Grand Years with Frank Morris

Number of blogs returned: 1 to 10 records of 235

SHADOW KING: He was the bridesmaid of the top event!

MELBOURNE CUP, 1930. FIRST PAST THE POST WAS THE MIGHTY PHAP LAP WITH SHADOW KING RUNNING THIRD. Bottom: Another angle of shot.

“THE FOLKLORE OF HORSE RACING CHIEFLY REVOLVED AROUND THE WINNER AND FAIRLY TALE SUCCESSES, SAID RACING WRITER, DARREN ELIAS IN THE PORFILE OF SHADOW KING. THE CHAMP WILL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN.

DARREN ELIAS        Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

“Some of the more interesting stories, however, go on to concern the perennial losers, the ‘could-have-beens’”.

Shadow King was a bay colt by Comedy King, a Melbourne Cup winning stallion, out of the mare Berylium.

There was one problem with his name, Shadow King. “He proved to be a ‘shadow’ by nature” said Elias.

In the time of great racing and great horses, Shadow King stands out as one of the “unluckiest horses ever” to race in the Cup.

His starts in the Melbourne Cup make Shadow King far from forgotten. He raced in the Cup six times for 2 seconds, 2 thirds, fourth and sixth.

It all started in 1929.

THE MIGHTY PHAR LAP

The flashy Kiwi, Nightmarch, came with a withering run in the final 400 metres to win the Melbourne Cup by three lengths. The mighty Phar Lap ran poorly throughout the race finishing third. Shadow King came in sixth.

In the 1930 Shadow King ran third, resoundingly beaten by the then legendary Phar Lap, unbeatable at the time. In 1931 he was unlucky not to beat White Nose. Hampered several times in the run Shadow King was charging to the finish line, but he was too late.

There was only one horse that was compared to Phar Lap – Peter Pan.

In 1932, Shadow King met the awesome Peter Pan, a rising star. A striking, loose-limbed colt “with plenty of pace to develop” Peter Pan put in an amazing performance in the two-miler that he nearly fell 800m from home.  The “Shadow”— that was his nom de plume – weaved his way through the field to miss at the finish.

A TORRID RUN

Probably his most hapless run came in the 1933. In this Shadow King was only beaten by inches by the great 3 year old, Hall Mark. After a torrid run, Shadow King had again struck interference at the top of straight and was forced to come wide. He was actually in front past the winning post.

The reason Shadow King did not run in 1934 was because of the bog track. The great Peter Pan, the delight of the near-record breaking crowd, won the race.

In was not until 1935 did an ageing Shadow King contest the Cup. He finished a creditable fourth to Marabou.

Shadow King had the honour of leading the field out that day in recognition of his efforts.

AS A POLICE HORSE

A funny thing did happen. Peter Pan, who was unplaced in the Cup, played second fiddle to the ‘old stager’. Shadow King retired with his name firmly etched in Cup lore. By today’s standards his Cup pacing’s would have him more than $2 million.

“Folklore remembers that as being the end in the Shadow King story,” said Darren Elias. “But there is another facet to his remarkable tale”. Elias continues: “Despite the fact that he never to race again, Shadow King attended several further Melbourne Cups as a police horse.

In 1943 the 17-year-old Shadow King was in a palsy state. The “Shadow” was put-down not far from where he was standing.

Below: Shadow King, in all its glory, just before running third to Phar Lap in the 1930 Melbourne Cup.
Source: From Grand Years 10 years ago; Historic Australia, Spring, 1997.


Elly Gross (ABOVE) was born in Hungary in 1929. Elly began encountering antisemitism at an early age. And she was brought into a time of terror by the Nazis as they tightened their grip on Europe.

This is the true story – the truth of Elly Cross in a series of miracles that take her from the daily horrors of world she is in – Hungary.

The miracles did come … coming in May.


Special Mention: Television brought to book after it fails due to lack of technology!

FIRST MAN OF AUSTRALIA TELEVISION. HE OPENED THE SERVICE IN 1957.

AFTER SUCCESSFULLY TRANSMITTING A 180-PICTURE, THE SERVER CLOSED BECAUSE OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR.

FRANK MORRIS

The first book on television could be bought in Australia in 1926. It was called Television: Seeing by Wire or Wireless, by A. Dinsale. It was publicised as the first publication to appear on the subject.

The first book published in Australia to coincide with the launch of regular television transmission in September, 1956, was How Television Works: A Simple Guide by adman Phil MacMahon.MacMahon described television as a delightful toy – a toy which is bringing us a “fascinating new way of living”.

From the early 1920s the daily press, through its overseas cable hook-up, was giving “some prominence” to “the subject of television” much to the chagrin of the fledgling broadcasting industry.

In 1927 the Australian magazine, Wireless Weekly, warned that the public, could be “prone to accept attractive statements … about having televisors or “looking-in” attachments wired to their receivers”.

TELEVISOIN TERROR

The magazine pointed out that there had been two years of speculation about the early advent of television “or radio vision”, but “we have not yet been shown any demonstration of it, nor has any practical application of it to the ordinary user been given in any part of the world.”

It was only a matter of time, in fact, two years, when the “television-terror” was demonstrated on home turf.

In January, 1929, Melbourne’s first commercial radio station, 3UZ, conducted the first public demonstration of TV in its studios, using the mechanical scanning system.

Although it was still experimental, the first regular television transmission, using the 30-line Baird system, began from a building in Wickham Terrace, Brisbane, in 1934. The project, which was successfully transmitting a 180-line picture, was closed down by the Federal Government on the outbreak of the Second World War in 1938.

Below: A group of kids around the television at the Royal Easter Show in 1957.
SOURCE: Television Brought to Book was previously published in Grand Years in 2012 and syndicated to various other media.


The Dog: Things the animal will do that you won’t know about

THE THREE DOGS STRAINED AT THEIR LEASHES.

FRANK MORRIS

Taurus seems to have an acute sense of smell. Generally, if this is the case with your dog, you can bet the animal has detected a group of dogs being taken for a walk a kilometre away.

But that’s not all. The dog was able to meet the animals – a Fox terrier and an Alsatian -- who wanted to get together with the Taurus. Your dog could smell them from a distance.

The three dogs strained at their leashes. And you could see why the owner was becoming a tad nervous. When I moved my dog to the side of the street, I noticed that they had gone back to her.

But Taurus is a funny hound to have around the place. Taurus, no matter what animal there is ahead, the dog frequently proves to be more than a match for any animal at bay.

CONSTANT COMPANION

If your dog is a well-trained veteran, the animal could be cleverer than they realised.

Your Taurus is a useful animal, ever faithful to its owner. The dog is a constant companion to its master. Taurus is quick at its commands, and always prompted to execute them.

The dog is a watchful guardian and will not suffer fools and strangers gladly; the Taurus will impede any intruder. The dog never fails to protect its charges.

When the dog take its stand, the Taurus threatens every known delinquent who wants to get involved.

APRIL 20 TO MAY 20

SOURCE: Frank Morris, after observing many dogs.


THE QUEEN: Meeting 11 presidents of the United States!

The Queen, in her diamond tiara and sash, laughs at one of President Ford’s impromptu stories. The event happened when President Nixon resigned.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 18 April 19

Isabella Bird, Author: She spotted early surf boarding in 1870s!

WHAT THE LADY DID SEE?

THE LADY WAS A BRITISH AUTHOR WHO WAS WRITING ABOUT THE INGENUITY OF NEW IDEAS IN HER COUNTRY.

FRANK MORRIS

Isabella Bird’s book, The Hawaiian Archipelago, written after her tour of the Sandwich Islands in the 1870s, contains what is probably the first account of surfboarding long before it became a national sport.

On this particular day, Ms Bird gathered with “a large party of friends” on the beach to watch “a grand display of surf-bathing…a really most exciting pastime, and in rough sea requires immense nerve”.

She gives a colourful description of the surfboard: “(It) is a tough plank shaped like a coffin, about two feet broad, and from six to nine feet long, well oiled and cared for. It is usually made of the erythrina, or the breadfruit tree”.

The surf this day was very heavy, but favourable. The men, she writes, pushed their boards before them, swam out to the first line of breakers…and reappeared in smooth water half a mile from shore.

DEXTEROUS MOVEMENT

“What they seek is a very high roller, on the top of which they leap from behind, lying face downwards on their boards”, she wrote:

“As the wave speeds on…(they) appeared poising themselves on it highest edge by dexterous movements of their hand and feet, keeping just at the top of the curl, but always apparently coming downhill with a slanting motion. “They rode majestically, always just ahead of the breaker…the more daring riders knelt and even stood on their surfboards, waving their arms and uttering exultant cries.“The great art seems to be to mount the roller precisely at the right time, and to keep exactly on its curl just before it breaks”.

Below: Isabella Bird saw ‘early’ board-riders steal the show.


When you adopt or return a dog you’re in BIG trouble – BIG, BIG trouble!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

See!


ONE IN 8 PERSONS HAS PARKINSON’S

NEXT: Remember Shadow King the racehorse? He was a champion at running places in the august Melbourne Cup from 1929-1935 … FLASHBACK -- The third newspaper in Australia, the Geelong Advertiser, is still going strong! … Wireless at sea marks an epoch of safety … THE CAUSE: Parkinson’s is still unknown. But, warned the Parkinson’s officials, your medication must be taken on time every time. 1t’s estimated that approximately four per 1000 – roughly 80,000 – in Australia have Parkinson’s. COMING: Did you know? A column that puts you in the know.


ROOFTOP GARDENS: Final! The ‘father’ of hydroponic gardening dates from a century and a half ago

BACK IN 1980, THE CASTLE HILL RSL LEAD THE PACK. IT DISCOVERED A NEW ‘MARKETING PLOY’ – A GARDEN DESIGNED WITH A HYDROPONIC ASSORTMENT OF PLANTS.

