Grand Years with Frank Morris

Searching for posts in the month of: October 2017

Number of blogs returned: 1 to 4 records of 4

SPECIAL: The orphan girls that sailed from Ireland to Australia

ORPHAN GIRL: ONE OF THE YOUNG LADIES CHOSEN TO MAKE THE TRIP TO WESTERN AUSTRALIA MADE A CHART OF HER FEELINGS ON THIS LONG, LONG TRIP.

They travelled over-land to Dublin … and sailed to Plymouth.

SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

After the first successful deployment of the good ship Travencore, another list of passengers was drawn up and the Palestine later set sail from Plymouth on November 26, 1852.

Among the girls chosen to make that fateful journey to Australia was Mary Dooley. Mary and three other girls replaced several girls deemed medically unfit to make the long journey to Australia. The girls that set sail on the Palestine were:

Pat O’Brien, Biddy O’Brien, Mick O’Brien, Catho O’Brien, Mary O’Brien, Catho Cunningham, Mary Geraghty, Mary Flanagan, Mary Flynn, Ms Staunton, Mary Taylor, Ms Egan, Biddy Fitzgerald, Ellen Hansberry, Mary Kilroy, Biddy Tully, Mary Cunningham, Biddy Bodkin, Mary Butler, Mary Neary …

Mary Flynn, Biddy Concannon, Henry Noone, Ms Nilfagle, Cathie Hughes, Georgia Ne, Marie Lorre, Maria Egan, Celia Coldman, Catho Glynn, Mary Cathe, Mary Mannion, Mary Dooley, Esther Tully, Ms Carberry, Mary Carberry, Eliza Trasta, Catho Coleman, and Ms Atkins.

DESCENDANTS OF RELATIVES

They travelled over-land to Dublin and from there sailed to Plymouth, England, prior to their departure for Australia.

The orphan girls arrived in Western Australia on April 28, 1853, after five long and probably terrifying months at sea.

The aim of the project is two-fold: Firstly, to trace the Orphan Girls’ present day descendants, if any, in Australia. Secondly, to research any possible descendants of relatives in Country Galway. Our aim, therefore, is to collate all the descendants and to reconnect them with their ancestors here in the community.

Anyone wishing to contact the coordinators of this project or make comment can do so through Facebook at: -https://www.facebook.com/Mountbellew-Workhouse-Cemetery-Restoration-814745548596059/


YOU BEAUT!: PERCEPTION OF HEALTHIER FOOD BEING SERVED IN SANDWICH SHOPS IS GOOD FOR BUSINESS. BUT FISH ‘N CHIP ARE DEFINETELY NOT OUT.

BITS & PIECES: FISH AND CHIP SHOPS ADRIFT FROM HEALTHIER MARKETS

Fish and chips are OUT and good wholesome sandwiches are IN!

The perception of rising health has encouraged healthier eating habits that are negatively affecting fast food operators that have struggled to project a healthy image to consumers. In this case, fish and chip shops are the ones to watch out for.

In Australia, consumer awareness has led to healthier eating habits over the past 5 years. The growing popularity of healthy food has influenced the performance and product make-up of the fast food industry.

FISH & CHIP SHOPS DRIFTING

The more traditional types of fast food – burgers, pizza and fish and chips – have declined as a share of industry revenue; while sandwiches, salads and juices are conducive to good food and have increased their share of the revenue.

The lesson to come out of this: Overall, fast food industries who offer good wholesome sandwiches are promoting the rising statistics of good health.

<< Information from IBIS/WORLD. Rewritten by Frank Morris.

Illustration: No go. Tasty fish and chips is one meal which is not conducive to healthy food.


VALE: AUSTRALIAN ACTOR JUDITH MCGRATH DIES AGED 70

Actor Judith McGrath won the plaudits of the public at large for her role as “Po Face” in the television drama Prisoner. McGrath, born in Brisbane, appeared in 253 episodes, between 1979 and 1984, of the show. Her part as the prison officer Collen Powell was voted as one of the “most loved” in the drama. She earned the nickname of “Po Face” because of her dry wit. McGrath also appeared in Neighbours, A Country Practice, Winner and Losers and All Saints.  – FM. SMALL SCREEN SUCCESS – FEATURING JUDITH MCGRATH – LAST ITEM.


WHAT A LAUGH: WAIT AND SEE WHAT HAPPENS?

BITS & PIECES: CHIMPS MAY BE STRUCK DOWN WITH ALZHEIMER’S, TOO!

Holy Tarzan! And now, it’s the chimps.

The human being may not be alone in its struggle against Alzheimer’s disease, according to the Metro, London.

“For the first time,” the paper said, “the sticky plaques that characterise the condition have been found in the brains of older chimpanzees.”

MORE ADVANCED AGE

It added: “A team at Northeast Ohio Medical University studied 20 brains from chimps ages from 37 to 62. They discovered beta-amyloid plaques in 12, and increasingly larger volumes in the brains of those of a more advanced age.

“However, it is unclear if they cause dementia in the animals.” said the Metro.

<< Metro, London, August 2017.

Illustration: Chimps have Alzheimer’s Disease. It is NOT clear what caused it.


BITS & PIECES: GET ME WEIS ICE CREAM, SAYS UNILEVER?

