Grand Years with Frank Morris

Searching for posts in the month of: January 2018

Number of blogs returned: 1 to 4 records of 4

FOR HUNDREDS OF YEARS, IT HAS BEEN THE WORLD’S GREATEST EASTER PLAY

THE END: THE CROWD GATHER TO WATCH THE THREE MEN DIE. Below: JESUS, BEARING HIS CROSS, FALLS. Below: HIS DISCIPLES LOWER JESUS DOWN FROM THE CROSS.

Oberammergau Passion Play is the world’s greatest play. It has brought visitors from all over the world and fame to a small mountain village.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

When the big day came in 1970, townspeople thought there were to be fewer people than when it was performed in 1960. The town’s coffers had been swelled by something between 40 and 50 million marks to prove the ancient tradition that things were just the same.

What is this ancient tradition?

The Passion Play is actually a performance of the events that led up to the death of Jesus Christ. Parts of the play have been performed by members of one family for centuries. And all this is done in fulfilment of a strange vow.

In 1633 when the Thirty Years’ War was devastating Europe and a plague was spreading death over the countryside … Oberammeragau alone was free of the pestilence.

In case he took the terrible black plague back with him, Casper Schisler, who was working as a farm labourer near Eschenlohe, was forbidden to enter his home town; but he wished to see his wife and children after which his left again.

Schisler and 84 of the people of the village died in three weeks. Those people who remained alive prayed to be saved from the plague, promising God that if He would save them … they would celebrate the suffering and death of Jesus … and hold the Passion Play every ten years. The plaque disappeared.

STUNNING WORK

In time the Passion Play became a great success and a profitable investment … its fame spread throughout the world at the time when travel was becoming easier.

Some famous people have visited Oberammergau to take in the Passion Play, among them Henry Ford, Adolf Hitler, General Eisenhower, the famous poet Rabindranath Tagore and a score of other top names down through the years.

The grand presentation of the spectacle they witness in modern times has 60 star performers, 700 extras, an orchestra and a choir. The audience come away overwhelmed and amazed that the whole of the production is the work of simple villagers.

In 1860, Daisenberger wrote the present script; the music composed by a village schoolteacher named Dedler in 1815. One critic, a Munich priest, said watching the play has the same “brutalising effect” as watching a horror film.

But the Oberammergau people are steeped in tradition and believe in what they are doing.

The next Passion Play at Oberammergau in Easter is being staged in 2020. So make sure you book soon.

<< Adapted from Frank Morris’ Living World magazine, 1970.


VALE: THE MIGHTY CHANGA, GRAEME LANGLANDS, THE ILLUSTRIOUS LEAGUE FULLBACK

He could do marvellous things (like) turn the tide with a run or a tackle. He’s the best I’ve seen, said one league writer. Born on September 1, 1941 in Wollongong, “Changa” Graeme Langlands died last weekend January 20, 2018. REMEMBER LANGLANDS … TWO PART SERIES NEXT WEEK.


THE BEGINNING OF … SURFBOARDS -- The start of surfboard riding!

MISS FIRST:  ISABEL LETHAM BECOMES THE FIRST AUSTRALIAN WOMAN TO RIDE A SURFBOARD. Below: THE FATHER OF SURFBOARD RIDING, DUKE KAHANAMOKU, REMAINED A FRIEND OF ISABEL’S, RIGHT UP TO THE TIME HE DIED.

FRANK MORRIS, LANA WELLS

The world’s first and probably greatest surfers were Polynesian natives. The tribes hailed from some of the Pacific Islands. Many authorities believe the Hawaiian Islands were the birthplace of surfboard riding.                                                                                                                                                      

Captain Cook and later William Bligh, described surfboard riding they saw in Hawaii. In a book published in New York in 1819, the book showed pictures of natives riding plank-like boards in the wild-looking surf.

In 1912, C.D. Paterson brought to Australia a Hawaiian redwood board, but it was too heavy to be handled in rough waves. In 1915, Duke Kahanamoku, when he visited Sydney, bought some pine and carved a surfboard which he rode at Freshwater Beach, Sydney.

I WAS TERRIFIED

Kahanamoku decided he needed a “pretty young partner” to ride the rough sea. Lana Wells, in her book Sunny Memories, says: “Isabel Letham, a fifteen year old and strong swimmer, was obviously intrigued with the board. ‘Come on!” he said’, coaxing the teenager onto the front of it.

