Grand Years with Frank Morris

Searching for posts in the month of: October 2018

Number of blogs returned: 1 to 4 records of 4

A TO Z HOME CARE: Peace of mind is a two way street for carer and recipient

FRANK MORRIS

A FATHER & CARER: REMEMBER, IT’S TOUGH FOR BOTH PARTIES. Below: A WIFE CHECKED IN WITH HUBBY BEFORE SHE WENT OUT SHOPPING. REMEMBER, A CRISIS CAN HAPPEN  AT ANY MOMENT. THERE IS NO TIMETABLE.

In Australia, last count, there were 2.7 million unpaid carers. Which means 1 person in 8 are carers who provide informal assistance to an individual. It would cost $60.3 billion dollar – or over $1 billon a week-- to replenish this service.

Believe or not, commonsense must prevail at all times. The carer’s role is a responsible and onerous one and especially so if one is holding down a demanding job. It is said that the stress levels can be greater than for workers who dependents are children.

The greatest family conflict arises when our parents become our dependents, says a leading psychologist. “It’s tough for both parties.”

If there is a common thread that’s flagged through every stage of the working carer’s role it is this: be prepared for the unexpected. From the start, the carer must understand that peace of mind is not a one-way street. But the carer MUST make it happen, at all times.

From the outset, the carer must understand that:

THE NEED for care is somewhat unpredictable.

A CRISIS can happen at any time – and it usually does. There is no timetable.

AGAINST A MISHAP

INVARIABLY, a crisis strikes at an awkward, inconvenient, unpropitious moment.

HIGH per cent, aged over 65 years, have a medical problem or disability.

THE condition of an aged person can deteriorate quickly.

There are others. These are the ‘red flags’ if you like that can make life terribly difficult. Knowing what facilities are available and what precautions one can take against a mishap occurring can make all the difference.

Of the people 65 years and over, many tend to ‘age in place’ – that means at home. They want to be as independent as possible. But there will be a time when, if you like, a second fall, or deterioration of the person’s mental faculties will become an overwhelming problem.

That’s why the role of carer is vitally important.

NEXT: A TO Z HOME CARE: The strength of ‘personal’ emergency alarms.


MO STATUE: Mo sits on table in our lounge room doing a lot of thinking

FRANK MORRIS and Barbara Byrne (Bartlett)

Dear Frank

I’d like to tell you a tale about MO. He was, as you said, the undoubted comedy king from the 1930s. MO is a statue, 26 centimetres tall. You probably know him better as Roy ‘MO’ Rene or ‘MO’ McCackie.

My father, Alec Bartlett, bought it for his mother, Harriet. He was 14 years old. Nanna and I grew up seeing MO. Then mum sold our house, Carlton, and gave MO to Yvonne, my sister. Yvonne kept MO in her lounge at faraway Chipping Norton, with a photo of myself and dad standing opposite.

‘LIVE’ REVIEW

Yvonne restored MO. It was early 2000, I think, and was very proud of her work; very proud of the way he looked. He was getting rather shabby, Yvonne thought. Yvonne died 12 years ago in 2006.

MO sits in our lounge room, now. He is dreaming. At the corner of English Street and Railway Parade, Kogarah. It is believed in its day to have has ‘live’ review theatre. It later became known as Carlton stadium.

Did he ever perform at this venue? To our knowledge he did not.

Love Barbara.


Classic Repeat: Mighty Mo -- authentic feel of vaudeville is “uncannily perceptive”`

FRANK MORRIS

MO & GARRY: Mo McCACKIE, ACTOR GARRY MACD0NALD, TAKES ANOTHER APPLAUSE IN THE GRAND FINALE OF THE 12TH ANNUAL MO AWARDS IN 1987. Below: TWO COMEDIANS GET TOGETHER – STAN LAUREL, OF LAUREL AND HARDY FAME, AND ROY RENE,  WHO PLAYS MO McCACKIE.

