Grand Years with Frank Morris

Number of blogs returned: 1 to 10 records of 183

FM’s CONNECTION: Smoking – others stop why can’t you!

I THINK I’LL QUIT: DON’T JOIN THE THOUSANDS OF AUSTRALIANS WHO HAVE DIED FROM SMOKING. Below: LOOK AT THIS SIGN CAREFULLY: IT SAYS QUIT NOW. Below: READ THE MESSAGES ON THE PACKAGES.

Thousands of Australians have died from smoking and related diseases every year.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Quitting at any age will give you immediate benefits and reduce your chance of developing any type of smoking related illnesses. With planning and determination a person can quit and never smoke again.

Tobacco smoke is toxic and contains more than 7000 chemicals. At least 70 of these are known to cause cancer.
Many chemicals from tobacco smoke pass through your lungs and pass into your bloodstream and are carried around in your body. Carbon monoxide replaces some of the oxygen carried in a person’s blood, robbing their muscles, heart and brain of oxygen.

Other toxic gases damage the tiny hairs that help clean a person’s lungs, allowing mucus and toxins to build up and increase the risk of lung disease. It make no difference if they smoke “light” or regular cigarettes: they will inhale a similar amount of toxic chemicals.

Nicotine is the addictive drug in tobacco smoke that can make quitting difficult – but not impossible.

SMOKING – STOP IT!

A person’s health can be affected by smoking, it:

INCREASES the risk of developing heart disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease.

DAMAGE a person’s lungs, causing respiratory diseases such as emphysema, asthma and bronchitis.

INCREASE the risk not only of lung cancer but also many other types of cancer – including cancer of the mouth, throat, bladder, stomach and pancreas.

REDUCES fertility in women and men.

WEAKENS your immune system, making you more susceptible to infections.

CAN cause or contribute to many other health problems – blindness, osteoporosis, etc.

LIVE LONGER

Tobacco smoke in the air comes from both the burning end of a cigarette and from the smoke breathed out by a smoker over family members, friends, co-workers, etc.

This exposure to second-hand (SHS) can cause heart disease, lung cancer and increase breathing problems in non-smokers living or working with smokers. Children, too, exposed to SHS are more likely to suffer from health problems.

Why stop smoking?

It’s important to be clear about your reasons for smoking and for quitting. Good reasons to quit are simple: the condition of your heart, lungs, circulation and immune system, will improve. Breathing will improve within weeks; and food will smell and taste better.

And the person live will longer!

Contact the Quitline on www.quit.org.au

<< Pharmaceutical Society of Australia; ABS.

COMING: The Heide Gallery, in Heidelberg, Victoria. In the same area, which was the beginning of a strong tradition of Australian modern art, stands the famous Heidelberg School of the 1880s. Enter the movers and shakers of the new venture in the 1930s.


ART GALLERY: Making History – Nolan at the newsagent

CAR AND FLOWERS: HONEY, WHERE IS THE FORD?

This exhibition recreates the 1942 experimental display at a local newsagency at Heidelberg.

FRANK MORRIS

Sidney Nolan would try anything as long as he sold some of his work. This is why in 1942 the young Nolan held a “ground-breaking” display of his work in the window of a local newsagent in Heidelberg, Melbourne.

“It was the idea of Nolan’s benefactors, John and Sunday Reed, to ‘take art to the people’ rather than to an exclusive audience in an art gallery,” the curator said. “The works were mostly experimental landscapes … the prices were low but nothing sold.

“Many of the paintings subsequently languished in obscurity. The exhibition re-creates this remarkable but little-known venture. It brings together the surviving compositions which have been identified through photographs … taken at the time.”

At Heide Museum of Modern Art until May 20, 2018.

Picture: One of the paintings. Sidney Nolan’s Golden Landscape, 1942.


COVERS: Final farewell to magazine after 44 years!

FAREWELL: MODEL JESINTA CAMPBELL CAME FACE TO FACE WITH CLEO TWICE. WHEN IT WAS STARTING, AND 44 YEARS LATER FOR ITS FINAL ISSUE. “I FELT HONOURED”, SAYS CAMPBELL.

Gone are days of sass, bachelors, sex and centrefold.

FRANK MORRIS

In March 2016, a mighty explosion took place in Australian magazine-land! The controversial magazine Cleo was shutting up shop. The magazine, which for 44 years, had hunted down everything related with bachelors, sex and centrefolds to become one of the best read journal’s in Australia by women.

At Cleo, they described the magazine as “Australia’s paper giant.”

When Cleo arrived in 1972, it created excitement and pizazz in Australia. I remember the issue that contained the ‘seductive’ Jack Thompson centrefold was truly a knockout. Of all the centrefolds published over the years, none have ‘caused a stir’ like Jack’s.

“My centrefold was part of the liberating of women and I’m happy to be a part of that sense of freedom,” said Jack.

BRAVEST DECISION

On its arrival, Cleo was caught up in Helen Reddy’s emphatic declaration “I am woman, hear me roar”, a statement the Australian women responded to “in droves”.

“By the early 90s, Cleo was the highest selling women’s lifestyle magazine, per capita, in the world,” the magazine said.

As a young mother, Ita Buttrose was never considered “the most of likely of people to head up a controversial new women’s magazine” like Cleo. But she was. There were thousands upon thousands of young women who had a yearning for the “new sexual revolution.”

In her editor’s letter, she completed by saying, “Like us, certain aspects of women’s lib appeal to you but you’re not aggressive about it.”

The model, Jesinta Campbell, met Cleo when it was starting – “It was the first cover I ever shot for any publication in Australia” – and again – “To then shoot the final issue was an absolute honour.”

Launch in 1972: 200,000 copies. Final issue: Over 54,000 copies.

Creating Cleo was one of the bravest decisions ever made.


THE MO STORY: Final! His son, Sam, tells it all

VISIT FROM HOLLYWOOD: CAROL LANDIS AND JACK BENNY GO BACK-STAGE AT THE TIVOLI TO MEET ROY ‘MO’ RENE IN 1943. Below: SADIE GALE AND ROY RENE IN 1929. Below: ROY RENE. JUST CALL ME MO!

Sam talk about his famous mum, Sadie Gale.

SAM VAN DER SLUICE      Adapted by FRANK MORRIS   

My mother’s name was quite famous in show business.

Her name was Sadie Gale and she had been on the stage since she was three years old. She even beat my father. She was a star in her own right.

She retired when my sister, Milo, and I started high school and she thought that it was the right thing to do. She decided to be our mum. Up to then she played soubrette roles and principal boys, and she was a very beautiful woman.

In fact, I think she is a very beautiful at eighty years old.

Come this March, she will be eighty-one and I don’t think she would mind if I still call her beautiful.

She and my father would never encourage my sister or me to go into showbusiness. Dad was always aware, however, that it is probably one if the hardest businesses in the world.

Friends and parents … would come home and see mum and dad studying scripts for a new show. They would think that it was all fun and games.

Show business is a very tough business. As far as father and mother were concerned, there is not a better business.

The audience are zany, lovely, wonderful human beings.

LOT’S OF MONEY

Dad was pretty well liked. He knew everybody. In fact, I would go so far as to say that everybody loved my dad. He was a soft touch, though. In those days he was being paid fairly well, and even though he made lots of money whilehe was working, he certainly did not die a wealthy man.

He must have given a lot on money away; we certainly didn’t get it! People used to go up to him in the street and tell him a sad story and he’s give them a few quid. Yes, he definitely was a soft touch!

Dad knew a lot of the “underworld”. People like Tilly DeVine thought he was a wonderful person. Then at the other end of the scale he had judges and people of the legal fraternity who were his friends.

He had that rare gift of making everyone feel that they were his closest friends.

(On reflection), it was really a funny combination of people who would come to sit in the audience and listen to my father.

The Macquarie Theatre, at 2GB, was not far from the Police Station. Opposite, on the corner of Hunter and Phillip Streets, there was a hotel. Dad would spend his time between the Saloon Bar with the police and the Public Bar with the “underworld”.

Dad would happily flit from the Law back to the cut-throats and thieves without any problem. He was one of their mob and they were one of his mob!

WE WERE PALS

The funny part about it, though, Dad was very unsure of himself. He had to be constantly reassured by his colleagues and by my mother. He’d come off stage and say, “Was that any good’, “Did I get any laughs”. You know that sort of thing.

He really was very unsure of himself and always wanted to do better. He was a professional through and through.

Before he went on stage he would check his props … then he’d take a cigarette out of his mouth and hand it to somebody else … without fumbling. Dad was a complete professional in every way.

I was twenty-two years old when he died. I was just getting to know him as a man. Dad would discuss contracts or a show … and it was nice relationship to have. We were pals.

That was so sad, because he died before I had a chance to really spend a lot of time with him as an adult – man to man. We were a very, very close family.

I think my father was the best, no, the greatest comedian that Australia has ever produced. I say that with all sincerity. God bless you dad!

<< From Grand Years. Adapted from the 8th Annual Mo Awards, 1983.


Last Laugh! Sorry! I’ve got bad news for you chief. It's about the noise!

Next week: Shop Window -- when we gave away properties to the nation.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 20 April 18

THE MO STORY: Part 1. His son, Sam, tells it all!

CHANGE-OVER: MO AS ELIZABETH 1 IN THE VIRGIN QUEEN.  Below: MO AND HAL LASHWOOD PASSING ONE ANOTHER IN SYDNEY.  Below: MO PLAYS THE "STARS AND STRIPES FOREVER" WHEN STRAIGHTMAN HAL LASHWOOD LOOKS ON LAUGHING. THE PHOTO: 1947.

The Mo statute is only 32 cm tall and weighs nearly 1500 grams.  He either comes in Gold, Silver or Bronze. For a statue, he stands tall. He is the Mo Award. The Mo was in honour of one of our great entertainers, Roy Mo Rene.

SAM VAN-DER SLUICE   Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

My name is Sam Van-der Sluice. That wouldn’t mean anything to you. But I’m the son of Harry Van-der Sluice. I guess that wouldn’t mean anything to you either. I’m the son of  “MO” -- Roy Rene Mo.

That might mean something to you!

What sort of man was Mo? Harry was born on February 15, 1892, in Hindley Street, Adelaide. He was the son of a English Jewess and a Dutch Jewish cigarmaker. He had two brothers and four sisters.

He started his showbusiness career when he was 14. He used to sing in the gallery in a falsetto voice. In those days, his stage name was Boy Roy, and when his voice broke they said to him you’re getting too old for that now; you’d better call yourself a different name.

“Why don’t you give yourself the name of the famous French clown, Roy Rene,” a stage-hand said. Rene became Roy Rene. Later, a stage door keeper by the name of Bill Sadler claims that he, Sadler, gave him the name of Roy Rene Mo because of his moustache.

