Grand Years with Frank Morris

Searching for posts in the month of: October 2019

Number of blogs returned: 1 to 4 records of 4

DRUG RAID: Raid that led her on the journey to faith

CASSIE COOPER as told to Lauren Martin

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

CASSIE COOPER WITH HER ‘REALLY GREAT’ FACILITATOR, SALVATION ARMY CHAPLIN BRIAN RENNIE.

LAST EASTER MARKS A YEAR SINCE CASSIE COOPER FIRST WALKED INTO CHURCH WITH HER DAUGHTER. IT WAS A TURNING POINT IN HER JOURNEY TO FAITH.

My house was raided by police on February 10, 2018. It was a rude awakening from a sixteen year stint in and out of drug abuse.

I was addicted to smoking ice, an addiction unknown to anyone in my family until the police raid. They actually raided my mother’s house because I was living in the shed.

My life had become that bad.

When I woke up the next morning in a prison cell, I was gobsmacked; heartbroken. I just thought about my mum’s heart as to whether it was still beating.

I know what it would have done to her. I would not be here without my mother.

She’s still kept that door open for me, even after her home was raided and the embarrassment that brought her.

That feeling I had that morning in the cell was gut-wrenching. I realised that I’d been caught, and the time had come to learn the really hard part of living; so that I wouldn’t do this ever again.

It was time to change.

Brian Rennie, a Salvation Army court chaplain, was my godsend. I came into contact with him at the courthouse on one of my court dates. Eventually, I received a suspended sentence.

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DREAMS …
“THERE SEEMS TO BE SOMETHING IN DREAM IMAGES THAT REMINDS US OF LANGUAGE … WE HAVE THE FEELING THAT THEY MIGHT MEAN SOMETHING”, SAID THE ENGLISH POET, SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE.
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My solicitor suggested that I see Brian and do the Positive Lifestyle Program (PLP) run by The Salvation Army.

Brian opened doors that I didn’t think could open; he showed me things about myself I didn’t know existed.

Brian is a really great facilitator; he’s really understanding. He’s put up with me, from being a rude drug addict … to what I am now. He has seen quite a transformation.

Last Easter, my daughter asked me where the Easter Bunny came from. I said, “I don’t know.” So I asked my mum if we could go to church at Easter. My daughter just loved it.

It was all for my daughter initially, but in the end I started going to church for myself.

Northlakes Salvation Army is my ‘home away from home’. I feel really welcome. God is working miracles. Brian gave me a Bible; I really love that Bible. I read it every day.

I take it everywhere I go.

SOURCE: This article was adapted from The drug raid that led to faith; Warcry, April 13, 2019.

Below: Easter time Cassie walked into a church -- for the first time; it was the turning point.

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DREAMS …
THE PAST IS ALL ONE TEXTURE, WHETHER FEIGNED OR SUFFERED; WHETHER ACTED OUT IN THREE DIMENSIONS; OR ONLY WITNESSED IN THAT SMALL THEATRE OF THE BRAIN WHICH STAYS BRIGHTLY LIT ALL NIGHT LONG. -- ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON, SCOTTISH WRITER.


GOODBYE JACK: Son John says au revoir to Jack on behalf of the family … “Dad was a man’s man.”

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, JOHN EDEN

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

SURFING LEGEND, BOBBY BROWN, PLOWS DOWN A WAVE WITH A BALANCD, SWEEPING RIGHT HAND TURN. HE WAS A SURFING EXTROVERT. THE YEAR WAS 1964. HE WAS ONE OF JACK’S DISCOVERIES.

“LIFE, GROWING UP WITH DAD, WAS FUN” SAID JOHN.

Welcome to this celebration of Dad’s life. I would like to say a few words on behalf of Mum, Adam, Michelle, Danielle and myself.

Life, growing up with Dad, was fun. Surfing, fishing and his crazy friends.

Dad used to have a motorbike and a MG. The motorbike, a white Triumph I believe, had a sidecar with roof racks.

Dad was a man’s man.

In an era of “toxic masculinity” … he taught me respect for women, but not to be afraid to be a man.

He surrounded himself with colourful strong men: my uncles and his surfing mates: Scott Dillon, Midget Farrelly and The four amigos/musketeers – Dad, Reg Millar, Norm Robins and Frank Morris.

I am a third generational fisherman and I have fond memories of bogging black nippers with dad and uncle Bill; and to go fishing the next day -- crabbing and prawning at night.

We used to do surfing safaris to find new surfing spots.  I remember one trip to Spot X where we surfed all day and then slept on the beach on tarpaulins.

Another time Uncle Tony came on a surfing safari, and collected a mountain of lobsters, which we boiled on the beach and ate with bread and butter.

Dad was smart, practical and a trailblazer.

Dad self-taught himself photography.

There used to be these amazing conversations about aspects of his craft. I remember that he would go on and on about “the mysteries of light.”

He used to tell us to “take lots of pictures, and photograph everything: not just the surfers, but the beaches, the people, shops and even signs.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
PART OF JACK’S TRIBUTE TO THE UNFORGETTABLE AND INDOMITABLE BOBBY BROWN: “BOBBY LIVED AND SURFED TO THE MAX. I FIRST MET HIM WHEN HE ABOUT ELEVEN. AT AGE 13, HE WAS THE FIRST TO NOSE RIDE AT CRONULLA. RIDING THE POINT, HIS SURFING PROWESS BECAME LEGENDARY.”
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In a time when no-one wants to go to a museum; when Dad’s Surfing exhibition was on there would be lines out the doors. I’m told that many a time, old surfers would find themselves in a picture and marvel.