HYDROPONICS BEGAN TO APPEAR PROMINTENTLY FROM OVERSEAS IN THE 1950s. WHICH, OF COURSE, WAS NOT THE CASE.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Sir -- I was an interested reader of your cover story, Hydroponics Hits the Club Scene, on growing plants.

I am quite sure that most people who read it would have gained the impression that your unnamed German horticulturist invented hydroponics in the late 1950s. Which, of course, was not the case. Nor would he have been the first to apply the technique to the growing of indoor plants.

Real water culture dates from 1860d when Knop, a German chemist, and Sachs, a botanist, first added chemicals to water and obtained a nutrient solution. In 1929, W.F. Gericke announced hydroponics, having developed the method along substantial lines in America.

A MERE AMATEUR

In fact, it would be safe to say that hydroponics, as we know it today (first called aquiculture, really had its beginning in that country and Gericke was the "father" of it.

W.F. Gericke wrote a book on the subject, The Complete Guide to Soiless Gardening, which was first published in 1940. As a mere amateur, I established two inground hydroponicums in my backyard in 1946. And, along with other enthusiasts ... experimented and had success with indoor plants.

So, in the light of the foregoing facts, you will forgive me for querying your assertion that a young German horticulturist "came up with the method" in the late 1950s. If he did, there is no way in the world that the gentleman could call it his own!

G.H. TUCKWELL

Secretary

Balgowlah Golf Club, Sydney.

Frank Morris comments: They did quote 1950s as when the young German horticultural wizard came up with a method of growing indoor plants without water, called in hydroponics. Said Club Management magazine: "It involved growing plants in water, impregnated with nutrients." The method was so successful in Europe that it spread to Britain, Japan, Saudi Arabia, United States and, more recently, Australia. In the late 1970s, when I was editor of the same magazine, Club Management, I introduced an article on hydroponics by American writer David Devor. I angled the story towards clubs that wanted new marketing ideas for their establishment. Growing of hydroponic vegetables was the "in thing" then -- and still is.


THE QUEEN: Meeting 11 presidents of the United States!

THE QUEEN ON ENGLAND, INFORMALLY, MET THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, MR RICHARD NIXON, AND THE FIRST LADY. BRITISH PRIME MINISTER, EDWARD HEATH HAD A CONVERSATION WITH THE PRESIDENT. THE YEAR WAS 1971.

SOURCE: “Isabella Bird” by Frank Morris … Adoption of a dog by Shaw Cross, 1960 … Rooftop Gardens by Frank Morris … The Queen from Google.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 12 April 19

DOGS: Aries -- will you know how to react! But you'd better be quick!

YOUR ARIES WILL RUSH AHEAD AND WILL DRIVE YOU MAD! 

THE IDEAL ACCOMMADATION FOR THE ARIAN WOULD BE A HOUSE THE SIZE OF BUCKINGHAM PALACE.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

A dog born under this sign will be full of vitality, well able to run several packs of hounds right off their feet. But they will have only one aim in life, into which they will channel every drop of excess energy, to get to the front, and stay there.

As the Aries is born under the first sign they must be first dog.

The way the dog rushes ahead will drive you mad. The dog will push between your legs when you get up to put the cat out. The animal will be out of the house and sight, before you have taken the lead off its peg.

NOT IMPRESSED

And it will never enter the dog’s head to check which way you were going to go. When you get out of the car, your Aries will be sitting there waiting for you; they will not take kindly to travelling in the back either.

The ideal accommodation for the Aries would be a house the size of Buckingham Palace. If like the majority of us you do not own a palatial residence, a country seat would do in a pinch.

The Aries erratic and demanding manner will soon exhaust you. You must live somewhere where you can escape from the dog occasionally.


 

Grand Years editor is off on holidays. In the meantime, GRAND YEARS, will be packed with features as far as the eye can see. There will be: One of the first accounts of early surfboard riding in the Sandwich Islands in the 1870s written by a woman …  The Big Fight, featuring Albert Griffiths, or “Griffo”, and Torpedo Bill Murphy in a featherweight championship of the world. The fight was fought at the White Horse Hotel in Sydney. Plus, there are many others, of course!

 

Rooftop Gardens: The system that can provide for our nourishing plants!

WHEN YOU PLANT YOUR HYDROPONIC GARDEN, IT COULD LOOK LIKE THIS.

PERCHED ON THE ROOFTOP OF A SKYSCAPER IS ONE THE MOST UNLIKELY SETTINGS YOU’LL EVER SEE. ROOFTOP GARDENS ARE HERE TO STAY.

FRANK MORRIS

Rooftop or market gardens have been around for centuries in one form or another. But in the early 1970s they made a come-back, growing on the roofs of skyscrapers and buildings, home units and clubs.

In fact this system is not as silly as it sounds, I wrote in the 70s. Some of them are perched on the top of buildings – hotel complexes – up to 20 storeys high.

“In the 1970s, I discovered a one acre farm growing a new system called hydroponic vegetables,” said American David Devor, a writer who had studied this type thing of for 40 years.

“Many of the pilot schemes have yielded over l00,000 lbs of vegetables such as tomatoes, eggplants and string beans in a six months period.  It was the most unusual setting you’ll ever see -- and it was in 1975.”

HARD TO SEE

The garden “many rows of lush green growth set in perfect symmetry”, Devor said, “was a sight to behold. The system was in parallel lines and is composed of sections of PVC pipe with an opening cut into the top from which the plants grow.”

Today, it has developed into a big business industry.

The other day, when I was at a club, I got the shock of my life. Rooftop gardens are hard to see. They’re near you but camouflaged so you can’t see them. However, this is not exactly on the roof but a fairly sizeable mound, and panelled off into section.

“A market roof-style garden creates enough produce for a restaurant or family,” said the executive chef. “Our market garden, while still in its infancy, will produce the freshest of herbs and heirloom vegetables.

“We really enhance the natural flavours of our dishes. We are very excited to be able to offer our guests the freshest ingredients directly from our market garden.”

Rooftop gardens are here to stay.

Below: A garden will grow in any place – even from the ceiling.

NEXT: Final! The ‘father’ of hydroponic gardens dates back as far as the 1860s and a German chemist.


Trio of disarming bandits: Overseas officials caught snoozing while guarding the coffers

LOOK AT THE THREE DIAGRAMS, ABOVE. YOU COULD HAVE WON THE CASH – NOT IN ONE CLUB OR CASINO, BUT IN ALL!

THE YEAR 1965 PROVIDED A MAJOR EVENT OF THE DAY – BEFUDDLED CLUB AND CASINO OPERATORS WERE BLATANTLY ROBBED ON THE SPOT. BUT HOW?

FRANK MORRIS

Remember the three Australians who in the mid 1960s took on the poker machines in Australia, Las Vegas, Monte Carlo and London and cleaned up? If you can’t recall their names it was Keith Jennings, George Clamped and C. J. Mackenzie.

Their amazing feat was going to be made into a movie 15 years after the event took place, but it never was made.

The system they used, which was all legal and above board, earned the trio almost 100,000 pounds in the first year. In 1965, Time wrote that the “Sydney System, as they call it, only sounds simple.”

ASK TO LEAVE

“It was like having duplicate keys to Fort Knox,” said one of the syndicate in a book written their profitable venture, How to Beat the Bandits. “For one thing it was legal; no risk of being jailed. The worst that could happen was that we would have been asked to leave.”

Like Fort Knox, the syndicate wrote, “there was seemingly no end to the money involved. And it was easier to get at.”

The syndicate’s exploits made headlines all over the world.

“All we had to do was to walk into club, work the bandits over, and walk out with the money. Left alone we could have eventually busted every club in Australia,” the syndicate member wrote.

In a remarkable series of demonstrations, the syndicate showed how a poker machine could be drained in minutes.

FRANK MORRIS COMMENT: The diagrams show three of the six essential moves in the syndicate’s “amazing but simple” system that “broke the bank” in casinos around the world

Below: A 1960s poker machine. These and others like them were in clubs and casinos around the world.


THE QUEEN: Meeting the 11 Presidents of the United States!

The Queen, accompanied by Prince Phillip, met up with President Kennedy and the First Lady, Jackie, at a special function at Buckingham Palace in 1961.                                         

SOURCES: Adapted from Dog Horoscopes by Liz Tresillan, SEP, Spring 1975; Rooftop Gardens by Frank Morris; Cracking the club/casino case by Frank Morris; The Queen, Google.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 05 April 19

BONUS: Australian Chronicle, 1908. The Big Fight … it was the stoush of the century!

JACK JOHNSON STANDS AND WAITS FOR TOMMY BURNS TO LEAD THE ATTACK IN THE TITLE FIGHT AT SYDNEY STADIUM IN 1908. POLICE STOPPED THE FIGHT IN THE 14TH ROUND.  

THIS TITLE FIGHT PUTS SYDNEY STADIUM ON A SCALE NEVER PREVIOUSLY ATTEMPTED. THE WORLD HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP BETWEEN JACK JOHNSON, AMERICA’S PREMIER COLOURED FIGHTER AND TOMMY BURNS, IN THE STRUGGLE FOR WHITE SUPREMACY. THE FIGHT WAS ALSO THE CLASH OF THE TITANS.

FRANK MORRIS

Before the stadium became one of the world’s largest outdoor boxing arenas, it was the site of a Chinese vegetable garden at Rushcutters Bay.

Hugh McIntosh surprised everyone when he proposed to promote the world championship fight on a scale never before attempted. On Boxing Day, 1908, more than 60,000 spectators converged on the Sydney Stadium.

Reports of the day claim “there were 20,000 men at ringside and twice twenty thousand lingered outside the stadium.