Isabel Letham recalled: “I was terrified. We caught a wave but I too scared to stand to stand up. So Duke grabbed me by the scruff of my neck and the back of my costume … and yanked me to my feet”. As it turned out for Letham, that was it. She had to have her own surfboard.

Although her father, a builder hesitated he relented, so he ended up doing the deed. Isabel Letham is probably the first woman in Australia “to stand upright” on a surfboard.

From then on, surfboard riding became an Australian sport. The first Australian board championships were held soon after World War 1; and the first Australian champion was Claude West. However, it was not until after World War 2 that surfboard riding gained its present popularity.

<< Frank Morris from Living World, 1970; Sunny Memories by Lana Wells, Greenhouse Publication Pty Ltd. Richmond, Victoria; 1982.

COMING: Caught Inside – Jack Eden, one of Australia’s leading surfing photographers, from the surfing sixties.


Natural Born Columnist: Writing can be a daunting task!

FRANK MORRIS

The great Brian Penton, editor of the Daily Telegraph saw potential in David McNichol’s writing. So he said to him, “I’ll help you hone your column into punchy short sentences, active voice.”

Penton could sit back and think that his mentoring had paid off. The configuration of the sentences, and the man behind it, McNichol, had made himself the talk of the town.

During the scourge of the “dull and politically correct,” David McNicol, poet, journalist and writer, penned the famous Talk of the Town column from 1945 to 1951.

Modelled on the style of column pioneered in the US by Walter Winchell and Drew Pearson, it appeared on the front-page of the Daily Telegraph.

When Penton died, McNicol went on to become editor-in-chief of the Daily and Sunday Telegraph. He remained in this role for almost 20 years.

McNicol resumed his old career as a columnist, on The Bulletin, when Packer sold the paper to Murdoch in 1972.

<< Adapted from the Australian Book Collector, 2001.

Illustration. Honed his work: David McNichol achieved the top with some assistance from the editor, Brian Penton.


Two Years of Restoring Sight: Fred Hollows – an extraordinary life!

MANY STRANDS: FRED HOLLOWS AND GABI, HIS WIFE, SET OUT TO END AVOIDABLE BLINDNESS IN BURGEONING COUNTRIES. Below: FRED AND GABI AND THEIR GROWING FAMILY.

“Every eye is an eye,” Hollows told his people.

Adapted By FRANK MORRIS

“Fred was many things to many people – a husband, a father, a friend, a skilled ophthalmologist and, for a few politicians and bureaucrats, an irritating thorn in the side,” said Gabi.

“But above all else he was a humanitarian, which made him a terrific doctor. He truly believed it was the role of the doctor to help those in need.”

A New Zealander by birth, Hollows felt a good deal of chance accounted for the fact that he ended up a doctor and not a tradesman. He also dabbled with the idea of a career in the church before choosing medicine, a practical job that allowed him to help people.

After studying stints in Wales and England, Hollows made Australia his home.

EVERY EYE IS AN EYE

Professor Hollows first came into the public eye when he led a medical team through rural and remote Australia in the late 1970s. The endemic eye disease he found in Aboriginal communities had appalled him.

Conditions like eye trachoma, which had been eliminated in Australian town and cities, were common. It was similar to what was seen in developing countries.

Never one to bite his tongue, Hollows had manufactured a reputation for being outspoken and getting things done. He would annoy the media to alert Australia to the hidden health emergency in the country’s interior.
His direct approach won him friends and enemies.

Trips to Nepal, Vietnam and Eritrea convinced Hollows that with support people in burgeoning countries could enjoy the same quality eye-care as Australians.

AUSTRALIA AT THE FOREFRONT

In war-torn Eritrea medicines were being produced behind battle lines, in improvised sterile laboratories inside bunkers.

Hollows decided to give aid to the Eritreans to produce their own intraocular lenses, essential for effective treatment of cataract blindness. He believed that the poorest people deserved exactly the same quality eye-care as a king or prime minister.

In 1994, one year after he lost his battle with cancer, Hollows dream came true. The Fred Hollows Foundation opened up two modern intraocular lens laboratories in Eritrea and Nepal.

And within three years, the Foundation kept Hollows promise alive by training 330 eye doctors in Vietnam.

Hollows believed that Australia would play a leading role in efforts to overcome avoidable blindness around the world.

He was diagnosed with cancer in 1988. He was born in 1929 and died in 1993.