When mum got onto the National Gallery, a historian came out and had a look at Dad’s stuff. They took the collection because it was social commentary, a photographic record of the sixties onwards; it was all there.

Some of Dad’s collection is in the Maritime Museum, too.

I remember a time when he had to photograph mirrors. He had to invent a way of using flashes to do it.

He put together the first surfing magazine, Surfabout, with Frank Morris.

Dad had an earthy practical wisdom: Know what you like son; don’t confuse lust for love; be high on life son, not drugs.

He was also good with his hands and made many things. He was an upholsterer.

Dad loved to talk. Tracks magazine described Dad in the following way:  “Jack can talk under six foot of wet cement ...he’s a human time machine...”

The one time he was silent was the time Jack met John Denver. Eddie, his son-in-law, had obtained tickets to the John Denver concert.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
SURFABOUT REVISITED FITTED THE PERTH MUSEUM’S GOAL – PROMOTING ITS HISTORY COLLECTION … ON THIS OCCASION, WE HAVE CAUGHT “THE WAVE OF SUCCESS”, WRITES THE MUSEUM. THE EXHIBITION WAS A CHANCE TOO GOOD TO MISS. “THE STUNNING BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS BY SURF GURU, JACK EDEN, HAD NOSTALGIA, STYLE AND WIDE APPEAL”.
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Dad had a great time and then Eddie took him to the VIP area to meet the great singer. All dad could say was, “Hello John,” and then his lower jaw just hung open.

No surfing stories, not another word came out apparently. A first for Dad.

Dad the ballet partner.

Michelle told me an interesting story recently. She learned ballet from a young age. She reminded me that Dad used to be her dance partner in the pas de deux.

Dad received many honours from the surfing community including being inducted into the Surfing Hall of Fame. My kids, after that, called him “Poppy the Legend”.

Dad was a strong family man.

We Eden’s love family. Even if we don’t see each other regularly, we will do anything for family.

Barbara, my wife, and I encouraged favourite aunties and uncles for our kids as a safety net.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
VALE. BOBBY BROWN, ONE OF NATURE’S GENTLEMEN, A MR NICE GUY OF SURFING IN AUSTRALIA. TRAGICALLY, BOBBY WAS KILLED IN A DISPUTE OVER A BILLIARD TABLE AT HIS LOCAL HOTEL. HE WAS AGED 20.
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Dad was one of 16 kids and used to tell this story over and over: apparently one day the local Catholic priest knocked on the door, saw all the kids and said, “Ah, you must be good Catholics!”

Grandfather Eden replied, “No, we are Passionate Protestants.”

Dad was a family man.

Dad was an honourable man.

Dad was wise, clever and full of fun.

Dad was an example to us kids and his many friends of how to be a real man, father and true friend.

We would also like to thank the wonderful nurses from the Parkinson’s association who were always just a phone call away and were so helpful and comforting to mum.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
THE LAST WORD! AS A SURF-STARVED SIXTIES “GREMMIE”, WROTE LEGENDARY SURFER ANDREW MACKINNON, I COULDN’T WAIT FOR SURFABOUT TO HIT THE NEWSAGENT STANDS. I WROTE TO JACK EDEN JUST TO SEE IF HE WOULD PUBLISH MY LETTER OF THANKS. TO MY SURPRISE – HE DID!
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Lastly, we kids want to honour Mum.

Mum and Dad were married for over 60 years. We all remember that part of the wedding vows that reminds us to remain in “sickness and in health.”

Well, Mum modelled how to keep your wedding vows. For twenty years Dad had Parkinson’s disease and Mum met every challenge resolutely and bravely. Thank you Mum.

Finally …

THE SURFER

Waves churn,
the lone surfer stares,
searching for that one.
Perfection.
Of wind and water
that will carry him
as his board,
glides along
the watery plain
towards his destiny …
Thank you.

SOURCE: Jack Eden was buried on Friday, October 4, 2019. Jack’s coffin was at St Andrews Church, Sans Souci, draped in the Union Jack flag, with a mini-mini surfboard, white flowers and navy blue cap.

Below: Jack and part of beloved Surfabout Revisited Collection in 1997.


RIVETS THE DOG …

THE END


WALT DISNEY: Final! The secret life of Walter

JIM HOKERMAN       Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

REMEMBER WHAT I SAID …

“I DON’T WANT A FUNERAL,” SAID WALT. “I WANT PEOPLE TO REMEMBER ME ALIVE”.

One of the things about life that used to bug Walt Disney was death. Walt hated the idea of dying. “Dad never goes to a funeral if he can help it”, daughter Diane once revealed.

“If he has to go to one, it plunges him into a reverie which lasts for hours after he’s home”. Obviously, Walt was figuring something out.

“I don’t want a funeral”, said Walt. “I want people to remember me alive”.

Accordingly, when Disney died in December, 1966, his funeral service wasn’t announced until it was all over. No details, including disposition of the body, were ever released.

All that the Los Angeles Times was able to discover was that the ‘secret rites’ had been conducted at Forest Lawn Cemetery – a theme park with a “Mausoleum of Freedom” for dead soldiers …

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ABOUT WALT DISNEY …
ALL EMPLOYEES ARE GRADUATES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WALT DISNEY WHERE THEY HAVE STUDIED WALT DISNEY TRADITIONS ONE AND TWO. THEY LEARNED, IN THE WORD OF ONE CAMPUS DIRECTIVE, “TO ENJOY THINKING OUR WAY”.
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It’s not nice to “kill off Santa Claus”, so most cynics figured that the decision to downplay Disney’s funeral was simply good business.