They did. And Unilever loved the taste for Weis.

“Global food giant Unilever has snapped up the Australian ice cream company Weis, “said the SMH. The Dutch-British consumer goods company said it had entered into a definitive agreement to acquire the Queensland company.

Already, Unilever own the Streets ice cream company and more than 400 other consumer brands from around the around the world like Lipton, Bushells and Dove.

<< From SMH, 2017.


MANAGED TO HANG ON: WESTCOURT WENT STRIDE FOR STRIDE WITH LINGLE AND IT PAID OFF.

MELBOURNE CUP: 1917 AND FOR WESTCOURT THE TIDE TURNS

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

There has never been a dead-heat for first or second in the Melbourne Cup. On one occasion, in 1933, there has been a tie for third; but the judge must have been sorely tempted to call it even when Westcourt and Lingle went across the line almost on terms in the 1917 Cup.

Both W.H McLachlan on Westcourt and P. Brown on Lingle thought they had won. As far as the crowd was concerned a decision for a dead-heat would have been acceptable. But the judge, the only man in the right place to see, said that Westcourt had won by a short half-head.

It would have been bad luck for Westcourt if the verdict in the 1917 Cup had gone against the horse. Two years previously, Westcourt had lost the Melbourne Cup to Patrobas by a mere half-neck as a three-year old.

That year, Westcourt had an exasperating run of minor placings in important races. He did not win a race as a three-year-old, but his placings were high on the list.

ELEVENTH HOUR

Westcourt suffered an injury to his near foreleg and a veterinary surgeon declared the horse would never race again. With patient care, the effect of the injury was minimised but the possibility of a complete breakdown was never far from the thoughts of his connections.

Set for the Australian Cup in the autumn of 1917, Westcourt was forced to withdraw from work. His Melbourne Cup trial was the Melbourne Stakes on Derby Day but he ran third to Cetigne. It was only then, did Westcourt reach his eleventh hour.

From 10th position in the Cup field, Westcourt was able to improve his position to the point of taking the lead after turning for home. Westcourt, under heavy punishment from McLachlan, went stride for stride with Lingle, hanging on for a game win. Wallace Isinglass was two lengths further back, third.

It was McLachlan’s third winning ride in the Melbourne Cup.

<< The Melbourne Cup from 1861, Maurice Cavanough; 1960; Lloyd O’Neil Pty Ltd, Melbourne, Victoria.

Illustration: Who was responsible, says The Strike newspaper. Because of the sudden-death Great Railway Strike in NSW, who was to blame? How many people would have been game enough to take the train to Melbourne?                                                                                                         


THE WHISPER: ELSPETH BALLANTYNE (LEFT) AND JUDY MCGRATH IN A SCENE FROM THE HIT DRAMA PRISONER.

SMALL SCREEN SUCCESS: PRISIONER ALMOST TURNED THE WHOLE TV WORLD CRAZY

FRANK MORRIS

Australian drama Prisoner was the only show to take wayward women down the path to a correctional facility called Wentworth Detention Centre. For the time it was made, just about everybody got a good going over -- some of it quite bizarre.

The series was produced by Reg Grundy Organisation and aired through Network Ten from February 27, 1979 to December 11, 1986, a total of 692 episodes.

It was released in the United States and United Kingdom but with copyright injunction, it was retitled Prisoner – Cell Block H. The series was released in Sweden, and various other countries, with a cult following.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 27 October 17

TRUE STORY: FINAL! “WE WERE IN LOVE”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHAT’S HAPPENED?: SHE WAS GOING TO RING SEVERAL TIMES. SHE GAVE TRYING TO REMEMBER.

But the same awful silence continued.

SELECTED BY FRANK MORRIS

She said she loved me. I wanted it all to go on forever. And yet all the time there gnawed at my mind something which seemed to warn me that it would end.

I never knew much about Nancy. She worked as a receptionist in a West End Hotel and that her folks were dead. Sometimes I used to think that she might have been hurt by some man, for there was always in her eyes a sort of haunting sorrow.

But she never spoke to me about that ever again. After the first few days she grew palpably fond of me. Then came the time when she said she loved me. That is an experience which millions of other people have had, but to me it seemed unique.

Then came that day when I said: “I’ll see you tomorrow at six outside Romanos”.

But the didn’t turn up. I waited for a hour and a half. I was frantic with worry. The worst part of it all was that I didn’t know where to find her.

WHAT HAPPENED?

My only hope was that she would write to me. I waited a day, a week, a month, a year – but not a line. Meanwhile, I put advertisements in the agony columns, asking her to write. 

But the same awful silence continued.

What happened? Did she have an accident? Did she really love another man? Or was she afraid to share her life with me?

I don’t know. I don’t suppose I shall ever know.

For a brief, crazy moment, while I watched that girl in the Strand, I thought that she might be Nancy’s daughter.

I wanted to go up and speak to her, but something inside held me back. A moment later she had vanished like a dream.

Since that day I have cursed myself for not talking to that girl, for I have a hunch that maybe she was Nancy’s daughter.