STOPPED BY POLICE

“A record crowd paid 26 thousand pounds to see the fight in such a venue” reported the Australasian Star, one the papers American author, Jack London, was hired by to cover the fight.

Burns was badly outpointed and horrifically mismatched by Johnson and the police stopped the fight in the 14th round.

“It was not case of too much Johnson, but all of Johnson. Burns never had a show,” reported the newspaper.
Burns was hopelessly outclassed.

“I never had any doubt. I knew I was too good for him,” said Johnson to the newspaper.

Below:  Police charged into the ring and stopped the fight in the 14th round.


BONUS: The clash of the titans boxed as they fought for racial supremacy!

THE PUGILISTS WERE READY FOR THE FIGHT OF THEIR LIVES.

FRANK MORRIS

“How many people in Australia realise that within a very short time an event is to occur on this southern continent that will make history”, penned the correspondent for Australasian Star, “history that will be very interesting, vitally interesting to the Caucasian race – the now dominant people of the world.”

On Boxing Day two men, heavyweights Tommy Burns and Jack Johnson, over 25 rounds, will face each other at the Stadium at Rushcutters Bay, and get ready for the fight of their life!

The correspondent continued: “One of these men is the perfect specimen of the negro race, as physically-attuned as he could be – intelligent, alert, and game.

“He was born and reared in the United States, as many of his ancestors were, yet in him has been preserved the pure racial blood.

GREAT BATTLE

“The other is a most remarkable man in many ways. Acute and superior mentally, and a physical phenomenon; he has indomitable will and a fierce courage – the conqueror of conquerors in ‘fustian’.

“This battle may in the future be looked back upon as the first great battle of an inevitable race war.

“There will be several ranks of dark-hued mortals that will be gazing across the seas toward the land of the Southern Cross on Boxing Day, anxiously awaiting the result.

“A great racial problem may be solved. There is more in this fight to be considered than the mere title of a pugilistic champion of the world.”

[This was a not ‘title’ fight; it never was sanctioned by the North American boxing council. Australasia Star, December 27, l908.]


BONUS: What they said about the “big fight” will amaze you?

JOHNSON: WHEN THE FIGHT WAS FINISHED, I FELT LIKE GOING AGAIN!

FRANK MORRIS

Round 1 – Johnson reached Burns’ head with a flurry of punches

When the gong had sounded the men were at it in a second. Johnson coming up to his man, saying, “All right Tommy.” Johnson suddenly lunged forward and reached his opponent’s body, but the blow was only light … Both men brought their hands to the body; and Johnson reaching Burns for a sharp uppercut; Burns toppled over. The champion was down for eight seconds … he signalled that everything was all right … Though there was a flurry of punches from both fighters … The men were locked together … Burns was finding the body with the left hook, while Johnson brought his right hand down to Burns’ kidneys … Johnson brought a beautifully timed right to the head, staggering Burns temporarily. Up to this time, Johnson was getting decidedly the better of the fight … Johnson worked his man over to the side of the ring and charged with a right lead to the head; but Burns had no difficulty in getting under … Burns was boxing superbly … just as the gong sounded, Johnson reached Burns’ head with a stinging rush (of punches).

Round 5 – Burns went down … but was up again!

At the end of round four, Johnson let a straight left go which Burns dodged. Johnson walked up quietly and he said: “Come right for a couple of seconds” then let loose with his right, reaching Burns under the chin. The champion’s ankle gave away and Burns went down; but he was immediately up again. Johnson placed right and left punches repeatedly to Burns’ head … and his left eye started to swell. Johnson was having the best of the round. Burns was receiving heavy punishment by Johnson but Burns was dancing around. Johnson, however, was surveying him coolly … After several seconds Burns remarked to Johnson: “Are you going to fight, you cur?” Johnson suddenly moved forward and swung a terrific left jab, which found its way to Burns’ stomach … The champion still kept to his work but he was doing very little scoring. His mouth was bleeding … Johnson brought his right jab up, catching Burns under the chin. The gong sounded.

Round 7 – Johnson swung his right across Burns’ head; the eye drew blood

At the end of round six, Johnson bustled Burns into his corner … a terrific left jab just missed
the champion’s chin. The gong sounded. After a few seconds the fighters circled each other; Burns commenced the attack … but Johnson cut around and got both hands severely on his ribs and body … and let in some unmerciful blows … slinging his right across Burns’ head. Burns’ right eye drew blood … Johnson was scoring freely with both hands. It seems at this point Burns was tiring. Then, Johnson turned to the crowd and said: “I thought Tommy was an in-fighter.” … But only a few seconds remained … Johnson took matters very quietly when the opportunity presented itself. The coloured man swung his left on to Burns’ ribs, dropping him. Burns remained down for a few seconds … when the gong sounded.

Round 14 – Burns buckled and fell to the canvas

At the end of round 13, Burns was attacking his opponent’s head. Johnson used both left and right on the face and drew blood from Burns’ eye. In the opening of the 14th round, the last of the fight, the left side of Burns’ face was badly swollen. They sparred and clinched for a few seconds. In the breakaway Johnson sent his right viciously to the jaw. Burns saw it coming, and was quickly out of reach … They stood out again and Johnson looped his left to Burns’ body … and a good right to the ribs. Johnson, who had a big advantage in reach, swung his right and got Burns square on the jaw. The champion buckled and fell to the canvas, where he remained for eight seconds. When he rose … Johnson swung his left which caught Burns on the forehead. Mr McIntosh, the referee, declared Johnson the winner.


BONUS:  Johnson v. Burns … What they said after the BIG fight!

JOHNSON TAKES THE ADVANTAGE.

JUST ABOUT EVERYONE HAD AN OPINION ON THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE BIG FIGHT. EVEN JACK LONDON CAME AWAY WITH THE BIGGEST PRIZE OF ALL!

FRANK MORRIS

Jack Johnson at ringside. “I never had any doubt; I knew I was too good for him. Why, I had forgotten more than he ever learned. You must admit that I punished him severely, and he had to take the punishment. From the start of the fight I was dead sure I would win. It was a good crowd and a fair crowd.

Tommy Burns, before leaving the ring: I did my best. I fought hard but Johnson was too big. His reach was too much for me … I fought as hard as a man could … that’s all I have to say.”

Mr H.D. McIntosh, the referee: “It was a great fight, and I think the best man won.”

Mrs Jack London, wife of the celebrated American novelist, and only woman to witness the fight: “It seems a pity … that it should end as it did, but I think Burns is the grittiest fighter it is possible to be. I was much surprised at Johnson’s fighting. He is a much better fighter than I thought he was; it was too bad to see Burns cut up the way he was.”

Larry Foley, one of 20,000-odd at ringside. “The fight, in my opinion, was not a great scientific display; but was a splendid physical effort -- Johnson’s weight, strength and in-fighting gained him the day. I have not seen any better fights.”

Not that London missed anything between Johnson and Burns as they skirted each other around the ring. Those left hooks, particularly those from Johnson, would have knuckled me for sure.

Not surprisingly, the Burns-Johnson stoush inspired London to pen a short story, a Piece of Steak.

Set in Sydney, its protagonist is an ageing fighter, Tom King, once champion, who at forty, is at the end of his days.

When the book was released, London wrote to the president of the Macmillan Company, George F. Brett, saying that the collection of stories “is the best l have ever written, I believe that the title-story is one of the three best short stories I have written.”


VIETNAM: Part 1.The major battles that involved Australia

FLY IN, FLY OUT.

PROBABLY, THE BEST KNOWN ‘PUBLICISED’ OF THESE WAS THE BATTLE OF LONG TAN. IT WAS NOT THE ONLY MAJOR BATTLE OF THE WAR, NOR EVEN THE LARGEST. BUT IT WAS A VIET CONG HOTSPOT.
BOB FRESHFIELD      

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Australia’s involvement each year seemed to bring with it at least one or two major confrontations that would become known to Australians as ‘battles’.

While the battle details that follow are brief … readers are encouraged to seek further, more descriptive material available throughout the internet and unit histories.

Probably, the best known and publicised of these was The Battle of Long Tan. It was not the only major battle of the war, nor even the largest.

In May 1966, we saw elements of 1RAR and 5RAR deployed with the Americans 173rd Airborne Company, to secure and set up a Task Force Base at Nui Dat near to the centre of the province and alongside a key road route (2), that ran from Vung Tau, via Ba Ria, in the south, north into Long Khan Province.

OCCUPY PERIMETER

By early June the task force base, 1ATF, was complete with Artillery emplacements, Armoured Corps, with their tanks and APCs’, SAS Squadron manning the highest point, at what would become known simply as SAS Hill; and sundry units like Signals Corps and Task Force Headquarters (HQ).

The 5 RAR arrived in during May 1966, and 1 RAR completed its first ‘tour of duty’ in June 1966, to be replaced by 6 RAR.

The 5th and 6th Battalions of the Regiment, each with four rifle companies and support, administration company, as well as their own HQ, took up positions occupying perimeter areas along the base’s extended boundaries.

The exclusion zones were cleared for added security in approaches to the base. This required the relocation of some villages, including Long Tan, a known Viet Cong hotspot.

MORTAR BOMBARMENT

Meanwhile, in response to the threat posed by 1ATF, a force of between 1500 and 2500 men from the Viet Cong 275th Regiment, possibly reinforced by at least one North Vietnamese battalion, was ordered to move against Nui Dat.

On the nights of the August 16 and 17, Viet Cong mortars and recoilless rifles (RCLs) bombarded Nui Dat from a position 2 kilometres (1.2 mi.) to its east, damaging the base and wounding 24 people.

The Viet Cong positions were then engaged by counter-battery fire and the mortaring ceased.

NEXT MAY: Vietnam – the battle of Long Tan: Heavy fighting ensued as the attacking battalions Viet Cong attempted to encircle and destroy the Aussies.