Romantics believed that Disney, with a late interest in cryogenics, had had himself frozen like a TV dinner. He was destined to sleep on a cushion of liquid nitrogen until some Prince Charming appeared with a cure for the big C.

Meanwhile, Disney’s corporate heirs continued to act as though their master were still alive.

When Walt died, he was drawing up plans for a city – cash free, climate controlled, and vacuum cleaned.

It was a space-age pyramid of dwellings where 20,000 or so lucky Alices could live inside his Magic Kingdom for the rest of their lives.

SOURCE: Adapted from Jim Hokeman’s The secret life of Walter Disney, published in Nation Review, May 31, 1979.

Below: TIME Magazine and Walt Disney. Most of the American and international press, radio and television—magazines – got caught up in the Disney frenzy. 

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ABOUT WALT DISNEY …
“I BELIEVED THAT EVERY CONCEPTION IS IMMACULATE”, HE TOLD A STAFF MEMBER, AND HE OPENED DUMBO (1941) WITH A SQUARON OF STORKS FLYING OVER FLORIDA TO “DELIVER BABIES” OF EXPECTANT CIRCUS ANIMALS.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 25 October 19

WALT DISNEY: Part 4. The secret life of Walter

JIM HOKERMAN        Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

THE THREE MUSKETEERS, GERMAN-STYLE. THEY DON’T KNOW WHAT THE’RE IN FOR …

DER FUHRER’S FACE CARTOON WON AN OSCAR AND, IN ADDITION, SPIKE JONES’S RECORDING OF THE SOUNDTRACK SOLD A MILLION AND A HALF COPIES.

In a ghost-written magazine article of the mid 1930s, he complained that “Mr A Hitler, the Nazi old thing, says Mickey’s silly. Imagine that! Well, Mickey is going to save Mr A Hitler from drowning one day. Just wait and see if he doesn’t. Then won’t Mr A. Hitler be ashamed!”

However, by the time he made The New Spirit (1942), the first of the government-sponsored propaganda and training films that virtually subsidised the Disney studio during World War 2; Walt did decide to let the “Nazi old thing” drown.

He demonstrated his distaste by showing the swastika “flushed away in a vortex of dark, swirling water”.
The next year saw Education for Death (with Hitler playing Prince Charming to Hermann Goering’s mountainous Sleeping Beauty) and Disney’s greatest piece of agitrop, Donald in Nutzi Land.

Also known as Der Fuhrer’s Face, the cartoon won an Oscar; while Spike Jones’s recording of the soundtrack sold a million and half copies.

In a dour comment on the mock flatulence of the song’s chorus, Richard Schickel remarked, “Even in wartime (the Disney studio) found a way to state its belief in the location – the seat as it were – of human emotions”.

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DEAD TIRED …
MORE AMERICANS ARE LOSING SLEEP OVER THE STATE OF THE UNITED STATES NATION UNDER PRESIDENT TRUMP AND OTHER PERSONAL FINANCIAL CONCERNS. INADEQUATE SLEEP IS ASSOCIATED WITH UNHEALTY LIFESTYLES AND NEGATIVELY IMPACTS HEALTH AND SAFETY. COMING: DEAD TIRED -- STARTS IN THE NEW YEAR.
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What is particularly interesting about Der Fuhrer’s Face is Disney’s visualisation of “Nutzi Land”. Donald’s room is plastered with swastika wallpaper, he sleeps in swastika pyjamas between swastika sheets.

His alarm clock keeps time with swastika numerals.

It’s as though the Disney artists were rehashing the 2000 Snow White products that helped pull the toy industry through the recession of 1937.

Even nature is not immune to the totality of “Nutzi Land”. Outside Donald’s widow we see that trees and hedges have been shaped into swastikas.

Such an improvement may never have occurred to Hitler. But a decade or so later the bushes of Disneyland would be carefully trimmed to resemble Mickey, Donald and Dumbo.

SOURCE: Adapted from The Secret life of Walt Disney by Jim Hokerman, Nation Review. May 31, 1979.

NEXT: Final. “I don’t want a funeral,” said Walt. “I want people to remember me alive”.

Below: One of the posters for Education for Death, in which Hitler play Prince Charming.

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DEAD TIRED …
THE CYCLE OF WORRY AND INSOMNIA: THE MORE YOU WORRY ABOUT NOT SLEEPING THE MORE YOU WORRY ABOUT GOING TO BED AND, MORE LIKELY, CONTINUE TO EXPERIENCE INSOMNIA. EXPECTATIONS ARE, WHAT CONSTITUTE A GOOD NIGHT’S SLEEP, AND THIS MAY ALSO CONTRIBUTE TO THIS VICIOUS CYCLE. DEAD TIRED – STARTS IN THE NEW YEAR.
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RIVETS THE DOG …

RIVETS WAS A POPULAR STRIP BACK IN THE 50s. RIVETS WAS SYNDICATED TO CHUCKLER’S WEEKLY, A MAGAZINE PRODUCED BY THE SUNDAY TELEGRAPH FOR THE YOUNGER SET. CHUCKLER’S WEEKLY STARTED IN 1954 AND ENDED IN 1960.

CONTINUED.


THE JACK EDEN STORY: Final. Jack’s photographs “catch the mood” of a nation in the sixties

FRANK MORRIS

A SERIES OF PHOTOS, WHICH WERE TAKEN BY JACK, WAS A LESSON IN LENSMANSHIP. ONE IN PARTICULAR, WITH GARY BIRDSALL, LEANING AGAINST THE DOOR OF HIS SMALL CAR, WITH A BOARD DANGLING FROM THE BOOT.