Picture: I remarked to Nancy: “Remember, I’ll meet you at Romano.”
<< The Daily Mirror, Britain, August 30, 1940.
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ONE DOWN, ONE TO GO: JOHNNY GILBERT BRACES HIMSELF FOR HIS LAST GUNFIGHT. GILBERT WAS SHOT DEAD BY POLICE AT A PLACE CALLED BINGALONG, NSW, IN 1865.

BUSHRANGERS: PART 4. DEATH OF JOHNNY GILBERT!

The Waverley Hotel, Sydney, said a habitual drinker, was a “bush shanty” and a dangerous abode. Bushranging author, Roy Mendham, comes out with a real secret!

FRANK MORRIS

January 14, 1854, It was Saturday night, the hotel was the site of a murder when publican John Davis was found hacked to death. A newspaper of the time described the crime and said that “it was a bloody mess.”

The newspaper said, “On the left of the head was a terrible gash extending from eye to the ear, the bed and bedding being saturated with blood. Under the bed was found a blood-stained axe which had done the deed.”

What made locals even more fearful was the isolation of Bondi Junction and that the murderer was known to be “on the loose and in their midst.”

The newspaper went on to explain the scene: “This event has struck no small degree of dismay into the residents of the neighbourhood … there being no police protection, the nearest point they could send for a constable being [at] Paddington, a distance of nearly three miles.”

Enter Joseph Roberts.

A veil of suspicion immediately fell upon Joseph Roberts, the nephew of John Davis. Roberts, a “mild looking youth [who was] said to be 17 years of age” and worked for Davis, was now missing.

Several mounted police started a search and 228 km south of Sydney Roberts was found at Collector near Canberra. He told police that he was riding to the goldfields. Local residents said Roberts’ guilt was “purely circumstantial” and “vouched for the boy’s good character.”

NOT GUILTY

The murdered man’s widow, Mrs Davis, later gave evidence that “her unworthy spouse was a habitual drunk.” She had married Davis in September 1853 and stayed with him for three days.

At his trial Roberts showed the court how intelligent he was; he pleaded not guilty to the charge “in a firm and collected manner.” The trial stirs up intense local interest. When the case was heard on April 6, 1854, the court was crowded and the officials had difficulty in maintaining order.

Despite the fact that he fled on the night of the murder he was arrested and found to have money on him -- $200. His uncle was known to carry large sums of cash, and did so when he was killed.

The jury, alas, found him not guilty of Davis’s murder. He left the place soon afterwards and headed for the Goulburn district. However, Roberts soon fell in with a ‘bad crowd’, or ‘flash gang’, as the local landowners called it. 

Joseph Roberts was born in Canada.

He and his uncle came to Australia in the 1850s and got hooked on the world-wide publicity about the gold discoveries in Victoria. They arrived in Melbourne from New York on board the Revenue in 1852.

MENDHAM: IM RELATED

Roberts is listed on the ship as 10 years old, making him only 12 at the time of his uncle’s murder. This conflicts with contemporary newspaper reports in which they described him as being 17 years old.

In his book The Dictionary of Australian Bushrangers, Roy Mendham claims that after the murder of his uncle Joseph Roberts became ‘Johnny Gilbert’, a bushranger who later rode with the infamous Ben Hall and Frank Gardiner. He was later a key part of their gang.

In the wanted notice for Johnny Gilbert from the Colonial Secretary Office in 1863, he is described as:

“Between 22 and 24 years of age, boyish appearance, 5 feet 7 or 8 inches high, between 9 and 10 stone, light brown straight hair, worn long in native fashion, beardless and whiskerless; has the appearance and manner of a bushman or stockman; and is particulately flippant in his dress and appearance.”

Joseph Roberts/Johnny Gilbert was killed by police at Binalong, 37 km north-west of Yass, on May 13, 1865. His body was taken to Binalong police station where it was put on display. Locks of hair were taken for souvenirs.

He was buried on May 16 in bush near Binalong, where his grave can still be seen today on the outskirts of town.

Pictures: End of the road: Johnny Gilbert, born in Canada, dies as an outlaw. Alone: Johnny Gilbert … guns ready to blaze.

<< Based on the article, A Bushranger at Bondi, in 18??
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ALL THE NEWS:

PSYCHOLOGIST MADE GOING TO THE DENIST LESS PAINFUL

DR EVELYN HOWE, BORN IN 1947, WAS A DENTAL PSYCHOLOGY PIONEER AND THE FIRST WOMAN TO EARN A DENTAL PHD IN SYDNEY.

MARINE ARTIST WAS A TRUE MASTER

OSWALD BRETT, BORN IN 1921, WAS A TRUE MASTER OF PAINTING SHIPS. BRETT MADE A PROFESSIONAL LIVING OUT OF PRIVATE AND CORPORATE COMMISSIONS. HE HAD THE WONDERFUL FACILITY FOR PLACING HIS SHIPS IN HIGH SEAS … AS IF THEY WERE MOVING.
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CLOSE FINISH: BETTY CUTHBERT FINISHES THE 4X100 METRES AHEAD OF HEATHER ARMITAGE (GREAT BRITAIN) AND ISABELLE DANIELS (USA). THE AUSSIE’S SET A NEW WORLD RECORD OF 44.5.