The greatest of all Australia comedians, Roy ‘Mo’ Rene, made a triumphant return to the vaudeville stage in the high-stepping, and glittery musical Sugar Babies.

But, alas, it’s not the inimitable Mo up there. Instead, it is the highly talented actor Garry McDonald doing his acclaimed impression of the inimitable Mo. McDonald first brought Mo back from the grave at the Nimrod Theatre six years ago. It was great stuff.

In the thirties and forties, Mo was the undoubted King of Comedy. Vaudeville was his domain. And vaudeville thrived on his inexhaustible talents. Well, those clowning and slapstick days were created in Sugar Babies at Her Majesty’s.

MO WAS AWARDED

Although the show has struck out with some critics, the Sydney Morris Herald’s H.G. Kippax awarded McDonald with a B-plus for his efforts. Kippax described his Mo as “uncannily effective” even though “much of his material is very unlike Mo’s. He added: “McDonald can be very funny indeed without gagging at all.”

Kippax also served up some kind words to popular club performer Marty Coffey, rating his juggling act as “brilliant” and one the “best moments” of the show.

“Here is the authentic feel of vaudeville,” wrote Kippax.

<< Mighty Mo was released in newspapers around NSW in 1986.


SOCIAL JUSTICE: The barriers against older people not getting work

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

ON THE HEAP: OVER 50 YEARS OLD AND WITHOUT A JOB. AT ONE TIME HE WAS WORKING AS SECOND IN CHARGE OF A GAS PETROLEUM OUTFIT UNTIL THEY AMALGAMATED. Below: AT 54 YEARS OLD, IT CAME AS A SHOCK. MAVIS WORKED FOR A RETAIL COMPANY IN THE ACCOUNTS DEPARTMENT.

Older Australians have a great contribution to make, but this is dependent on their own capacity: as well as the kind of opportunities provided.

It is important to ensure the older generation have access to flexible workplaces … that will allow them to work or to retire in dignity.

Immediate barriers to the employment of older workers include the lack of workers compensation and restriction on income protection insurance. Age discrimination throws up other barriers, too. Older people are stereotyped as … slow and unproductive.

DOWNSIZING

Older workers may be seen as more expensive and not worth the trouble and cost of training. They are most vulnerable to redundancy where companies are downsizing and restructuring.

A recent national survey found that that 25 per cent of people 50 years and over experienced some form of discrimination -- like being denied employment, promotion or training, or subjected to derogatory treatment.

Many had given up looking for work. As a result, those most affected, included people on lower incomes and single parents. Unemployment among older workers involves huge losses to the economy.

COMBATING AGE

Australia’s Aged Discrimination Commissioner believes the cost of losing mature workers amounts to around $10 billion each year. By comparison, keeping just 3 per cent more people over 55 in work would gain $30 billion annually.

Those are just the economic costs and benefits.

Unemployment has shocking effects on individual self-esteem and family finances. Combating age discrimination in the workforce will require more than raising awareness and appealing to the better nature of employers.

It will need regulation to ensure older workers, particularly the low-paid workers, have a better access to employment that is flexible to their needs.

<< A place at the table: social justice in an ageing society, 2016-2017.

NEXT: After rescuing over 700 people, mainly women and children, from the rapidly-sinking Titanic, the Carpathia, headed for another assignment which she never came back from the 1914-18 war.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 26 October 18

Les Miserables: Final. Louis Blanc writes about the characters in the play

FIERY COURAGE COMBINED WITH THE DEEP FEELING OF HUMANITY.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

PEACEFUL: ON JUNE 8, 1832, THREE DAYS AFTER THE BLOOD-BATH WAS OVER, TRANQUILITY SEEMS TO BE RESTORED AND THE LAKE AND SURROUDING PROPERTY, NEAR WHERE THE BARRICADES WERE PLACED, WERE AT PEACE.