Below: The chopper noise was like machine gun rattle – there was death around, said a soldier. Below: The newspaper headline: LBJ to Menzies – “Thank you.”


THE QUEEN: Meeting the 11 Presidents of America!

The Queen catches up with Ike Eisenhower, when he became president of the United States.

SOURCES: The Big Fight by Frank Morris extracted from various publications … Vietnam series adapted from Bob Freshfield, Vietnam Veterans Magazine, March 2017 … Presidents Eisenhower from Google.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 29 March 19

SHORT STORY: BRUNO & ALICE -- Alice wants a kennel for the puppy Bruno bought!

BRUNO SAID HE ALWAYS USES THE WORD ‘YOUNG’ WHEN SOMEBODY ASKS HIM HOW OLD HE IS.

ALICE REMEMBERS HE IS ALWAYS THE CORNERSTONE OF HER EXISTENCE.

FRANK MORRIS

Bruno was in deep throught.

Here I am, dead-set seventy years young. I never ‘age’. I remember when my old dad once broke into a conversation with me and a buddy.

He grumbled and replied: “Don’t use ‘age’ use ‘young’ when you’re telling someone your age?” Poor old dad. He’s been gone a fair while now.

I’ve the woman I really love since my first wife died about 20 years ago. I’ve got everything.

Since I got in toe with Alice, I know what your thinking. That I  was on top of the situation. There’s an old saying: I was ‘running to get behind’. Well, now to think about that I really was. Running. Anyway, that’s what it felt like!
It’s a habit of …

“Bruno, teas on and the pot is boiling …”

“I’m under the oak tree …”

… just the way you like it,” called Alice.

Minutes later, out bustles Alice, with not only the boiling tea, but several layers of the rainbow cake. Alice was talking to the Dalmatian puppy running beside her. It was farther than you think. “Nearly there, nearly there,” laughed Alice. “How big will the puppy grow?.”

No answer.

SHE HADN’T CHANGED

Bruno fell into his thoughts again. I’ve got a woman I fell in love with as soon as I met her. I was on my way to the local art gallery to see the etching expo and sat reading my newspaper in peace. Suddenly, I looked up and there was a woman sitting on the same bench. Reading. And do you know what …

“Here we are,” announced Alice. “You have to build a fence to keep puppy in, Bruno. He almost tripped me up.

Incidentally, when are you going to name the poor thing? He’s sitting around expecting some cake.”

Bruno never said a word. But he watched her. She hadn’t changed, you know. She was five years older. Alice had turned sixty-five years a few months ago. She’s young for that age. I pay homage to her. I truly do.

Meantime, Bruno was drinking that tea as fast as he could. Everything was ok.

Bruno said: “This is a good damn cuppa. And it is always piping hot, too. I’m thinking that puppy needs a castle. I’m going to build a castle …”

Alice chipped in. “What sort of castle. Not a large one I hope. Nothing too extravagant …” She was also the money handler.

Bruno held his both his fists high. “I going to design it and I’ll get Bob the carpener to build it. He built their home. All that will cost 200 to 300 buckaroos. Eh, not bad wouldn’t you say!

THE PUPPY

“As I was saying, nothing too extravagant,” Alice demanded. “I could buy a kennel for half of that amount. Not a castle like you have in mind. Just a simple kennel where you can lock him in day or night.”

Bruno looked defeated. “Ok. Ok. I’ll buy the kennel. Remember this Alice, he will be rounded up like a pack of greyhounds,” he’d said jokingly.

Alice began to become cross.

“Alright, alright. I do it.”

Alice was halfway to the French doors, pleading with the puppy “to get off my dress”. Bruno laughed out loud.
Bruno could understand why few cross words ever passed between them over time. She gave the impression that she was always glad to hear my voice.

I make sure that the well-flowered garden looked spotless every-day. Right through the month I never missed a day. Nor did she.

At the end of the month, I was thinking a whole lot more about Alice. I figured that I would ask her out … for a date.
Bruno awoke from his thoughts.

I could have married Alice after I spotted her, he finally told himself.

Alice was packing the dishwasher. Puppy was in the house chasing a toy mouse round the table. And me? I went up to Bob’s place to quiz him about building a castle for the puppy.

And those four bottles of beer didn’t go astray, either.

“Bruno. Bruno. What a flash name that is!” But what about Alice? Alice. Alice. “I tell her the Bob’s come up with the name. We name him Bronco,” said Bruno who was happy with the name.”

I wonder whether Alice will like it or hate it?

Below: Bruno and Bob go for a walk in the bush to disscuss the castle for ‘puppy’ Below: ‘Puppy’.

COMING: Meanwhile, more interesting things were about to happen!


FLINDERS: Final. What I now and must ever feel, says Ann

THE GRAVE OF MATTHEW FLINDERS WAS UNEARTHED NEAR A LONDON RAILWAY STATION.

MATTHEW FLINDERS AND HIS BODY WAS BURIED AT A GRAVE SITE AT ST JAMES CHURCH, HAMPSTEAD ROAD, LONDON. THE GRAVE-SITE AND ITS CONTENTS DISAPPEARED IN 1852, THE WHEREABOUTS OF HIS BODY FOREVERMORE UNKNOWN. BUT THE BODY WAS FOUND IN 2018. A TEAM OF ARCHEOLOGISTS, WHICH HAD BEEN ASSIGNED THE TASK, MADE THE DISCOVERY. 

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

The leather-bound copy of the completed book arrived from the publishers …as Matthew was dying. Ann laid the volumes in his bony grasp. He did not regain consciousness, but she believed he knew his life’s work to be complete.

Perhaps the words she was to write in her memoir of him dwelt somewhere in her mind:

“Indeed, so strong was his inclination for this dangerous service that amongst his friends, he has been frequently heard to declare his belief that if the plan of a Discovery Expedition were to be read over his grave, he would rise up awarked from the dead.”

On the morning of 19 July, Isabella was woken by the sound of Ann crying:

ROOM OF DEATH

“She was going to the sick room,” said Isabella.I begged her to let me go first. The sun shone brightly on me as I went down stairs, all seemed still. I entered the drawing room, his bedroom room opened  into it, the door was open, I went in.

“There laid the corpse, the spirit flown, his countenance placid … Dear Matthew! I stood at the foot  of the bed contemplating the scene for a few moments, then rushed up stairs to my sister. She was soon in the room of death & pressed his cold lips to hers It was a heartbreaking effort …

“Her dear babe … the poor child felt that something very dreadful had happened, but did not know what, & putting her little fingers to wipe the tears from her Mother’s eyes, she said, “Don’t cry Mamma’.”

Matthew Flinders died, aged forty years and four months and three days. He was buried in the graveyard of St James Chapel, in Hampstead Road.

TOMBSTONES MISSING

His daughter, on visiting the grave many years later, found the site greatly altered, the tombstones removed, as had been the graves and their contents. His whereabouts was forevermore unknown.

After Matthew’s death, Ann wrote to his closest friend, Thomas Pitot, who had befriend him on Ile de France or Mauritius, as it’s known today.

He was someone with whom she continued to correspond; and who continued to act as an adviser to her in matters of business for many years.

Frank Morris comment: Flinders left the family over 3498 pounds; his publishing venture with A Voyage to Terra Australis has been widely acclaimed. He wife, Ann, died at 79 years, according to family records. Her grandson, William Matthew Flinders Petrie, noted “her early life was happy, her married life very sad … she suffered much”. She was buried at St Thomas Rectory in London. Her death inscribed in a tablet in the south wall of the churchyard, shows her passing nine months earlier than family records indicate.

Below: Flinders’ Terra Australis. Below: Ann looked down on her gallant husband and there were tears in her eyes.


MIND SET: Are you worried about your memory?

TRYING AT 50 AND 60 TO OBVIATE MEMORY LOSS.

Have you became concerned about increasing lapses in memory? Changes in memory can cause stress, depression, medication and pain. Sometimes, it could be a sign of early dementia. Consult your doctor. Either your doctor or a specialist can property diagnose whether it is yes or no regarding dementia.

FRANK MORRIS

“Every week,” Australian Alzheimers said in a radio commercial, “1500 Australians are diagnosed with dementia.”
Think about your neighbours, your relatives, your friends or your own family who might be in the grip of dementia. I lost a neighbour through dementia, I heard him complain several times about his car keys. “Why can’t I drive,” he would ask.

There has been no known cure for Alzheimer’s disease. There’s a new drug being trialled to treat the disease and give hope to  people living with dementia.

One of these trials involves Anavex 2-73. “The theory behind this drug is that it targets a receptor that, when activated, leads to the removal of the abnormal proteins from  brain cells,” said Associate Professor Macfarlane, Head of Clinical Services at the Dememtia Centre, Malvern.

Malvern centre is “leading this important global study of 450 patients from across Australia and the United States.”

STAGES, PROGRESS

Anyone who is concerned about the disease in their family should find out about early diagnosis, the risk factors and the different stages as well as the progression of the disease.

Facing, dealing and treating – these are the factors in coping with the malady.

“Learning as much about Dememtia or Alzhemer’s as possible could mean the difference between fearing the future and facing it if and when it strikes in the family,” says a leading gerontologist.

When a member of the family starts to become ‘very’ forgetful, or turns on the gas and forgets it, then these are possibly the early warning signs of dementia.

Below: Memory loss and it’s effect on the brain.


The Queen: Getting together with the twelve Presidents

First president the Queen met soon after she was crowned Queen Elizabeth 11, was President Harry S. Truman, 1945 to 1953.