The name stuck until years later in radio when he was christened McCackie – Mo McCackie.

So -- Dad started as Harry Van-der Sluice, his real name; Boy Roy, Boy Roy Mo and Mo McCackie. The last three were stage names. As far as the very early years of his showbusiness life was concerned, that is.

THE NAME STUCK

Needless to say, I only knew him as DAD!

We had a lovely life together. My father, my mother, my sister and I lived in a home at Kensington. It was a lovely home: I suppose by today’s standard it was modest; but it was a castle to us and it was dad’s palace.

I remember every time he used to swing into Cottenham Avenue, Kensington, where we lived. After he returned from the Tivoli, he would say to my mother, “Happy Road”. And it was a happy road. He loved all the children and they loved him – despite his moustache!

The family came first and work came second, and I don’t think dad lived for anything else apart from his family and his work. He was happiest when he was doing both – with his family and the stage.

Dad had a love/hate relationship with the audience. He could love them and yet hate them. I remember, he used to say when he got his first “belly” laugh, “I’ve got ‘em, I’ve got ‘em pal!” – and he would get them, too!

HE ADORED HER

The greatest thing that can happen to any performer is when they hear that round of applause. Or when they get that lovely belly laugh, which is so great. There nothing more pathetic when a comedian doesn’t get a laugh.

Dad got most of the laughs.

My mother’s name was quite famous in showbusiness. Her name was Sadie Gale and she had been on the stage since she was three years and four months old. For many, many years, she was a star in her own right.

She retired when my sister Milo and I started high school and she thought that it was the right thing to do and stay home and be a “Mum”.

Up to then she played soubrette roles and principal boys and she was a very beautiful woman. In fact, I think at eighty years, she still is a very beautiful woman.

My father loved her very much. He adored her and anything she did was fine by him.

Sadie Gale gave the Mo Award her blessing and said, “the Awards took on a new shape.” Ingrid Berg, publicity manager of the Mo, said, “The Mo Awards are living proof that Australian talent is not a rarity.” Yes, Rene would been much chuffed at that. Sadie Gale presented the Mo Award for the Entertainer of the Year at the 10th Annual Meeting in 1985. Strike me lucky! – Frank Morris.

Next Week: Sam talks about his famous mother, Sadie Gale.

<< From Grand Years. Adapted from the 8th Annual Mo Award, 1983.


LIVING ALONE: Retirement – a woman can get a mixture of feelings!

DOWN CAME THE RAIN? IT POURED AND IT POURED. AND THEN IT STOPPED. THEN IT POURED AGAIN ALL NIGHT. THEN IN THE MORNING, ITS CLEARED. I JOINED MY VILLA MATES AT THE COFFEE SHOP.

There are times when I get depressed.

ANNE SIMOND*     ADAPTED BY FRANK MORRIS

Living alone in retirement? Anne, who has been retired for five years, discovers that being alone is not the same as being lonely.

“When I was approaching retirement age there was one problem – or stumbling block – which perhaps worries many women, but not me. A man. I didn’t have to worry about ‘my man getting under my feet.’ I don’t have one. I live alone.

“I did think about retirement before the time came, which I consider to be a great advantage. While working and bringing up my children single-handed, there were many things that I had neglected. Since then I have managed to make amends in some spheres.

“I find I quite enjoy splashing around with wallpapers, brush and paint. And there’s no one to laugh about the fact that sometimes I get almost as much paint on myself as on the doors and window frames!,” Anne said.

Her role was to become part of the tribe that went to evening classes in English, which might have annexes that flow from that. Anne took to writing for pleasure.

THE BEST YEARS OF MY LIFE

“I’ve now have written at least 200 poems and have about 80 published in various journals,” said Anne. “Then I found delight in experimenting with some exotic cookery recipes to the advantage of a few clubs in the area. Next, I turned to one of the loves of my youth – music.

“I was pleased to find that the theory and sight-reading hadn’t left me entirely. And no neighbour had yet complained about the few scales and five-finger exercises which I found necessary. If I do find myself getting a little depressed, I find playing my piano really lifts my blues!

“I don’t believe that ‘such and such years’ are the best years of our lives. No one can know this. It’s up to us all, individually; and each stage had its compensations, both financial and otherwise. In retirement, reduced bus and rail fares, visits to cinemas and theatres are a great boon.

“Guilt about neglecting friends and relatives living some distance away has now left me. I’m in touch with them again. The numerous emails I receive, and the replying to them, gives me quite a kick.

“Before my retirement, I never had time to write!,” Anne said.

<< Living alone in your retirement; Best Years Newsletter; March, 2010.

*Not the correct name

Next week: l0 tips for living alone.

Pictures: Backpacking. At 72-year-old, our newest friend in the villa is skirting around the world for 12 months as a last hurrah. Catching up. I look for Skype to catch up to my relatives and friends.

The name has been changed.

<< Best Years Newsletter, 2010.                                   


Let’s Laugh! Your tool kit will say: don’t take it with you!

Increasingly, you are one of the people who own their home. This can be a great comfort to you that you are safe from rising rents. The mortgage is paid off and the house is yours. But then you find other problems arising. You are getting older. Maintenance on a house keeps rising. Even the routine decoration jobs are expensive. Let’s face it, you have to pay somebody else to do them because you are not as agile as you used to be. You don’t need roller skates. After a lifetime of working hard, the old habits die hard. Join the throng that are going the right way. Go to a reliable accountant and he or she will explain the ‘right way’ of doing things.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 13 April 18

HAPPY EASTER! The Black Rabbit discoverers a Mulberry Tree!

A MULBERRY TREE: ITS THE ONLY ONE IN LA LA LAND. Below: WELL STOCKED. Below: I FEEL LIKE DANCING AROUND IT, BLACKIE SAID.

Jolly is a happy word. He feels it in his bones.

FRANK MORRIS

The Black Rabbit was feeling marvellous. Jolly marvellous.

“Absolutely, stupendously jolly marvellous!” he yelled. “That is a jolly happy word,” he said.

He could feel it in his bones.

What he could see of La-La-Land, it looked perfectly fine, too.

As he looked over La-La-Land, from his front porch, he saw that every animal was leaping around.

They must be caught up in a kind of merriment.

I wonder whether it’s something in the grass.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!,” he said, with a modicum of goodly mirth. "How ex-tra-ordinaaaary.”

The Black Rabbit felt like leaping too.

He tried it. He leapt very high.

He tried it again. He leapt even higher.

He thought he might try it again. He did. He leapt so high he thought he would never come down.
He plummeted down to earth and rolled all the way to the river.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he said.

“Those animals must be in peak form”, he muttered to himself.

With all that leaping around the Black Rabbit began to feel tired himself.
Fatigued, in fact.

He looked at the other animals and they were still leaping.

All of a sudden he stopped walking and yelled out, “Where am I, where am I. I know La-La-Land like the back of my hand, but this is ridiculous.”

He looked up-the-hill, down-the-hill and to the left and right.

SING AND DANCING

He sighted the Mulberry Bush. Only one. Oh, and four rabbits popped out.

The rabbits were bright-eyed and full of smiling. Each rabbit was standing around the bush holding a piece of multi-coloured tape.

And then they were off … singing and dancing.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he said, in a rather high voice.

Next, the rabbits were singing in front of a wash tub, with a new verse to the same song.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he said, in a higher voice than last time.

The four rabbits were busy hanging their clothes on the line to dry.

And all were singing a verse of the same song.

When they finished, the four rabbits darted into their house.

They emerged minutes later with a pile of school books, some wrap and string. And off to school went the four rabbits. All were singing, quite happily, “going to school on a cold and frosty morning.”

Next moment, he was alone. “I wonder how long they’ll be,” he thought.

HEADING FOR HOME

I hopped back to the Mulberry Bush and tried to emulate the rabbits singing and dancing.

I tried singing.

I tried skipping and hopping to the same tune.

The next thing I knew I was doing it. I was doing it … singing and dancing.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he said in a voice that would have drowned out all of La-La-Land.

At last, just over the hill I heard the four rabbits heading for home.

They were singing and dancing.

“This is the way we come out of school on a cold a frosty morning,” all four rabbits sang.
I ran to meet them. And I joined in.

They laugh at me. I laugh back.

All five of us were singing and dancing. “Here we go round the mulberry bush, the mulberry bush, the mulberry bush early in the morning …”

They were out of sight.

“I got my wish”. “How ex-tra-ordinaaaary! How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” was the familiar tone that I heard echoing from on high.

<< From Grand Years 7 years ago.


COMING: Victor Hugo wrote Les Miserables, the story of insurrection in Paris, in 1845. An outstanding feature. It will be a six-part series. More soon.


BUSHRANGER: Ben Hall was the first “criminal of the bush”

THE FIGHTER. HALL ONCE SAID, "I'LL BE DEAD BEFORE I'M THIRTHY. Below: A BOLT OUT OF THE BLUE: CAPTAIN THUNDERBOLT WAS DEAD. Below: DAN MORGAN IS THE NAME. JUST CALL ME "MAD DOG."

FRANK MORRIS

Ben Hall was only young when he was shot by police. Ben made the statement that “you’ll never hang Ben Hall.” Hall was called upon by authorities to surrender or became “our” outlaw.

So Ben became the first bushranger to be outlawed. A week later, he was dead.

At the age of 27, shot dead by police on the morning of May 6, 1865. Police knew of his whereabouts at Billabong Creek, near Forbes, NSW.

OFTEN BEFUDDLING POLICE

He appealed to the tracker to finish him off but suddenly there was another hail of bullets and Hall was dead.

There were 36 bullet wounds found in his body. For 3 years the Hall gang audaciously plundered the area around Forbes and often “befuddling” police by stealing their uniforms.

Some of Ben Hall’s exploits can be read in Rolfe Bolderwood’s Robbery Under Arms which he penned in 1888. Hall was born in 1838.

In 1910 there was a spate of bushranging films to add to the drama already on display. Both in television and movies the spectacle has never stopped.

Out they tumbled, starting with Moonlight, King of the Road, Starlight, Thunderbolt, Captain Midnight and Ben Hall.
With Ben Hall, the producer says “thanks” to his production team for their “down to earth” work in playing and photographing the Ben Hall production.

In Ben Hall and His Gang, while there was scant attention that the film was Australian but, nevertheless, the publicity for the picture was “colourful and intriguing.”

CRIMINAL OF THE BUSH

The career of Hall covers his escape from prison, the sticking up of the Eugowra Mail and his “death by 30 bullets.”

Two days later, at the Glaciarium, a large audience witnessed the first production of an Australia Biograph film.