FAMOUS CELEBRITIES: PART 2. BETTY CUTHBERT AND HOW SHE WAS DISCOVERED

She was sent into the Olympic Games as Australia’s No 1.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

The 100 yards championship of Australia was the yardstick for Betty Cuthbert.

However, she was unable to qualify for the final, being third in her heat. But two days later, just 3 weeks before her eighteen birthday, she won the 220 yards in 25 seconds. The time was irrelevant.

The grass track had been soaked by heavy tropical rain that competitors were in part ankle deep in mud; and to avoid two very bad patches, the race was run from end to end of the arena on a curve all the way. The importance of the race was that Cuthbert beat five opponents of international repute.

SHE WAS THE BEST

Marlene Mathews was second, and Norma Croker was third; fourth and fifth were two 1952 Olympic sprinters, Shirley Strickland and Winsome Cripps; sixth was Nancy Boyle, the Victorian Champion, then considered a probable Olympic representative.

This was the first time the sporting public, outside of NSW, had heard of Betty Cuthbert.

But consistently good times in Sydney during the Australian winter climaxed with a world record 200 metres of 23.2 in September. This culminating in a double victory in the Australian Olympic trials sent her into the Games as Australia’s No. 1.

<< Olympic Saga: The Track and Field story Melbourne 1956; by Keith Donald and Don Selth; Futurian Press, Sydney; 1957.

Next month: The similarity in the careers of Betty Cuthbert and Marjorie Jackson.

Picture: Like a breeze: Betty Cuthbert flashes home in the Olympic 200 metres. Then came Stubnick, second, and Mathews, third.………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

HOLMES AND MORIARTY: IS IT THE END?

SPECIAL: FINAL. SHERLOCK HOLMES AND FRIENDS – THE VARYING DEGREE OF PERSONIFYING!

He donned tweeds or the oppressively respectable Victorian frock-coat!

FRANK MORRIS

These appurtenances “are stereotypical symbols of Sherlock Holmes … all, alas, are apocryphal … part of Sherlockian lore,” writes Jack Tracy in The Encyclopedia of Sherlockiana.

“Sidney Paget, the famous illustrator of the stories for Strand magazine, was fond of wearing the deerstalker … and the Inverness cape, which is essentially a travelling cloak, to protect one from railway soot and road mud.”

This “traditional” apparel was not worn by Holmes in London. Rather, he “donned tweeds or the oppressively respectable Victorian frock-coat” asserts Tracy.

The American actor William Gillette, who originated Holmes on stage in 1899, is attributed to supplying the detective with a meerschaum pipe. When he illustrated the stories for Collier’s magazine, the American artist Frederic Dorr Steele based his representations of Holmes on Gillette’s character.

PAGET ILLUSTRATIONS OKAY!

Doyle complained that Paget had made Holmes more handsome than he intended. But the author considered Paget essential to the success of his stories, and especially asked for him as illustrator of The Hound of the Baskervilles.

Paget work from his studio, at Holland Park Road, Kensington. From the time he illustrated A Scandal in Bohemia, Paget produced a total of 357 drawings, ending with The Adventures of the Second Stain in December 1906.

Some of the earlier drawing were imperfect. But Frederic Dorr Steele defended Paget, saying that any defect in the engraving was partly because of the crudity of the reproduction. Those who have seen the originals say the illustrations lost much in the publishing.

James Montgomery, in a Study in Pictures, wrote: “It would be impossible to overestimate the influence that he (Paget) exerted on the hearts and minds of countless thousands who based their conceptions then, as they continue to do after sixty years, on his interpretation (of Holmes).”

HOLMES DIDN’T CHANGED

Montgomery found that Paget was more accurate in his illustrations than was Steele.

In 1953, the Sherlock Holmes Society of London used a portrait of the great detective as a Christmas card; however, the portrait, though first published in the Cornhill magazine in 1951, was done by Paget and found in waste-paper basket by his wife who rescued it.

Montgomery thought it possibly the most satisfactory portrait of Holmes; a wonderful character study of the Master in a contemplative mood. In Peter Haining’s The Art of Mystery and Detective, it was said the “first appearance of Holmes no doubt helped The Strand circulation.

Haining added: “Particularly the earlier ones by Sidney Paget played a significant part in the success story by giving the world a physical likeness of Holmes which has changed little to this day.”

Paget married Edith Hounsfield in 1893 and had five children; one son and four daughters.

Sidney Edward Paget died on January 29, 1908.

<< Sherlock Holmes and Friends came about when Frank G. Greenop wrote the storyline, I think it was in 1974. Frank Morris wrote the story in 2002. It was never published until it appeared in Grand Years.

Pictures: Honest man: Frederic Dorr Steele defended Sidney Paget for his engravings. Holmes hadn’t changed. Paget’s likeness of Holmes has changed little to this day.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 20 October 17

GHOST SHIPS: The Mary Celeste and other derelicts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SHE WAS A GHOST: MARY CELESTE WAS ALMOST STATIONARY IN THE LIGHT NORTHERLY AS THE DEI GRATIA APPROACHED HER. SHE WAS ABANDONED.

The map showing Mary Celeste’s course from New York to the Azores from where she drifted in an abandoned state. The first of a three parts series.