“There were young boys present who loaded the guns, using for wadding the police notices they had stripped from the walls: when this failed, the insurgents tore up their shirts for the purpose.

“Thus, they awaited for coming events surrounded with silence and in darkness; themselves, as it seemed, the only moving things in that vast city. And, knowing well that the greater portion of them would never see the morrow’s sun.

“Their exultation was immense, and seemed to increase with the increase of danger. A boy who was fighting in the foremost ranks, was fearfully wounded in the head. He was just twelve years old. But Jean, nothwithstanding the most urgent solicitations, could not induce him to quit the post he had assumed.

“This fiery courage, on the part of the combatants of St Mery, was combined with a deep feeling of humanity.”
(Gavroche, a Les Miserables urchin, fought and died at the barricades.)

“Informed by a sub-officer in disguise, of the critical situation of dragoons on the Quai Morland, the colonel of the regiment left the barracks at the head of the second detachment. And, with his trumpet sounding, took the direction of the Place de l’Arsenal.”

(Policeman Inspector Javert, of Les Miserables, went behind the barricades disguised to spy on the insurgents.)

“A young man, brother of an illustrious savant, exclaimed, raising aloft a tri-coloured flag: ‘Let him who loves me, follow me!’

“We have seen in what manner Jeanne made good his retreat from the barricades. From that moment the police had had their eye constantly upon him, informed of his every movement by a traitor whose treacherous assistance they had purchased.”

(M.Thenardier -- a master the house, extortioner, exploiter, blackmailer, thief – who caused Jean Valjean to be captured.)

Louis Blanc’s conclusion!

“How many a man, perhaps, has died a peasant or a common soldier, who, if circumstances had brought him forward, would have be greater than Cromwell! At all events, however stormy the condition into which a republic might have brought our country, it would never have reduced it to what we now see: the social, the individual character debased; Frenchmen utterly indifferent under national misfortune and disgrace; the genius of the country decaying, disappearing; the nation itself dying, exhausted, corrupt and rotten.

<< Les Miserable is published by Cullen Publications Pty Ltd, l987, and the Cameron Mackintosh (Overseas) Limited.


NO NEWS! Paper forced to close: not by the revolution but by police

FRANK MORRIS

NEARLY ALL NEWSPAPERS OF THE GLOBE DID AN EXTENSIVE COVERAGE OF THE CIVIL WAR, OR INSURRECTION, OF PARIS, ON JUNE 5, 1832.

IN PARIS ESPECIALLY, SEVERAL PAPERS WERE CLOSED AND SEALS WERE PLACED BY ORDER OF THE POLICE. THE PRESSES OF THE TRIBUNE, QUOTIDIENNE, COURRIER DE L’EUROPE, THE BRID’OISON, THE MODE, AND THE PRINTERS JOURNAL, MONITEUR TYPOGRAPHIQUE, WERE SEIZED BY POLICE OFFICIALS.

SO MUCH FOR LIBERTY!

IN SYDNEY, THE SYDNEY HERALD THE HOBART TOWN COURIER, THE TASMANIAN AND THE SYDNEY GAZETTE CARRIED THEIR SHARE OF NEWS.

NEWSPAPERS IN THIS COUNTRY COVERED THE EVENTS AS LATE AS OCTOBER 14, 1832.

NEXT: SOCIAL JUSTICE: Removing barriers from employing older people.

THE VIETNAM WAR: 1965 to 1975 -- most divisive period in Australia in the 20th Century!

FRANK MORRIS

MENZIES TO SEND TROOPS: TO TELL PARLIAMENT TODAY

ACTION NEAR SAIGON: FIRST TRAINEE KILLED FIGHTING ON FOREIGN SAIL

ALL THE WITH LBJ

This is a dedicated front cover from OZ magazine.

11 PM AND THE BOMBS STOPS

No, it wasn’t the end of the war. In 1968, there are peace talks going on between Viet Cong and Saigon. It was President Johnson’s bid to turn “fighting into talking”. The war began in 1965.