The picture presented a seamy side to the life of Ben Hall – the Notorious Bushranger. Unlike the usual bushranging films, which glorified the villainy of the criminal of the bush, this one recorded a “triumph of the law over lawlessness.” Scenes reflected great credit to the producer, Gaston Mervale.

Among the early films to open in 1910 was one that would have the bushranger mutter “Thank God … free at last” and the curtain comes down.

People talked about it for ages.

In The Life and Adventurers of John Vane, which premiered in Melbourne, was the first of the bushranger’s type movie ever screened.

The newspaper critics highly praised the film and the fact that a record number of spectators, and the “inclement” weather, didn’t stop them attending.

KEIGHLEY HOMESTEAD

One critic said that a man, despite the fact that he may have led an evil life, “may nevertheless … be possessed of sterling qualities.”

For John Vane, he did not lack exciting incidents, despite its conventional ending. Here is synopsis of the story: Beginning a downward career, John Vane bails up a Chinaman. Vane captured by police.

Vane is then released by his sweetheart. Vane, after robbing banks, joins Ben (“You’ll never take me alive”) Hall for the raid on the Keightley homestead.

Vane suffered from remorse and leaves the gang. Vane surrenders to Father McCarthy and is sentenced to 15 years.

When he’s released, he mutters, “Thank God, free at last.” Who was it who said, “Often from evil cometh good.”

<< The bushranger story is an adaption of three profiles on Hall which appeared in Grand Years.


LET’S LAUGH! First aid kit – how much can you drink?

Alcohol – moderation is the key word. How much can you drink? Large amounts depress the appetite and habitual heavy drinking will cause liver damage, leading to impaired digestion and detoxification of harmful substances in the body. This, in turn results, eventually in physical and mental deterioration. There is no simple no safe limit – it will not only vary between individuals, but on mood. And how much have food you have eaten. Is alcohol a problem? Experts agree that a person drinking more than six schooners a day or a bottle of wine, is running a risk. If alcohol is affecting your life, it’s about time you saw a doctor. He or she will most likely send you to an organisation who will help you to stop drinking. – FM; Retirement Pack.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 06 April 18

HAPPY EASTER! Blackie Rabbit meets a pair of bilbies

THE ADVENTURER'S: I WONDER WHAT WILL HAPPEN TODAY? Below: WE ARE IN THE RIGHT PLACE, SAID ONE OF THE BILBY. 

What is the sound? Was it a squeak?

FRANK MORRIS

Blackie the rabbit was all nestled up. Soon, he was fast asleep.

He did not want to meet anyone. He wanted to slumber.

He wanted to catch up on the sleep he missed out on the day before.

He’d done what all the animals do. Go to parties. Be entertained.

You know, they trip the light fantastic. They do it all the time.

That was one of the fantastic things about La La Land. It’s such a huge place that you could vanish all together. It was just magical.

There were giant trees touching the sky, hills that flow into valleys, rivers that ran for ever and day. And there was daylight all the time.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he muttered to himself, half asleep.

Then he heard in a noise in the background. What was it?
Was it a sound? Was it a squeak?

Then, there was a cussing sound. Like it has ran slap into a giant tree.

Blackie uncurled himself and was wide awake.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he said, coughing and spluttering.

“A squeak.”

AT YOUR SERVICE

He was dumfounded.

“Where is the blighter,” a perplexed Blackie yelled.

“If you are talking about this blighter then here I am,” the little cove said. It’s taken me almost an hour to walk around that tree. It’s the biggest one I’ve seen. Actually, where am I? Are you some kind of rabbit.”

“I’m Blackie,” said the frustrated rabbit. “And this is La La Land.”

“I’ve never heard of it – it sounds quirky to me. Let me introduce ourselves. My name is Edison Bilby and this is … hey, come out of that bush will you … this is Sandy Bilby. We are both at you service.”

“A pair of bilbies!” shouted Blackie. ”At my service! If I had a gun I ... what the heck. G’day you pair of bilbies and welcome to this quirky land of ours.”

“What is La La Land? asked Edison Bilby. “Why are we here? We come from Australia.”

“I’ve never heard of it. You’re here because both of you fell asleep. It’s hard to explain. You’re having a dream. When you to go to sleep again you’ll be back where you started,” said a relaxed Blackie.

“Who the boss of this place, La La Land,” asked Sandy Bilby.

“It has no boss. We all look after ourselves,” replied a less relaxed Blackie. “Anyway, so you fell asleep and boom, boom and you here.”

The three sat down on the soft grass.

CONTINUES AFTER THE NEXT STORY.


FROM THE PAPERS: The Northern Daily Leader, 1930 -- Dirty flies!

READ ABOUT IT!  NEWSPAPER SWOOP'S  DOWN ON SOME RESTLESS FLIES. 

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

It had been definitely proved by scientists that flies transmit over 30 different diseases – some of them could be deadly.

People are apt to brush a fly away from their food mechanically; or flick a fly out of their cup on with no further thought … of drinking that cuppa; or eating a piece of bread that a fly has just walked over.

If people realised just a fraction of a fly’s loathsomeness there would develop such a horror of these broadcasters of filth and diseases that would result in a nation-wide campaign that would not cease until every fly was exterminated.

FOUL TONGUE, HAIRY FEET

Bred in filth which it carries on its foul tongue and hairy feet, the fly not only contaminates food but by settling on a child’s face; it’s inoculates immediately. Drastic efforts should be made to destroy flies and their larvae.

All garbage should be incinerated or covered until removal. Manure in stables should be raked up daily and the heaps rammed down so hard that the great internal heat generated will kill any eggs. In the home, an approved exterminator should be sprayed.

Not only does it kill flies, mosquitoes, moths, silverfish, fleas and cockroaches, but the housewife who sprays daily will protect her own health as well as the health and comfort of her family.

<< Northern Daily Leader, 1930.


HAPPY EASTER! Final! Blackie Rabbit meets a pair of bilbies

INTRODUCTIONS: WE WOULD LIKE TO MAKE OURSELVES KNOWN -- WE ARE THE BIBLY TWINS. 

We ran and ran until we were exhausted.

FRANK MORRIS

“I’m the eldest of the two Bilbies”, said Edison. Both Sandy and I would be given as an official gift to William, Kate and baby Cambridge of the royal family when they come to Australia.

Edison continued:

“The head guy thought a plush toy bilby and other gifts, like a classic book and a $10,000 donation to the Taronga Zoo’s bilby’s preservation theme would be best.”

Blackie butted in.

“Oh, we don’t have anything like that here …”

“As I was saying,” said Edison, “they had us penned-up in a squatter hat in front of a battery of news and television people. And then it happened.

“The hat was tipped up and we ran for our lives. We ran, and we ran and we ran until we dropped down exhausted. We were done in. We slept and nothing would disturb us. And then we ended up here.”

“Just when you’re having a mighty nap,” said Blackie. “Come, let me introduce you to some of the animals. As a matter of fact, they are like no other animals you’ve ever met.”

“Before we go there something I like to say,” said Edison.

“Our clans want to us become the Easter Bilby. I might add, it’s catching on fast. You find chocolate replicas in the shops. Dozens of them. It’s growing.”

“THE EASTER BILBY!” Blackie screamed out. “Well, let me tell you something – we don’t have Easter or Christmas in La La Land. So there, there, there!”

Blackie gathered his wind. The bilbies would have been faster if they managed to keep up with Blackie. They were very, very tired instead.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary! How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he yelled. They’ll go to sleep and end up where they started from.”

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!”

<< The Blackie Rabbit Adventures was created for Grand Years.


Let’s Laugh! First aid kit – what to take with you!

Don’t worry if your medicine bag takes up more space in your luggage than anything else. It should do. Medicines are very expensive abroad and you don’t want to be stranded away from a doctor and chemist when you need them. If you have any chronic illness, it is important to see your doctor before you travel. The doctor may prescribe and supply an adequate supply of any specific items you might need to take with you.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 29 March 18

CONNECTION: Oswald Mingay, Aussie, becomes an early wireless broadcaster

ON THE BEACH: OS MINGAY INSTRUCTED ADVERTISERS HOW TO REACH PEOPLE --ANYWHERE. Below: THE ONLY RADIO MAGAZINE IN AUSTRALIA, WIRELESS WEEKLY, SHOWED TOM FERRY AT WORK ON THE FRONT COVER OF ITS 1927 ISSUE. HE WAS THE FIRST. Below: WIRELESS WEEKLY’S FOUNDER, WILLIAM MacLARDY, NEVER SAW THE MODERN VERSION OF HIS MAGAZINE WHICH WAS PUBLISHED WITH A SELECTION OF ARTICLES FROM 1922 UNTIL THE JOURNAL QUIT, IN 1927.

Mingay’s “shock decision” on how he would sell advertising to business was accepted!

FRANK MORRIS

Os Mingay was a lucid writer and had a sense of humour. He was thoughtful and quick-witted; his mind was as sharp as a tack. He simply was an amazing character. Mingay was a radio pioneer in the early 1920s. Eventually, he was to organise many of the historic wireless transmissions in Australia.

It was Mingay, to the chagrin of newspaper proprietors, who suggested ‘selling’ broadcasting time as a way of financing the service.

Dealers, otherwise, would have to pay a 10% levy on their sales of sets. The practice, which was adopted in England, hit the dealers’ pocket nerve. It was “unacceptable to Australian wireless traders”, quoted the daily press.
Mingay’s scheme was that provided permission to advertise was granted, that broadcasting stations could fund their service from advertising revenue.

“We go to the theatre, which is essentially an amusement place, and we don’t complain about the advertisements used at interval,” said Mingay. “With wireless, providing the management uses discretion in regard to advertising, who should complain?”

“If the listener-in does not wish to hear, he or she could easily turn off the set.”

LECTURES ON WIRELESS

The diminutive Oswald Francis Mingay was born in 1895 at Peak Hill, NSW. He served on Western Front and, after Armistice Day, resumed duties with the Postal Department.

At the same time, he was writing a wireless column for the Daily Telegraph.

By the 1920s, he had become a highly skilled radio pioneer who had organised many of the historic wireless transmission in Australia. An executive from radio station 2UW said: “Mr Mingay is to be congratulated on his transmitting. He is giving a series of lectures on wireless.”

He served as an AIF signalman in the Second World War and when he returned to Civvy Street he continued with his publishing venture, which he had set up in 1931.

Mingay was a lucid writer. He had a sense of humour, and was quick-witted and thoughtful, and he had a mind as sharp as a tack. He could be rather pugnacious, too, if he ever got himself into a corner. I don’t know whether he attempted to write his life-story or not, but it was certainly a shame if he allowed this one to slip pass him.

The flagship of his company was Mingay’s Electrical Weekly, a trade news-magazine, which was the ‘bible’ of the radio and electrical industry in Australia.