ALAN LUCAS

To nonbelievers in paranormal events there are no such things as ‘ghost ships’. The term ‘mystery ships’ is now being better accepted.

In this context one of the most ghostly mystery ships of all time was the 282-ton, 98-foot long American hermaphrodite brig Mary Celeste. Built in Nova Scotia in 1861, she was found abandoned east of the Azores in the North Atlantic by the British brigantine Dei Gratia during November 1872.

Coincidentally, before leaving New York the captains of both ships dined ashore together at the time their respective vessels were in the hands of stevedores. Mary Celeste’s cargo was 1700 barrels of commercial alcohol destined for Genoa, Italy.

When Captain Reed Morehouse of the Dei Gratia caught up with Captain Benjamin Briggs’s Mary Celeste, he called across to her but received no response; conditions at the time being a light northerly over a calm sea with Mary Celeste yawing and luffing under reduced sail.

When Dei Gratia’s mate Oliver Deveau and a seaman boarded her not a soul could be found, despite everything appearing to the shipshape.

NO THOUGHT OF VIOLENCE

Deveau and his assistant first checked the main cabin and found a sewing machine with a reel of red cotton and a thimble near the remains of a recently eaten meal, plus the captain’s time piece. This scene of domesticity refuted any thought of violence; as did their finding of Captain Brigg’s petty cash and gold locket along with his wife and daughters’ neatly folded clothes.

The galley and crew quarters proved to be in good order and the only anomalies being the storeroom’s empty preserved-meat drawers and the ship’s papers, sextant and chronometer missing. The logbook was still aboard but it held no clues as to why Mary Celeste was abandoned.

A salvage crew from Dei Gratia was put aboard Mary Celeste and both ships sailed to Gibraltar, arriving in the evening of December 13, 1872. Gibraltar’s Admiralty Proctor -- Mr Solly Flood -- “had the ship arrested in the customary manner’; while Captain Morehouse lodged a salvage claim.

ENTER THE ‘GHOST SHIP’

Despite numerous official examinations in Gibraltar, no firm reason for her abandonment could be established beyond the possibility of vapour from nine damaged casks of alcohol causing a minor explosion, despite there being no signs of fire damage.

Under the circumstances, it was hardly surprising that the public soon tagged Mary Celeste as being a ‘ghost ship’.

On March 25, 1873, the Vice-Admiralty Court in Gibraltar awarded a sum of money to Dei Gratia for services rendered, which represented about one-fifth of the sworn value of Mary Celeste and her cargo.

The strange circumstances of Mary Celeste remain a source of conjecture. Yet drifting derelicts in her era were surprisingly common, many being abandoned during or immediately after extreme weather events.

Nearly all derelicts were wooden ships whose hulls kept them afloat when swamped; especially if their cargos were logs. So serious was their threat to shipping that the Derelict Vessels Report Act was passed in 1896 by the British Parliament with a fine of five pounds levied against anyone failing to report a drifting derelict.

<< Ghost Ships – the Mary Celeste and other derelicts by Alan Lucas; Afloat Magazine, August 2017.

Next November: What even stranger mystery was the derelict of the American sailing vessel Ellen Austin which sail in 1881?

Pictures: The man who was not there. Captain Briggs was called by the Captain of Dei Gratia to the Mary Celeste but received no response. No one’s home. Mary Celeste was found abandoned.

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DISASTER IN THE FOG: IN 1910, THERE WAS AN APPALLING RAILWAY ACCIDENT WHICH OCCURRED IN VICTORIA. IN THE EVENT, WHICH WAS AT RICHMOND STATION, 9 PEOPLE WERE KILLED AND 110 INJURED.

COMING NEXT YEAR. WATCH FOR PART 2 OF THE AUSTRALIAN CHRONICLE NEWSPAPER SERIES FROM 1901 TO 1984.

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ALL THE NEWS …
THIS RED INSIGNIA MEANS THAT A STOP PRESS NEWS ITEM HAS BEEN POSTED ON THIS SITE. WHEN IT’S WORLD-WIDE IT HAPPENS RIGHT HERE -- GRAND YEARS. KEEP LOOKING. IT CAN HAPPEN AT ANY TIME.

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BIOGRAPHY: JOHN CHRISTIAN WATSON -- THE FIRST LABOR PM IN THE WORLD

FRANK MORRIS

He was born at Valparaiso, Chile, when his parents were on their way from Britain to New Zealand. But he made his mark on the Australia political front.

His name was John Christian Watson and he became the first Labor Australian prime minister in 1904. He was the youngest incumbent to hold the office at the age of 37. And that’s not all. He was the first Labor prime minister in the world but it was short lived, however.

He governed Australia for 3 months and 21 days until it came crashing down.

Several attacks by the press for misrepresenting the aims and objective of the party made him very irate indeed. Watson said the party rejected a “definition of socialism” pinned on it by its opponents. He criticised Free Trade Party and Anti-Socialist leader George Reid for his attack that since the advent of the Labor Party wages had gone down.

Watson said the Labor Party’s aim “was to make life” happy and content for everyone. He was a moderate and a pragmatist who moulded colonial labour interests into a federal platform. He resigned his leadership in 1907; he left parliament in 1910.