WHEN THE FIRST MAGAZINE WAS PUBLISHED “THE RESPONSE KNOCKED EVERYBODY FOR SIX,” SAYS JACK. “EVEN THE DISTRIBUTORS”.

A perfect combination, from which have come photographs that have transcended the realms of living history and become prized works of art.  Eden has been lauded worldwide for his superb back-lit photography.  It gave Surfabout “a California feel,” according to a leading surfer/writer.

The inaugural issue of Surfabout hit the streets in August 1962.  It was produced in response to the growing popularity of longboards, which both preceded and then followed Midget Farrell’s world title victory in 1964.
There was no publication “uniquely Australian” for the grommets.

Surfabout’s first print run was 10,000, which evaporated in a week.  A newsagent in Surfer’s Paradise reported selling 150 copies in a day.   “They went like hot cakes,” the vendor said.  Surfing was hot and the magazine-starved masses, both hardcore surfers and weekend warriors, literally devoured the ink from the pages!

Says Eden: “The response knocked everybody for six – even the distributors.  They had never seen anything like it. The first issue broke all records so we increased the next issue to 18,000 copies.”

Where did the name Surfabout spring from?

Eden ponders the question for a moment.  “It took many hours of deliberation before we came up with the idea of adapting the aboriginal term ‘walkabout’ for the magazine title.  So Surfabout it became.”

(The name was later hijacked by a top American company as the title for the first major Australian pro surfing event.)
The debut issue of Surfabout, in keeping with the origins of the title, was emblazoned with aboriginal motifs which certainly made it look different to other magazines on the newsstands.

This was long before indigenous cultures became the vogue. The cover design is simple, uncluttered and unpretentious; the content is an unaffected, uncomplicated presentation of the new sport of surfboard riding.
Surfabout is a historic magazine in other ways too.

True, it was beaten to the post as Australia’s first surfing magazine by a few months, but Surfabout made up for it in myriad other ways.

Predicted, as early as 1965, that the Australian surfing scene would spawn a multi-billion dollar industry-boards, male and female fashion, accessories and so on.

A Surfabout editorial said: “The growth … has been one of notable achievement … there is now a competitive drive (and) the tempo has trebled its pace and shows no sign of diminishing.”

Reflects Eden: “We gave our readers their money’s worth and more.  I believe that is the reason the magazine is so well remembered after all this time.”

The debut issue of Surfabout sold for five shillings and sixpence – 55 cents in today’s currency.  (Later issues were four shillings and sixpence.)

The same issue, as a collectible two years ago, fetched $400!

*At that time there was a popular magazine called Walkabout, which will be fondly remembered. It’s safe to say that it also had a great influence on the outcome.

The Jack Eden Surfabout Revisited Collection began its national tour at the Perth Museum in August 1964.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
EDEN CAPTURED COUNTLESS IMAGES ON AN ARRAY OF DIFFERENT CAMERAS. HE LOOKED LIFE IN THE EYE. THIS NEW LIFE WAS BOUND IN THE CLASSICAL SHAPE OF YOUNG SURFERS, SOME TO BECOME SPORTING LEGENDS, IN WHICH CAN BE DESCRIBED AS AN IRRESPRESSIBLE PERIOD IN OUR HISTORY.
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SOURCE: Adaption from Jack Eden’s Surfabout Revisited Collection edited by Frank Morris, published in 1997.

Below: The Surf, the first in the world, published in 1917. Then came “Surfing Sixties” brigands. Coming soon. 


THOMAS COOK: Final. Thomas’s son took over the reins and  began to visit new places afar!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

THERE WAS A THOMAS COOK OUTLET IN PRACTICALLY EVERY CITY.

FOUNDER THOMAS COOK SAW TRAVEL AS AN ANTIDOTE TO DRUDGERY.

Founder Thomas Cook died in 1892.

John Mason Cook, the son of Thomas Cook, who became manager of Thomas Cook’s first company in Fleet Street, was perhaps the world’s first business traveller -- notwithstanding Marco Polo. Throughout his life he was constantly on the move: appointing agents and negotiating contracts.

And, like today’s businessman, he was more than likely nagged by his family for never being at home. John Cook’s apprenticeship in travel began in 1851.

At 17, he was appointed chief assistant to his father and given the responsibility of taking 165,000 people to the Great Exhibition in London. During his apprentice years he would work for five consecutive night and days at a time, accompanying trains filled with passengers.

This was just a taste of what was to come.

At the beginning of 1865, his father had returned from a trip to North America during which he had agreed with the principal railways for a system of booking to the Paris Exhibition to be held the following year.

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DEAD TIRED …
AN AUSTRALIAN STUDY A FEW YEARS BACK SHOWED THAT ALMOST I IN 5 WORKING ADULTS ARE RUNNING A BIGGER RISK OF DEVELOPING CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE AND DIABETES. UP TO 1.2MILLION AUSTRALIANS SUFFER A RANGE OF SLEEP DISORDERS, FROM INSOMNIA TO SLEEP APNOEA. ARE YOU ONE OF THEM? COMING IN THE NEW YEAR.
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This innovation assisted him in his responsibility of promoting trips to the Exhibition, and indeed to Paris as an attraction in itself. To date his main market had been in the United Kingdom where the return fare Cook’s offered from London to Paris was one pound and a four-day package could be secured for one pound eighty.

In 1868, Cook’s posters advertised North America-to-Paris return fares from twenty-one pound to thirty-one pound fifty. During the four years it took for that side of the business to develop, Cook recorded in his diary that, on average, he was annually away from home for 100 days.