SOURCES: Short Story -- Bruno and Alice; Frank Morris … Flinders – Letters to Ann: The love story of Matthew Flinders and Ann Chappelle, published by Angus & Roberston … Are you worried about your memory; Frank Morris … The Queen of England with President Harry Truman, Google.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 22 March 19

PEARL S. BUCK, AUTHOR: China as I see it … conscious memories

PEARL LIVED HER ENTIRE CHILDHOOD IN CHINA. HERE, WITH CHARACTERISTIC AFFECTION, SHE HOLDS HER SISTER GRACE. Below: PEARL IN 1938, AT THE SAME TIME SHE WON THE NOBEL PRIZE FOR LITERATURE.

HER NAME WAS PEARL SYDNEYSTRICKER. SHE WENT TO CHINA ONLY A FEW MONTHS AFTER HER BIRTH IN AMERICA IN 1895, WHERE HER FATHER AND MOTHER WERE OCCUPIED IN THEIR EXTRAORINARY MISSION WORK. PEARL’S LIFE IN CHINA WAS BIZARRE. SHE WAS TUTORED SIMULTANEOUSLY AS A CHINESE CHILD AND AS AN AMERICAN CHILD. SHE RETURNED TO AMERICA IN 1935. SHE SPENT FORTY YEARS IN CHINA AND 40 YEARS IN AMERICA. PEARL S. BUCK WAS BORN IN 1892 AND DIED IN 1973.

Adapted by Frank Morris

“China is more than a part of me. She is in my heart and soul and mind.

“My first conscious memories are of her people and her landscapes. They formed my childhood world, they shaped my adolescent years, and they brought me to my maturity.

“Chinese in education and feeling, I knew I was American on the day I very nearly lost my life at the hand of a Communist army. They invaded the city where I lived.

“I have never returned to China since, and it may be that I never shall.

WE MUST BE READY

“But through the years of exile from China I have continued to learn everything I could about the strange new life that is going on there. From time to time, I have written of China and her people, hoping to help my American people to understand the Chinese better; as somehow we must.

“These paper have been gathered together in a book. The book is timely. For soon we shall see changes in Chinese attitudes toward the outer world, or so I believe. And we must be ready.

“Even old tigers like Mao Tse-Tung and Chiang Kai-shek cannot live forever. There is always a tomorrow.


PEARL S. BUCK, AUTHOR:  America … the most important time in history!

THIS REGAL LADY, PEARL S. BUCK. AUTHOR OF MORE THAN EIGHTY BOOKS. “NOTHING HAS BLURRED THE EDGES.” Below: MISS BUCK ENJOYS MUSING OVER ANTIQUES.

I CRISS-CROSS AMERICA EIGHT TIMES. THE VARIETY IS BEWILDERING.

“Though I came as a stranger to my country, having lived in China since my birth; nevertheless, I was actually born in the United States. I like the combination.

“To be born in a country provides a natural anchor there. I am permanently American. To return as a stranger, however, also has its advantages.

“I see my country with the sharply observing eye of a stranger. Everything is new to me. There are no memories to blur the edges. I see my country (as a) whole.

“Eight times I have crossed the United States from East to West. Uncounted times, I have travelled from North to South. I have visited each State with the exception of Alaska at least once; and some I have visited many times.

WE HAVE EVERYTHING

“I came back from these journeys to our many states, awed and overwhelmed by the natural beauty of our country. The variety is bewildering.

“The highest mountains, the deepest canyons, the wildest rivers, the greatest lakes, the widest deserts, the richest farmlands, the beautiful seacoasts, the vast resources in mining, forests and industry.

“We have everything.”

<< These are notes from the books China As I See It and Pearl S. Buck’s America.  The Saturday Evening Post, 1972.

COMING IN AUGUST: More notes from Pearl S. Buck, winner of the Noble Prize for Literature.


FRANK MORRIS COMING ATTRACTION …
TODAY: Dogs and the things that has made them like they are. Dog horoscopes. You’ll read about all the antics your Piscean gets up too -- and you didn’t know about it … COMING: WHAT DOES A FORMER FEDERAL MP AND AUTHOR DO WITH THEMSELVE. He writes a spectacular book about the glory days of steam, an epic new railway book. The author’s name is Tim Fischer and the book, Steam Australia – Locomotives that galvanised the Nation. NEXT WEEK: Worried about your memory?


FLINDERS: part 2. The beginning of the end for a person who defined Australia

“WHAT I NOW AND MUST EVER FEEL”, SAID MRS FLINDERS. DETAILS FROM A PAINTING SHOWING ANN IN HER LATER YEARS. Below: A BROZE STATUE OF FLINDERS AND HIS FAITHFUL CAT, TRIM, WITH TERRA AUSTRALIS – AUSTRALIA – BEHIND HIM.

MATTHEW FLINDERS WAS NEARING THE END OF HIS LIFE. HIS FLESH AND STRENGTH WERE WASTING AWAY.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

In February 1814 the Flinders again moved house, this time to 14 London Street, close to the Transport Office. The day before their move, however, Mr Hayes the surgeon was called to Matthew to attend to his “gravelly complaint.”
It was said to be either a stone or gravel in the bladder … which had been troubling him for months, becoming increasingly painful.

The doctor now called every two days to attend to Matthew. It was the beginning of the end.

Matthew was in considerable pain and could attend to his proof sheets for only a short period. The surgeon passed a bougie, a slender, flexible instrument into the bladder, but found nothing much of consequence.

Samuel, his brother, ran errands to the bank and to the engraver, while Matthew became increasingly afraid to move about. When he did walk, he was forced to move in what was described as a ‘snail-like’ manner.

He was prescribed calcined magnesia for some time until the crystals which he passed were analysed and were thought to have been exacerbated by the magnesia. He was then given distilled water. Matthew took the citric juice and tea which relieved him more than the medicines.

Then he was prescribed muriatic (hydrochloric) acid, gum arabic and barley water; and, finally, castor oil and seltzer water.

THE AWFUL ORDEAL

He became daily worst. His need to ‘make water’ increased from eleven to twenty, to thirty-six, fifty-two times in twenty-four hours. This, alone, kept him exhausted from lack of sleep, his flesh and his strength were wasting away.

Sitting down was painful for him; and a hollowed cushion was fashioned to allow him to sit for half an hour at a time; after which, he was obliged to lie down on the sofa.

In his diary of 26 March, Matthew described his ordeal in all its awful detail:
… Had more pain today, and the urine more red than lately.

On 1 April, the outlook was no more positive: … it is certain the irritation at … my bladder has increased lately, and that generally I am worse.

On Sunday, 10 July 1814, Matthew wrote: “Did not rise before two, being I think weaker than before …”

They were the last words recorded in his diary.

NEXT WEEK:  Ann was crying. “I begged my daughter to let me go in first,” said her mother. “The sun was shone brightly. I went in and there he lay … the spirit flown, his countenance....Dear Mathew!"

<< The Letters to Ann; the love story of Matthew Flinders and Ann Chappelle. Angus & Robertson, Australia.


FOR DOGS: Pisceans will show you how to react!

IT’S TIME FOR MY BATH!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

They will unpredictable from one minute to the next. Their lives will be an ebb and flow of moodiness, changeability and contrariness.

Take a Piscean out for walk and they will inevitably want to set off in the opposite direction … but by the time you have decided to go along the dog will have will had a touch of contrariness and go your way after all. The dog will get hungry, and by the time you offer food you will find the animal okay.

The Pisceans will be all over you one minute and you will be in the dog-house the next. They will be equally contrary with your friends, treating one person like a long lost brother on one visit; and a dog-thief the next time they call.

Pisces is ruled by Neptune and all Pisceans will have a close affinity to water and all that is wet – whether it be sea, river or bath. Ideally, this dog would like to be on a houseboat were the animal could enjoy the quiet and lapping water.

SHALLOWEST PUDDLE

Abandoned on dry land, and made to live in an ordinary house, the Piscean will do as much as he can to remedy the situation by making the most of any wet that happens to be to paw.

With his theme-song water, water everywhere, the Piscean would be able to find an oasis in the desert; the dog will revel in the shallowest puddle. The Piscean will roll and splash in pure ecstasy at the feel of water on their skin.

A walk in country will be essential. Knowing that you like water as much as towser does -- leaping out to shake themselves spraying you with unselfish abandon.

A MOOD CHANGER

Rain, of course, will cause this dog as much excitement as lollies to a small child. The dog will be driven to ecstasies of enjoyment … and frolic in the garden trying to catch each drop in its mouth.

But the one aspect all of this that can be a blessing in a dog: you will never have any trouble when time comes to its bath.

Pisceans have been known to sit or stand in an empty bath – waiting.

The primitive Piscean will be the eternal coming and going, running and jumping dog. The dog will drift through life with no other purpose than to change its mind and mood more times than any one dog has done before.

Any form of emotional outlet will be leapt at and played to the full. The dog will have no sense of ownership for other people’s belonging, being a firm believer that finders is keepers.

<< Dog Horoscopes by Liz Tresillan in the Saturday Evening Post, Spring 1972.


MATE: There’s a war going on here!

“So ‘ere’s to the cove ‘oo is nursin’ ‘is ‘urts.

The first and only edition of The Moods of Ginger Mick by C.J. Dennis, published in 1916. C.J. Dennis could not directly criticise the idea of Australians fighting on foreign soil – but there is an undercurrent of doubt.

 

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 15 March 19

FLINDERS: Part 1. The beginning of the end for a person who defined Australia

IMPRESSIVE: MATTHEW FLINDERS’ PERSONALITY … THE PRESSURES HE FACED IN ADVANCING HIS CAREER WHILE STRUGGLING TO MAINTAIN HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH ANN CHARPELLE.

