Grand Years with Frank Morris

Searching for posts in the month of: November 2018

Number of blogs returned: 1 to 5 records of 5

LOOKING BACK: ENOLA GAY’s papers auctioned in New York: more than they estimated

“ENOLA GAY LOG IS A UNIQUELY IMPORTANT DOCUMENT,” SAID A SPOKESPERSON.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

CONQUEROR: THE ENOLA GAY DROPPED THE FIRST ATOMIC BOMB IN THE WORLD CALLED “LITTLE BOY” ON HIROSHIMA. Below: COLONEL PAUL TIBBETS AND ENOLA GAY JUST BEFORE TAKE OFF.

New York (Reuters): “My God, what have we done?”

The Enola Gay co-pilot’s log book, which recorded the horror of having just dropped the first atomic bomb in war, was the most chilling item on auction in the sale of US historical documents that fetched record prices. The auction was held on March 28, 2002.

Winning bid for Capt. Robert Lewis’s log chronicling the “Little Boy” mission that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945 was $350,000 – more than the estimated range of $200,000 and $300,000.

“It is a uniquely important document,” said dealer Seth Kaller about the Enola Gay log. “It’s one of the greatest moments, but one of the most terrible, of the century. It’s a terribly sad record. I think that affects the desire to own it.”

Lewis’s minute-by-minute account of the mission, written in pen and pencil during the flight, was full of details of the bombing run aimed at bringing a fast end to the Second World War. It also was filled with awe after the 9000 pound bomb, dubbed “Little Boy,” was dropped over Hiroshima.

HOW MANY KILLED

It is believed that more the 140,000 people died by the end of the year as a result of the bomb. The total number of people who died due to the bomb has been estimated at 200,000.

“Fifteen seconds after the flash there were two very distinct slaps (air turbulence) that was all the physical effects we felt,” wrote Lewis. “There in front of our eyes was without a doubt the greatest explosion man has ever witnessed.

“The city was nine-tenths covered with smoke. A column of white cloud, which in less than three minutes, reached 30,000 feet and then went up to 50,000.

“I am certain the entire crew felt this experience was more that anyone human had ever thought possible. Just how many did we kill? We’re groping for words to explain. My God, what have we done.

“If I live a hundred years I’ll never quite get those few minutes out my mind …”

<< From Reuters; Larry Fine; 2002.


IT’S CHRISTMAS TIME. MERRY CHIRSTMAS, MERRY CHRISTMAS TO YOU ALL!


HOME-CARE: Large-print novels are for people with impaired vision

“I COULDN’T READ ANY OF THE BOOKS I’D BORROWED BECAUSE OF POOR EYESIGHT.”

FRANK MORRIS

ONE- UPMANSHIP: LARGE-PRINT EDITIONS WERE AN IMMEDIATE SUCCESS. Below: BRITISH CRIME WRITER AGATHA CHRISTIE’S RECENTLY FINISHED NOVEL CONTRIBUTED TO THE WORLD-WIDE FAME OF PROJECT.

Large-print novels have been available from your local library for years.

The pioneer of large-print books, Frederick Thorpe, formerly a publisher of childrens’ classics, was the founder of Ulverscroft Books in 1964. His idea “met with resistance from publishers reluctant to have their popular authors associated with what they considered to be a gimmick.”

The catalyst for what was eventually to became worldwide the bestselling “Ulverscroft large-print series” was initiated by a group of women volunteers who delivered books to the elderly. Though grateful for the service, Thorpe was informed, many of the service’s clients “couldn’t read the books they borrowed because of poor eyesight.”

CHRISTIE WAS THE LIGHT

To get the project off the ground, Thorpe realised that he had to have the support of at least a few high profile authors.

He approached Agatha Christie, who was published by Collins. When she heard what Thorpe had in mind, Christie embraced the scheme wholeheartedly. The author’s A Pocketful of Rye was one of first titles published in the new quarto sized, hard-cased format.

Thorpe’s large-print editions were an immediate success with libraries throughout the English-speaking world. He opened the floodgates for other publishers. By the mid-1970s, the edition had become an international market.
Thorpe dies in England at 85 in 1999.

COMING: HOME-CARE RESUMES IN FEBRUARY.


FOODFROLICO: Christmas time – try Bacardi rum daiquiri with your favourite fruit

FRANK MORRIS

“It’s the easiest drink to concoct. It sounds complicated. But anyone can do it. It’s not an idle boast. Not at all.

“What you’re trying is a Bacardi rum daiquiri – its simplicity itself. But there is a trick to it! You must become a theatrical entrepreneur of showmanship, you must now demonstrate the flamboyance of the mixing performance.

“So pay close attention. My guests, take a step forward.

“To 45ml of light, dry Bacardi rum. Add a dash of lemon juice, a teaspoon of sugar, ice … crushed usually … and strawberries. Into the blender. And then, I said, switching my voice into a loud vibratory sound.

“Mesdames and geeentlemen”, the guests broke out in cheesy smiles, “the 18 second Bacardi rum, and strawberry daiquiri!”

A sip of the foaming, pink, magical daiquiri makes you feel like you had dreamed and gone to La La Land.

The guests gathered around me. “I raised my glass. The guests cried ‘Encore!’” Try your favourite fruit – bananas, peaches, limes or strawberries.

<< Ogilvy MBA Advertising; 1988.