He was travelling between 67,000km and 85,000km a year.

With the company well established Cook began to organise tours further afield and began to take travellers through Europe and into the Holy Land. In 1870, Cook’s was successful in setting up a network that organised tours of Egypt.

In 1871 Thomas formed a partnership with his son and the business was, fittingly, renamed Thomas Cook and Son. This move created even more drive in John Mason; and between 1873 and 1889 he travelled relentlessly, opening up new destinations and establishing new lines of communication.

During these years John Cook spent much of his time interviewing the managers of railways and steamboat companies, particularly in North America, where a big expansion was planned. He was always concerned about getting the best for his clients.

When John died in 1899 and the business was then worth about two millions pound.

Source: Adapted from The Australian 1981.

Below: The gravestone of John Thomas.

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ROAD CCCCRASHED ...
“ROAD RAGE” – IT’S WATING TO HAPPEN. IT WOULD PAY RETIREMENT VILLAGE MANAGERS TO HEED THE WARNING FROM ROAD ACCIDENT EXPERTS THAT THERE ARE SENIOR DRIVERS WHO BELIEVE THEY ARE STILL SAFE AND COMPETENT BEHIND THE WHEEL. BUT, IN REALITY, THEY ARE ACCIDENTS WAITING TO HAPPEN. – FM. ROAD CCCCRASH! STARTS SOON.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 18 October 19

THE JACK EDEN STORY: Part 1. Surfabout magazine photography “caught the mood” of a surfing nation in the sixties!

FRANK MORRIS

THE MIGHTY JACK TAKES TIME OUT TO BE PHOTOGRAPHED WITH HIS FAVORITE SURFBOARD.

JACK EDEN BEGAN CAPTURING SURF IMAGES ON FILM IN 1956. SUDDENLY, THE SIXTIES HAD ARRIVED. JACK, LIKE EVERYONE ELSE, WANTED TO KNOW WHAT MADE THE SIXTIES TICK.

Regarded as the pioneer of surfing photography, Eden clicked his way “through truckloads of film” for his magazine, Surfabout, of which 24 issues were published between 1962 and 1968.

There’s no way he could have realised at the time that these images, which record the innocence, lifestyle and revolutionary surfing styles of this period, would be the focal point of a major national point of a major national Jack Eden’s Photographic exhibition more than 30 years on.

The original negatives had been squirreled away since those halcyon days in the back-room of his studio in Sydney’s south.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
FROM THE MID 1990s, THE JACK EDEN SURFABOUT REVISITED COLLECTION WAS ONE OF THE MAJOR EXHIBITIONS TO RECOGNISE THE INPUT OF JACK’S WORK DURING THE SURFING SIXTIES. IT STARTED IN PERTH AND WENDED ITS WAY ACROSS AUSTRALIA. OVERSEAS, IT WAS SHOWN AT THE TRITAN’S GALLERY, CORNWALL, ENGLAND. – FM.
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Eden has captured the quintessence of Australia and Australians in much the same way as the celebrated Max Dupain “defined Australia” in the 1930s.  Writing in The Australian Magazine, Mike Safe said: “His (Dupain’s) style – from the beach and bush scenes of the thirties…was direct, unadorned and strong.”

Says Eden: “The explosion of interest in the exhibition has been phenomenal.  Suddenly, everybody wants to know more about the sixties.”

Eden has been described as “the photographic biographer” of Australian surfing history.  He regards the sixties as surfing’s golden era.  He captured all the greats from the time and one of them, Midget Farrelly, was the seed from which this critically acclaimed exhibition grew.

Jack explains: “He (Midget) rang me up and said “Jack, don’t you realise that you are the recorder of our (surfing) history?”  At the time I thought Midget was having a go at me.  But that’s how the exhibition got started.”

It’s been said that when you talk to Jack about the sixties you’d better be prepared for a good ear bashing.
Says Tracks magazine: “Jack can talk under six foot of wet cement … he’s a human time machine ready to transport you back to the days when surfers could swim and boards were bloody heavy. (He) suspends your disbelief and you find yourself trimming along the lip of his surf stories.”

Retorts Eden: “Guilty as charged.  I found that it was a happy period.  There was an innocence in those days that is hard to explain.

But, obviously, my photographs have caught the mood, the feeling that people relate to.  We’ve noticed people of all ages, surfers and non-surfers alike, take great pleasure in viewing this record of an era that will never return.

“At the time we were regarded as bums – even though a lot of those bums were the top surfers of their day.  Now many of them are important people such as judges, lawyers and barristers … name it and you’ll find former surfers in the ranks.”

Below: Jack, kneeling in front of a portion of his photographic exhibition, with a protective arm around one of his most talk-about print.

SOURCE: The Jack Eden Story appeared in the Jack Eden’s Surfabout Revisited Collection: A time capsule in print, published in 1997.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
OF THE SURFING SIXTIES, JACK WAS QUITE LITERAL ABOUT THOSE TIMES. “IN THE ERA WE WERE REGARDED AS BUMS. BUT FOR SOME REASON A LOT OF THOSE BUMS WERE TOP SURFERS. IN THEIR DAY THEY WERE PRETTY IMPORTANT PEOPLE. THERE WERE JUDGES, BARRISTERS, LAWYERS, AND BIG BUILDERS’. YOU NAME IT”.


YOUR DOG: Libra in dogs makes them very snappish towards other people yet very understanding

FRANK MORRIS

I DON’T HAVE A NAME. I’M REFERRED TO AS ‘THE DOG’ WHEN IN THE POUND. BUT I SENSED THAT I LIKED IT VERY MUCH.