<< The Fred Hollows Foundation is 1800 352 352. Your contributions will assist the Fred Hollow’s team.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 25 January 18

OLYMPIC GAMES 1936: Owens tells about the golden moment of triumph

THE FLASH: JESSE OWENS – HIS MOUTH WAS DRY AS COTTON – BURNISHED THE FIELD IN THE 100 METRES FINAL. Below: JESSE OWENS – HE WAS COOL, CALM AND SLIGHTLY NERVOUS BEFORE A BIG RACE!

At the start of the 100 meters final, Jesse Owens was like some relaxed panther ready to burst out!

JESSE OWENS        Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

I remembered that moment nine years later when I stood at the starting line of the 100-meter race in the Olympic Stadium in Berlin, waiting to run against the finest competitors that the world had to offer.

I looked down that field to the finish 109 yards and two feet away and the I began to think in terms of what it had taken for me to get there, the number of people who had counselled and coached me; and the people who believed in me- the community from which I had come and the school which I attended.

And as I looked down at the uniform of the country that I represented and realized that after all I was just a man like any other man, I felt suddenly as if my legs could not carry even the weight of my body.  My stomach said that it wasn’t there.

My mouth was dry as cotton; the palms of my hands wet with perspiration.

VICTORY OVATION

And as we stood there, unnoticed because a German boy had won an Olympic victory in another part of the stadium, and the crowd was giving him an ovation that was due an Olympic champion; this was the sight that I saw within that wonderfully arena. 

As my eyes wandered across the field, I noticed the green grass-the red track with the white line.

A hundred-and-odd thousand people crowded into the stands.  And as my eyes looked upward, I noticed the flags of every nation represented there at the Olympic Games underneath the German blue sky.

Now, my attention was diverted from that beautiful picture, because the whistle had been blown and we were to assemble around the starter to receive our final instructions for this historic event.

After our instructions had been given every man went to his mark and adjusted hands and feet. Every muscle in his body was strained.

RAN NECK AND NECK

And suddenly the gun went off.  The athletes ran neck and neck for some yards, but our Ralph Metcalfe of Marquette University led the field at the fifty yard mark.

From then, the seventy to the ninety, Ralph and I ran neck and neck. And then for some unknown reason I cannot yet fathom, I beat Ralph, who was such a magnificent runner.

The greatest moment of all, of course, was when we knelt and received the Wreath of Victory and standing there facing the stands we could hear the strains of the “Star Spangled Banner” rise into the air and the Stars and Stripes was hoisted to the skies.

It was then that I realized the immensity of my ambition of nine years to become a member of Uncle Sam’s Olympic Team and to emerge as a victor in the Olympic Games.

Yes, this was the moment I had worked for all those years.

And let me say that as you stand there and watch your flag rise above all others because of your own efforts and you can say to yourself today, “I am an Olympic champion,” there cannot be a greater thrill.

<< Grand Years, 2008.


Natural Born Columnist: Writing can be a daunting task!

WHAT MORE IS THERE TO SAY: COLLEAGUE MATT WHITE’S COLUMN IN THE AUSTRALIAN SAYS IT ALL: “REGULAR BY-LINES IN THE DAILY PRESS WERE RESERVED FOR THE GIANTS OF JOURNALISM. JIM MACDOUGALL WAS SUPREME.”

FRANK MORRIS

MacDougall’s column was lauded a “hallmark” in Australian journalism

Jim Macdougall and Eric Kennedy were fervent mates. They were old colleagues. Macdougall wrote in his Daily Mirror column: “In a savagely completive world of newspapers, Eric Kennedy has too much humanity, too much kindness.”

The columnist who thrived on people as well as humour was the redoubtable Jim Macdougall. Jim seemed to be forever part of the Sydney landscape. The name Jim Macdougall was as well-known as any landmark in Sydney!
His long career began as a cadet reporter on the Melbourne Herald in 1924.  After a while he was sent to the paper’s London bureau.

When he returned to Australia, he was assigned to write a front-page column for The Sun, which was lauded as a “hallmark” in Australian journalism. Over the next four decades his column moved to the Daily Telegraph, and later, the Daily Mirror.

Macdougall died on his 92nd birthday in 1995.

SUPREME COLUMNIST

Colleague Matt White’s tribute in The Australian says it all. “In an age where the word columnist conjured up all the glamour of newspaper reporting, and when regular by-lines in the daily press were reserved for the giants of journalism, Jim Macdougall, columnist, was supreme.”