COMING IN MARCH, 2019.


CLASSIC REPEAT: “Ahem, my name is Roy ‘Mo’ Rene, or ‘Mo’ McCackie or ‘Mo’ …”

MO’S FAMILY ALWAYS CAME FIRST. HE WAS HAPPY WHEN HE WAS WITH FAMILY AND ON STAGE.

FRANK MORRIS

THE THREE FUNNYMEN: LEADING TRIO OF SHOW BUSINESS – ROY RENE, JACK DAVEY, BROADCASTER, AND HAL LASHWOOD.

“Roy had a love-hate relationship with the audience,” Sam Van-der Sluice, son of the ever-great Roy Rene McCackie. He could love them and yet hate them. I remember he used to say when he got his first “belly” laugh, ‘I’ve got ‘em, I’ve got ‘em pal!’

“And he would get them too!,” said Sam. “Dad got most of the laughs.” The humour of Mo could be deadly and dangerous. Take “You dirty mug!” for instance. You didn’t know when he was having you on or being deadly serious.

Strike me lucky, you dirty mug! – it was the familiar sound-piece that Mo used mostly in the show.

Here’s a clip:

COLONEL:

Men, when the sun is on high at midday, 30,000 Swahili warriors will come swarming over the fortress wall armed with spears and clubs. But we fight them to the last man, we will fight them to the last drop of blood! Any questions?

Private MO:

Yes … Can I have the afternoon off?

LASHWOOD:

McCackie … why are you late?

MO:

I ran over a silent cop on the corner of Market and Pitt Street.

LASHWOOD:

There is no silent cop on the corner a Market and Pitt Street.

MO:

There is now!

PHILLIP:

I saw you outside the Hotel Australia.

AUBREY (MO):

That where I’m staying.

PHILLIP:

At the Australia.

AUBREY (MO):

No … outside.

PHILLIP:

You don’t tell me.

AUBREY (MO):

I just told you.

SPENCER THE GARBAGE MAN:

Do you like the perfume of my new after shave?

MO:

It’s lovely Spencer … but you’re still coming through!

AMY ROCHELLE:

Oh, Moey. We could go to the ball as “Beauty and the Beast”.

MO:

Oh, lovely. But you don’t look anything like a beast! 

MO’S FAMILY ALWAYS CAME FIRST. HE WAS HAPPY WHEN HE WAS WITH FAMILY AND ON STAGE.


Queen Elizabeth: Celebration 90th birthday – it’s been a swell time!                                        

Queen Elizabeth II, the longest reigning monarch in British history, is celebrating her 90th birthday. And the following year, her Sapphire Jubilee, marking 65 years on the throne. There have many joyful moments: royal weddings, babies galore, and, of course, a robust 70 years of marriage with Prince Philip.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 19 October 18

VALE RON CASEY: He left a wide mark on the radio dial for people who had problems!

I AM HERE TO EXPRESS MY OPINION AND THAT’S WHAT I DO, CASEY SAID.

FRANK MORRIS

RAYS OF LIGHT: THREE INTERVIEWS WITH CASEY BEHIND THE MIKE IN THE 1980s. Below: LEAGUE CLUB BAN: WHAT CASEY SAYS. Below: I DON’T THINK BRITT’S THAT CRASH HOT, SAID CASEY.

Some people like him, other people hate him. But many people disliked him once he opened his mouth.

“After leaving Channel 9, (Ron) Casey had a three-year stint with Channel 10 before talking on talk-back radio,” writes Ray Chesterton in his obituary. Casey died, aged 89, last week.

After this brief stint, he resumed a relationship that began 1967 “when he was recruited” by legendary program director to 2SM John Brennan.

Casey’s talkback career had begun.