Let’s cut to the chase. Compared to other carnivorous domesticated hounds of all sizes, many well-bred; I have lived with a few of them! See, I’m a bit of wag tag sort of breed. I’ve got at least three strains in me, but don’t get me wrong, I’m not strange.

Eleven months ago, I was picked at a dog pound by a carer who had just lost his wife. One of his daughter’s was by his side.

“Let’s just name him my little Comfort,” said the carer. He was in his mid-sixties. The daughter agreed. She carried me to the car. After she got in she said, “Maybe I should get a small dog. What do you think? This one is so nice”.
Hmm, said the carer with a smile.

A whole bunch of ladies at the dog shelter treated us extra-well. And I spent my time frolicking around with a bright terrier a bit older than me. He taught me things – lots of things, in fact.

Libras, in the main, are very affectionate, and the carer spotted it. The carer wiggled his fingers and I ran towards him. I looked around at the terrier.

He was dumbfounded. His eyes were glazed over, not because I was going but he was going to lose a friend. I barked my cheery good-byes to him; and was gone.

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YOUR DOG …
WHEN A DOG WANTS TO HANG OUT THE ‘DO NOT DISTURB’ SIGN AS ALL OF US DO NOW AND THEN, HE IS REGARDED AS A TRAITOR TO ALL HIS SPECIES. – ROMONA C. ALBERT.
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As I grew older, the carer always spoke kind words to me. He looked at me and said, “You’re a most elegant little animal”. I followed him around or kept an eye on him, even at play!

Then I fell asleep …

All I recall is the wide spaces. In my dreams, which were humungous, I was down at the park. It was here that I brought out another of my worldly traits; being artistic.

I don’t draw, I don’t paint, I don’t do, aah … but I can do artistic body-shapes on the field.

It was just natural. That’s not say that I also elected to do some damn painstaking practice to boot.

But I dreamed on …

First, the field comes alive with my antics playing catch-the-ball. They never witnessed anything like it.

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YOUR DOG …
WE ARE ALONE, ABSOLUTELY ALONE ON THIS PLANET, AND, AMID ALL THE FORMS OF LIFE THAT SURROUND US, NOT ONE, EXCEPTING THE DOG, HAS MADE AN ALLIANCE WITH US. – MAURICE MATERLINCK.
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The carer tosses the ball into the air, then I jump and let my body perform all the tricks.

On trick is (I call them tricks) that I’m in the air ready to catch the ball in my mouth; next is my front feet, protecting all my body, and showing amazing skill, grabbing the ball, with my shape-wise falling to the ground.

The crowd clapped.

I must have done at least a dozen tricks like this. The best one, I feel, was when I used my tummy to bounce the ball and me catching it with back paws.

It’s hard to believe but I travelled kilometres off the ground and I had a hypnotic view. The crowd loved it. Every artistic trick got the people gaping. Some with horror.

My performances draw people from all walks of life to the field. They expected to see a magnificent show. When it was over, so was the dream. You could see the relief in my face.

On this day, a district inspector came to see if my carer would be interested in a badge for the dog’s home.
“Yes, yes, yes!” said my carer.

As usual, I was sitting by his side. “Come on Comfort, let us get something to drink and eat.

You bet, I thought.

Below: Comfort: true and discreet Libra.


WALT DISNEY: Part 3. The secret life of Walter

JIM HOKERMAN     Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

FUHRER HITLER AND LENI RIEFENSTAHL. TOGETHER THEY PLOT A WAY THROUGH DISNEY’S FOIBLE.

WHEN LENI RIEFENSTAHL HIT HOLLYWOOD SHE ADROITLY PRESENTED HER PSEUDO-DOCO TRIUMPH OF THE WILL, THE FILM FOR WHICH SHE IS KNOWN.

When the Nazi film maker Leni Riefenstahl visited Hollywood in 1938, Disney was the only industry notable to greet her publicly.

Had he been smitten by the vision of totality, that she had so adroitly presented in her pseudo-doco Triumph of the Will (1934), was as controlled an artifice as any of Disney’s cartoons.

Although not everyone is as blunt as Kenneth Anger. (He told an interviewer that ‘Walt Disney was the Hitler of children. ‘He killed their imaginations by programming them with his saccharine prefab fantasies!’).

Anger said “it has more than once been observed that the mania for cleanliness, control and order was a trait that Uncle Walt happened to share with the Nazi dictator”.

Of course, Disney only indulged in the fantasy of mass murder, and it happened just once. Under the pressure of World War 2, but acting as a private citizen, he dreamed up Victory Through Air Power (1943).

It was a long-since suppressed feature-length cartoon that ended with the triumphant obliteration of Tokyo.

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GENTLEMEN OF THE PRESS …
IT’S 1952, AND THE CHURCH IS OVERFLOWING WITH MOURNERS. MORE THAN 200 WAITED OUTSIDE AT THE TOORAK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH FOR THE FUNERAL OF SIR KEITH MURDOCH. PRESENT WERE GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES FROM AUSTRALIA AND OVERSEAS, EVERY METROPOLITAN NEWSPAPER IN AUSTRALIA INCLUDING THE NEWSPAPER UNIONS -- AND FIVE HUNDRED WREATHS WHICH CARPETED THE LAWN. – FM.
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Apparently, the film displayed an alienation worthy of Riefenstahl’s.

A contemporary film reviewer cited the absence of “suffering and dying enemy civilians” underneath its animated explosions and called it “a gay dream of holocaust” that reduced war: it became a “morally simple (matter) of machine-eat-machine”.