FAMOUS PIECART: Stopover for generations of Sydneysiders since it started

“FREE WHEELER”

TINO DEES, A MASTER BUTCHER, WHO HAS WON MORE 170 AWARDS FOR HIS SAUSAGES, HAMS AND BACON, IS THE NEW OWNER OF THE 73-YEAR-OLD INSTITUTION, HARRY’S CAFÉ DE WHEELS. ‘WE’RE CALLED HARRY’S CAFÉ DE WHEELS, BUT HAVE YOU TRIED OUR COFFEE? WE WANT TO OPEN MORE THAN 100 “HARRY’S” LOCATIONS AROUND AUSTRALIA. ACCORDING TO A NEWSPAPER REPORT, FANS OF HARRY’S FAMOUS TIGER – A MEAT PIE TOPPED WITH MUSHY PEAS, MASHED POTATO AND GRAVY – CAN TAKE COMFORT. IT WILL STAY ON THE MENU AND REMAIN UNCHANGED. I’VE NEVER ‘DINED’ AT HARRY’S. HERE IS A WRITER WHO HAS VISITED THERE MANY TIMES OVER THE YEARS. – Frank Morris.

Sydney is famous for its landmarks. But there’s none more colourful than Harry the Wheels piecart on Cowper Wharf Drive, Wooloomooloo, near Garden Island naval base.

To Sydneysiders and overseas vistors, Harry the Wheels has become an institution. Harry’s legendary piecart has been a stopover for generations of sailors and taxi drivers.

Although the original Harry has long since departed for that great Piecart in the Sky, his successor, Alex, has carried on the tradition for many years. Harry the Wheels and Alex have been popularised in several documentaries shown on American and European television networks.

DAMN SHAME!

As a result, Harry the Wheels has gained international fame. Over the years many well-known personalities have made a point of paying Harry’s a visit. The walls of the piecart are festooned with photographs of some of the notables.

Colonel Sanders, of Kentucky Fried Chicken fame, is shown munching one of Harry’s pies – and enjoying every mouthful.

But sadly, Alex and Harry’s are an endangered species. Even though Harry’s has been shifted to various locations in recent years, there is a move to bring the curtain down on Alex for good.

And that would be a dammed shame. [This article was written in July, 1984. The author was a correspondent of Cab Talk, a weekly newspaper. A lot has happened since then. Started in 1945, Harry’s is now operated under a franchise system and has branches all over Sydney and Newcastle.]


S.O.B: Save our brumby … that’s the call to Australia!

FRANK MORRIS

HE COULD BE TRAPPED: PALEFACE IS CAPTURED IN HIS ELEMENT BY PHOTOGRAPHER MICHELLE BROWN. Below: A BRUMBY IS OFF AND RUNNING IN FULL FLIGHT.

It’s been a hard year for the brumbies. Like every other year. This year, the brumby situation is way out of control.

“Originally, the plan called for the culling of most of the estimated 6000 wild horses in the park,” reported The Land newspaper, “with the intention to leave a remaining population of 600. One of the potential captures is a famous grey or silver brumby known as Paleface.”

Photographer Michelle Brown has spotted Paleface many times.

“About four years ago I saw Paleface … for the first time … and it’s an experience I’ll never forget,” she told the newspaper. “Paleface is a ten-year-old white stallion who roams the Mount Selwyn, Kiandra and Three Mile Dam Area.

“Each year, I have noticed that he graces us with one or two new foals and the closeness he has with his mares is a bond I have never witnessed before in my life around horses.”

“CULL THE BRUMBIES”

The Land newspaper reports the “current wild horse trapping near Kiandra was foreshadowed in the 2016 Wild Horse Management plan to ‘minimise impacts in the northern and southern regions by reducing the horse population in these areas.”

In 1991, wild horses caused trouble for a NSW Environment Minister when word got out of the plans to cull the brumbies in Kosciusko National Park. They were horses immortalised in Banjo Paterson’s The Man from Snowy River.

Premier Bob Carr stepped in and said “Not on.”

If you want an easy way to do it, said a guest on the ABC’s Back Roads, then get a community to pay the horseman to secure the horses. Once you’ve got them, they will be broken-in and sold to the public. It may take time but it will be worth it.

That’s one way, at least.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 30 November 18

THE BOLD, THE BEARDED: Barber certainly notices a change in men’s facial hair

NOW, YOU STEPPED OFF A COBB AND CO COACH YOU COULD BE SURPRISED. JUST LOOK AT THE MEN SPORTING BUSHRANGER BEARDS.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

HMMMM: HOW DO I LOOK? Below: BUSHRANGER BEARD! EVEN NED KELLY WORE ONE.

Unless you have been living under a rock for the past few years, you’ll have noticed that beards are back all across Australia. One of the good-points of men sporting bushranger beards is looking like they’ve stepped of a Cobb and Co coach.

A barber said he’d “certainly noticed a change in men’s attitude to facial hair.” He said, “Thirty years ago, men grew beards and they didn’t bother looking after them.”

These days, based on research he’s done on his own customers he estimates that about 40 per cent of men are using more care products than they were three years ago. For blokes keen to grow their own Ned Kelly beard the barber recommends that they treat it as they would hair on their head.

That means washing it regularly with a good sulphate-free shampoo and condition it afterwards with a spray-on conditioner which will make it easier to comb out.

CHRISTMAS TRIM

“When a bloke’s had a beard for a long time, he gets really dry skin underneath,” the barber said. To prevent skin from drying out, he suggests, using beard oil as well. For the gents out there who prefer a closer cut, an oil-free moisturiser should do the trick.

Close-cropped beards should really be attended to and trimmed weekly, depending on how short you want it. This can done at home or by a professional. But, as the barber says, “beard trims aren’t that dear to get done. So I reckon they should treat themselves, really.”

Longer beards also require regular attention. A manicured look that’s in fashion means it’s about shape and style, not just bushiness. The barber suggests having this done … in conjunction with haircuts. It’s also important that the hair on your head suits the hair on your face.


FOODFOLICO: Christmas Drinks! Get some sparkle in the Henkell Trocken

FRANK MORRIS

SOMETHING ABOUT IT: HENKLELL TROCKEN! IT’S NAME HAS A SPECIAL RING TO IT. Below: DOUGLAS LAMB, WINE WRITER EXTRODINAIRE.