THIS IS MATTHEW FLINDERS BY HIS WIFE ANN CHAPPELLE. IT REVEALS THE PERSONALITY OF FLINDERS AND THE PRESSURE HE FACES ADVANCING HIS CAREER WHILE STRUGGLING TO MAINTAIN HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH ANN. IT WAS A LOVE STORY. TO PUT YOU IN THE PICTURE, WE’VE PUBLISHED THIS SHORT PREFACE WHICH IMPARTS FACTS ABOUT FLINDERS YOU MAY OR MAY NOT HAVE KNOWN.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS    

In 1814, a delicately pale Englishwoman of uncertain health but most certain convictions, sat at her desk and wrote a letter of protest to history about her husband Matthew Flinders.

She wrote, “The disaster of his life has followed him even into death.”

Her presence on his ship had once caused stern rebuke from his patron, Sir Joseph Banks. Flinders had survived shipwreck on two occasions before being imprisoned by the French, causing a separation of nine and a half years from his wife after just three months’ marriage.

Now, on his death, the Lords of the Admiralty had left his widow pensionless.

“He died if ever Man did, a martyr to his zeal for his country’s service,” Ann Flinders Chappelle wrote sadly of her husband.

His life and his disasters, his martyrdom were also her own. A woman in nineteen-century England had few ways to right an injustice. Ann did what little she could. She set down an account of Matthew Flinders’ exploits for future generations – for her child and future grandchild.

During Matthew’s lifetime Sir Joseph Banks, also an important figure in Australian history, saw in Flinders a man of determination and single-minded ambition; a man who would not disappoint his patron.

CONVERSE INTELLIGENTLY

The Lords of the Admiralty, however, saw in him only a brave and somewhat foolhardy adventurer. Flinders’ journals … show him to be a man who loved enduringly and passionately.

Yet Ann wrote of him, “no difficulty could stop his career, no danger dismay him: hunger, thirst, labour, rest. Sickness, shipwreck, imprisonment; Death itself, were equally to him matters of indifference if they interfered with his darling Discovery.”

Flinders was also a man before his time.

Ann was fortunate to have been born into the latter half of the eighteenth century. No longer was she to be a just a decorative accessory to her husband or an efficient housekeeper. Among gentlefolk, a woman was now expected to be able converse intelligently and become a true companion.

The education of young women was therefore look upon quite favourably.

<< Preface to Letters to Ann. The love story of Matthew Flinders and Ann Chapplelle. Shirley Sinclair and Catharine Retter. Angus & Robertson, 1999.

NEXT WEEK: Part 2 Matthew Flinders -- The beginning of the end.


Flinders first circumnavigation of Australia was in his ship Investigator in the years 1801 to 1803.”I call the whole island Australia or Terra Australis,” he wrote. But he was forced to reverse the title of the map for commercial reasons. This was the first time the continent and Tasmania has been named Australia.—FM.


FRANK MORRIS COMING ATTRACTION

NEXT WEEK, WRITER OF RENOWN, PEARL S. BUCK, TALKS ABOUT HER LIFE IN CHINA AND, LATER ON, AMERICA. ACCORDING TO HER, THE GOOD EARTH OF VERMONT MADE HER A WOMAN OF LETTERS, A REGAL LADY, AT 80 YEARS OF AGE, SHE WENT ON TO WIN THE NOBLE PRIZE FOR LITERATURE IN 1938. PEARL S. BUCK WAS ONE OF THE MOST TRANSLATED AUTHORS OF ALL TIME … COMING: FOR 15 YEARS, AUSTRALIA WAS A NEWSPAPERLESS SOCIETY. THE PRESS WITH BATTERED TYPE HAD LAIN DORMANT. CONVICT GEORGE HUGHES, THE FIRST PRINTER OF THE NEW COLONY, STEPS INTO THE BREACH.


SOCIAL JUSTICE: Back to work! This is what women want!

SPARE A THOUGHT: THINK OF THOSE WOMEN WITH LIMITED RETIREMENT SAVINGS? Below: GRAPH SHOWS OLDER WOMEN GOING TO WORK.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

The graph above shows that women from aged 60 to 75 are trying to bridge the shortfall in their superannuation as they approach retirement. “Last year, the super balances for women aged 55 to 64 were on average 37 per cent lower than those for men,” a morning newspaper reported.

“The proportion of working women aged 65 to 74 has almost doubled in a decade,” the newspaper said.

RETIREMENT INCOME

Think of women with limited retirement savings? Nonetheless, they are at a perilous disadvantage. Many have spent long periods outside the labour force when raising and caring for family members. They are more likely to have employment that offers little chance for promotion; and is low-paid, casual or part-time.

These factors combine to have a serious impact on retirement income.

Before the introduction of compulsory superannuation, women’s retirement savings were very low. Even now, the typical balance for women is around half that for men.

Women can face real difficulty if they have experienced family poverty or marriage breakdown.


SOCIAL JUSTICE: Back to work – men workers shouldn’t stop looking

LISTEN WISELY: YOUNG PEOPLE SHOULD BE ALL EARS TO THEIR FATHER OR NEXT OF KIN. THEY WILL HEAR SOME AMAZING THINGS!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Unemployed older workers, who are part of a traditional industrial section, have been pummelled hard by global competition and restructuring. They continue to be the most vulnerable to radical changes, particularly when the economy and technological changes are in progress.

It is predicted that over the next 15 years, 40 per cent of Australian jobs are likely to be computerised or automated. Routine manual and service jobs are at high risk.

WITHOUT WORK

This is, cards on the table, where older people often experience long-term unemployment; in the job market 60-64-years-olds remain without work … for over two years.

Many draw down on retirement savings; or spend the years before retirement on the Newstart  Allowance or Disability Support Pension. Increased investment in training and employer incentives for people over 50 is particularly important.

<< Social Justice, 2016-2017.


Inside Newspapers: The Labor Daily, 1936 -- Footlights and Films’ great line-up of shows!

AS TIME GOES ON: MODERN TIMES, IN 1936, STARRING CHARLES CHAPLIN AND PAULETTE GODDARD. Below: SWORDMAN PERSONIFIED, CAPTAIN BLOOD.

EASTER IS ALMOST WITH US, WROTE FILM REVIEWER, IAN SMITH, IT USHERS IN A PERIOD OF ENTERTAINMENT OF SUCH OUTSTANDING VARIETY AND QUANTITY THAT IT’S PROBABLY UNRIVALLED.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION

It is easy to recollect many previous occasions on which various theatres had claimed the presentation of their “most colossal, stupendous production ever.” I think this Easter’s attractions leave little to be desired – personally.
It is the most enticing line-up put forward by the cinemas for some time.

Magnificent Obsession, at the Regent, has been put on as a special Easter Treat, and it stars Irene Dunne, Robert Taylor, Charles Butterworth and Betty Furness. It is interesting to record that it’s handled by director Carl Laemmle Snr, under whose supervision have been made some of the outstanding motion pictures of all time.

Laemmle regards Magnificent Obsession as the pinnacle of all his achievements. Great praise indeed from the director who gave you Seed, Back Street and All Quiet on the Western Front, and many others. They were all equally outstanding successes!

CAPTAIN BLOOD

From the adventure-dipped pen of Rafael Sabatini comes Captain Blood now showing at the State. And what an offering it is too!

Errol Flynn, who will be remembered for his role in the Australian-made Charles Chauvel production of In the Wake of the Bounty. Flynn plays the central role. It is a distinct credit to this young actor that his performance has earned world-wide attention and praise.

There seems little need to stress the entertainment value of this story. The name Sabatini stands for the best there is in adventure and romance. And in Captain Blood, the producers have one of his best works.

With Flynn, the producers have assembled an unusually talented cast. There’s Olivia de Havilland, Guy Kibbee, Ross Alexander, Lionel Atwill and Basil Rathbone. Incidentally, the sword-fight scene will go down in screen history as one of the most stirring occasions … for the last 25 years.

MODERN TIMES

Perhaps the most momentous production at the Plaza this Easter is Modern Times, Charles Chaplin’s new picture. With him is Paulette Goddard, who engagement to the comedian was head-lines in the newspapers recently.

If the gigantic success attending this picture in London and New York is any criterion, then the Plaza should have the biggest attraction of all times.

<< The Labor Daily, 1936, and feature Footlights and Films.


Father & Daughter: How to fish?  A father and daughter give it a try out!

LOOK: A DAUGHTER ASKS HER FATHER EVERYTHING ABOUT FISHING!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

A father is teaching his daughter to fish. They are standing up to their shins in a big Estuary and the expanse of water in front of them is glassed out, taking up more than its fair share of the horizon.

Floating on the surface nearby is a polystyrene box filled with salt-water and live bait fish. The sky is the strange colour that distant bushfires and sometimes give to summer haze. But the most striking thing about the scene is how still the pair are.

The entire view seems to be holding its breath; a Mexican stand-off between the lake, the sky, the family and a handful of birds perched on a couple of semi-submerged posts.

The spell is broken from beneath when a mullet, as long your forearm, burst through the surface.

<< Adapted from the Sun-Herald, 199(?).

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 08 March 19

GEORGE HOWE: Two hundred and sixteen year ago, he made Australia go to press for the first time

THE FIRST COPY: GEORGE HOWE HANDS GOVERNOR PHILIP GIDLEY KING THE FIRST COPY OF THE SYDNEY GAZETTE, WITH PHILIPS’S WIFE AND SON LOOKING ON.

 

COMMORATIVE ISSUE: A COPY OF THE SYDNEY GAZETTE, WITH A FEW LIBERTIES TAKEN, GIVEN OUT TO PEOPLE WHO ATTENDED THE MUSUEM OF SYDNEY’S ‘BREAKFAST BRIEFING’ SESSION ON THE ACTUAL DAY IT WAS PUBLISHED IN 1803. Below: A FLAT-BED WOODEN PRESS SIMILAR TO ONE GEORGE HOWE USED. Below: THE GAZETTE IN THE MIDDLE 1820s, A CHANGE OF NAMEPLATE.