IT WAS A EUPHORIC YEAR

Mingay patterned his weekly on Time magazine, of which he was a great admirer. He was dedicated to quality reporting and Time-style layout, simple and unadorned. “It’s the articles that count,” Mingay often said. His Observations column was compulsive reading, even by the office boy.

The august editor J.C. Squire, of the New Statesman and later, London Mercury, described of his fellow scribe, thus: “He wrote admirably, pungently, eloquently, wittily … I found him unique; and there are men alive, much more widely known than he ever was, who would bear me out.”

The more I think about, that's Os Mingay.

The company celebrated its twenty-fifth anniversary in 1956. It was a euphoric years. The Anniversary issue of his great weekly -- a thick, spiral-bound edition -- which was appropriately printed in silver ink.

In the 1960s, Mingay’s periodicals were taken over by the giant Canada-based Thompson group, as part of its huge UK operation. Mingay’s served as a platform for Thompson’s multi-million dollar expansion into Australia.

(Eventually, Thompson’s was swallowed up by IPC-Reed, now Reed.)

Mingay’s deputy editor, Arthur Hoad, who was employed in 1953, left after the takeover and started his own electrical industry magazine; it was titled Hoad’s Read Out.

Mingay died in 1973.

Frank Morris comments: I joined Mingay Publishing Company and did my cadetship in 1956. I was 16. I remember the so-called “Chief” episode very well. I called him Mr Mingay once, when I got the job and, thereafter, I referred to him as “Chief”. When I left five years later, he wished me luck. My reply was: “Thanks, Chief.” Everyone called him Chief. As I entered the building that day in 1956, which I recall, was next door to a cigarette shop, there were about 20 steps to the first floor. The building was just like it belonged to a newspaper of that period. I remember well all the newspapers I went to over the years. All that I heard was lots of talking and the clicking of typewriters. For five years, I must have gone up and down those steps umpteen dozen times.


Dear Reader -- I am heading on a three-week break to go to that other part of our great nation, Melbourne. My next column will be April 13. Meanwhile, I’ll keep the pot boiling with a good supply of articles. Until then have a Happy Easter!


MASON KNIGHT: Ace reporter, found working out a mystery is a great pastime!

EVERYBODY’S FRIEND, UNTIL: MASON KNIGHT, ACE REPORTER HERE. I’M ABOUT TO NAIL THE RUTHLESS GANG! Below: KNIGHT’S 1936 BUICK. Below: KNIGHT WATCHED FROM THE SIDE AS THE BULLETS FLEW.

You be the reporter.

FRANK MORRIS

I got in the front door and the phone rang. “It’s Mason Knight here!” Then dead silence. “Bernie Squires, your favourite editor. I just …” Knight coughed. “… I just wanted you to know that four crooks, headed by McCann, are meeting at Towong Shopping Mall early in the morning. So be there!” Squires rang off.

Squires must think the four crooks are going to explode, thought Knight. They just as well might, you know, he thought. Four murderers with guns are down there for a reason, he thought again.

I’ll bet they are going there to gun down someone else, according to my favourite editor. Knight ran the story through his head. He could be a bastard at times, thought Knight.

Knight gleefully put his hatted figure on the unmade bed. He then went to sleep. In no time at all, he was awake. Knight lifted his sprawled figure off the bed, gave his face a wash in cold water, and a quick shave. He was already attired.

He marched to the car, a maroon 1936 Buick sedan, and was off. Knight headed straight to Towong Shopping Mall, stopped the car, and ran to an escalator coming in the opposite direction. He rode up and down before he spotted the four bandits.

Earlier on, the four men started a serious argument that resulted in a fatal shooting of one man by the others. All of the others ran away after the shot, but were eventually rounded up by police and brought to headquarters.

POWERFUL GANG

Knight took in all the action, including the fatal gunshot. He took in who was killed and by whom. The police brusquely rounded up the gang and an innocent man, not one of the crowd, who was unfortunately among the suspects.

Knight saw who the murderer was, who the victim was, and who the innocent man was.

McCann, the boss of a powerful gang, was an escaped convict. He was the first one found by the police. Evans, who stood behind the murderer when he fired the shot, was sure that Barker had done it. Barker, who had just met the murdered man and knew he controlled a gang, wouldn’t dare tell on the killer.

Carter is a pal of McCann’s and a cousin of the murdered man. He hated the murderer whom he had known for four years. Gates was in Melbourne with his girl the evening of the murder and hadn’t seen Carter for two years. He was arrested in Sydney two days later.

Mason Knight made his presence felt among the police. He introduced himself to Police Inspector McCraddock. They talked for a while, got the nitty gritty of the shootout and even eventually asked Knight for his solution.

HE WAS INNOCENT

Knight then stated: Evans was neither the murderer nor the victim, as he stood behind the murderer when the shot was fired. Barker could be neither, since he had just met the murdered man and wouldn’t dare tell on the murderer.

Gates must have been the killer. He could have been in Melbourne the evening of the murder and still committed the crime and fly from Melbourne to Sydney. There is nothing to indicate Carter’s presence at the scene so he must had been the innocent man.

McCann must have been the victim since all the others are obviously alive.

Knight was happy to receive a “well done” by some of the police. Even the Inspector joined in. “That’s the beauty of these cases,” the Inspector said. “You know what the guys ate for breakfast.” Said Knight: “Better still, you’ll be able to read my account in tonight’s Inquirer.”


SCAMMERS: When you think you’ve got one, be careful

SCAMMERS ARE AT IT: DON’T START YOUR DAY BY BEING DUDED. Below: LOOK WHO’S FALLEN INTO A MISHAP – A GROCERY SCAM? WHY DON’T YOU PLAY IT SAFE – REPORT IT.

But now, it seems, it’s all year round.

FRANK MORRIS

A great deal has changed in the art of scamming these day. Scammer’s are far more professional than they once were. Some are not.

When the computer and internet were invented scammers used the devices to cook up a reason that shows that you owe money on something you didn’t know anything about!  There are many occasions when you don’t know you have been duded.

The best idea:  DON’T READ IT! If happens again, report it.

When the hard times hit the bogus charities proliferate like mushrooms. Christmas and Easter proved to be the periods of the year for easy pickings.  But now, it seems, it’s all year round.

While it’s a great feeling to be the good Samaritan, a little scepticism goes a long way.

Don’t be taken in by somebody approaching you on the street or knocking on the front door, asking for money.

There are certain people wandering the community ready and willing to cash in on your good intentions.

“Consumers of any age can become victims of a con artist - older adults who become victims of fraud may experience feelings of hurt, anger, grief, loss, guilt, betrayal, or embarrassment,” said an Ageing Network official.

“These feelings can be used constructively to keep you, a friend, or a family member from becoming a victim of consumer fraud.

“Remember, if something sounds too good to be true - it probably is.

“The good news is you can protect yourself. Ask questions before you make a decision. Never allow others to pressure you into making quick decisions. Talk to a trusted friend of relative before responding.

CREDIT CARDS

“Remember, con artists rely on getting you to trust them and make a quick decision without thinking it through.

“Con artists may call you on the telephone, come to your door, speak to you in a parking lot, or contact you by email.

Don’t let them take advantage of you.”

Here’s what you are up against:

SOLICITATIONS are designed to prey on your sensitivities.

VAGUE claims are made that proceeds from the sale of a product will go to a charity.

NEVER release any financial details relating to credit cards or bank accounts.

BE CAREFUL of charities with names that sound like other charities.

Checking out charities bona fides on the spot is not an easy task.

Choice magazine advises people to ask for the collector’s identification card and a receipt. The receipt, says Choice, should display a registration and tax deductibility number.

THINK BEFORE RESPONDING

Also, you should:

ALWAYS take time to read contracts and verify the legitimacy of companies and individuals.

TALK to a trusted friend or relative before you make a decision.

BEWARE of an offer that is only good if you respond right away.

AVOID impulses to donate, repair, or purchase items.

BEING asked for personal information does not mean that you have to share it.

KEEP door-to-door salespersons or unknown callers outside your home.

THINK before you respond. Protect yourself.

“If you become a victim of a con game, report it”, the Ageing Network official said.

“Do not be afraid or embarrassed, because you are not the first person to fall victim to a scam.

“The people carrying out scams are professionals at what they do and practice their schemes in all parts of the country. It can happen to you.

“Remember, if something sounds too good to be true, it probably is.”

<< Written for Grand Years


SHOP WINDOW: Heritage Places – A gift to the Nation

Cooktown, on the far north coast of Queensland, has a special place in the history of Australia. Captain Cook guided the Endeavour there after hitting a coral reef in June, 1770. Cook and his men spent six weeks making repairs to the ship, a far longer time than they had spent at Botany Bay. Cooktown was rapidly established as a port to service the new goldfield at Palmer River. Eventually, after much hardship, about fifty-tonnes of gold was extracted, and fortunes were made. Above: A fine heritage building in Charlotte Street, Cooktown. It was built in 1886 for the Queensland National Bank. Frank Morris; Australian Pathways, spring, 1998. Back after the Easter break.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 22 March 18

CONNECTION: Humour! Ace reporter beats police to the punch!

ACE REPORTER: MASON KNIGHT KNEW WHICH STRINGS TO PULL!

FRANK MORRIS

ACE REPORTER MASON KNIGHT HAD JUST FINISHED SOLVING THE “MR BOOTS” SCANDAL WHEN THE PHONE RANG. HE STOPPED IT. IT RANG AGAIN. “KNIGHT,” HE ANSWERED. IT WAS THE EDITOR. “YES, SIR.” THE EDITOR PRATTLED ON. HE CAUGHT THREE WORDS – “LUXURY, MURDER AND CHECKERT POINT” THE SUBURBS WHERE THE RICH AND FAMOUS LIVE.

He was the first media person there. “Mmmm! So, this was what the Checkert country house looks like,” he said in a mumble. The late Sir Henry Checkert bought the land on which the 500 abodes were built nearly 40 odd years ago.

By the time he ‘investigated’ the Checkert country house there were dozens of media people, cops and Coroner Lewing and Sheriff Tom. The Ace Reporter knew both of them so he followed them inside to the living room.

No other reporter or media person would have realised how to go about things, except Mason Knight; he knew everything. The day was developing into a heady time for the Ace Reporter.

This room was like a ‘mini casino’ with all the mod cons of a happy existence. Just away from them, was Caroline Checkert’s body lying on the couch as if she were asleep, clad only in her lingerie, socks and riding shoes.

WHERE WAS THE HORSE?

The Ace Reporter went over and studied a deep gash showing near the base of her skull, not forgetting the cuts and bruises on her arms. He stood up. “I know who did it,” he thought to himself.

More the half of the media contingent had departed; half was waiting outside.