I was having a few drinks with a couple my colleagues. As I poured the sparkling Henkell into their champagne glasses one fellow looked up and said: “How long have you known this bubbly?” I think it was over thirty years ago, I reply.

Before then, I asked a wine expert on the magazine. He said “it was 1980.” When I departed, the chap was still talking about sparkling Henkell.

The wine writer was Douglas Lamb, who penned the Lamb and Wine column. And here is a piece of what he wrote back in 1980 -- “It’s a world of sparkle at Henkell”:

Henkell Trocken has a pleasant sounding ring to it, don’t you think?

ITS OWN WISDOM

Actually, it is the name of the largest sparkling wine company in the world. It produces more than 69 million bottles o year for the international market. Henkell Trocken use the Charmat method, which was perfected in the last twenty years in Germany, in making its sparkling wine.

And by law, the wine must remain on the lees in large tanks for six months. In its own wisdom, the company has extended this period to 15 months. The Henkell Trocken Sekt … is a typical example of a very well made wine which, by anybody’s standard, could only be described as excellent.

Frank Morris comments: Henkell Trocken can be brought at most wine shops and comes in a variety of bottle sizes. Give it a go this Christmas. You be amazed at the price.


WHAT CHRISTMAS IS ALL ABOUT! In the days before I became a wine writer, I used to read the wine columns at Christmas time and marvel about the quality and quantity the wine scribes would put away. Now, I have been at this caper a long time, I can tell you that it ain’t quite like that; Christmas becomes a day off. There is no real reason why Christmas Day should become a marathon of drinking; but there is every reason to pull out some special bottles and share with friends. Since Christmas in Australia is usually hot, I’ve gone for a cold wine selection and I’ve also tried to stick within a budget. Naturally, it would be great to splash the Krug around, but at $145 a bottle, or there about, that’s hardly likely. This year, I’ll be serving chilled sherry as a pre-dinner drink; it simply delicious with turkey and cranberry sauce; and the Christmas Pud, it’s nice and rich. -- Mark Shield, Wine Guide.


THE FESTIVAL IS COMING: There’re places blooming with Jacarandas just like Grafton

FRANK MORRIS

GLORIOUS COLOUR: JACARANDA AVENUE, GRAFTON, FORMS A CANOPY OF MAUVE
IN AUSTRALIA, INCLUDING THE GRAFTON DISTRICT, NSW, OF COURSE, EVERYBODY HAS ADMIRED THE JACARANDA’S 82 YEARS AS PART OF THE GRAFTON FESTIVAL. IN FACT, JACARANDAS WERE PLANTED IN THE 1800S. HENCE, THE BRILLIANT CANOPY OF A MAUVE BACKDROP OF THE FESTIVAL CITY.

There is a long-standing tradition in many Australian towns and cities of celebrating the local harvest or a blossom-time of flowers with organised festivals.

The various festivals usually have exhibitions, street displays, processions and social and sporting events which  attract thousands of tourists from all over Australia. And, of course, the crowning of a “festival queen” is also an integral part of the festivities.

Eighty-two years ago, the first Grafton Jacaranda Festivals was held on October 30, 1935.

“Grafton has that awesome looking Clarence River bisecting the city,” wrote a colleague. “Thousands of Jacarandas and other trees lining its streets and filling its national parks.

“Scores of lovely historic homes, public buildings and numerous old pubs. The ‘capital’ of the Clarence Valley has a beauty and charm that’s worth stopping to sample.”

The event has not only become one of national renown but it is today recognised as Australia’s foremost floral festival.*

CANOPY OF MAUVE

Needless to say, the city is gearing up to celebrate this historic event in grand style. In the early 1800s, Jacarandsa were planted in the Grafton district. In the 1900s, a citizen names Volkers, in the cause of civic pride, planted an avenue of jacaranda trees which is now referred to as Jacaranda Avenue.

“As these trees grew to their full height – up to 15 metres – they embowered the avenue in the spring time with a canopy of mauve and carpeted the roadway with blossoms,” said a spokesperson for the Council.

“At festival time the jacarandas contrast with the colour and greenery of flame, white cedar, fig, pine and flowering gum trees.”

The festival was inaugurated by Mr E.H.Chataway, and it received “whole-hearted support from the community,” said the spokesperson.

Grafton, the birthplace of champion sculler, Harry Searle and sometime Prime Minister, Sir Earle Page, has become a popular tourist centre – especially at Festival time. The jacaranda, of which there are about 50 species, hails from the West Indies to Brazil.

It is described as “one the finest ornamental flowering trees” for subtropical regions. The jacaranda can be found in the gardens and streets plantations of eastern Australia, particularly around Brisbane; and also as far south as Melbourne.

“There are many beautiful examples of jacaranda in Melbourne, and they recover their beauty quickly if cut by severe frost,” said a leading flora expert.

A CHART OF NSW’S FESTIVALS AND WHERE ARE THEY FROM

Dahlia, Mittagong; Lasiendra, Wauchope; Orchid’s, Ballina; Wattle Time, Cootamundra; Tuplip, Bowral; Apple Blossom, Batlow; Spring Flowers, Katoomba/Leura; Cherry Blossom, Young; and the Rhododendron, Blackheath.

Illustration: The original jacaranda tree, in Grafton, in the early 1800s, acts as a shading device on a hot day.


FOODFOLICO: Special from 1940! Something different for Christmas

WORLD OF DIFFERENCE: 1940s RAISED PIE, A SAVOURY ALTERNATIVE. Below: SPECIALTY SHOPS ALL OVER THE WORLD COOK FAMOUS BRITISH PIES, JUST LIKE THE SAVOURY RAISED PIE! Below: HANGOVER, HANGOVER, HANGOVER! PLEASE – DRINK A LITTLE LESS.

For hot food lovers! A perfect Christmas raised pie – this should make a world of difference at YOUR family mealtime!