White describes Macdougall’s column as a “mixture of humour, humanity and some incredible predictions.” In 42 years at the job, Macdougall turned out more than 10,000 columns, many of which broke important news in a couple of paragraphs long before the stories became front-page headlines.

When Macdougall departed the Daily Mirror in 1975, it was the end of an era. His column had appeared every day for 14 years.

A few years later, he wrote: “It’s not until evening does one realise how splendid a day has been. As I look back, it has indeed been a splendid day.”

<< Grand Years, 2013.

TOMORROW: The third episode.


LET’S LAUGH!  A chuckle now and then will do you good!

Chuckle 1

“My wife was telling me you bought a car cheap the other day,” said Mr Brown. “How are you getting on with it?”

“Not at all,” said Mr Smith. “I’m just beginning to realise how hard it is to drive a bargain!”

Chuckle 2

“It was mighty nice of you to give up your seat to that robust lady,” Mr Binks. “It’s pleasant to see that there are still some polite men left in the world.”

“Sorry, Mrs Jabbers, but it wasn’t politeness at all. The man who sat next to me was quarrelsome because he said I crowded him too much, and all I did was use that robust lady as a sort of courteous retort.”

Chuckle 3

Flashback: In 1984, actor Britt Ekland, now pushing 41, revealed at her press conference, “I’ve never been with a man older that I am now.” When asked her opinion of Australian men, Britt replied: “They are the nicest, funniest men I know. They are very open and they treat me like gold.” – FM.


MAGIC FOR YOU! THE COIN TRICK -- ESPECIALLY FOR THE YOUNG AT HEART!

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 19 January 18

NATURAL BORN COLUMIST: WRITING A COLUMN FOR A NEWSPAPER – A DAUNTING TASK

 

STERN EDITOR: WRITING A COLUMN FOR THE WRITER IS “DECEPTIVELY SIMPLE”, SAYS JOHN PRINGLE. Below: CHARMIAN CLIFT  --  SHE MADE HER COLUMN INTO A GREAT PERSONAL SUCCESS.

The American historian, Jerry D. Lewis, said columnists are “the stars of the newspaper business.” Lewis also labelled the daily column as “literature in a hurry”. That’s why writing a daily column is a daunting task. John Pringle chose Charmian Clift because Clift “could maintain a good literary tone.” Charmian’s biographer wrote: “He (Pringle) was never to regret his choice of Clift … who made the column into a great personal success.”

FRANK MORRIS

Pringle describes a columnist’s writing as “deceptively simple”

The celebrated newspaper editor, John Pringle, was staunch an admirer of Ross Campbell. Pringle, in his book of essays, On Second Thoughts,* expostulated that there is no excuse “for ignoring one of Australia’s best writers.”

The editor said of Campbell, that “his writing is deceptively simple, both in style and subject matter. I say “deceptively” because, of course, this extreme simplicity conceals considerable art as well as a very shrewd perceptive view of life.”

A MASTER STROKE

Pringle, in his second tour of duty as editor of the Sydney Morning Herald, from 1965 to 1970, introduced a weekly column in the paper’s women’s pages written by the exceptionally talented Australian writer and novelist, Charmian Clift. Pringle’s choice turned out to be a master stroke.

Clift’s brief was that she could write about anything that took her fancy; and because she was a writer and not a journalist, Pringle correctly surmised that Clift’s reputation could “maintain a good literary tone”.
Writes Garry Kinnane: “He (Pringle) was never to regret his choice of Clift … who made the column into a great personal success.”

*Angus & Robertson, 1971.

Note: This series will run all through the month.


A NEWSPAPER LEGEND DIES AFTER BATTLE WITH CANCER

I’VE KNOWN RON TANDBERG FOR AS LONG AS HE’S BEEN DRAWING HIS ‘POCKET CARTOON’ FOR THE AGE AND HERALD. TANDBERG DIED AGE 74.

HE WON ELEVEN WALKLEY AWARDS, INCLUDING TWO GOLD WALKLEYS. THE REPORTER, TONY WRIGHT, DESCRIBED TANDBERG AS A  LEGEND FOR  DRAWING THE “PREFECT LITTLE “POCKET” CARTOON.

TANDBERG  SAID HE WAS EMPLOYED BY GRAHAM PERKIN, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF OF THE AGE, IN 1972. WRIGHT SAYS THAT TANDBERG WAS TO ASKED TO DRAW A “SMALL” CARTOON TO ACCOMPANY THE MAIN FRONT PAGE STORY. THAT WAS HOW THE “POCKET CARTOON” WAS BORN.