FRANK MORRIS

It was 16 years ago, March 5, 2003, that a special event at the site of the first Government House to mark the birth of Australia’s first “news sheet”, The Sydney Gazette and New Wales Advertiser, took place two hundred years ago to the day.

This historic celebration was only a few metres from where the convict, George Howe, printed the inaugural issue on Saturday, March 5, 1803.

More the 120 guests attended the informative Breakfast Briefing, which hosted me and the Museum of Sydney. A forum ‘briefing’ on the impact of the “www” revolution on the print media was one of the highlights of the morning.

For 40 odd years, there has been an ongoing debate over whether the internet will kill newspapers. It managed to kiss good bye to dozens of newspapers over the last four decades for various reasons, but mainly in was the internet.

But the newspaper as a whole is struggling to stay alive; some have been taken over.

In 1969, in March, the World Wide Web was “conceived as a user-friendly layer” to partner to the internet. We know how it works. We know the power it has. We know the challenges and the power and influence it has over newspapers.

REALISED IT

Meanwhile, George Howe’s publication continued to appear weekly despite adversity. The first seven years he faced “goading penury” – he felt like he’d run out of steam. Howe never realised that once you became a newspaperman you’re always a newspaperman. But he soon realised it.

The quality of the paper was poor and varied, the type was worn, the old wooden screw press was close to “decrepitude”, and he was sorely pressed to find sufficient paper for each edition.

But he battled on.  He had the courage of his undertaking.

As Government Printer he took it upon himself to suggest to Governor Philip Gidley King the production of a weekly news sheet.

King backed the idea.  His Excellency considered that it would be a desirable addition to the colony provided a Government Officer approved its contents.

“It was out of felt need that the Australian Press was born,” says media historian, Frank S. Greenop, “Looking at the yellowish files we cannot imagine the interest the Gazette aroused”.

In his opening editorial, Howe wrote: “Innumerable as the obstacles were, we are happy to affirm that they were not insurmountable.

FREE PRESS

“The utility of a paper in the colony, as it must open a source of solid information will, we hope, be universally felt and acknowledged.

“We open no channel to political discussion or person animadversion.  Information is our only purpose.”

The Gazette had a monopoly on Sydney journalism for 21 years.  Although the paper was heavily censored, it paved the way for a free press.

A few months earlier, Howe had also published the first book.  He would go on to become the patriarch of Australia’s first publishing dynasty.

Howe died in 1821 aged 52.  The cause was from a condition called edema, or “dropsy,” which is the abnormal accumulation of fluid in the cells, tissues or cavities of the body.

His estate was valued at four thousand pounds ($8000).


FOUND! Australia’s first printery where the book and newspaper saw the light of day!

FRANK MORRIS

In one of the outbuildings at the first Government House, on which site now stands the Museum of Sydney, is where George Howe made history.

It was there that Howe printed the first book, first newspaper, and a raft of other government documents that were important communication links in the new colony.

Howe operated from this location for about two years.

In the l980s, as the excavation of the site progressed, it was like opening Pandora’s Box.  Among the thousands of objects unearthed were pieces of lead type and other artefacts that were intrinsically connected to Howe’s printery.

MANY LAYERS

But the commercial development that was planned on the site threatened to eliminate every fragment of this unique culture.

“The first printery … once again depended on the government for survival,” writes historian, Sandra Blair. Premier Neville Wran later announced his government would preserve the First Government House site as a museum.
Designed by architect Denton Corker, the Museum of Sydney opened in May 1995.

“It’s a place of many layers” says a Museum spokesperson. “The archaeological remains of Governor Phillip’s house, the modern architecture and the permanent and temporary displays created by historians, curators, artists and others, would remain.”

GRAPHIC ART

It is true that one “layer” of the Museum of Sydney does reinforce its “historic association” with early printing – the “black art.”

The masthead, above, that forms part of the heading of the early issues of the Sydney Gazette, is a masterful example of colonial graphic art.

The seated figure, at left, represents New South Wales, “surveying a prospect of agricultural and industrial endeavour”, which is symbolised by a ploughman and crossed picks and shovels, with the buildings of the rising town prominent in the distance.


SHARK ATTACK: Nina Dobrev wants to save the known man-eaters!

“I USED TO BE SCARED. BUT THEN I LEARNED THE FACTS …” SAYS NINA DOBREV ACTRESS AND OCEAN ADVOCATE.

TWO OF KIND: WHEN I LEARNED THE FACTS ABOUT SHARKS I WASN’T SCARED!, SAY NINA DOBREV. Below: A SHARK CAME OUT A NOWHERE AND ATTACHED.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

“Sharks keep the oceans healthy and aren’t really interested in us,” said Oceana, campaigning to protect the World’s oceans.

“It’s actually our interest in their fins; that’s the scary part. Millions of sharks end up in the global fin trade every year.”

Let’s go back nearly three centuries. This is what the Sydney Gazette reported in 1804. Under the headline Shark Attack, it had this to say:

Some days ago, an angling party, consisting of three men, one of whom had a young daughter, in a boat which was moored off George’s Head, about 150 yards from the shore were surprised with a visit from a shark of such enormous size as to be mistaken for the head of a sunk rock, whose summit rose nearly to the surface of the water.

PONDEROUS JAWS                        

But terror and trepidation were aroused when the voracious monster appeared close alongside the little boat, and eagerly seizing the baited hooks, plunged and darted with strength and speed … they had no other expectation than to be hurled out to the mercy of the furious assailant.

The formidable creature at length seized the … rope within its ponderous jaws, and forced the bow down even with, if not below the water’s edge, but happily the line snapped, the boat recoiled, and for several seconds continued to vibrate, as if conscious of threatened danger.

The little girl clung to her father for protection … the poignant sensation that he endured must with difficulty come within the reach of conception.

One of the survivors gladly attributes his life to having the shark swallow an iron 561 pound weight … which the aquatic spoiler required time to digest.

<< Sydney Gazette, February 26, l804. Full version published in Australian Pathways, Spring 1998, vol 1, no. 1; visit oceana.org/savesharks to see more from Nina and learn how you can help protect these vital ocean animals.

COMING: Shark Attack – A small recreational launch called NBC was run over and sunk by a ship entering Moreton Bay in 1977 with two of her three crew being taken by sharks. Three parts. Starting soon.


LAUREL & HARDY: Laurel: “Look at what you’ve got us into now!”

STAN AND OLLIE’S NEW MOVIE HAS BEEN GETTING SOME RAVE REVIEWS – DAVID STRATTON SAID “I LAUGHED AND I CRIED” AND THE TIMES, “STUNNING PERFORMANCES, A DAZZLING DOUBLE ACT.” SANDRA HALL DESCRIBES THEM AS “DUO DYNAMICS.” COME AND ENJOY IT. YOU’LL SEE JOHN C. REILLY AS OLIVER HARDY AND STEVE COOGAN AS STAN LAUREL. NICOLA MORRIS, GRAND YEARS, SAID “THE PAIR OF THEM HAVE BEEN PREFECTLY CAST.” THIS IS A PURE 100 MINUTES OF RESURRECTION.

FRANK MORRIS

THE FIRST MISTAKE: MAE BUSCH, IN 1932, WITH STAN LAUREL AND OLIVER HARDY IN, WHAT A NEWSPAPER CALLED, “A HILARIOUS CAPER”.

STUNNING DUO: OLLIE AND STAN, JOHN C. REILLY AND STEVE COOGAN, TAKE TIME OUT.

Mae Busch made several movies with the famed comedy team, Laurel and Hardy. It was like she was listed in their telephone books.

Many people hadn’t seen her appear seven or eight times with the same leading men. Never.
Aussie first screen star Mae Busch, the lady with smouldering dark eyes and attraction honey-blonde look, could her hold own with the best of the Hollywood gang.

Mae was just five when she and her parents departed Melbourne and settled in America. She was, by nature, “rebellious and lacking in discipline.”

MAJOR SUCCESSES

When she was 15, Mae was signed up by the Keystone Studio in Hollywood. Her outstanding looks and mobile face were ideally suited to the silent movies. She appeared in some of the major box office successes of the 1920s.

The advent of sound found her now in 1930s. Although her timing at delivering snappy punch-lines was impeccable, Mae was invariably cast “as a cynical, acid-tongue bitch”. She was still in demand for supporting roles on stage and in films.

Mae Busch died in 1946.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 01 March 19

Houses of Mystery: Part 1. They are still haunting and enjoying themselves!

THEATERGOERS: ACTOR WHO WAS LADY LAVENDER FROM THE PLAY THE MERRY WIDOW BUT SOMETHING REALLY AWFUL HAPPENED. Below: UNDERTAKER C.T. FINNEY – WHAT DID HE GET UP TOO. 

Nearly every place in Launceston is haunted, it seems. What is scary, and what many, many people believe is crazy after they found themselves gazing at a black wooden slat on the wall swaying back and forth. But, believe it or not, these people were indoors; and there was no breeze.  Now, that’s SCARY!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Literally, Tasmanian history wreaks of mind-bending horror tales!

When you came to think about it, it’s out of the ordinary. Take, for instance, the Cape Grim massacre in 1828. Four shepherds ambushed and murdered 30 Aboriginal people, hurling their corpses over a 60 metre cliff into the ocean.

Or the positively merry tale of the eight male convicts who escaped from Sarah Island’s prison in 1822. The convicts got lost in the woods – all of them – and turned on each other, with the strongest convicts slaughtering the rest for food.

The locals believe that their island is full of ghosts. Rather than shy away from the past, though, the ghoulish Tasmanians have developed a knack of making money out of it. Across Tasmania, there are many paranormal investigation societies. There are those that investigate whether a home or business is haunted; the competition for clients is fierce.