Here is what you do: use the same ingredients as the 1940s cook does but cook it your way. The family cook says: “This is a 1940s wartime raised pie prepared exactly the way the cook does in the 40s -- BUT cooked in my own oven.”

RAISED PIE. A savoury alternative to the more usual Raised Pie. Enough for 4 people.

INGREDIENTS. PASTE: 8 oz flour, 1 level teaspoon salt, 2 oz lard, quarter pint water.

FILLING. 8 oz sausage meat, 4 oz fat bacon, minced, 1 onion, minced, 2 level teaspoons mixed herbs, 1 level teaspoon salt, ½ level teaspoon pepper.

METHOD. Mix flour and salt. Boil lard (or equivalent) in water and add to the flour. Knead well and line a bread or cake tin with the pastry keep back a little for the lid. Mix the remaining ingredients thoroughly, place in bread tin and cover with remaining pastry. Brush over with reconstituted egg and bake in a moderate oven for 1 hour. Serve hot from tin; or turn out when cold.

<< The Daily Mirror, April 19, 1945.

PAYING THE PRICE FOR HANGOVERS

Christmas is a celebration time. Over-indulgence is costing Australia dearly, according to the latest research. Hangovers are causing 11.5 million “sick days” a year at a cost of $3 billion to the economy.

A university study found the more alcohol one consumes, the more time they are likely to take off work. They estimated that the cost of lost productivity ay $3 billion a year, up from $1.2 billion in an alcohol-related absenteeism in 2001.

Researchers looked at data from the 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey, which asked more the 12,000 people about their habits.

HANGOVER?

While most, (56 per cent) drank alcohol at low-risk levels (four or fewer drinks on one occasion), 27 per cent drank at risky levels (five to 10 in a session) and 9 per cent drank at high-risk – more than 11 drinks in one stint.

“Hands up all those who have never suffered a hangover?” said Mark Shield, wine writer. “Too much of a good thing can make for a very uncomfortable aftermath.”

NEXT: HOME CARE: Large-print novels. For people who suffer with impaired vision.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 23 November 18

CARPATHIA: From a rescue ship to a ship of war

GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN; THE 1918 WAR.

FRANK MORRIS

GOODBYE: THE CARPATHIA, WITH ALL HOPE ABANDONED, ON ITS WAY TO THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA. Below: IN ANOTHER LIFE, CARPATHIA WAS THE FIRST SHIP ON THE SCENE DURING THE TITANIC CRISIS. Below: BOAT 14 TOWING ONE OF THE LIFEBOATS AS IT NEARS THE RESCURE POINT.

Wireless messages were soon received from the various ships relaying the disaster of the Titanic in 1912. Titanic had hit an iceberg estimated to be 30 metres high above the water and 120 metres long when the boats were ordered out at 11.45am.

There was no panic or rush to join the boats. By 12.05, there was mass hysteria.

Up on the top deck of Titanic, a lady claimed the attention of a passing steward.

“What ship is that?” she asked. “It is the Cunarder Carpathia, ma’am.”

“The Carpathia?”

Yes, ma’am.”

********

The rescue was underway. It was rowdy, uncontrolled bedlam.

When all the boats, containing mothers and children, a few men, finally were off-loaded down from the rapidly-sinking Titanic, they broke out in song and drifted away easily.

On boat 14, one of the survivors, Lawrence Beesely* wrote, it was now 1 o’clock in the morning. It was an ideal night, except for the bitter cold. In the distance, the Titanic looked enormous. At about 2 o’clock, we observed her settling rapidly, with the bow and the bridge completely under water.

She slowly sank. Titanic was heading for the bottom of the sea. She was gone.

********

What happened to the extraordinary Carpathia after the rescue?

In July 1918, while Thia waits patiently at Huskisson Dock, in the Port of Liverpool, for the naval escort that will see her convoy of merchant ships – some bound for the Mediterranean, others the Americas – through the Southwest Approaches, Captain William Prothero visits his wife and children at their home in town.

A proud Welshman, he nonetheless moved his wife … to the city on the Mersey, soon after they wed and he began working for Cunard.

He misses singing sea shanties while crewing on a big, three-skysail yarder in the China trade, whole-sail set on a moonlit night. And now … he captains steamers. He’s Thia’s longest-serving captain, in fact.

Though these days she’s more of an armed merchant cruiser than ocean liner, courtesy of Cunard’s agreement with the British admiralty that allows them to requisition ships during wartime. Her funnel has long since shed its red and black livery … for battle grey.

It’s been that way since … he had been forced to paint her funnel in the rain. A wild rumour had washed across her decks that she was about to fall prey to a pack of German warship. But that voyage was blessedly uneventful.

She’s spent most of the war as a pack mule, hauling horses for the cavalry, aeroplanes for the air force and oil in her double bottom. She’s carried $25 million in securities from the Bank of England … Canadian troops by the thousands … Americans when they finally joined the cause …

Somewhere during these years, she acquired armament … a 4.7 inch gun that weighs as much as an elephant. The eighteen-foot rapid-fire barrel can hit a target at 16,500 yards and it has a 210-degree arc of fire.

The gun caused a furore in New York … (it was) the largest, at the time, ever brought to the city aboard a merchantman.

********

“Hard-a-starboard,” William orders. “Port engine full astern.” But it’s too late. The torpedo hits Thia’s side and detonates. A plume of water shoots up towards the bridge and she shudders hard from the impact, bleeding black smoke.

It’s long and bruising encounter with the U-55 submarine, five of the crew were missing, but none of the passengers.
The U-55 had won it day. Carpathia was never to return.

<< Carpathia, Jay Ludowyke, 2017.

*Lawrence Beesley’s account was given to The Times three days after the sinking.


HOME-CARE: Personal emergency alarms can be yours … and save your life

FRANK MORRIS

SAVIOUR: NURSE TO CLIENT – “NOW YOU ARE SAFE.” Below: THE PREFERRED MODEL.