OUT ROLL THE TRUCKS: DURING A REMAKE OF PHAR LAP IN 1983, EVEN THE TINEST ITEM WAS CONSIDERED IMPORTANT TO THE SAGA – THE NEWS POSTER. Below: EVEN THE NEWSPAPERS GAVE THE CHAMPION THAT TIME HONOURED POSITION – THE FRONT PAGE.

“HE’S DEAD” … THE POSTER THAT TOLD THE WORLD CHAMPION PHAR LAP HAD DIED

These two word stopped people in their tracks and they wept. Everyone who it was. It was the mighty racehorse, Phar Lap. The classic HE’S DEAD poster, in its meaningful ways, stands our loud and clear. – FM. The poster, see below.

AN ARGUS SPECIAL WRITER        Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

(Melbourne, April 7):  Australian Prime Minister, Mr Joseph Lyons, when informed at Bathurst this afternoon of the death of Phar Lap said, with a regretful smile: “The death of this wonderful horse is a great sporting tragedy.”

Jockey, J.E. Pike, who was associated with Phar Lap in many of his greatest triumphs, including the Melbourne Cup of 1930, said that although he was only his rider he could not help liking such a horse.

Phar Lap would live in racing history forever.

A tribute to the gelding was also paid by the United States consul, Mr Keblinger, who said that Phar Lap’s achievements had significance beyond purely sporting considerations, in keeping Australia’s name before the American public and before the world.

Bred at the Seadown Stud, Timaru, New Zealand, in 1926, by the late Mr A.F. Roberts, Phar Lap was by Night Raid from Entreaty, by Winkie-Prayer Wheel, by Pilgrim’s Progress-Catherine Wheel, by Maxim-Miss Kate (imp.), by Adventurer.

HE WON THE AQUA CALIENTE HANDICAP

He won only one race as a two-year old, but after four unplaced starts in the following season he indicated his real worth by running second to Mollison in the Chelmsford Stakes at Randwick.

Then followed successes in the Rosehill Guineas, AJC Derby and Craven Plate and the VRC Derby.  He was third in the Melbourne Cup and the VATC St George Stakes the same season, and then he won nine races in succession, including the King’s Cup at Adelaide.

Phar Lap’s career as a four-year old was even more noteworthy.  For at this age he won 14 races. One of these was the Melbourne Cup.

As a five-year old the gelding still retained his superlative form.  Phar Lap was given 10.10 in the 1931 Melbourne Cup, but he failed under his huge burden, although he won every other race in which he was started.

The 1931 Melbourne Cup was his last race in Australia, and soon afterwards his owners decided to send him abroad.  On March 20 he carried out the task set him by winning the rich Aqua Caliente Handicap.

Including the stake his owners received for his victory in the Aqua Caliente Handicap, Phar Lap won the magnificent total of sixty-six thousand seven hundred and thirty eight pounds ($A133,476).

He won 39 races, was second three times, third on two occasions, and was unplaced in nine races.  He was third on the list of the world’s greatest stake winners, only Sun Beau (USA) and Ksar (France) being ahead of him.

Had he not come to such an untimely end there is little doubt that Phar Lap would have won enough to place him at the top of the list.

<< Adapted from the Argus, Melbourne.


EVEN THE PRESS RAISED THE QUESTION OF POISON. Below: “HE’S DEAD” -- AND PEOPLE VISIBLY WEPT.

THE NEWSPAPER STREET-POSTER THAT CAPURED THE HEART OF A NATION

FRANK MORRIS

Like the newspaper street-posters, for example, these are important forms of communication: getting the message over in a few seconds.

“YES”, underscored, truncated the Saturday Paper. It was promoting the recent victory of a tele-poll plebiscite. The news poster fills the bill.

(In the 1960s and 1970s, in particular, The Sun and the Daily Mirror relied heavily on the strength of their poster in daily battle to see came out on top. While The Sun had superb posters, the Mirror’s poster seems to beat the Sun hands down. One in particular was a notorious winner: I SEE WAS HANG, a poster which, accompanies by a photo of Ron Saw. It’s our sold The Sun by nearly 60,000 copies.)