MODICUM OF SHAPE

He only held the position for a short time but it was long enough to make an impression of him as a Labor Prime Minister. Deakin wrote: “His simple dignity, courage and resource during his short lease of power, made him hosts of admirers and many friends.”

Deakin, who took over from George Reid as prime minister, lasted only 4 month 9 days in the position, before Andrew Fisher swooped in for Labor. The two battled with the prime ministership twice more until Fisher scored again, serving for 3 years and 1 month.

With Billy Hughes and others, he was expelled from the Labor Party in 1916 for supporting conscription.

Later in life he pursued other business interests, one of which was the presidency of the National Roads and Motorist Association in 1923. He was there until his death in Sydney on November 18, 1941.

Watson will be remembered as an influential figure who helped put a modicum of shape into the ALP.

<< Monash Biographical of the 20th Century Australia, 1994; Frank Morris from the series Great Aussie Firsts.

Picture. There’s one man. Australia’s first Labor ministry in 1904 with Labor Prime Ministry John Watson, centre.
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RED PANELS: AMERICAN 1906 STEAMED CAR MADE BY ABNER, WILLIAM, JOHN AND WARREN. IT TOOK 90 SECONDS TO HAVE IT MOVING AFTER A COLD START. THE MODEL PICTURED ABOVE WAS MADE BETWEEN 1914 AND 1917.

THE CAR MY FAMILY WOULD LIKE – DARING YOUNG MEN AND THEIR STEAMING MACHINES!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

The Locomotives on Highways Act inflicted on motorists in Great Britain three quarters of the way through the 19th century banned speeds of over about 7km/h and insisted that vehicles had be preceded by a man carrying a red flag.

It did much to retard the development of the motorcars in the UK. It was repealed in 1896. The speed limit was then raised to 20km/h and the flag bearer dispensed with, possibly because even lawmakers realised he would be too puffed out at the new speed limit.

Steam was a serious business, particularly on the market in the USA in the early 20th century. The advantages over internal combustion included silence, lack of fumes, flexibility, smoothness and acceleration. But the problem was getting a steamer engine, moving from scratch.

(The steam engine’s furnace had to be lit, then there was a pause for the steam to be ready so it had plenty to pull the beast. FM)

FIRST CARS WERE STEAMERS

The decline of the steamers was hastened when Cadillac began offering self-starters in 1912. This, in turn, complicated Whites sojourn into steamers which lasted until 1911. The simpler Stanley Steamers went on until 1927.

Steamers were fast, with a surging acceleration due to torque being good from low engine speeds. Every stroke was a power stroke; while, in the internal combustion engine, only one stroke in two is. Steamers were easy to drive, vibrationless, quiet and gears were needed.

Incidentally, Australia’s first cars were steamers, starting with the Shearer in 1885. It lasted until 1895. Then came the Thomson in about 1896. Interest in steam cars has never really died. The Gvang steam powered sports car, built in the 1970s, was exhibited at a motor show in Sydney.

It has no clutch or gearbox and was capable of 320km/h.

Sadly, it ran out of, no, not steam, but funds.

<< Those daring young men in their steaming machines by Eric Wisemen; Restored Cars, Sept-Oct 2017.

Picture. A 1905 White steam car. A similar vehicle was used by American President Taft in 1911. They were built from 1905 to 1911.

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HELLO!: BIG TED, WITH GRAHAM AND THREE OTHER CHARACTERS OF THE ABC PLAY SCHOOL SHOW, HAVE THEIR PHOTO TAKEN.

THE KIDS SAY, “HELLO TO BIG TED” … HE CATCHES UP WITH PLAY SCHOOL AT A SYDNEY CLUB

Guess what? School kids found time to say “hello to Big Ted” in the flesh. Big Ted, and four other characters, joined the throng of fans of the ABC Play School Show at the Revesby Works Club, Sydney during the school holidays. “Charlie, the husband of my eldest daughter, Vanessa, met the manager of Revesby Workers, and said, ‘I know the man who made Big Ted,’ said Graham Byrne, the creator of Big Ted. The rest is history. Graham Byrne went along. He met the presenters and the many of kids who turned up.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 13 October 17

SPECIAL COVERAGE: The orphan girls that sailed from Ireland to Australia

CONNECTION: THE GOOD SHIP PALESTINE PREPARING TO SAIL FROM IRELAND TO AUSTRALIA WITH ORPHAN GIRLS IN 1853.

Descendants of Mountbellew who sailed on the good ship Palestine in l853.

SPECIAL CORRESPONENT

A team of genealogists and researchers are diligently working on a project to trace the descendants of the Immigrants of the ship Palestine that left Ireland and travelled to Australia in 1853. But this team needs your help.

On this ship were 33 workhouse orphan girls from Galway. The team is trying to connect with as many of the Orphan Workhouse Girls descendants in Australia with the hope of telling their stories – stories that establish where they came from, and, hopefully, would connect with their Irish cousins!

In addition to this a TV documentary will commence this year on the project. (The Editors are eager to connect with any possible descendants.)

The magazine is aware that there are 12 girls not on the list from Mountbellew workhouse from County Galway – Ann Archer, M. Border, S. Burrow, S. Evans, J. Mayne, M. Rawlings, H. Stillmon, W. Warde, S. Pinder, M. Cooke, E. Arnold and M. Hall. From information garnered in Australia, we now believe they were from another facility – Ennis workhouse, County Clare.