Coroner Lewing sighed and turned away from the body. “I’m out of breath. Open the widows, get me a little air,” the Coroner quickly found a classic French chair. Mason walked through to the French doors which opened out on the front lawn.

The Ace reporter noticed one important facet of the case: Caroline had been moved to the house. The stepmother, the heiress to all of Checkert Park, came downstairs and walked onto the landing.

Before she uttered a word, the Ace reporter asked. “Where was the horse, Mrs Checkert?  ”Mrs Checkert walk passed him, admittedly, to front him.

“Caroline was always crazy about riding. Her father actually built this style of country house so she could have horses. She wasn’t afraid of anything. This same horse had thrown her before, but she laughed and called him Bronco.

BRONCO HAD BOLTED

“When she didn’t come home for lunch, I became worried and went looking her. I found her over by that big tree  opposite the gate to the meadow …”

Ace Reporter: “But did you move Caroline …” She carried on.

“She was unconscious. Bronco must have bolted and thrown her off. I managed to half-carry, half-drag her the house. I took off her sweater and jodhpurs and tried to revive her; then I called the doctor. Thank you.” She was rattled.

Ace Reported: “This is no accident. Let me explain it!”

The three men stepped on to the lawn.

Ace Reporter: “When I went to the French doors they were already unlocked. I take it that route was the way the in. The stepmother said she “half-carried, half-dragged” Caroline to the house. That is a chargeable offence. The stepmother said she removed the girl’s sweater and jodhpurs. In order to remove them, the shoes must be taken off first. A fact the stepmother overlooked.”

“Where was Bronco, the steed?” inquired the Sheriff.

“As Bronco got nearer to big tree he stopped, dead, and Caroline was ditched on the gravel. She was alive then. Bronco continued to run. The damage was done later,” said the Ace reporter.

As they about turned, they spotted Bronco in one of the paddocks, chewing away, not a care in world. The police went in and charged Mrs Checkert with murder.

The Ace Reporter went to his car and phoned through his story. He looked around the Cherkert’s property and imagined what Mrs Checkert would be thinking. He was ecstatic.

Pictures. The one and only. Mason Knight – he looked over the dead corpse and knew it was murder. Bronco bucked: Once the Bronco ditched his rider he gallops off.

<< Grand Years.5+


BEING AN ORGAN DONOR: They greatly improve recipients’ lives

PLEASE, BE A ORGAN DONOR: REMEMBER, THE NEXT DELIVERY COULD BE FOR YOU. Below: DONOR REGISTERS ARE ALL PREPARED FOR YOUR DONATIONS.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Individuals of any age -- regardless of gender, ethnicity or religion – could one day need a life-transforming or life-saving transplant.

At any one time, more than 1500 people are on Australian organ transplant waiting lists. The average time you wait for a kidney transplant is nearly four years. The first successful kidney transplant was performed in 1965. Since then more than 30,000 people have received transplants.

Australia currently has one of the highest success rates for organ transplantation in the world. In the first year a survival rate exceeding 90 per cent was scored.

UNDERGO THESE TESTS

Tissue and organ donation saves lives and is part of the medical process where organs and tissues are removed from a donor and transplanted into someone who is very ill or dying from organ failure. Tissue donation also provides an individual the opportunity to improve the quality of life.

Everyone, including babies, requiring organ transplants are very ill or dying as result of their organ/organs failing. People needing tissue transplants can also be of any age.

Not everyone with organ or tissue failure can have a transplant. There is range of tests people will undergo. Only those who fit the appropriate criteria and will benefit are put on the waiting list.

<< Australian Organ Donor Registers available from the Australian Government Medicare Australia.


VALE: “His body was paralysed but his mind roamed space and time.” Stephen Hawking, aged 76, died this week, in Cambridge, England. “Hawking was the most renowned scientist of his time, sought answers to our biggest questions.” He help fund the $100 million Parkes telescope; and wrote A Brief History of Time. Hawking said the “book was probably the least-read, most-bought book ever.”


BILLY GRAHAM: Graham died this year just falling short of age 100!

SADNESS: BILLY GRAHAM JUST FELL SHORT OF A CENTURY OF LIVING. Below: GRAHAM, IN A THOUGHTFUL MOMENT, IN HIS BOOK-LINED STUDY.

Graham in his book-lined study. The text here shows one of the passages he referred to while conducting his thousands of crusades throughout the world. It is this: Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me. Billy Graham was born in 1918 and died in 2018 at what was to be his “last crusade”. He was 99. He lived in Charlotte, North Carolina. – Frank Morris. Below is a piece on one of his frequent appearances with President Nixon.                                                          

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

As Billy Graham talks, a tremendous surge of sincerity and energy comes out of him. That morning, in the room blazing with mountain sunlight, it is a kind of living force.

The Saturday Evening Post: It has been suggested because of your frequent appearance with President Nixon, that there is some political connection implied here. For instance, he accompanied you on your recent homecoming visit. Do you have any response to the observation?

Well, my association with the President is based purely of on friendship. As a matter of fact, I am a registered Democrat … I was a little afraid that the news media might give the occasion some political interpretation, but they didn’t. The New York Times and the Washington Post ran it right on the front page with big pictures and they didn’t have a word of politics in it.

IT’S YOUR DAY

The President was wonderful. They had signs throughout the city that were going to say “Welcome Mr President,” but he made them take them down. He said to me: “No, this is your day and I’m not going to let politics spoil it.”

He and I rode along with these thousands of people on each side of the car, and he even told me how to wave. Little things like that, you know. It was quite a treat for me to be back in my home town and to see all my high-school classmates.

<< The Saturday Evening Post, Spring 1972.


Dream House: Final. A quick overview!

If you’re selling to move into a retirement village or aged care facility make sure you cover the right essentials.

Retirees should choose carefully before they organise their home for sale. Your choice of the wrong agent can ruin your chances to selling quickly. It’s important to select a highly ethical and professional real estate agent. As with other professional services, the level and style will vary from one agency to another. One way to establish an agent’s profile is to drive around the area in which the retiree lives and look for agencies that actively promote their properties. Most importantly, speak to family and friends, particularly those who have sold property in the same area. When you have chosen you agent let them explain to you the various selling methods available.

 

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 15 March 18

CONNECTION: Final! Case Study: Looking for a country pub – we found it!

OLD NEWS: THE PUB’S OLD TALES OF THE BUSHRANGERS HAVE BEEN A HUGE SUCCESS. THE NIGHT IS RUN BY A BLOKE WHO WAS TOLD THESE YARNS AS A YOUNGSTER BY PEOPLE ‘IN THRE KNOW’. Below: THE PARENTS OF THESE FELLOWS WERE OFTEN HELD BY THE POLICE -- SOME WERE INCARCERATED FOR A LONG TIME.

Richard was able to learn by talking to publicans from all walks of life. Two of the gentlemen in question had just bought country pubs and he was able to arrange a cross-promotion with both of them.

FRANK MORRIS

Richard now found it much easier to appraise the Swan as a prospective investment. The figures made it obvious the pub had been allowed to run down in both turnover and the state of the furnishings. It was many dollars behind in turnover, the solicitor told me, but we decided to move in.

The first twelve months was a difficult an adjustment period. It took this long to come to terms with a new way of life behind the bar. It was an especially hard time for Carole.

From talking to publicans and attending various courses before-hand, they knew the demands likely to be place upon them. But Richard had not realised how ultra-important it would be in a country pub to be physically present in the bar and how much time it would take up.

The reality of the pub life is a 16-18 hour day, all year. At this stage, Richard decided to stay open. He had five staff from the takeover and he knew it would work out. One of the staff was a young chap who was delighted with the job and knew the trade back to front. He made him assistant manager.

THE SWAN WAS NUMBER ONE

There were several major unforeseen factors that took up enormous amount of improvement. To date, this has cost them thousands of dollars, which they had to borrow. Richard advises anyone thinking of moving into a country pub to make sure there are no hidden problems; make sure it’s a viable proposition in winter.

On current trading, they believe the turn-over does not really justify the purchase price and expenditure they’ve made to date.

“Over the next five years, we must build up our turnover so that when we have reached our objectives we maintain our capital and will have money to live on,” Richard said. Up until five years ago, the Swan was always number one in turnover and customer appeal over the other two pubs.

It won the Country Pub of the Years for the past 8 years.

Said Richard: “With health and everything else willing, we’re looking on it as a seven year project.”

<< Retirement Pack, London. Frank Morris rewrote to article.

Richard and Carole took over the Swan several years ago and it has truly justified its owner’s tender loving care. The Swan regained its number one spot and has won the Country Pub of the Year ever since. The memorabilia on Bushrangers’ nights have been successful since ‘Mr Antidote’ started to run the program. The cross-promotion with publican friends of his all that time ago has been a tear-way success. The takeover staff have never wanted to leave.


FLASHBACK: Diggers 1945 – were coming home after the initial confusion

IT’S ALWAYS GOOD: ERWIN EDEL TOLD THIS STORY TO FRANK MORRIS TWENTY ODD YEARS AGO. Below: ERWIN AND HIS WIFE, UNA.

It’s moments like these! Erwin Edel’s victorious homecoming … and the fact that he still faces “the most embarrassing moment of his life.” Erwin still enjoys retelling it.

ERWIN EDEL   Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Well, the war is over. Who says so?

We're here in Wewack, New Guinea and the Japs are up in the hills with their guns and they haven’t said so!

True, since the Emperor surrendered, they have not shelled us. But here we still are, not sure that the Japs will peacefully surrender.

We still have to stand guard at night even though the war is supposed to be over. But boredom is worse than ever.

Yes, our tents are now better and we do not get wet every night. We have a bit more food and perhaps a bit more variety. My mate George and I got fresh meat - the first in twelve months.

We were doing a job for the Yanks and got the meat as payment. Otherwise, we are making souvenirs in the workshop, and giving lectures to the battalions signals on electronics.

OCTOBER, 1945

Now the big news. General Adachi (The Governor General of Australia, he thought) and the remaining force of about 9000 of a total of 245,000 have surrendered.

He handed over his sword and the men their weapons. But the war has been over for a while and we are still stuck in the jungle. When, oh when, are we going home?

It was November, December 1945 and a small number of men was going home. But what about us?

Well, it does not seem likely we will be home before Christmas. We just got the news that about 2000 of us will go shortly. But I don’t know if I am going or not. I’ll just wait and hope.

Well, what excitement when we are told that we’re going home. Eventually, the day comes when we pack our things including our souvenirs and get on the truck, drive a short distance to the barge and steam out to a large aircraft carrier. What a sight!

We’re not sorry to leave the island which certainly was not a tropical paradise.