Don’t let another day pass without checking out the personal alarm for yourself! Remember, it could save your life. Choice magazine described the devices as “the ultimate” product for carers and dependents alike.

Says Choice: “These alarms are the modern cry for help. Emergency alarms effectively give people more independence. They’re only a button press away from help if they need it.”

When you’re not these it is reassuring to know that there is a ‘safety net’ of a 24-hour emergency service are in place for your dependent/s, which operates 365 days a year.

PREFERRED SYSTEM

Falls and all sorts of problems, which would not be a problem in times past, can now become a dire emergency.

The Vital Call system was launched in Australia in 1976. It is the preferred brand for retirement villages, hostels and for personal use at home; and certain areas of the home. Its technology is second to none. It is recognised throughout the world for the quality of the equipment and the services that come with it.

Vital Call’s switchboard operators are a dedicated response team that know the ins and outs of the service.

If a person at home is in trouble and cannot speak, Vital Call can identify the user and react appropriately by using confidential details to summon the necessary service to that person’s house.

<< Retirement Villages: MAKING THE RIGHT CHOICE; Frank Morris, PRP Graphics Pty Ltd, Queensland; Best Years No 1, Vol 2.

NEXT: Large Print novels. For people who suffer with impaired vision.


MARBLE BAR: A drinking den of unique finery celebrates 125 years!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

GLEAMING: THE MARBLE BAR HAS CELEBRATED 125 YEARS SINCE IT WAS BUILT. Below: MR GEORGE ADAMS, OF ADAMS HOTEL, CONSTRUCTED THIS HIGH VICTORIANA STYLE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DECORATION IN AUSTRALIA – THE MARBLE BAR.

Where else in Australia could one enjoy a beer in best Aussie tradition in such an improbable and extravagant setting?

Come on, have a guess? The Marble Bar, of course.

The Adams Hotel was the favourite drinking place of Sydneysiders since the 1870s. It was demolished in the 1960s. It was to make way for a new building development. Unusual steps were taken to save its lavishly ornate Marble Bar from a similar fate.

The Marble Bar rescue mission was overwhelmed by a tide of sentimental attachment rather than for historical reasons. The Bar, itself, had been constructed by the self-made swashbuckling entrepreneur George Adams and perhaps represented one of the finest examples of the High Victoriana style of architecture and decoration in Australia.

A well-known Sydney architect said the Bar had become semi derelict and “the cost of preserving it was estimated at $250,000.”

WAS REPRIEVED

However, the problem was unexpectedly resolved when the Hilton organisation expressed an interest in the old Adams site, which ran from Pitt Street through to George Street, provided that the Marble Bar could be incorporated into the proposed new Hilton Hotel.

With the site secured by the hotel chain, the Marble Bar was reprieved. This year is the fourteenth in its new location under the Sydney Hilton complex.

From the 30s, the Marble Bar declined in popularity and appearance. It became increasingly shabby and patronage waned to the extent that by the 1960s, according to a spokesperson, “you could shoot a gun through the place and not hit anyone.”

The official opening of the Marble Bar was at the Hilton Hotel in April 1973. It was culmination of the most complex and, with costs of $250,000, the most expensive architectural restoration in Australia.

<< Historic Australia, 1987, for a much fuller version of the Andrea Loder article; Frank Morris.


It’s 1963, and Pearl Turton does a bit of twisting and turning at Palm Cove

IAN LORDING            Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

HAPPY THREESOME: PEARL TURTON, CENTRE, LAPS UP ALL THE ATTENTION. PHOTOGRAPH JACK EDEN, RIGHT, SEEMS TO BE HAVING A GOOD TIME. Below: YOUNG PEARL TURTON.

The Surfer Detective, Ian Lording, has dug up from the musty bowls of the British Pathe Reuters Historical Collection a super sleuth’s dream. Six minutes of gold. But for the life of us we can’t get the sound board to work.

Nevertheless, it has everything from the local milkman to Pearl Turton and her mates (and brother, Ron) cruising the dirt road of Sydney’s Palm Beach in the Morris Major for a bit of surfing. Just a shame the producers couldn’t have waited for a better day, and catch up with Pearl at work.

And it’s all topped off with a jaunt way up north to the Barrier Reef for a spot of diving and shell collecting.

And with a newsreel for British cinema and TV, they had a pretty good budget by the looks of it. The Poms were rather enamoured with Oz beach culture – and that’s fair enough!

Here’s a short summary of the British Pathe event:

A THINKING GIRL

The young Australian, Pearl Turton is typical of the Sydneysiders who start every day really early. Pearl has been surfboarding for two years and, at sixteen, is already a champion.

Some 62,000 boards, it is estimated, are used on the Australians beaches. And Pearl Turton “owns” her own --- Palm Beach.  She talks about the quality of waves, their size, their potential and how they can be mastered. This is the thinking of the Australian outdoor girl.

The boards are light and easily manoeuvred, and cost about 40 pounds each. The Australian Surfing Association hopes that Sydney might the venue for a World Championships next year – 1964.

Then comes Pearl’s working day – as a cosmetician in a Sydney pharmacy.

<< Pacific Longboarder magazine; Pacific Longboarder.com

NEXT YEAR: Pearl Turton story. In over four hours of surfing she has ridden some top waves.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 16 November 18

THE GREAT WAR HAS ENDED: At last the dawn breaks and the whole country comes alive

THE WORD ‘VICTORY’, IN GREAT ELECTRIC LETTERS, WAS FLASHED ACROSS THE FRONT OF THE HERALD 0FFICE. THE NEWS HAD SPREAD RAPIDLY. THEN, BY MID-MORNING, THE WHOLE COUNTRY HAD BURST ALIVE TO CELEBRATE.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

CHEERS!: MARTIN PLACE WAS THE STARTING POINT FOR THE GREAT CELEBRATIONS. Below: THE ARMISTICE IS SIGNED. BELOW: BILLY HUGHES CONSCRIPTIONS WERE BEATEN.