BRIDE-SHIPS OF DESTITUTE GIRLS

This group travelled on the Palestine with the Mountbellew workhouse orphan girls in 1852 and arrived in Western Australia on April 28, 1853 after five long months at sea. (The editors are hoping that descendants will recognise the names and places published in Irish Roots magazine.)

A group of 33 young girls were transported to Australia on Palestine from Mountbellew workhouse, County Galway in 1853. It was renowned that these ‘bride-ships’ carried destitute girls from orphanages, poorhouses or those involved in a sponsored fare during the Great Famine.

In 1852, The Mountbellew workhouse at that time, had 418 inmates, 130 able bodied females. On November 6, the same year, there were 392 inmates and 124 able bodied females. On November 20, there were 401 inmates, 134 able bodied females, though 32 able bodied females were discharged in this week; presumably, there were 30 which had assisted emigration.

The county in 1845 to 1847 was very much affected by the famine. In 1841, the population was 443,000. Ten years later, it had fallen to 322,000. More than 73,000 persons died between 1845 and 1850.

Approximately, 11 per cent of the population emigrated over the next 5 years. By 1891, the census showed 215,000 inhabitants of the county.

TRANSPORT TO VAN DIEMEN’S LAND

In 1852, in early September, an entry in the Mountbellew Poor Law Union Board of Guardian Minutes, described a letter from Lieutenant Saunders (R.N. Emigration Agent), stating that the Emigration Commissioners had instructed him to make a selection of 30 young women from the female inmates in Mountbellew workhouse who were candidates for emigration to Van Diemen’s land.

Their passage to the colony was going to be on the good ship Travencore, which sailed from Plymouth on September 23, 1852. Saunders requested to be informed of the day he could make his selection.

On September 10, 1852, there was a revealing entry: That Lieutenant Saunders Emigration Agent from the limited time given to purchase 500 yards of grey calico for the necessary number of shifts, which are complete and prayed the Boards sanction to his so doing: submitted the following list of articles necessary to complete the outfits prescribed by the Colonial Land and Emigration Commissioners.

He requested the Boards attention to buy: 40 yards calico, 210 yards of flannel, 540 yards cotton, 360 yards cashmere and 120 towels. That the Master be authorised to purchase the above articles required was resolved. – Adapted by Frank Morris.

Anyone wishing to contact the coordinators of this project or make comment can do so through Facebook: -https://www.facebook.com/Mountbellew-Workhouse-Cemetery-Retoration-814745548596059/

<< Irish Roots Magazine, issue 102, Irish Roots Media, County Wicklow, Ireland.

Next month: Final! After of the first successful deployment of passengers had been sent another list was drawn up.

Pictures: Orphan girl. Mary Dooley, who born in County Galway in 1826, was the daughter of Edward Dooley. Edward was born 1780-1800. Mary Dooley was an orphan and ended up in the Mountbellew Workhouse in 1852. Project coordinators: Outside the Mountbellew Workhouse are from left: Martin Curley, Mary McLoughlin, Kathleen Connolly and Paula Kennedy.                                              


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BITS & PIECES: DONYALE LUNA WINGS INTO SYDNEY

FRANK MORRIS

Blast from the past … that’s American super model Donyale Luna absorbing the crowded spotlight of Sydney’s past 50 years ago. The place was at Roselands shopping centre, a social epicentre of suburbia. She was flown out by the now defunct Daily Mirror in 1967.

She wore the slinky see-through gown the made onlookers “not quite sure where to fix their focus” reported the newspaper.

DIED AT 33

And supporting Donyale Luna during the “epic” was a bunch well-known Aussie model. Seeing this photo brought a flood of memories. I was working on the Daily Mirror in charge of the Luna troupe.

As I remember they were exciting times. I’m buried in the crowd down there at the side, well back.

She was the first black model to appear on the cover of American Vogue. She died from a heroin overdose at age 33.

Picture: Rear view. Donyale Luna in that see-through gown.


PERFECT MATCH: JAKE LAMOTTA AND SUGAR RAY ROBINSON CREATED THE PERFECT RIVARY.

BITS & PIECES: BOXING ICON DEAD: JAKE LA MOTTA -- 83 FIGHTS, AND MIDDLEWEIGHT TITLE

FRANK MORRIS

“Hit me, don’t worry” Jake LaMotta screamed out. “He was 55 and looked really tough”, say Robert Di Niro. “I didn’t realise it until I’d reached his age but you can really take a punch.” 

Di Niro was preparing for his brilliantly captured film of Jake LaMotta in Raging Bull. The film was made in 1980 and is regarded as one of the best movies ever made. Di Niro won an academy award in 1981.

LaMotta, who died aged 95, was not a great fighter but one of toughest, a boxing beast that lapped up some of the most brutish behaviour dished out by opponents and came out on top. He was middleweight champion in1949 by stopping the titleholder Marcel Cerdan at Briggs Stadium in Detroit. He held the title until 1951.

He fought Sugar Ray Robinson six times and won only one bout. He told the Times he had “mixed up feelings” about the film. “Then I realised it was true. That’s the way it was.”