But whatever else Walt and Hitler had in common, the Fuhrer (unlike his buddy Benito Mussolini) was not a fan of “Michael Maus”.

Evidently, no mouse could be clean enough for Hitler. He termed Mickey “the most miserable ideal ever revealed” and unsuccessfully attempted to have banned from his Reich.

Hitler’s failure to get rid of Mickey may explain the megalomaniac undercurrent in Disney’s response to this attack on his alter ego.

NEXT: More about the Fuhrer’s Empire and the back-biting over a bevy of anti-Hitler cartoons.

SOURCE: Adapted from The secret life of Walter Disney by Jim Hokerman, in the Nation Review, May 31, May 1979.

Below: A nightmare for the face of Hitler.

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YOUR DREAM …
O GOD, I COULD BE BOUNDED IN A NUTSHELL AND COUNT MYSELF KING OF INFINITE SPACE WERE IT NOT THAT I HAVE HAD BAD DREAMS. – WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, HAMLET.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 11 October 19

THOMAS COOK: Part 1. The man who help build a travel empire!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

THOMAS COOK HIRED A ‘BONE RATTLER’, ONE OF THE EARLY TRAINS, TO GET 570 GUESTS TO A TEMPERANCE MEETING.

THOMAS COOK IS BELIEVED TO BE THE FIRST TRAVEL AGENT TO CASH IN ON NEW ZEALAND AS AN EXOTIC TRAVE DESTINATION!

In the 1800s, US author Mark Twain was perhaps the first international literary luminary to visit and publicise New Zealand. Twain found the “land of superb scenery” irresistible. Twain wrote about the snowy grandeurs, the mighty glaciers and “beautiful lakes.”

“The fiords”, he wrote, “were ‘wonder rivals’ to those found in Norway and Alaska.” After his historical sojourn, Twain expostulated that “our stay had been too brief; still, we are not unthankful for the glimpse which we have had of it.”

Thomas Cook saw travel as an antidote to drudgery. If Mark Twain were alive today he would back every word.
A man of humble beginning, Cook founded an empire that has served travellers throughout the world for the past 174 years. Cook was born in Britain on November 22, 1808, the son of an unskilled labourer who died soon after his birth.

He left school at 10 and worked in market gardening, carpentry and printing. He became interested in the Baptist Church and promoted the temperance movement and non-smoking. When he just turned 33, it dawned on him that he could alleviate the hard work of a person’s life by taking on excursions.

In 1841, he hired a bone-rattler train and took 570 people from Leicester to a temperance meeting at Loughborough in the Midlands. The journey’s success encouraged him to continue these activities. He dedicated himself to the belief that travel could improve the quality of life for everybody.

“Cook has made travel easy and a pleasure,” said Mark Twin. “He will sell you a ticket to any place on the globe, or all of the places and give you all the time you need and much more besides.”

Cook married an hotelier, Marrianne Mason, and had three children: John, Henry and Anne.

John born in 1834, was well-educated; in 1856, he became manager of Thomas Cook’s first company office in Fleet Street, London.

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THE GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
NEWS LIMITED STRIKE IN DECEMBER 1975, OVER POLITICAL BIAS, WAS THE FIRST STOPPAGE IN THE AJA’S HISTORY ATTRIBUTABLE TO A POLITICAL ISSUE -- FM.
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Frank Morris comments: The collapse of the 178 Years old Thomas Cook Group, is believed to be the biggest demise in the travel industry. The publicity that the giant stirred up over its folding was mindful, yet regrettable. The Thomas Cook wrangle will be talked about in decades to come. With 150,000 touring the world shaking their heads about Thomas Cook going broke it is difficult to fathom when you’re stranded in a foreign country. Think about the 22,000 employees worldwide whose jobs are at risk. Believe me, that’s huge. The cessation of Thomas Cook will take years to resolve. But its symbol on their present stores, I Love Thomas Cook, is something the old-guard of family travellers could have uttered.

Below: Up the Nile. Men and woman guests pose in front of the pyramids.

NEXT WEEK: Son caught the travel bug early!

SOURCE: The Australian, 1981.

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THE GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
JOHN NORTON, WHEN HE WAS EDITOR OF THE SYDNEY TRUTH, USED THE TERM ‘WOWSER’ IN PRINT FOR THE FIRST TIME IN 1899. NORTON WAS A PASSIONATE MAN ‘LOVED’ BY THE WORKING CLASS. HE DIED IN 1916. – FM.
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REMEMBER WHEN! Odd news reports in 2013

FRANK MORRIS

APOLOGISE FIRST IF YOU ARE RIGHT!

You all know the depression-era girl Marjorie Bligh? Yes, off course. The real-life Dame Edna, who was about be launched into the US with her biography Housewife Superstar, describes her as “unique.” Marjorie’s tip for a happy marriage: Choose carefully; when it comes to food, be imaginative, original and appreciative; don’t gossip about your partner’s failings; be honest with each other, but not brutal; be kind to each other; nagging never accomplishes anything; always apologise first – even if you are right … Doug Engelbart, the person who laid the foundation for the information superhighway with a computer ‘mouse’, died in July. Engelbart was age 88 … The Herald, Sydney, reviewed the new film of For the Term of his Natural Life, in 1927. The paper was on the side of the cinema-goers, after it was marred by a weak scenario and the “violent and unrestrained” acting, called for “something more subtle”… The new $5.3 million Cardboard Cathedral in Christchurch was supposed to open in February, then Easter, then July, but now it looks like August, reported The New Zealander.

SOURCE: Compiled in 2013.