Casey in talk-back radio was an immediate success. His broad-church approach, however, was with 2KY, a station I listened to non-stop. Over the years, I had deducted enough material to fill a book. Here are few instances of him behind the mike:

CASEY vs THE CABBIE: COMPLAINTS OVER TAXIS ‘DRIVING ON’

“Several hundred listeners of Ron Casey’s talk-back breakfast program complained that they were not getting a fair deal from Sydney taxi drivers,” I wrote in 1984.

The following is an extract from that interview:

Casey: What is the legal requirement of the taxi driver? And what is the legal right of the hirer.

Kelly (official, DMT’s Taxi Division): The driver has no right to refuse a fare. My advice to anyone who hails a cab is to get into the cab and then tell the drives where they want to go.

Casey: But some of complaints have been that the taxis weren’t pulling up. They would keep on moving, then drive off.

Kelly: Any complaints the public would like to put to the department will certainly by investigated.

Casey: If the number of the taxi that refuses a fare is taken and reported, your department will do something about it.

Kelly: Yes. But I would impress upon people that they must get the right tie cab number, location and time.

Casey: Do you get many complaints?

Kelly: We do; quite a few. No complaint is shelved or disregarded.

Casey: Is there a condition under which a taxi driver, outside of someone being objectionable or drunk, can refuse a fare?

Kelly: No. The only time if 2pm and 4pm when a lot of shifts are changing over.

“I must say that ninety-nine per cent of taxi drivers I’ve had anything to do with have been people doing a difficult job the best way they can,” Casey said. “But that one-half per cent are the people who are causing the trouble.”

DO YOU REMEMBER: The Casey bags Britt affair?

2KY’s breakfast ‘oracle’ Ron Casey, I reported, obviously does not subscribe to Emerson’s claim that “beauty is in the eye of the beholder.”

When Britt Ekland’s name was mentioned on his open-line this week, Casey began firing from the lip.

“I don’t think Britt’s that crash hot,” he said. “I watched her in the James Bond movie the other night and she had wrinkles under her eyes even then.

“With all the spare time Britt’s had on her hands, I don’t think she’s that much better at 41.”

Thank goodness Britt didn’t wear hair curlers in the movie.

THE GOOD SIDE: Casey goes in to bat for the cabbies?

Outspoken radio commentator Ron Casey, I reported, didn’t pull any punches when he went into bat for Sydney’s taxi drivers on his 2KY talk-back breakfast show.

The issue at hand was the impending introduction of a 50 cents tax on drivers at airport cab ranks by the Federal government.

“It’s obviously the brainchild of some bureaucrat in Canberra who has nothing better to do,” said Casey.

After speaking to several angry cabbies on his open-line, Casey said: “I’m with the taxi drivers all the way.

<< Written for magazines and newspapers.

COMING: SOCIAL JUSTICE – BACK TO WORK FOR WOMAN AGED 74, WHAT ABOUT THE MEN!


MR ETERNITY: The man that Sydney wondered about as he chalked the pavement

THAT SHY MYSTERIOUS POET WHOSE WORK WAS JUST A SINGLE MIGHTY WORD, SAID DOUGLAS STEWART.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

THE MAN: PAINTING CAPTURES THE ENIGMA OF ARTHUR STACE. Below: STACE IS PHOTOGRAPHED FINISHING ONE-WORD SERMON. Below: ETERNITY GETS ALL THE ATTENTION.

Since 1930, the writer with the yellow crayon had kept his identity secret except from a few close friends, wrote Tom Farrell. Stace expressed himself by scrawling a one-word sermon, Eternity, on Sydney’s footpaths, from the 1930s to 1966. Arthur Stace, until then, was an enigma.

But it was the Sunday Telegraph who first unmarked Stace to the Sydney public as Mr Eternity. Farrell said that paper scored the first press interview in 1956 with the man who had masterminded Eternity.

Eternity soon became a power word in Sydney’s mythology. 

As night fell on December 31, l999, five million Sydneysiders looked forward to hours of splendid celebrations, on the eve of the Third Millennium. There had not been a scene like it since the Bicentennial festivities of Australia Day 1988.