The aircraft carrier is off; the next day the amplifier throughout the carrier is calling for Sergeant Edel to report to Cabin 15 on C deck. Well, what have I done? I go to the cabin.

The Captain greets me in a very friendly manner and informs me that when he was in Sydney at a party, I and my mates taught him to play two-up. Well, the world is certainly small.

BEAUTIFUL DAY

After a nice chat, he asks me if I would like my wife to be told that I am on my way home. I didn’t hesitate to say yes.

After a smooth trip in beautiful weather, glorious Sydney Harbour came into sight. A fleet of aircraft escorted the carrier.

At the wharf the bands played and a bevy of Generals is waiting for us.

After a while, somebody calls out: “There are some sheilas on the wharf!” There was a sea of turning heads. After all, we hadn’t seen any women for two years.

But to my horror, I see that there are only two sheilas there – one is my wife, Una; and the other, her sister-in-law. It was the most embarrassing moment in my life when, with my gear and rifle, I walked down the gangplank and embraced my wife to the enjoyment of 2000 cheering voices.

It was embarrassing, but nice. Now the war is really over, I thought.

It’s June, 1993 -- fifty years on. I am still married to the same sheila! The grandchildren have grown up, and at 80, after a grand life, I have retired.

We have our own unit. We have security and are very happy here.

<< Written from LifeStyle newsletter, 1993.


COMING TO GRAND YEARS. Historic Hotels, The Bushrangers, Go New Zealand, The Wild Frontier, The two-up game, Henry Lawson’s Ghost, OZ Spot, The Authors and “Mrs Movie”. Plus … all the other engrossing features we have lined up for you … plus Ghost Ship: Amazing wrecks in the Baltic Sea and the Vietnam War – The major battles.


KANGAROOS: Give your health a hop in the right direction

ON THE HOP:  THEIR MEAT FINISHED NUMBER ONE. Below: HERE IT IS: SOME SUCCELENT MEAT WHICH CONTAINS LESS THAN 4 PER CENT FAT

Kangaroo – a game meat – contains less than 4 percent of fat. An Australian study looked at whether eating kangaroo over Wagyu beef, usually between 20-30 per cent of fatty marbling, of which 40 per cent is saturated fat.

The researchers served a healthy group of people a single baked potato and green peas, with either Wagyu beef or kangaroo.

KANGAROO THE WINNER

In the hours after the meal, blood samples were collected to measure whether there was an inflammatory response; usually a sign that something is wrong with body.

Wagyu beef ran second compared to those who ate the kangaroo.

So next time you’re at the butcher or supermarket you might consider sticking to leaner meats; and maybe even kangaroo. It might give your health a hop in the right direction. Adapted by FRANK MORRIS.

<< Rewritten from a report in Your Doctor Newsletter.


FOODFROLICO: Let’s have a healthy ‘roo burger for dinner!

Ingredients

1 KG KANGAROO MINCEMEAT
2 LARGE EGGS
1 CUP BREADCRUMBS
1 TABLESPOON GARLIC, CRUSHED          `
1 TABLESPOON FINELY CHOPPED PARSLEY
1 LARGE BROWN ONION, FINELY DICED
¼ CUP WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE
¼ CUP TOMATO SAUCE OR PASTE
2 TEASPOONS DRIED THYME, 1 TEASPOON TABASCO SAUCE, 1 TEASPOON DRIED OREGANO, ½ TEASPOON GROUND BLACK PEPPER. SMALL SQUEEZE OF LEMON JUICE.

Burger

WHOLEMEAL BURGER BUNS, ROCKET, TOMATO (SLICED), LOW FAT TASTY CHEESE (SLICED), BEETROOT (SLICED), TOMATO SAUCE OR RELISH TO SERVE.

Method

1- thoroughly mix all burger mince ingredients together in large bowl.

2- Form mince mixture into 8-12 burgers (using clean hands is best) and cook on a medium heat BBQ plate or pan until cooked through, turning several times. Use a little olive oil to help minimise sticking.

3- Assemble the burger using the wholemeal bun with sliced cheese, beetroot, tomato and rocket.

4- Add tomato sauce or relish to taste. – Your Doctor Newsletter, April 2012.

FUN WITH FOOD. Kangaroo meat is taken from a species of the wild animal. The meat taken from Australian Kangaroos in 2010, was exported to 55 countries and all sections of the globe. 


DREAM HOUSE WILL BE HELD OVER UNTIL NEXT WEEK.                                

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 09 March 18

CONNECTION: Part 1. Case Study: Looking for a country pub … we found it!

IN THE BEGINNING: THE PUB AT THE END OF THE CROSS STREET, FAR LEFT, IS SIMILAR TO WHAT IS KNOWN TODAY AS THE SWAN. DATE IS 1865.

Carol had taken enthusiastically to the pub idea. The search was on in earnest.

FRANK MORRIS

Three years ago, Richard was made redundant. His life as a managing director was finished at the age of 60. He was given certain options but he refused them. He was MD of a rather big firm but didn’t have the patience to, at his age, hunt for a new job; he and his wife would go into business for themselves. He had the money.

Richard’s case was the result of a takeover.

Of course, he’ll miss his salary, and his service contract was left with still had two years to run; the inevitable sometimes has got to happen – and it happened to him. He was reimbursed for the service contract and three years of salary.

He still kept his extensive shares option.

Richard and Anne decided they would search for a business that would maintain their capital and enable them to live off it. Their son, Peter, suggested that they buy a country pub. Not anywhere, mind you, but in a small holiday district which has water views.

SERIOUSLY DEDICATED

Richard felt that they would enjoy country living and running a pub. Carol, surprising herself, had taken enthusiastically to the pub idea. The search was on in earnest. But first, they had to find out how to go about looking a pub and learn all the “ins and outs” of the licensed trade.

He went to hotel authoritarties and they put him in touch with one-week course for managers of local pubs. It was an effective and practical course which provided Richard with a sound potted introduction to the licensed trade – looking after a cellar, legal aspects of licensing, customer service, booking keeping and accounts.

Next stage was the hotel and catering industry. They attended a privately run course, with high reputation, that was divided into three stages. First stage paints a broad picture across the whole industry, highlighting areas of opportunity.

It seeks to demolish any idyllic nonsense about running or owning a business in this country. It dissuades all but the seriously dedicated.

HAVEN OF BUSHRANGERS

After a period of searching, they came across a medium size country town that had everything they would require: It was a waterway wonderland of the utmost perfection. After their solicitor examined the books, they bought the pub.

The pub, the legendary The Captured Arms, was frequently hassled by the last of the bushrangers.

The pub was built in 1890, and became the hangout for memorabilia and antidotes history. It had been rebuilt several times, the last time as the Swan, in 1969.

Meanwhile, Richard had not been wasting his time. He returned to do the final eight weeks of the course which is concerned with the final planning to run a particular business.

Richard was able to get a much clearer understanding of how to about costing and pricing. Although Richard was familiar with financial aspects, he had to change his views quite considerately.

<< Retirement Pack, London. Frank Morris adapted the article.

Photo: With all the legal papers signed we suddenly realised that we were the owners of a country pub.

Next week: Final! The most important items the pair had to face was the many days a year the pub was open.

Coming: 50 years on, recalling the heady years of space … and the building of the 64 metre telescope at Parkes, NSW; Smoking – your health risk; A case of depression: “Carol” speak out!


VALE: AINSLEY GOTTO

Ainsley Gotto, whose alleged love affair shook parliament house, died in Sydney. She was 72. Gotto was age 22 when she was appointed the principal private secretary to Prime Minister John Gorton. Gotto had a distinguished career in international business and media, but she remained loyal to her old boss,” Tony Wright wrote in Sydney Morning Herald. She returned Australia to work for him in his retirement. She assisted his widow, Lady Nancy, with his funeral arrangements after his death in 2002.

VALE: ALAN GILL, JOURNALIST

Journalist and author Alan Gill passed away on February 23. He was aged 80 years. He was well-known as a religious writer for the Sydney Morning Herald. He immigrated to Australia in 1971; and in 1985 was awarded a Walkley Award. And in 1995 was made a member of The Order of Australia for Services to the Media.

VALE: SYLVIA LAWSON, JOURNALIST WHO REINVIGORATED CINEMA

Sylvia Lawson, who assisted in the revival of the Sydney Film Festival, has died in 2017. She was born in Summer Hill, NSW, in 1932. After university she worked as a cadet on the Sydney Morning Herald and left there to work on the Daily Mirror and then the Nation, the independent publication founded by Tom Fitzgerald in 1954. The Nation “provided an opportunity for robust and independent commentary.” She was author of several books, including her first book The Archibald Paradox.

Picture: Ainsley Gotto. She had the town talking.


THE DC-3 REVISITED: FINAL! The undercarriage failed as the plane was landing

FLYING CAREER: MITZI REVISITED THE DC-3 SHE WAS ON WHICH HAS PRIDE OF PLACE IN THE MACKAY AIR MUSEUM. Below: THE FLIGHT WE WERE ON HAD ACCIDENTLY RETRACTED THE UNDERCARRIAGE AS  THE PLANE TOUCHED DOWN. IT NEVER FLEW AGAIN.

“I never found out whether we were legally married,” Mitzi says.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

The pilot of the DC-3, Captain Marian Kozuba Kozubski, a Polish World War II Victoria Cross recipient, was one of the best. But his flying skills were not enough to prevent the frequent minor mechanical problems and a breakdown in out-of-the-way places.

The crew of four would then pool their ideas and, with a sense of humour, ingenuity and sometimes a little rascality, come up with a solution. On one occasion the DC-3 burst a tyre on landing at the wadi in the Sahara -- Kozubski and the engineer set off into the darkness and returned several hours later pushing a DC-3 wheel.

“We thought it best not to ask questions,” says Mitzi. “We can only surmise the wheels came off another DC-3; but where they found a DC-3 in the middle of the desert was another matter!”

Ingenuity and hard work were the trade-marks of an air hostess in the early 1950s. It was her job to shop for all the supplies needed for the trip, to ensure there was sufficient water on board, and to make sure that the passengers were looked after with meals and entertainment.

On one long and tedious flight, Mitzi married the flight engineer-navigator. The ‘wedding’ ceremony was united by Captain Kozubski in mid-flight, with the team as witnesses.

AIR CRASH

“I never did find out whether we were legally married,” she says, “but the passengers thought it was wonderful.”
There were no heating facilities on the DC-3s: if a stopover could not be organised to coincide with meal times, it meant cold meats prepared as creatively as possible. But, says Mitzi, the team “were very understanding.”

In the post-war years, items like whisky and cigarettes were expensive. So the crew used to stock up in Malta with enough for their stay in England. They became more and more daring until the day they got caught smuggling in the stuff.