In Launceston, which is a City of Ghosts, a mainstream tourist attraction is all about ghosts. This event is even listed in the “must dos” page of the official guide.

FEELS THE TREMORS

Rosemary, a brassy woman dressed in white and adorned with hooped earrings, looks down upon us, “Are you believers?” she asks, looking us in the eye. Some people says yes. Other people shrug. “Sitting on the fence, eh?” Rosemary laughs.

As the sun goes down, Rosemary leads us into the basement of the Royal Oak Hotel. For effect, she has lit only a single camping lamp. People’s eyes customise to the darkness. Rosemary warns each person they may feel a creature’s presence: they might manifest by playing with your hair, blasting cold air on your neck or making your hands be suddenly freezing cold.

Rosemary tells the people that a girl on a tour was smashed in the back of the head with an empty wine bottle.
Meanwhile, doors have slammed open and shut. Another ghost-like figure is notorious for pinching people’s bottoms, but only men’s. It’s must have been a male spirit.

The dead can be so scandalous.


INSIDE NEWSPAPER: International Express, UK – See, I told you Gran will look at us!

It might seem a little quackers but when an amateur photographer captured a picture of geese and ducks at a lake, clouds in the background looked like …a goose. Margaret McEwan, of Sandhurst, Berkshire, was snapping birds at a local lake when she noticed the bird shape in the sunset sky. “I live close to the lake and was taking photos when they came over to feed.”


Houses of Mystery: Final! They are still haunting and enjoying themselves!

DARK AND SCARY: OUTSIDE THE PRINCESS THEATRE SOMETHING BIZARRE TOOK PLACE. Below: THE MERRY WIDOW WAS A PLAY FOR LAUGHS BUT THE LEADING ACTRESS SLIPPED AND FELL TO HER DEATH.

More favourites from Launceston’s litany of horror.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Launceston undertaker’s C.T. Finney’s, at a former site, had a prop coffin on display in the embalming room. Back in the 1800s, bodies would be pushed through the window like, say, a delivery of fresh meat. The bodies would be laid out on ice and hessian bags.(Our tour adventurer) Rosemary points out the grilles through which the corpses’ fluids would drain on the mainstreets of Launceston caking the road with blood … God knows, what else!

While we’re imagining the stench of the streets in summer … the coffin lid slams down loudly and everybody who was passing by would hear the screams. And none of tourist was standing anywhere near the coffin.

The groups venture outside.

A TRAGEDY

From there, a place called Peppers was next on the list. Rosemary looks mildly disappointed. Peppers is where I was staying, I told her. Peppers is a newer establishment but not famous for being haunted. Peppers, said Rosemary, is close to a site where parents and children would once gather to watch the weekly public executions … overseen by the local government.

Nearly every place in Launceston is haunted; or where a dead person appeared to the living, it seems.

There is a bizarre and odd turnout at the Princess Theatre that ends up in tragedy. The theatre is haunted by the Lavender Lady, an actress who starred in The Merry Widow. She slipped off the stage into the orchestra pit one evening, fatally breaking her neck.

HIS DAIRIES

Further on, the touring party was outside a grand-looking white building, the former residence of a doctor, who is said to have conducted a number of gruesome “experiments” on the homeless and mentally disabled people.

Rosemary said, “He never got caught – ever. No-one found out what he’d done until he died. Someone read his diaries. His diaries also said he used to put a little instruments up people’s noses and wiggle them around.”

What happens then is too graphic to print. “They died in an awful way”’ Rosemary said.

Afterwards back at my hotel, I stare at the ceiling for a while. It found it hard to sleep when my hands are so cold.

<< Background from this original story from Tasmania – Go behind the scenery.


ACTIVE DETECTIVE: Edward, Prince of Wales, goes to Hawaii in 1920!

IAN LORDING

ALWAYS SMILING: WHEN THE PRINCE RIDES ON HIS SURF BOARD HE INVARIABLY FALLS OFF – SMILING.

LUCKY LAST: PRINCE OF WALES AT THE END OF THE CANOE.

“Keeping things current, this video is to coincide with the royal tour,” says Ian Lording, who’s been foraging through the decaying films of Pathe.

“Waikiki Beach, Hawaii, where the Prince of Wales enjoys the exhilarating sport of surfing in a strange banana shaped canoe. There are six paddling and Edward, the Prince of Wales. He settles in at the end of the canoe.

“He, like all the other men, is dressed in a bathing suit while he laughs at the camera. Following the canoe … are several men on surf boards. A large wave comes up behind the canoe and the surfers, with the canoe, are coming into shore.”

British Pathe cuts “to the Prince lying on his stomach on a surf board as a Hawaii’s man pushes his board along. Various

<< Longboarder Magazine, Australia.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 22 February 19

ARTBEAT: Adolf Hitler loved Walt Disney cartoon art … that’s why he copied them!

TWO OF A KIND: PINOCCHIO BY WALT DISNEY. PINOCCHIO BY THE ARTIST, ADOLF HITLER.

POINT OF VIEW: HITLER SAID THAT SNOW WHITE WAS ONE OF THE BEST FILMS EVER MADE. Below: BASHFUL … HE WAS ALWAYS SHY.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Doc, a Walt Disney character from the fairy tale Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, was sketched by Adolf Hitler during part of World War Two.

William Hakvaag, director of a war museum in northern Norway, said there was no independent confirmation that the drawing was the work of the Nazi leader, who tried to make a living as an artist before going into politics.

Hakvaag is on record as saying that there had been a series of drawings hidden in a painting signed “A.Hitler” that he brought at German auction for about $300.

He found three coloured cartoons of dwarfs from the 1937 Walt Disney film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, signed A.H. There was an unsigned sketch of Pinocchio, another Disney character, he said.

BEST MOVIE

He said he had done tests on the paintings and suggested they date from 1940. Hakvaag told Reuters that he was “100 percent sure that these are drawings by Hitler. If one wanted to make a forgery, one would never hide it in the back of a picture where it might never be discovered”.

The initials on the sketches, and the signature on the painting, matched other copies of Hitler’s handwriting, he said.
“Hitler had a copy of Snow White,” Hakvaag said. “He thought this was one of the best movies ever made,” Hakvaag said about the animated classic, which was an adaptation of a German fairy tale.

Said to be by Hitler, nineteen watercolours and two sketches were sold in Britain a few years ago for a total of $59,000.

Yes, Hitler allegedly loved Disney animated movies. In particular, Snow White and the seven Dwarfs and often Nazis reportedly sourced Disney animated movies for the dictator to watch.

<< Put together by various Google lead-stories.

COMING: More on ARTBEAT. Ike Eisenhower – the paintings he loved the most.


FRANK MORRIS COMING ATTRACTION

Australia gets its first newspaper! In 1803, George Howe started The Gazette and New Wales Advertiser. It’s 16 years since l commented on this new arrival, now 216 years young. At the Museum of Sydney, it began with a Breakfast Briefing and a panel of well-known speakers who spoke many of things related to Howe, including the monopoly on Australian journalism … Pearl Turton: she was Queen of the waves … Dog horoscopes: Here is part of dog’s “star” that lets you know how to treat it … Pearl S. Buck, winner of a Noble Prize for literature, lived 40 years in China and 40 years in America. “I came as a stranger to my country, having lived in China. Coming in March.


FLYING PASSENGER: Drones are ready to take off!

THE STUFF OF SCIENCE FICTION IS CLOSE TO BECOMING REALITY. KARL WILSON REPORTS.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

TAKE OFF: THE EHANG 184, ELECTRICALLY POWERED PASSENGER DRONE, IN DUBAI. Below: THE ‘TAXI’ -- READY, SET, GO!

In February, the drone manufacturer Ehang, put out a video of the world’s first passenger drone, the Ehang 184. It showed the drone being put through its paces with and without a passenger. Many analysts watched the demonstration in amazement. The future was suddenly upon us.

The electric drone can carry one passenger, weighing up to 100kg, and travels at up to 100 km an hour. The Ehang 184, has been described as the “world’s first all-electric, consumer-facing autonomous passenger drone. In short, it is a “flying car”.

Two and half years ago, Ehang was virtually unknown in the technology world.

It strutted its stuff at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas in January 2016. And it made a bold claim: that it would build a completely autonomous, passenger-carrying quadcopter, a multirotor helicopter that is lifted by four rotors that it said would revolutionise mobility.

Now, no-one is laughing. Quadcopters, flying cars or taxis are a reality.

Ehang is not the only Chinese company involved in the research and development of flying cars.

THE SYSTEMS TAKE OVER

Flying cars are set to disrupt the personal mobility space of the future. There’re at least 10 early entrants expected to launch various versions by 2022.

With the newly developed Ehang 184, it seems that all passengers need to do is climb into the small cabin, fasten their seat belts, and the automated flight system does takes over. The drone has been tested more than 1000 times and is designed to withstand gales with wind speeds of up 50 km/h, the company said.

Analysts believe that flying cars and air taxis that ferry people … will be commonplace within in the next decades.

<< The China Post, 2018.

Frank Morris comments: The next frontier in technology is to take human workers out of dangerous subterranean situations, says The Australian’s The Art of The Deal magazine. Hovermap, is an Australian invention, developed inside Data61 … flying autonomous missions inside underground environments, such as mine shafts, collecting high-quality data for 3D mapping. Another being tested in the UK since 2016 is an autonomous drone delivery. Some envision a future where this kind of food delivery will make fridges obsolete.                                                                                      


Time magazine: How did plastic straws become so popular

CHEAPER: PLASTIC BECOMES MORE POPULAR.

The plastic straw version, says Time magazine, jumped in popularity during the post-World War 2 years, as plastics became cheaper. Today, while it’s difficult to count, some say the US alone uses 500 million of disposable straws daily.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 15 February 19

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