On November 11, 1918, the war has ended.

The news reached our shore early last evening. Germany had submitted to the Allies’ terms and signed the armistice. The war was over.

The information, transmitted through the State Department in Washington, reached the offices of the Herald at seven o’clock. A few minutes later an extraordinary edition was being sold in the streets and the word ‘Victory’ in great electric letters was flashed into being across the front of the Herald office.

(Nearly all newspapers in Australia, Britain and America, for example, would have done something similar. At the end of five years of war, it’s amazing what brings on these super-human tasks. –FM.)

By 7.30 the news was spreading rapidly. By 7.45 steam whistles on ferries and locomotives were in full blast; the whole city began to stir. Even in the smallest and most distant suburbs, people commenced to gather in little knots and discuss the news.

Then, suddenly, from cottage and mansion, flat and lodging, everyone who could walk turned an eager face towards the city. Never in the history of Sydney did a greater flood of passengers flow over the evening service of trams, trains and ferries.

WILD, UNRESTRANED JOY

Every-man, woman and child came into the city to “celebrate”, but they came in such numbers ... At nine o’clock, in Martin Place and Moore Street, and in Pitt and George Streets adjoining, the crowds were so dense that no one could move. They could only stand and cheer.

But in the surrounding streets, where it was possible to move, old and young let themselves go, and there were witnessed scenes of wild and unrestrained joy.

The crowds armed themselves with two varieties of articles considered indispensable – flags and noise-makers. The former added to the picturesqueness of the scene, the latter made existence nearly unendurable.

But nobody cared.

SHOWERED WITH CONFETTI

The realisation that the most terrible war of all history was over, that the Allies were completely triumphant, that the menace of Prussianism was swept away, that peace was once more to come to the earth after four years of horror – this did not come to every mind.

Perhaps, but on every face, there was gladness, relief, satisfaction. Perhaps, no incidents were more striking than the enthusiasm that men in khaki, and those wearing returned soldiers badges, were greeted. All were hailed with expressions of gratitude and showered with confetti.

“I know of no words adequate for such an occasion,” said the Premier, Mr Watt. “The long night of suffering and anguish has ended. There will go up from the hearts of the people of Australia a great sigh of relief that dawn has come.

“”The first impulse of a Christian nation … is to thank God for the triumph of right against the demoniac designs of the enemy.”

<< Sydney Morning Herald, November 12, 1918; Frank Morris.

CHRISTCHURCH CHEERS ON: THERE’S NOTHING THAT SOUNDS MORE CHEERFUL THAN 100,000 CITIZENS JOINING IN WITH EVERY TOWN AND VILLAGE OF NEW ZEALAND.


THE GREAT WAR HAS ENDED: Troops praised for their braveness and courage to annihilate Turkish armies

THEIR GALLANTRY AND DETERMINATION MEANT TOTAL DESTUCTION OF THOSE WHO OPPOSED US.

FRANK MORRIS

IMAGE IN GLASS: A SPECIAL MEMO WAS SENT TO OUT TO ALL TROOPS FOR THEIR GALLANTRY AND THEIR DEFEAT OF THE VIIth and VIIIth TURKISH ARMIES. THIS COPY, AN ORINGALS, IS OWNED BY FRANK MORRIS.

On September 26, 1918, General Allenby sent his gallant forces a specially signed memo which amplified his “total thanks” for the role they played in the defeat of the Turkish Armies.

It reads:

“I desire to convey to all ranks and all arms of the Force under my command, my admiration and thanks for their great deeds of the past week, and my appreciation of their gallantry and determination, which have resulted in the total destruction of the V11th and V111th Turkish Armies opposed to us.

“Such a complete victory has seldom been known in all the history of war.”

General Allenby

26TH September, 1918.


THE GREAT WAR HAS ENDED: Brothers in arms and a war of words…

BRASS HAT, STANDING: “THINGS PRETTY QUIET TODAY, EH? THE CANDID DIGGER: “YAIR, WHAT WITH THE BIRDS SINGIN’ AND YOU BLOKES STROLLIN’ AROUND, A MAN’D HARDLY KNOW THERE WUS A WAR GOING ON!” Frank Dunne, Smith’s Weekly.

THE SERIOUS SIDE …

ON NOVEMBER 11, 1918 WAR ENDS, LEAVING A COUNTRY IN MOURNING. GUNS OF WAR WERE FINALLY SILENT. EUPHORIC SCENES IN AUSTRALIA CELEBRATED THE ARMISTICE – BUT FOR TENTERFIELD’S CAPTAIN WOODWARD. NOVEMBER 11 WAS MORE SOBERING. HE WROTE: “THE OUTWARD MANIFESTATION OF JOY WHICH COULD BE EXPECTED … WAS ABSENT. WE WERE AS MEN WHO HAD COMPLETED A TASK WHICH WAS ABHORRENT TO US. THE OCCASION CALLED FOR THANKSGIVING. IT WAS … TOO GREAT FOR WORDS.”

AUSTRALIA’S FIRST SHOT FIRED

A GERMAN STEAMER, AFTER DISCHARGING CARGO AT MELBOURNE, ATTEMPTED TO PASS OUT THROUGH THE HEADS TO SYDNEY. SHE HAD HER CLEARANCES, BUT THOSE ON BOARD DID NOT KNOW THAT WAR HAD BEEN DECLARED BEWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND GERMANY. A SHOT WAS FIRED FROM THE CLIFF FACE. THE VESSEL WAS IMMEDIATELY STOPPED AND RETURNED TO WILLIAMSTOWN.    .