Mitzi’s flying career came to an end in an air crash at Livingstone in 1953. This is not long after the DC-3 had been phased out and replaced by two Avro Tudors which had a greater payload.

She had already burst an ear drum during a flight on a DC-3, and spent three months in hospital after this crash. The undercarriage was apparently and accidentally retracted as the plane touched down. It never flew again.

<< The Queensland In-flight Magazine, l986.


Part 2. THE GREAT WAR: War memorials – make a visit this year!

Selected by FRANK MORRIS

SOLDIERS’ MEMORIAL HALL, BIDGEE WIDGEE, SA: After the Great War there was much argument about what to do for World War 1 soldiers. Some of it was acrimonious, whether to settle for a conventional stone monument or a “useful” monument, such as a hospital, a library or a hall.

Those who had raised the funds, and those who had endured the rigours of organising functions in such unsuitable premises as the School or the old woolshed usually voted for a Memorial Hall. And if they got it, what a boon and blessing it would it be!

No more Jumble Sales in the church under the eye of a somewhat cranky parson; no more whist drives in the cramped little desks of the school. Freedom from everything – from a Monster Baby Show to a Grand Football Dance.

SEMAPHORE, SA: A clock-tower with an angel on top. The angel is manufactured out Carrara marble from Italy; but the rest of the work is wholly designed and executed by Mr J. E. Topham of Norwood.

On May 24, 1925, the President of Semaphore RSL, Lt. Col. L.O. Betts, unveiled the monument. It is a great service to the people who go fishing without their watches!

<< Sprod’s War Memorials, Ouadrant, October, 1975.


House Proud: Part 2. A quick overview!

Remember, if it’s for sale, don’t spend too much money. In other words, do not get carried away. Here’s a tip: If it really needs a painting, do so, but stick to safe neutral or fashion colours – but none to brash – and not a colour that shrieks loud and clear. Prospective buyers may thank you for saving them cost of repainting.

Here’s another tip: If you haven’t time to cook before potential buyers arrive, try putting a bought cake or a loaf a fresh bread in a low oven with a pan of hot water underneath. The kitchen will smell of fresh baking.

Next week: If it’s for sale, clear out all the junk you have hoarded.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 02 March 18

THE GREAT WAR: Winston Churchill was a man of his time!

ON THE RISE: IN 1910, CHURCHILL, THE HOME SECRETARY, ACCOMPANIED THE CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEQUER, LLOYD GEORGE, TO THE HOUSE OF COMMONS. Below: IN 1912, CHURCHILL WATCHED MANOEUVRES AT ALDERSHOT WITH GENERAL SIR JOHN FRENCH WHO COMMANDED THE FIRST BEF TWO YEARS LATER. Below: CHURCHILL WITH POLICE AND TROOPS AT THE FAMOUS ‘SIEGE OF SIDNEY STREET’ IN 1911. PHOTOS: FROM THE NEWSPAPER.

Churchill demanded mobilisation of the British naval fleet (but in the end) he mobilised it on his own responsibility.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

The growth of German sea power threatened the security of France and Britain. Asquith, in 1911, felt it was time for a drive to strengthen British naval preparedness. He moved Churchill to the Admiralty.

In the days of crisis before August 4, 1914, Churchill demanded mobilisation of the Fleet, but the Cabinet refused to allow it. He mobilised it on his own responsibility; when war came all ships were at their appointed stations.

The Navy did not bring off a decisive victory over the main German fleet. Some German ships slipped out of the harbour, shelled two British coastal towns, and got away unscathed. In early 1915, Churchill was losing public support; and then came the tragedy of the Dardanelles.

DETESTED CHURCHILL

Churchill originated the scheme for a land-and-sea assault towards Constantinople. The aim was to effect a junction of the Western Allies with Russia through the Straits, and at the same time cut Turkey off from Germany.

The War Council approved this daring plan. Its execution, however, was a disastrous bungle. In May Admiral “Jacky” Fisher resigned and the Conservatives, who detested Churchill as a renegade, were waiting for a chance to “get” him.

When the first Coalition Government was formed, they insisted that he be shifted.

Asquith made him Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. After a few bored months he resigned and rejoined the Army. In France, as Colonel Churchill, he was given command of the 6th Royal Scots Fusiliers. But in May, 1916, his battalion was amalgamated with another; he was left without a command. He went back to England and took part again in the debates of the Commons.

A CONSTITUTIONALIST

Churchill’s reputation went up in February, 1917. When the Dardanelles Commission published its report the document severely criticised the handling of the affair by Asquith and Kitchener, but found nothing to condemn in Churchill’s conduct, or the plan he had conceived.

Five month after the report Lloyd George, who was the new Prime Minister, made him Minister of Munitions.

After the Armistice, Lloyd George shifted him to the War Office. There he had to tackle the big problem of demobilisation. Three million men were demobilised smoothly in six months.

After the Conservatives won the election in 1922, and Churchill lost his seat, he got back into the House of Commons in 1924 as a Constitutionalist – and independent Conservative. To the astonishment of many, Stanley Baldwin, the Conservative Prime Minister made Churchill the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

<< Winston Churchill Dies, The Sydney Morning Herald, January 25, 1965.


NEXT WEEK: Mitzi’s back with a riveting conclusion to her ‘holiday fun’… Annette Kellerman, long-distance swimmer and movie star … World War 1: Famous War Memorials … Retirement - Taking over a country pub. COMING: Smoking and the health risk.


THE GREAT WAR: Churchill’s words that stirred Britain and the rest of the world!

EXCELLENT: CHURCHILL LOVED THE ENGLISH LAUGUAGE. Below: DASHING YOUNG WINSTON CHURCHILL IN 1899 TAKEN DURING HIS SERVICE IN THE BOER WAR. PHOTO: FROM THE NEWSPAPER.

FRANK MORRIS

Words have a real meaning in a craftsperson’s mind. In the mind of Winston Churchill, “the English language was such that his writing and speeches … were never dull; and he detested dullness in others,” the newspaper said.

He schooled himself in Gibbon and Macaulay when he was a young man. “His power as a writer and speaker matured over the years … But in his greatest speeches during World War II, he combined tremendous strength and force with a piercing simplicity of phrase.”

For any craftsperson with Churchill’s love of the English language they will find full expression in the use of words.

“I don’t know if all the ‘grabs’ are authentic but they have been attributed to Churchill and they certainly hit the mark,” writes a friend of a friend of mine.

Enjoy.

Winston Churchill …

When you’re 20 you care what everyone thinks, when you’re 40 you stop caring what everyone thinks, when you’re 60 you realise no one was thinking about you in the first place. You have some enemies? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.

Diplomacy is the art of telling people to go to hell in such a way that they ask for directions.

Everyone is in favour of free speech. Hardly a day passes without its being extolled, but some people’s idea of it is that they are free to say what they like; but if anyone else says anything back, that is an outrage.

You will never reach your destination if your stop and throw stones at every dog that barks.

FINEST HOUR

Fear is a reaction. Courage is a decision.

To each there comes in their lifetime a special moment when they are figuratively tapped on the shoulder and offered the chance to do a very special thing, unique to them and fitted to their talents. What a tragedy if that moment finds them unprepared and unqualified for that which could have been their finest hour.

A nation that forgets its past had no future.

The POSITIVE THINKER sees the INVISIBLE, feels the INTANGIBLE and achieves the IMPOSSIBLE.

A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth had a chance to get its pants on.

There is nothing government can give you that it hasn’t taken from you in the first place.

A good speech should be like a woman’s skirt: long enough to cover the subject and short enough to create interest.

<< AZ Quotes, England.


THE GREAT WAR: Diggers tale of epic gallantry is a highlight of the film

DETERMINED: THE 800 STRONG BRIGADE OF THE LIGHTHORSEMEN CAME AT THE TURKS LIKE AN EXPRESS TRAIN. Below: HORSE AND MASTER – THE HORSE DRINKING WATER FROM HIS MASTER’S HAT.

The film deals with the last cavalry charge in history.

FRANK MORRIS

The multi-million dollar Australian film The Lighthorsemen is a story of courage and comradeship during the First World War.  The film was released in 1987.

Described as “an epic film in the classic tradition,” The Lighthorsemen focuses on a little known incident involving a band of ordinary Australians who rode against overwhelming odds in the charge at Beersheba and became heroes.

The Lighthorsemen achieved the impossible and their action became one of the great military triumphs of modern warfare.

“Australian and British military history often celebrates failures,” says co-producer and director Simon Wincer. “The Lighthorsemen celebrates a magnificent victory.

In essence, the film deals with the last great cavalry charge in history.

TURKISH DEFENCES STORM

The time is 1917 and the British campaign in Palestine is stalemated. Beersheba, an ancient water-rich stronghold of the Turkish desert flank, becomes the lynch-pin of the British strike at Jerusalem

In an all-or-nothing move 800 Australian Lighthorsemen obey the seemingly impossible order to gallop their horses across two miles of open desert against Turkish troops who are formidably supported by machine guns, artillery and aircraft.

The storming of the Turkish defences to win the precious water wells of Beersheba changed the history of the Middle East.

“Lighthorsemen is rich in colour and spectacle,” says the film’s writer, Ian Jones. “For young audiences, the film’s teenage hero is a potent link to the remarkable events of a known war.

“For an older generation, the film brings to life the Light Horse legend.”

<< The Lighthorsemen is available on video.

 


THE GREAT WAR: Diggers epic bring life to the legend!

THE TRUE STUFF: THE WORD ‘EPIC’ IS A MUCH ABUSED EXPRESSION, BUT FOR THE FILM, THE LIGHTHORSEMEN, IT WAS SPOT ON. Below: IAN JONES SAID: “YOUNGS CHAPS ON BOTH SIDES TASTED THE DRAMA THAT ONE HAD TO GO THROUGH.”

IAN JONES and selected by FRANK MORRIS

“Epic” is a much-abused word in the vocabulary of film.

But, to me, this is a true epic – and one that has great rightness about it for an Australian audience.

Its heroes are ordinary men who are called on to achieve the impossible, against overwhelming odds.

And they win. After ten years of research on the charge at Beersheba, during which I formed friendships with several men who rode in the remarkable action, I was tempted to tell their story on film.

TEENAGE HERO

But I couldn’t let personal and emotional ties outweigh the cold realities of such an ambitious production. I had to believe that the film’s potential audience would justify the large budget needed to realise this huge story: and I do.

For the young audience, the film’s teenage hero is a potent link to the remarkable events of an unknown war. To the audience at large, it offers a unique and uncontrived combination of war film and western, with a powerful emotional core operating on both personal and national levels.

For an older generation, the film brings to life the Lighthorse Legend.

For a world audience ready to accept exciting horse action from Australia, we offer a totally new genre, rich in colour, texture, and spectacle.