THE SMOKE CLEARED

By now, literally billions were watching on television, their attention fixed on Australia … the first of January 2000 would arrive, there came a massive fireworks display – perhaps the most spectacular ever seen in Australia.

And then, as the smoke cleared. It came into view … just below the apex of Bridge’s towering arch ... the first word written of the third millennium, in distinctive copperplate script: Eternity.

The crowds cheered with gusto. This was a word deeply and affectionately associated with the history of Sydney. Using chalk or crayon every day, Arthur Stace had died 32 years ago, but (his name) was far from forgotten.

May Thompson was 84 years-old on New Year’s Eve, 1999. Mrs Thompson watched the television broadcast from the comfort of her bed. She was a frail, silver-haired old lady, a widow of more three decades … had known Arthur Stace intimately in life.

For fourteen years, from 1951 to 1964, her late husband, Lisle M. Thompson, had been Stace’s beloved pastor at the Burton Street Baptist Tabernacle in the Sydney suburb of Darlinghurst. It was the Rev. Thompson, in June, 1956, who persuaded Arthur to ‘go public.’

But for Thompson, it is possible, even likely, that Arthur Stace’s identity would never have been known.

<< Tom Farrell’s The man the Sydney’s wondered about, Sunday Telegraph, 1956; Mr Eternity: The story of Arthur Stace, Roy Williams with Elizabeth Meyers, Acorn Press, Sydney, 2017.


Hazelhurst: It comes to the community as an art gallery – “I think the area love it”

FRANK MORRIS

WISE DECISION: DIX HAWK AT HAZELHURST IN 1995. OPTED FOR GOOD DECISION AT HAZELHURST. Below: ART GALLERY: SPACIOUS GARDEN HAS A SPECIAL VIEW.

What’s the story behind the Hazelhurst Art Centre? It all started in an old Gymea house, largely hidden by tall trees and intervening vines, was resolved in 1995.

After much consultation, Sutherland Shire Council decided to name the property Hazelhurst Regional Art and Crafts Centre. The council announced 80 per cent of the land would be kept as open space, the old house refurbished and new structures built.

“I think the community loves it,” John Rayner, who retired in 2015 as general manager of the council.

The owner of the property, Ben and Hazel Broadhurst “had bequeathed” the area to the council “for use as a community facility and place of culture.” They had bought the land and built a house on it in 1945. They were accused “of breaking post-war austerity rules.”

“To thwart the government and developers, they registered the property as a farm and brought in goats, chickens, a pony and cow.”

COUPLE FORM HAZELHURST

In the late 1970s, when the couple “were unable to maintain the grounds and unpaid rates were accumulating, an arrangement was reached for the council to take over the maintenance of the property on the basis Hazelhurst would be used for community purposes after their deaths.”

Ben and Hazel (his second wife) adopted three children orphaned during a bombing raid on London. Two of the children, Denise and Ralph, lived at Hazelhurst; while their sister was brought up by Hazel’s mother.

Dix Hawk, a Canadian cousin of three adoptees, also came to live at Hazelhurst “and became part of the family.”
Ben was a vegetarian and “greenie” long before it was fashionable.

<< Use of The Leader’s story as a background for this article.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 12 October 18

COOK’S ENLIGHTENMENT: Raise the Endeavour -- his famous voyages!

IN AUSTRALIA, CAPTAIN COOK HAS GONE DOWN IN HISTORY AS THE MAN WHO DISCOVERED THE EAST COAST OF OUR NATION. IT’S CAPTAIN COOK’S 290TH BIRTHDAY AND HE IS PROBABLY GRINNING LIKE A CHESHIRE CAT THAT THEY’VE DISCOVERED THE ‘BLUE-RIBBON’ ENDEAVOUR.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS 

REMARKABLE FEATS: THE THIRD SMALLEST SHIP THAT CAPTAIN COOK SAILED IN ON HIS FANTASTIC VOYAGE, WAS ONLY 97 FEET LONG. Below: SIR T.O.M. SOPWITH, AN AVIATION PIONEER, SAILED IN TWO AMERICA’S CUP RACES AND LOST THEM IN ENDEAVOUR (1934i AND ENDEAVOUR II (1937). Below: COOK WAS STRUCK DOWN AND KILLED.