On the Lower East Side of Manhattan, Giacobbe LaMotta was born on July 10, 1922. He was one of five children. He father, a Sicilian immigrant, peddled fruit and vegetables.

THROUGH THE ROPES

His schoolmates lived in fear of LaMotta. In the rat infested tenement where they lived he, according to Robert Goldstein of the Times, LaMotta “attacked bullying schoolmates with an ice pick, and beat a neighbourhood bookie into unconsciousness with a lead pipe while robbing him.”

Goldstein continued:

“He emerged as a leading middleweight in the early 1940s, having been rejected from World War 2 military service. In February 1943, he dealt (Sugar Ray) Robinson the first loss of his career … after knocking him through the ropes. Robinson won their other five fights.

“LaMotta successfully defended his title twice, then lost it to Robinson in 1951 when their bout in Chicago was stopped in the 13th round. LaMotta was a bloody mess but never hit the canvas.

After he lost the title his career took a dip. He retired and then came back in 1954 for a few more bouts. He then quit for good. He was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1990.

Picture: Evasive. Jake Lamotta showing some of the defensive slips and rolls on an opponent.


BOMBORA: HERE, JACK EDEN CAPTURED A HUGE “DEATH WAVE” WHICH SCOTT DILLON WAS THE FIRST TO RIDE IN TO THE SHORE. THE PHOTO WAS USED BY THE SUN (SYDNEY) NEWSPAPER IN A FEATURE BASED ON THE SURFABOUT STORY ON BARE ISLAND.

THE SURFING SIXTIES: SURFABOUT’S COVERAGE – BARE ISLAND BARES ITS TEETH

Bare Island is a stretch of treacherous water near La Perouse, NSW. By 1964, it had claimed 12 lives.

JOHN MORRIS-THORNE*

Massive seas, the biggest recorded in eight years, pounded Sydney’s coastline.

At Bare Island, especially, mountainous sea swells pitched from the ocean depths and exploded resoundingly against the reef.

Bare Island is a stretch of treacherous water near La Perouse recognised by local fishermen as the most dangerous bombora in the Sydney area.  So far it has claimed twelve lives.

Here is how I reported the scene.

The reef 300 yards off shore was a mass of boiling surf as mountainous swells, peaking to an estimated 25 ft., peeled off left and right at the speed of an express train.

Many of the bystanders shook their heads in astonishment as it seemed well nigh impossible to handle monsters such as these.

Big-sea rider Scott Dillon was the first to untie his big gun, then Tony Burgess. But two out in these conditions was inadvisable, until two pint-size juniors, Chocko Ferrier and Karl Saw, offered to act as pick-ups in case of emergency.

THE METHOD

Launching their boards from the rocks to the rear of the island the small group paddled out wide gingerly approaching the critical zone.

Adopting the correct method in big seas at a strange place the group watched several sets roll through before moving in closer to the take-off point.

A small set of about 18 ft. reared up behind the reef and Scott Dillon moved off on the first heavy ridden at Bare Island.  Tony Burgess followed suit on the next set and the spell was broken.

Gradually moving in closer on each wave the boys felt more at home as their gun boards continued to escape the curl.

Unfortunately, the wind which at first was blowing off shore had turned in-shore forcing the peak surf to break too quickly thus preventing the boys getting right into the bin.

UNPARALLELED SPEED

Following directions from the many onlookers on the cliffs, including a dozen aborigines, the riders scampered to sea as some of the biggest sets of the day marched in through the Heads.

Words of advice could be heard shouted across the water as the boys endeavoured to escape the impending wipeout as the huge ominous sets standing in black lines moved in nearer.

The unparalleled speed of the big gun enabled them to make it over the top of the first two sets with ease.

Chocko Ferrier on his slower dog-board brought the crowd to its feet as he climbed in seeming slow motion up the face of the biggest wave of the day-clearly 30 ft. plus-to escape possible destruction by mere inches.

The excitement grew tense as the gun boards, caught wide of the box seat, battled for position as the third set thundered up,  Scott Dillon on his back hand took off right on a wave comparable with any seen at Waimea Bay.

But the fourth set saw Tony Burgess in trouble as the wave sucked hollow at the take-off.  The wave collapsed and Tony’s board quivered as if to break then catapulted skyward saving it from being carved up on a 15 ft. cliff break of bare rock.

Tony, however, was safely picked up, but it took over thirty minutes to retrieve his board which had drifted towards the oil tankers berthed 600 yards away.

This was a splendid effort by these four surfers. But once thing is for sure: Bare Island is no places for the beginner.

<< Surfabout, Vol 1, No 3, 1963.

NOTE: “John Morris-Thorne” was the name used by Frank Morris in the sixties.

Pictures: Evocative images. “Eden’s camera captured countless images which infused new life into what can described as an irrepressible period of our history,” wrote Frank Morris in Surfabout Revisited Collection catalogue. The top photo was taken by Jack Eden on the day. Moment of triumph: Scott Dillon said (left), “I was part of the surfing sixties. It’s my greatest joy that I was there.” Scott, on his big gun, became the first surfer to crack a huge “death wave” at Bare Island.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 05 October 17

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