VISIBLY WEPT

The classic HE’S DEAD poster from the 1930s stand out loud and clear. Nearly every Australian knew it was. It wasn’t some potentate and famous actor. Rather, it was a great racehorse that had captured the heart of a nation, the mighty Phar Lap.

Regaled in chucky, black wooded type, the poster’s impact was immediate. Passers-by – men, women and children – stopped momentarily and visibly wept.

This unique and timeless example of “word power” in action was created by a person who knew the craft. The “hard fact”, the message, is starkly reinforced by simple typography.

<< Extracted from Communication: Signs of the times by Frank Morris. 


MAGIC! WHEN CUSTOMERS SEE THE DIFFERENCE

ON THE BOIL: SINCE THE 1890S EDITORS HAVE BEEN GOING TOOTH AND CLAW TO GAIN DOMINATION IN THE MARETPLACE WITH GOOD POSTER WRITING.

HAPPY NEW YEAR … WISHING YOU A DAY THAT IS FILLED WITH THE BEST OF EVERYTHING.

 

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 11 January 18

NEW YEAR! Richard Hughes – when was the first newspaper published?

EPISCOPALIAN: HIS COLLEAGUES UNFAILINGLY ADDRESSED RICHARD AS ‘YOUR GRACE.’ TEXT, BELOW: IS THE DRAWING EXAGGERATED? NO-ONE WHO HAS BEEN WITH HIM BELIEVES THE ARTIST CAUGHT HIM TO A TEE. BELOW: IN THE ENGLISH SPEAKING WORLD, THE LONDON GAZETTE WOULD STANDOUT PRETTY CLEARLY AS ONE OF “THE FIRST”. AS A WORLD’S FIRST, ASIA WOULD BE THE SPOT, AS RICHARD POINTED OUT IN HIS ARTICLE.

FRANK MORRIS based on Derek Davies, Editor, of the Far Eastern Economic Review

Richard Hughes’ friends all accorded him with Episcopalian authority and, unfailingly, addressed him as “Your Grace.” Hughes was an outstanding pressman and from there an international correspondent.

From working in public relations he joined the Melbourne Star. From there he went to the Sydney Daily Telegraph, which sent him to Tokyo whence he penned warnings about the “challenges to come.”

After reporting on the Second World War, he began a long journey to the doyenship of correspondents in Asia and Korea, and a rambunctious spell as manager of the Tokyo Press Club. He worked for the London Economist and the Sunday Times, and wrote several scoops on the British traitors, Burgess and MacLean.

He wrote his weekly column in the Far Eastern Economic Review since 1971 before the Falstaffian soul of Richard Hughes went to meets its Maker in January 1983. He was 77.

RICHARD HUGHES

When and where was the world’s first daily newspaper published? Alas, The Times is not in the running. The contest, surprisingly, is between West and East: Europe and Korea.

There is, not unnaturally, some confusion about who produced the first newspaper in Europe and where. As early as 1513 a news pamphlet appeared in England giving stop-the-presses news of Flodden Field.

But it is generally agreed that the first regular newspaper did not appear until the beginning of the 17th century. The earliest was the Nieuwe Tijdingen, an early example of newspaper tautology: who would print old tidings?

This was published in Antwerp from about 1605.

There were also several early German newspapers, among them no fewer than three called the Avisa Relation oder Zeitung, published in 1609.

BRIEF SURVIVIAL

Up until now … my own belief being that German capitalists were the first with the Leipziger Zeitung published in 1660.

But the German claim is under respectful challenge by South Korean scholars, whose rival daily entrant allegedly beat Germany’s on to the streets by nearly a century; but was selling for only three months in 1577.

Its brief survival was not due to poor sales but to regal suppression. It had an executive staff of more than 30, and His Majesty’s basic anger against its “reportage of official court gazettes from Korea and China” was obviously spurred by its popular interest and sales.

A recent edition of New Korean Glimpses … also evokes a precedent of German and Korean competition in first printing with movable metal type. Herr Johannes Gutenberg had been given the credit for initiating that method when he printed the Gutenberg Bible in the 15th century.

MOVABLE TYPE BEGAN

Again there were unsubstantiated Korean claims that a 50-volume anthology on past and present social life and religious rites had been printed in 1230 during the Koryo Dynasty by moveable metal type.

The Korean book, entitled Abstruse Principles of Zen, was discovered in the French national library. It had been printed with movable metal type.

Those remarkable Koreans never gloat about their achievements in what they call “the world’s culture of letters.” But they remain confident that their publication of the first daily newspaper about a century before The Leipziger Zeitung will be proven.

