSSED HIS POSTPRESIDENTIAL PORTRAITS OF COURAGE AND SAID, “AS A CHILD I WASN’T ALL THAT INTERESTED IN ART. I HAPPENED TO GET A RECOMMENDATION TO READ WINSTON CHURCHILL’S PAINTING AS A PASTIME, THAT PIQUED MY INTEREST.” SOON.
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Hollywood Murder: Albert Dekker’s hard-to-explain death rocked the movie world!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

In l968, less than a decade after the George Reeves controversy, two more hard-to-explain fatalities – occurring only months apart – rocked the industry.

Albert Dekker, 63, big, shambling Warner Bros. heavy and noted character actor, came to a grotesque end in his Hollywood apartment. There were obscene inscriptions covering Dekker’s body and other oddities.

Two months before, Nick Adams, who played The Rebel in the hit TV series, died in his Coldwater Canyon bachelor quarters.

In the Dekker case, police swarmed over the apartment after the building manager had reported a “horrible sight” of Dekker slumped in the bathroom with two hypodermic needles stuck into him.

When the police arrived they found a length of rope – too loosely rigged to be identified as the sure cause of death – fastened to his left hand around his neck and tied to a shower pipe; and a hand-cuff dangled from the right hand.

Filthy words were written in lipstick and festooned over much of Dekker’s body.

“There was everything but a vampire’s bite”, the deputy coroner remarked. Suicide was ruled out. And “accidental suffocation” was named as the cause of death. It was a terrorising thought.

A rope had been tightened round Dekker’s neck, it loosened and sagged. The whole idea was full of holes to some observers.

Tightened by Dekker himself! His friends thought not.

Dekker served from 1944 to 1946 in the California state legislature as a concerned liberal representing a portion of Hollywood. He quit politics and went into showbusiness. He then won the awards on Broadway in Death of a Salesmen and other weighty plays.

Insiders agreed that Dekker never would have let himself die like that, with grotesque writing all over him.

Someone, they surmised, must have doped and then choked him. If so, police never could lay hands on a rope artist with a lipstick and drug fettish.

Case unsolved.

SOURCE: From Grand Years 13.

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VIETNAM: HOLLYWOOD VIEW …
THE BEST OF THE VIETNAM-THEME FILMS, COMING HOME, TACKLES IN DRAMATIC FORM THE MORAL DILEMMA OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE. THIS MOVIE WAS HIGHLY RATED BY SMH FILM WRITER. SOON.
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YOUR DOG: Virgo. Hi, Mr Terrier speaking, and this is my story!

FRANK MORRIS

MUM GIVES ME A CUDDLE.

I’m a well-bred, well-behaved and diligent little terrier.  Two decently bred terriers got together and produced me, so you can’t deny my bespoke breeding. That was three years ago.

Mum and dad were terrific dogs. They were both playful and frightfully energetic; and so was I. They played with me until I was eight months older. The literally put me in the spotlight.

My love deepened for them.

Then, of course, times must change. While I was having a lovely upbringing, the rug was pulled from under me.

While mum and dad went for their daily stroll, a human came into the kennel, picked me up, and put me in a card-board box.

I caught a glimpse of my new owner. He was 65, upright (you beauty) and had a softly spoken voice. His house was big and was trimmed to treat.

He got me out of the box, clung to me with both hands, and said: “What will we call you?” I almost choked. I’ve got a name and it, and it … Jut.”

“Let’s see, now. I know. I’ll call him Mr Terrier. That’s it, Mr Terrier.” For better or worse, that was my name.
Mum and dad came home they found me gone.

You know something that was strange to me. My relationship drew closer to this person, my new dad. I began to take to him.

Here’s another significant event I’ve been struggling with for a long time: I’m house-bound. I’m going on four-years-old, and have been out on one day a fortnight to go shopping. On a lead.

My owner won’t play with me, ever though I’d bring my ball up to him. He would kick it a fair distance, then turn and go into his house. He would fall asleep until tea-time.

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AUSTRALIAN PLACE NAMES …
BRIAN AND BARBARA KENNEDY WRITE: NEARLY THREE-QUARTERS OF AUSTRALIAN PLACE NAMES ARE OF ABORIGINAL ORIGIN. FOR EXAMPLE, MILDURA, IN VICTORIA, COULD MEAN ‘SORE EYES’ OR ‘RED SAND’.
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“Come on Mr Terrier, its den time. He would follow me and close the hand-engraved gate with “Mr Terrier” on it.
Then he’d take the wrap off Mr Terrier’s dish and push it towards me.

He’s an event that will leave you with a few options. A young man came around the back and knocked on the door. My owner appeared.

“Can I help you,” he said. The lad, who was about 21, spoke first. “I was wondering if we can take your dog for a walk every afternoon. We’d take him down to the park and let run with other dogs …”

The girl, about 20, butted in: “… we’ve moved into a house up the street …” The girl’s voice tails off.

I witness it all. This is the event that I could say yes to without any compunction. Yes, yes and yes. My owner didn’t reply for about 60 seconds, then he spoke.

“Of course you can. Mr Terrier is his name and he is an Australia Terrier. At this moment, my owner started to feel his age.

That was the start of an honest but friendly relationship – Geoff, Margaret and me.

The move showed how good-humoured, how intelligent and tender I could be for a scruffy, multi-brown Australian Terrier.

I ran mad. The dogs who were chasing me dropped before I did. The larger dogs lost interest.

We ate every ice block and ice cream ten times over during my umpteen years of going to the park. What days we all had! There was tomorrow, and the next day, and … You know what I mean.

Then I saw my mum and dad from a distance. They looked very old. I blink and they are gone. My owner went into a nursing home and there he stayed.

I now live with Geoff and Margaret, husband and wife. We still play when we can. My age? That’s not important. All I can say is I am impulsive as ever but I noticed recently that I need more rest during the day.

So, there you are!

Below: Mum and dad together!

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AUSTRALIAN PLACE NAMES …
BRIAN AND BARBARA KENNEDY WRITE IN THEIR VOLUME OF PLACE NAMES: THERE IS SOME DEBATE AS TO THE LONGEST PLACE NAME IN AUSTRALIA. IN THE AUG-SEPT I956 EDITON OF SOUTH AUSTRALIAN MOTOR … IS MENTIONED THE NAME, CARDIVILLAWARRACURRACURRIEAPPALARNDOO. NOBODY COULD SUPPLY ANY OTHER DETAILS.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 13 September 19

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