WALT DISNEY: Part 2. The secret life of Walter      

JIM HOKERMAN from the US

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

WALT LIVED ON A FARM NEAR KANSAS CITY. WHEN HE WAS NINE, HIS FATHER BOUGHT HIM A PAPER ROUTE. AS A RESULT, DISNEY USED TO WAKE UP SWEATING FROM A RECURRING NIGHTMARE.

“GIRLS BORED ME – THEY STILL DO. I LOVE MICKEY MOUSE MORE THAN ANY WOMAN I EVER MET,” WALT DISNEY.

Walt Disney never learned to draw Donald Duck or Pluto. Nor to duplicate the famous signature emblazoned on every one of his products. But his insight into the American collective unconscious was nothing short of mystical.

It was Walt who spotted Annette Funicello dancing in the Burbank Starlight Bowl and knew that she’d be the sex star of The Mickey Mouse Club.

“For a man as intense as Disney in his desire to control his environment,” critic Richard Schickel once observed, “animation was the perfect medium psychologically”.

The quintessential Disney shot occurs at the end of Song in the South, 1946, as photographic reality melts into an idealised cantoonland.

Yet, there was a brief time in Disney’s career when he used the cartoon not to supplant reality but to unmask it.
Although Disney’s temper tantrums might be likened to those of Donald Duck, his later cartoons were only intermittently autobiographical.

He satirized his love of animals by appearing in caricature as the matador in Ferdinand the Bull (1938); and probably identified with the heroine of Cinderella (1950), who spent her days sewing little caps for the birds and pants for the mice.

In 1953 he made the coyly confessional Ben and Me, which attributed Benjamin Franklin’s success to the friendship of another very clever mouse.

In Pinocchio (1940), the masterpiece whose theme song, When You Wish upon a Star, would become the national anthem of Disneyland, of which he was very proud.

Walt brooded over the nature of his art. Was he kindly Geppetto, maker of toy marionettes? Or, the greedy Stromboli, exploiting of puppets on his stage?

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DISNEY’TOON …
IN PINOCCHIO (1940), THE MASTERPIECE WHOSE THEME SONG, WHEN YOU WISH UPON A STAR, WOULD BECOME THE NATIONAL ANTHEM OF DISNEYLAND. – JH.
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Or, the glamourous Blue Fairy, who animated Pinocchio with the gift of life, another?

Or, the cruel proprietor of Pleasure Island, the amusement park where little boys are transformed into braying donkeys? Perhaps, he was Pinocchio himself …

That is the stuff of Disney’s basically childhood fantasies.

His father, Elias Disney, was a hard man, as free with his whippings as he was tight with his money.

When grown up, Walt became rich; he bought himself all the toys and candy he was denied as a child.

He scoured the world for doll furniture, constructing an elaborate electric train set around his house, installing a giant soda fountain in his living room.

Young Disney lived on a farm. When he was nine Elias bought a paper route in Kansas City.

For the next six years dutiful Walt got up each morning at the three-thirty, delivering his father’s papers for no more pay than bed and board. The rest of his life Disney suffered from a recurring nightmare ….

His daughter recounted that “he wakes up sweating and thinking, ‘I’ll have to hurry and get back and leave a paper before dad finds out that I didn’t.’”

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DISNEY’S LIFE …
KENNETH ANGER, THE AUTHOR OF HOLLYWOOD BABYLON, MAINTAINS THAT DISNEY, WHO HAD ONCE BEEN A INVETERATE PRACTICAL JOKER, USED TO OPEN A SMALL, ROUNDED DOOR IN THE WALL – A FAIRYTALE DOOR THAT CREAKED – AND TAKE HIS GUESTS DOWN A WINDING STAIRCASE INTO A DUNGEON FILLED WITH SINISTER RACKS AND IRON MAIDENS … -- JH.
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One of Walt’s major improvements on nature would be to eliminate to biological link between parent and child. Thus, Pinocchio has no mother, Snow White and Cinderella are the victims of evil stepparents, Bambi’s mum gets killed, and Dumbo is forcibly separated from his mother.

He told a staff member that he opened Dumbo (1941) with a squadron of storks flying over Florida to “deliver the babies of expectant circus animals”.

Disney did not consider the absence of sexuality to be any great loss. With a warmth of a computer print-out he once explained his motivation for marriage.

“I realised that I’d need a new room-mate, so I proposed to Lilly”. Late in his life he was quoted as saying, “Girls bored me – they still do.” And later, “I love Mickey Mouse more than any woman I ever met”.

“You could never tell Walt a dirty joke,” said animator Ward Kimball. “Yet, the Disney cosmos was not entirely devoid of eroticism”.

Below: LIFE magazine gives Mickey and Walt a chance to say “howdy”.

SOURCE: Adapted from The Secret life Walter Disney by Jim Hokerman; Nation Review May 31, 1979.

NEXT: Leni Riefenstahl in 1938 visited Hollywood. Disney was the only industry notable to greet her publicly.

 

WALT (KNEELING) FILLING IN SOME OF ASPECTS OF A FILM TO A COUPLE OF BANK DIRECTORS.

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DISNEY’S LIFE …
BY NIGHT, IN HIS BATHROBE, BE ROAMED THROUGHT “THE HAPPIEST PLACE ON EARTH” ALONE. WHEN THE REVEREND BILLY GRAHAM CAME TO BLESS HIS FELLOW WIZARD’S “FANTASY” WALT EXPLODED, “FANTASY? THE FANTASY IS OUT THERE … OUTSIDE THE GATES!”

 

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 04 October 19

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