THE GREAT WAR HAS ENDED: Milestones shows some of the battles fought in WW1

CAR RIDE: THE ARCHDUKE FERDINAND AND HIS WIFE WERE SHOT DEAD BY A SERBIAN NATIONALIST. Below: WORLD WAR IS OVER, SHOUTED THE AMERICAN DAILY TELEGRAPH. Below: THE WAR ISSUE OF THE SYDNEY MAIL.

1914

Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to throne of Austria-Hungary, shot dead by a Serbian nationionalist in Sarajevo.

A series of ultimatums leads to declarations of war between Europe’s great powers.

Australian make a pledge to Britain.

Australia quickly pledges its support for Britain and enters the war. Labor leader Andrew Fisher utters his famous promise to defend Britain “to our last men and our last shilling.” By the end of 1914, 52,561 volunteers have passed medicals to serve overseas.

First Australians die.

A skirmish in the German colony of New Guinea, Bitapaka, with Melanesian and German troops results in six Australians killed – the first of over 60,000 Australian soldiers to fall in WW1.

1915

Aussie sub sunk.

The only surviving Australian submarine, AE-2, was scuttled by her crew on April 30. The sub received severe damage incurred in her forcing of the Dardanelles.

Gallipoli begins.

Australian and New Zealand troops land at Anzac Cove near the Gallipoli Peninsula. The craggy terrain was easily defended by the Turks. Nevertheless, the Anzacs gained a toehold; but made little progress over the next eight months.

Lone Pine versus the Turks.

The 1st Division launches an attack on the Turkish positions. So fierce was the fighting that 1st and 3rd brigades suffer 2277 casualties between them.

A futile charge.

On foot, Australian Light Horsemen charge the Turkish trenches against machine guns and rifle fire. Over 230 of the 8th and 10th Light Horse regiment are killed and 140 wounded.

Evacuation of Gallipoli.

Gallipoli’s evacuation proved to be the most successful operation of the campaign. The Anzac Cove campaign led to 26,000 Australian casualties, including 8000 killed in action or dying of wounds or disease.

1916

Travelling Australians.

During the year, Australian troops took part in operations in Egypt, Palestine and Syria. Four infantry divisions were also sent to France to the Somme.

Battle of Fromelles.

Australian troops took part in their first big Western Front engagement at Fromelles on July 19. Seven days later, they went into battle at Pozieres.

Gov’ment twice beaten.

The war had deeply divided Australia. Prime Minister Billy Hughes had attempted to win a referendum on conscription. Twice he was defeated. On October 28, the first proposal for conscription was defeated 1,087, 557 votes to 1,160,033.

1917

Australia gets Flying Corp.

The Australian Flying Corp began operations in France and Palestine. On October 31, Beersheba was attacked, this triggering the third battle of Gaza. On December 20, the conscription referendum was again defeated.

1918

Monash takes it to them.

Five Australian divisions in France were formed into an army on January 1 under the command of Sir John Monash. On July 4, Hamel, an enemy stronghold in France, was captured by Australian troops. On September 18, the Hinderburg Line on the Western Front was captured. On September 30, more than 4000 Turkish troops were captured in action near Damascus, ending the war in Palestine.

War is over.

Germany surrenders on November 11 and the war was officially over. By the war’s end, 61,512 Australians have been killed or die from wounds or disease. Another 152,000 are wounded.

<< The Sun-Herald, The Land, Frank Morris.


MELBOURNE CUP 1918: Night Watch was to strengthen speed for the run home

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

SPECIAL DAY: ON THAT AFTERNOON, THE WEATHER WAS SUPERB.

On November 5, the 1918 Melbourne Cup was run less than a week before the war had ended. The newspapers said it to be the biggest and most light-hearted gathering at Flemington for more the four years. The crowd needed to be in good humour.

The Derby Day nor Cup Day, without a single favourite being mentioned, meant a disaster all around.

Although the favourite for the big one was King Offa, trainer Dick Bradfield had a ‘saver’ -- his name was Night Watch.

This was mainly because he had finished second in the Hotham Handicap on Derby Day. Night Watch was down at the end of the scale. He was handicapped the minimum of 6.7 and carrying two pounds overweight. In the hands of Billy Duncan, the jockey, took Night Watch to the lead six furlongs from home.               

MISSED HIS CHANCE

On the turn Daius moved up to join him at the half-mile … and the imported horse, Gadabout, snatched the lead from both of them. At this point, Night Watch was interfered with and seemed to have missed his chance.

Metropolitan winner, Kennaquhair, who got in front a furlong out, was called the winner. But the steely Night Watch came again, and with his light-weight was able to outstay his rival to win by half a length from Kennaquhair with Gadabout sticking on well for third.

Night Watch put up a new Cup record by running the two miles in 3.25 3/4.

<< The Melbourne Cup 1861-1982; Maurice Cavanough; Currey O”Neil, 1960.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 09 November 18

Classic Repeat: Paddington Bear – He always looks forward to a morning chat!

THESE WERE SOME OF THE CHRONICLES IN PADDINGTON’S HECTIC LIFE.

Chosen by FRANK MORRIS

FROM GROUND TO WATER: PADDINGTON GETS A RIDE DOWNSTAIRS, NOT ON A BANNISTER, BUT ON … A RIVER! IN ALL HAPPENS WHEN … SEE THE PADDINGTON FILM ON VIDEO AND YOU’LL GET A BIG SURPRISE!

One of the things that made visiting his friend’s antique shop in the Portobello Road so special was the fact that it was never the same two days running. People came from far and wide to seek Mr Gruber’s advice.

It was something to browse through his vast collection of books, which covered practically every subject under the sun. Paddington became quite knowledgeable about antiques himself. He could immediately tell a piece of the genuine Spode china from ordinary run-of-the-mill crockery.