When Captain Cook returned to England in 1771 from his greatest voyages, the Endeavour sank into obscurity until some Massachusetts whalers bought her, with several other English ships, writes Australian Marjorie Hutton-Neve.
Hutton-Neve is a recognised expert on Cook.

The present search is led by American archaeologist, Dr Kathy Abbass, Director of the Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project.

Dr Abbass said that “research of the Endeavour shows, the she was “renamed Lord Sandwich and used by the British Board of Transport to carry troops to North America during the American War of Independence. In August, 1778 she was scuttled.”

“Some time later, when the identity of the old hulk became public knowledge, she was practically torn apart by souvenir hunters. The rescued sternpost and a quadrant, (at the time of writing) were now in the Maritime Museum of the Newport Historical Society.

COOK WAS REMARKABLE

“The carved oak crown and some stern ornaments were held for safety in a Newport library. T.O.M Sopworth failed to win America’s Cup in 1934 with his yacht Endeavour; he was attending dinner given in his honour and presented with the old Endeavour Crown.

Lieutenant James Cook, RN, aged 34, the second child of James and Grace Cook of Great Ayton, Yorkshire, was married at St Margaret’s, Barking, Essex, to Elizabeth Batts, age 21, on December 21, 1762.
There were six children of the marriage.

Cook took command of the Endeavour in 1768. As well as an expert navigator and hydrographic surveyor Cook was a competent astronomer.

The three journeys he performed ran from 1768 and 1780; and although he is most remembered for the first, all three were remarkable feats of navigation and discovery. The first voyage in the HMS Endeavour was performed without any escorting ship.

Endeavour’s most notable achievements were the observation of the transit of Venus, the charting of the coast of New Zealand and Australia.

Cook kept his ship at sea for nearly three years without losing a single man to scurvy.

DEATH OF COOK

Endeavour was a “bark” of 370 tons, 97 feet long, 29 feet at its widest arc, was bought for 2500 pounds by the navy, refitted and armed with 10 carriage and 12 swivel guns for the voyage to Tahiti to observe the transit of Venus.

Endeavour’s journey lasted 2 years, 9 months and 14 days during which she was wrecked, and repaired by her crew on the Australian coast. This was at the present site of Cooktown, on the shores of what is now called the Endeavour River.

The reef on which she was wrecked, 24 miles from the shore, is now called Endeavour Reef.

Cook and his men spent six weeks making repairs to the ship, a far longer time than they had stayed at Botany Bay.

Captain Phillip Park King, who also lost a ship here, said he moored in the same location as Cook and even found a heap of coal left behind by him on which to operate his forge.

On his third voyage on the HMS Resolution to Hawaii, fighting broke out between white and native men over the theft of a small boat. Cook was struck down and knifed in the back. He was killed on February 14. The two ships were returned to England on October 4, 1780.

Dr Abbass’ date/figures have also been use in the article.

<< Marjorie Hutton-Neve in Captain James Cook, Historic Australian, Issue 4, 1987; The Sydney Morning Herald, September 20, 2018; Australian Pathways, Spring, 1998; The Pacific Ocean of Captain Cook, W.C. Penfold & Co Publishing, Sydney, NSW.


VALE: RON CASEY … FORMER 2KY BREAKFAST HOST AND CHANNEL 10’S LEAGUE ANNOUNCER DIED LAST TUESDAY. NEXT WEEK, I PRESENT SHORT CLIPS FROM HIS RADIO SHOWS.