<< Ian Jones was a film producer/writer. Jones wrote the above article for Prospectus, April 1986.


THE GREAT WAR: Here mate, There's a war going on here!

TRUE BLUE: THE “MILLION DOLLAR” MERMAID, ANNETTE KELLERMAN, WHOSE WATER FEATS WON WORLD WIDE PRESS COVERAGE. KELLERMAN DID WEAR A ONE PIECE COSTUME. Below: UP CLOSE, THE LEG SECTION OF A FORM-REVEALING ONE PIECE, COTTON SWIMSUIT.

How people lived? MILESTONES from our history.

1905.

Horse-drawn transport was gradually being replaced by the car.

Widespread use of concrete as a building material.

The “million dollar mermaid”, Annette Kellerman, Australian distance swimmer, appeared in a one-piece bathing costume. Kellerman’s water feats made a splash world-wide. A polio-crippled child, she turned into The Perfect Woman” of America. She starred in Neptune’s Daughter and A Daughter of the Gods.

1906

“The most thrilling and interesting Living Pictures Ever Taken – that’s how The Story of the Kelly Gang was introduced to its enthusiastic audience. It later emerged as perhaps the world’s first full-length film. The Kelly gang was made in 1906; and screened in Melbourne on December 26, 1906.

The first surf lifesaving club in the world was established at Bondi, NSW. The Surf, which was also started by the club, is credited as the world’s first surfing magazine. It began in December, and lasted until April, 1918.

1907

The opening of the Canning stock route, the longest in Australia, from the Kimberleys to Perth. The telephone linked Sydney and Melbourne. The Harvester Judgement initiated the “Basic Wage” – 7 shillings a day.                                                                                                                                                             

Norman Brookes became the first Australian to win the men’s singles at Wimbledon. Brookes and his partner Anthony Wilding won the 1907 Davis Cup for Australia.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 23 February 18

CONNECTION: Part 1: The DC-3 revisited – the pioneering days were lots of fun!

FAMILIAR: THE OLD DC-3, OR GOONEY BIRD AS IT WAS CALLED, IS SIMILAR TO THE ONE THAT MITZI FLEW ON. AS WITH MITZI’S DC-3, THERE WERE MINOR MECHANCIAL AND OCCASIONAL BREAKDOWNS IN FAR OFF PLACES. Below: MITZI DAVID … “MY TRIP WAS NEVER BORING; TIRING, YES.

Mitzi told the crew that she was on a DC-3 thirty-two years ago which brought her flying career to an end.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

In the days of grass roots flying in DC-3s there was only one way of coping with a plane-load of anxious passengers AND a coffin! How you could a carry the coffin and keep the passengers – and many of them were nervous -- happy at the same time?

Simple. Three rows of seats were removed for the coffin, which was disguised as a coffee table, and no one was the wiser.

As an air hostess on DC-3s, flying from Johannesburg to London in 1952, Mitzi Davis was quite used to unusual situations.

Sacrificial goats, which had free run of the aircraft, would leave their smelly calling cards behind them. Or Muslim pilgrims, all kneeling in the aisle, praying to Allah. Or being caught smuggling cigarettes and whiskey. Or being stranded for two weeks in Egypt with a group of highly-strung film stars.

These were some of the tales Mitzi told when she flew on a DC-3 for the first time since she was badly injured in a plane crash 32 years ago. This affair brought her flying career to an end.

The flight was in the Mackay Air Museum’s DC-3, in 1986, which took part in the 50th celebrations of the first of the legendary Gooney Birds. This and Grand Old Lady of the Skies and Bully Beef Bomber are all nicknames for the DC-3.

This plane was the pioneer of modern aviation service around the world.

For Mitzi, those pioneering days were really fun. It was an exciting era of aviation that has since disappeared from most parts of the world. But being an air hostess was hard work, and not the glamour job it is today.

NEVER BORING

After World War II, many C-47s – the military version of the DC-3 – were converted for use as passenger aircraft. Mitzi was one of the first hostesses on the William Dempster Line Charter DC-3, flying between Johannesburg and London, through the heart of Africa.

The twice-monthly trip took 38 hours and the crew, unlike those on scheduled airlines, had no breaks.
“Tiring? Yes,” says Mitzi, “but never boring.”

Although their stopovers were in such places as Livingstone, Leopoldville, Khartoum, Entebbe and a wadi in the Sahara desert, there was never any danger. The people were always friendly.

“We never dreamed then that so many of our stops would be the scene of horrific bloodbaths in years to come,” says Mitzi.

Livingstone and Rome were mandatory stops; Livingstone, because that was where the radio operator joined and left the plane; Rome, because there were always priests and nuns on board travelling to and from African missions.

Says Mitzi: “Our radio operator was an Indian, so we couldn’t take him all the way into South Africa. We left him each trip at Livingstone, near Victoria Falls in what is now Zimbabwe.”

NEXT WEEK: Mitzi back with a riveting conclusion to her ‘holiday fun.’


AFL/VFL: Alex Jesaulenko – he was the greatest of them all!

PERFECT: ALEX JESAULENKO, OF CARLTON, WITH THE 1979 TROPHY, HAD BEEN VOTED THE FOURTH GREATEST CARLTON PLAYER OF ALL TIME. Below: UP THERE WITH JEZZA.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Jezza became the first player to score more than 100 goals in one season for Carlton.

Carlton’s Alex Jesaulenko, was a handful on the paddock. He was often seen and not heard.

When Carlton played Fitzroy Jezza became the first player to kick 10 goals since Noel O’Brien in 1954 – also against Fitzroy. He brought up his hundredth goal with five against Melbourne on August 29. Jezza became the first (and only) Carlton player to kick one hundred goals in a season.

For many Carlton barrackers, the greatest player … is Alex Jesaulenko. He represented all that was mercurial and brilliant in football; he was a player people came to watch because he did the unbelievable on a regular basis, and the unexpected 10 times a game.

PARTICULAR GENIUS

Like Mozart, the greatest composer all times, Jesaulenko was born of Ukrainian parents in Salzburg, Austria. He came to Australia as a young boy and grew up in Canberra.

There are a couple persistent rumours about the young Jesaulenko and his particular genius at the game. One was that did not pick up an Australian football until he was 15. The Prime Minister Sir Robert Menzies personally intervened to have the Manuka-Eastlakes star, and Commonwealth public servant, transferred to Melbourne in time for the 1967 season.

The rest of his story is truthful and needs no embellishment; the soaring mark … of the century in the 1970 Grand Final and the hundred goals in a season. He had the ability to command the ball to do his will, the way his body worked its way, untouched, through marauding packs as if he could disappear ‘underground’ and worm his way up in a clear space.

SHIRT-FRONTED

Not to mention the way he could bring the rest of the team into the play by direct involvement … When called upon to coach Carlton in 1978, it was his being shirt-fronted by Collingwood’s Stan Magro that inspired a win that season, and eventually the Flag in 1979.

He left in loyalty to controversial President George Harris but was still blue through and through. When called upon in another crisis after the sacking of Robert Walls in 1989, he came and the magic worked again.

Carlton finished 8th in 1989 and 1990 before Jezza was replaced by David Parkin. Jesaulenko’s legacy is loyalty over 256 extraordinary games and 424 goals – 115 of them in 1970 and four Premierships in 1968, 1970, 1972 and 1979 – were some of the marks of the century.

Every Carlton player is measured against the standard of Alex Jesaulenko, as in: ‘Yeah, great mark, but not as good as that of Jezza’s.’

<< The Club – The complete history of every club in the VFL/AFL; Viking Penguin Books Australia; 1998.

Coming: Collingwood pushed for a senior football team to carry on the name.


Conclusion: The houses of mystery are still alive and enjoying themselves!

DARK AND SCARY: OUTSIDE THE PRINCESS THEATRE SOMETHING BIZARRE TOOK PLACE. Below: THE MERRY WIDOW WAS A PLAY FOR LAUGHS BUT THE LEADING ACTRESS SLIPPED AND FELL TO HER DEATH.

More favourites from Launceston’s litany of horror.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Launceston undertaker’s C.T. Finney’s, at a former site, had a prop coffin on display in the embalming room. Back in the 1800s, bodies would be pushed through the window like, say, a delivery of fresh meat. The bodies would be laid out on ice and hessian bags.

(Our tour adventurer) Rosemary points out the grilles through which the corpses’ fluids would drain on the mainstreets of Launceston caking the road with blood … God knows, what else!

While we’re imagining the stench of the streets in summer … the coffin lid slams down loudly and everybody who was passing by would hear the screams. And none of tourist was standing anywhere near the coffin.

The groups venture outside.

A TRAGEDY

From there, a place called Peppers was next on the list. Rosemary looks mildly disappointed. Peppers is where I was staying, I told her. Peppers is a newer establishment but not famous for being haunted. Peppers, said Rosemary, is close to a site where parents and children would once gather to watch the weekly public executions … overseen by the local government.

Nearly every place in Launceston is haunted; or where a dead person appeared to the living, it seems.

There is a bizarre and odd turnout at the Princess Theatre that ends up in tragedy. The theatre is haunted by the Lavender Lady, an actress who starred in The Merry Widow. She slipped off the stage into the orchestra pit one evening, fatally breaking her neck.

HIS DAIRIES

Further on, the touring party was outside a grand-looking white building, the former residence of a doctor, who is said to have conducted a number of gruesome “experiments” on the homeless and mentally disabled people.

Rosemary said, “He never got caught – ever. No-one found out what he’d done until he died. Someone read his diaries. His diaries also said he used to put a little instruments up people’s noses and wiggle them around.”

What happens then is too graphic to print. “They died in an awful way”’ Rosemary said.

Afterwards back at my hotel, I stare at the ceiling for a while. It found it hard to sleep when my hands are so cold.

<< Background from this original story from Tasmania – Go behind the scenery.


Part 2. House Proud: A quick overview!

What you can do fix a problem without it costing you a great deal of expense! Remember, an inviting exterior ensures inspection (if that what it is) of the interior which could lead to some big surprises! Make sure the fence is in good order. Does the gate squeak? Or drag? Made sure your yard is tidy. Keeps your lawns mowed and edges trimmed. Look at the flower areas. Do they need weeding? If it’s an inspection, tuck your garbage away out of sight. If your dog/s are not trained, keep out of sight; or made sure the dog/s are secured before the visitors arrive. Give the outside of the house a good scrub.

Next: A sparkling place will make you happy. If your house is for sale, then the potential buyer is of great importance?

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 16 February 18

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Cruise & Coach Tours

Fully escorted from start to finish. Combine modern luxury on board the indulgent Celebrity Solstice with a scenic coach tour of New Zealand. Great offers available!


WATCH! Celebrity Solstice