He would never pick anything up; just in case he dropped it by mistake.  “Better safe than sorry,” was Mr Gruber’s motto. They were never short of things to talk about. During the summer months they often had their morning tea sitting in deck chairs on the pavement outside the shop. Here they discussed problems of the day in peace and quiet before the crowd arrived.

Paddington couldn’t help but notice his friend usually had a faraway look in his eyes whenever he spoke of his native Hungary. “When I was a boy,” Mr Gruber would say, “people used to dance the night away. That doesn’t seem to happen any more.”

EAR FOR MUSIC

Paddington … did learn with Mr Gruber’s help … to play a tune called “Chopsticks” on an ancient piano at the back of the shop. It wasn’t easy. Having paws meant he often played several notes at the same time.

But Mr Gruber said anyone with half a ear for music would have recognised it at once.

On cloudy days, when there was a chill in the air, they made a habit of retiring to an old horsehair sofa at the back of the shop. And it was on just such a morning. Paddington arrived rather earlier than usual and found to his surprise that Mr Gruber had acquired a new piano.

It was standing in almost exactly the same spot as the old one had been, near the stove.

There was no sign of Mr Gruber, which was most unusual. So to pass the time Paddington decided to have a go at playing what had become known as “his tune”, when something very strange happened.

As he raised his paws to play the opening notes, the keys began going up and down all by themselves!

A SAD ENDING

He had hardly finished rubbing his eyes in order to make sure he wasn’t dreaming, when he had yet another surprise. Out of the corner of his eye he saw Mr Gruber crawl out from underneath a nearby table.

“Oh dear,” said Paddington, “I hope I haven’t broken you new piano.”

Mr Gruber laughed. “Have no fear of that,” he said. “It is what is known as a ‘player piano’ and it works by electricity. You don’t see many around these days. I’ve just been plugging it in to make sure it works properly.”

“I don’t think I have ever seen a piano that played a tune all by itself before,” said Paddington. “We didn’t have anything like that where I come from. But then we didn’t have electricity either.” This was a sad ending.

<< This is an adaptation of the book, Paddington, by Michael Bond. << See the Paddington Bear movie on video.

lIIustration: Where to go: “Excuse me, where is Paddington Station?” Here you are: You’re in it!


PLEASE NOTE: MY APOLOGIES FOR THE INTERUPTION THIS WEEK. THE ARTICLES, WHICH WERE DUE TO BE PUBLISHED TODAY, WILL BE PUBLISHED ON NOVEMBER 16. MEANWHILE, THE REST OF THE OTHER STORIES EARMARKED FOR PUBLICATION THIS YEAR WILL BE RUN EARLY NEXT YEAR.


Classic Repeat: Cover. Magazine’s 100 years – perfect tales for young people to read!

Written and adapted by FRANK MORRIS                                                                                                           

CELEBRATING A CENTURY: THE SCHOOL MAGAZINE, FROM 1941, SHOWING HOW THE DESIGN HAS EVOLVED FROM THE BLACK AND WHITE COVER OF 1916, OF PURELY TYPE AND DRAWING, HAS DEVELOPED INTO THE MODERN LOOK OF TODAY.

It is a world first! The School Magazine for 100 years has collected tales for children of Australia, making it the longest-running literary magazine in the world. It became a constant in the lives of primary school students since its beginning in 1916 as a 16-page monthly publication.

The publication’s existing readership is141,000. Its centenary will mark the launch of a new anthology, For Keeps, which, according to the editor Alan Edwards, will raise awareness of the magazine’s contribution to children’s literary resources.

Professor Ewing, one of the magazine’s four ambassadors, said the magazine still had a vital role to play to bring new works of prose, poetry and plays into the classroom and home. For children among disadvantaged families and children from isolated communities it was seen as a real break-through.

“Even though we’ve got fantastic books for children in this country, not every family yet understands the importance of literary texts for children and they’ll not necessarily be in every home,” she said. “It’s the books in the home and what we do with them – the sharing, the reading of them – that is so important.”

WITH DICKENS, KIPLING, ETC

When The School Magazine was first published its content reflected the prevailing literary establishment of Blake, Coleridge, Dickens, Kipling and Shakespeare. The iconic first editions were filled with stirring texts, psalms and prayers.

With the depression and war, the pages shrunk.

In the early 1980s, simple comic strips appeared and character mascots were introduced. A few years later, it became a two-colour publication, before switching to full colour in 1999. The literary magazine has introduced many of our best-known writers and illustrators, like May Gibbs, Ruth Park, Pamela Allen, Kim Gamble, Robin Klein, Tohby Riddle and many more.

Tohby Riddle, author, illustrator and former editor of The School Magazine, said the school magazine had spoken to generations of children. It played a role in developing Australian children’s literature, which is highly regarded around the world.

“That’s a huge achievement,” he said.

<< The Sydney Morning Herald, Fairfax Community Newspaper and Frank Morris.

lIIustration: Going modern: Now referred to as Touchdown, the school magazine’s received an intent going-over and introduced colour in l951.


FRANK MORRIS COMMENTS …

THE FINAL INSTALMENT OF 1914-18 THE GREAT WAR WILL BE PUBLISHED NEXT WEEK.

GRAND YEARS TOOK IT UPON ITSELF TO PUBLISH THE FIVE YEARS WAR EVERY WEEK UNTIL FINISHED.

THE 1918 MELBOURNE CUP WAS RUN ON NOVEMBER 5 “LESS THAT A WEEK BEFORE THE WAR HAD ENDED … IT WAS THE BIGGEST AND MOST LIGHT-HEARTED GATHERING FOR MORE THAN FOUR YEARS,”

ACCORDING TO THE NEWSPAPERS REPORTS. IT’S FITTING THAT WE RUN THE MELBOURNE CUP ON THE SAME SCHEDULE.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 02 November 18

Stay Informed

Receive eNews & Special Offers

Brochure Request Order

Tour Reviews Read

Last 12 months


Tags