Johnny O’ Keefe: He died 40 years ago as the “king of Australian rock”

I PENNED THIS STORY IN OCTOBER, 1978, THE YEAR HE DIED, FOR A SERIES OF NEWSPAPERS.

FRANK MORRIS

ON STAGE: HE WAS A HARD ACT TO FOLLOW. Below: DOING WHAT HE’S DOING, THAT WHERE HE BELONGED.

There is a subtle similarity between the late American actor Humphrey Bogart and Australia’s “Mr Showbiz”, Johnny O’Keefe, who died suddenly last month, aged 43, of a massive heart attack in St.Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney.

When Bogart started on the road to becoming a box-office legend, Otis Ferguson, one of the most gifted and erudite film critics of the 1940s, wrote that “You had the feeling that he was writing his own parts.”

Jazz saxophonist Bob Bertles, who played in one of O’Keefe’s famous bands in the late 50s, was quoted recently as saying: “When he was on stage he definitely looked as though he belonged there.”

Johnny O’Keefe will be a hard act to follow.

Like Bogart, O’Keefe was an original.  In the past twenty years, there has been no other all-round entertainer to match him for his sheer will to entertain.

O’Keefe’s career, which spanned over 26 years, oscillated between success and failure so many times that even he lost count.

Wedged in somewhere between those hectic, roller-coaster years, were several attempts to crack the big-time in America and Britain.

He came close…

LIKE A PRIZE-FIGHTER

In recent years, O’Keefe spent most of his time promoting his “Johnny O’Keefe Show” to clubs all over NSW.

It was three hours of high-powered frenzy, and as John Clare wrote in an issue of the National Times last month, “He was…bounding on like a well-worn prize-fighter, hurling himself into it and urging the crowd to clap and sing along.”

And they did – time and time again.

In 1976, O’Keefe launched his famous “Door Deal” package to clubs – and played to packed houses.

In an interview I did with O’Keefe last year, he said: “It’s top shelf entertainment.  We have a team of entertainers who know what the business is all about.

We go into clubs and say that if you can’t afford to pay us then we’ll take the risk and help you to promote the show.

“If the show draws a good crowd we make money or, at the very worst break-even. If it fails we’ve taken the risk and the club is not out of pocket.”

O’Keefe said nostalgia played an important role in the success of his “Door Deal” shows.

HARD WORKER

“It’s only natural that it would,” he said, “mainly because some of the early songs I recorded became popular hits.”
Andrew Urban, editor of Encore, the variety industry’s news-magazine, said: “O’Keefe had deep-seated ideas about the entertainment business and was concerned about the industry.

“He was a hard worker, a dynamic promoter and would never let you down, he always delivered the goods.
Urban said that in the short time he knew him, O’Keefe was never afraid to back his own talent.

“His ‘Door Deals’ were largely responsible for increasing mid-week crowds in clubs,” Urban said.

“But O’Keefe isolated the club from any risk and stacked his confidence up against the income.”

O’Keefe knew he’d be right – nine times out of ten, because he worked at it.


JOHN LAWS: He was “resplendent” in his white suit

On the cover for Open Road’s first colour magazine in 1986, was none other than John Laws the prominent radio personality and car collector looking okay. But it doesn’t stopped there! Laws looks resplendent in a white suit with a typical serious look on his face.

“I’ve always been a sucker for MG’s,” Laws said. “You get a marvellous exaggerated sense of speed. Looking back, the first MG I ever bought was far more important to me than any car I own now.”

RESTYLED

Open Road was relaunched as a ‘quality colour magazine’ after 56 years being published as a newspaper” said a spokesperson.

According to Jim Millner, the then President of the NRMA, it was “biggest change in Open Road’s history.

Good Roads was launched in 1921. It was renamed The Open Road with colours on the cover and improved layout in 1927. The newsprint versions of The Open Road in 1971. The Open Road was back as a colour magazine in 1986.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 05 October 18

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