Who really cares, anyway, except perhaps senile newspapermen, who usually can’t remember when their own papers were born.

<< Barefoot Reporter: The best of Richard Hughes columns, 1971- 1983.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FAREWELL: BRUCE BROWN – SURF MOVIES MAKER. HE LEFT BEHIND 55 YEARS OF SURF FILM. HE HAD IT ALL! BELOW: THE FAMOUS AD.

VALE: BRUCE BROWN – THE ENDLESS SUMMER “TRANDSFORMED” SURFING

FRANK MORRIS

In 1966, Californian Bruce Brown released surfing’s most wildly known film, The Endless Summer. With the movie “came its carefree mix adventure,” the Pacific Longboarder said.

The magazine added, “The exotic line-ups and cornball humour has hit the right romantic note. Capturing the aesthetic of wave-riding as a pure act within itself and inspiring generations of surfers to search for their own perfect wave.”

The technique of the surfers in the film was revolutionary.

The Endless Summer hit the screens in 1966, it was the perfect document of an epic surf adventure. With buoyant fun, Summer changed the way “surfers had been depicted in popular culture.”

In the formative years of The Endless Summer, I was editor of SURFABOUT magazine. “We were told by the experts that the epic film would be the “top surf movie ever made.”

RAPID SUCCESS

Before then there was Slippery when Wet, Surf Crazy, Barefoot Adventure, Surfing Hollow Days and Waterlogged, which brought to the screen all of these amazing sojourns which would leave a viewer breathless.

The Endless Summer was made on a $50,000 budget which sounds small now; but in the mid-sixties, it was a king’s ransom. The film was released in movie theatres, high school auditoriums and town halls, making it a rapid commercial success.

After The Endless Summer, as soon as surfers saw ‘Bruce Brown’ on the poster they couldn’t resist it. A rejigged version came out to represent 50 years since the film was made.

The cache of movies Brown’s turnout still carry that hypnotic splendour; the perfect world that he would have sought for most of his life.           

Bruce Brown died of heart failure at his home at California. He was aged 80.

<< Background help came from The New York Times and The Pacific Longboarder.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FAST FERRY: PROGRESS HAS CAUGHT UP WITH THE FAST RIDE TO  COSMOPOLITAN MANLY. BELOW: PEOPLE ENJOYING THEMSELVES. BELOW: ON THE WAY, THROUGH TO RAIN, TO MANLY.

FLASHBACK, 1984: GOING TO MANLY WAS ALWAYS A BIT OF AN ADVENTURE … AND MORE!

Ferries, not always names we know, today travel all day to a cosmopolitan beachside maze that is a wondrous sight. Workers and visitors doing their own thing. Today, there are higher buildings, finer streets, brighter pubs and more bars and nightclubs. Manly is a must!

FRANK MORRIS

There's no better way - or place - to find some solace then paying a visit to Manly. As the famous old saying goes, "you'll be seven miles from Sydney and a thousand miles from care." Sydney writer, Joseph Glascott, described going to Manly as 'an adventure."

Some years ago he wrote "A trip to Manly retains the special flavour of a visit to the seaside. "Manly evokes the charms of the sea rather then the pounding of the beach waves."

The hub of Manly, apart from the holiday-style sea side attractions, is The Corso. Its mall, with pavement cafes, fish shops and coloured awnings, had become the focal point of the village.

Maly's history is also a fascinating talking point. The first life-saving club, the Manly Surf Bathers, was founded in 1907.

GOCHER

Earlier this century, newspaper publisher, William Gocher, defied the law by bathing at daylight "and won the freedom for the public to bathe" in the ocean after 6am.

Were the natives a manly lot?

Governor Phillip could not be blamed if he looked back on his vist to Manly with some displeasure. It was there that Phillip was speared by a native Willemering while speaking to another native, his new-found friend Bennelong.

Luckily, at Phillip's side was the colony's assistant surgeon-general, William Balmain, who extracted the spear. Phillip refused to punish the offender. 

Manly was so named because of the "manly appearance" of the natives first encountered there. So come to Manly, where, as the music hall refrain goes, "you'll be beside the sea, beside the sea"

 

<< This article was written in 1984..

 


MAGIC FOR YOU! THE MAGIC PAPER TRICK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR … AND MAKE YOUR DREAMS COME TRUE!

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 05 January 18

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