Grand Years with Frank Morris

Searching for posts in the month of: November 2019

Number of blogs returned: 1 to 5 records of 5

ALCOHOL: Christmas … Now is the time to get the facts!

IF WANT TO ENJOY CHRISTMAS, WITHOUT A HANG-OVER, BE CAREFULL 0F HOW MUCH ALCOHOL YOU DRINK.

ALCOHOL VARIES ACROSS DIFFERENT DRINKS. IT’S ALL ABOUT REMEMBERING THE AMOUNT OF ALCOHOL YOU CONSUMNED.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

In Australia, a standard drink refers to 10 grams of alcohol. But it is worth remembering that the amount of alcohol varies across the type of drinks you’ve consumed.

The alcohol volume is stated on the label of packaged drinks. It’s hard to judge in non-packaged drinks, but on the DrinkWise website you are able to estimate this.

So, do you want cut down on drinking? Yes or no. If it’s one or the other, keep in mind that alcohol can affect your health. Here are some of the ways:

YOUR BRAIN: Alcohol slows down the central nervous system, which impacts on almost all of the body’s cells and systems. Misused, alcohol may cause alcohol-related brain impairment or brain injury.

YOUR SKIN: Alcohol dehydrates your body including skin – our largest organ. Over time, drinking heavily can have other, more permanent effects on your skin.

YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM: Alcohol can suppress the immune system, particularly in long-term or excessive drinkers; it makes you susceptible to illness.

YOUR HEART: Long-term and excessive drinking can increase your risk of developing heart disease, high blood pressure, weakening of the heart muscle and heart failure.

YOUR BREASTS: Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer among women. Alcohol consumption, studies have shown, that the risk of developing breast cancer will be increased.

YOUR LIVER: Regularly drinking to excess may result in a fatty liver, which can affect this organ’s important function. Continued excessive drinking may result in the liver becoming inflamed, leading to hepatitis, liver cancer or liver scarring.

YOUR STOMACH: Alcohol may irritate the stomach lining which can bring on nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea. Long-term, excessive drinking has been associated with increased risk of cancer.

YOUR BOWEL: Alcohol may cause bowel irritation and lead to irritable bowel syndrome. Excessive drinking can increase the risk of colon cancer.

YOUR KIDNEYS: Alcohol tends to made you pass more urine. Excessive drinking can lead to excessive losses of body fluid and marked dehydration.

Many Australians enjoy having a drink, but not a lot of people realise three important things: how alcohol may affect their physical, social and mental health.

USE THIS A CHART AS A GUIDE TO YOUR DRINKING.

SOURCE: Adapted from DrinkWise.org.au and Get Health.


THE BIG ASK: Questions pop up at the most lackadaisical time!

WILL YOU DRINK IT, OR LEAVE IT? THAT IS THE QUESTION!


HISTORIC MYSTERY: Was the man from Snowy River a women?

DID “BANJO” PATERSON REALLY HIDE THE TRUTH IN THE MAN FROM SNOWY RIVER?

FRANK MORRIS

IN A BID TO SOLVE THIS 130 YEARS OLD OBSCURITY IS A MAN WHO HAS RESEARCHED THE LIFE OF SNOWY RIVER AUTHOR “BANJO” PATERSON.

Cliff Crane grew up in the foothills of the Snowy Mountains and that’s why, 25 years ago, he started to research the life and ballads of Snowy River author “Banjo” Paterson.

Crane is set to know more about Paterson and the Man from Snowy River and, of course, the “one secret waiting to be revealed”.

Was the person in the Man from Snowy River a man or a woman?

There has been a great deal of work on “Banjo”, but never an analysis of his The Man Snowy River ballad of who did what and when.

Crane, who now resides in Oatley, NSW, said he plans to announce the outcome this mystery, on February 16, 2020, the day before 156th anniversary of Paterson’s birthday.

The museum at Yeoval, which is a speck in the central western part of NSW, is where the “mystery” will be solved.

“For the time being I leave people to ponder: why did he hide the identity of the rider?” Crane said.

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QUEEN VICTORIA BUILDING …
1959 -- CALLS FOR DEMOLITION, ESPECIALLY THE ONE FROM THE LORD MAYOR OF SYDNEY, WHO WANTS TO DEMOLISH THE QVB TO MAKE WAY FOR A PARK AND CIVIC SQUARE. ARCHITECT HARRY SEIDLER IS AMONG THOSE IN FAVOUR, DESCRIBING THE QVB AS “AN ARCHITECTURAL MONSTROSITY”.
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Crane reels off things like the nationality, skin colour, some infirmity; or was it a person on the run from the law. Or was the rider a woman?

Here is a clue. The rider’s family had been linked to one of Australia’s most famous or infamous bushrangers.

Crane penned a note to the RSVP column in a weekend Spectrum headed “Who did “Banjo” Paterson have in mind when he wrote The Man from Snowy River?

“Are you a Trove search engine user who’d like to help find the answer?

“I believe I know the ride and the rider and the location and date of the ride and know how it ended.

“I am looking to find a newspaper article quoting Paterson about the germ of the idea which led to him writing the work.

“I had it some years ago but didn’t then realise the significance. I am seeking experienced researchers in the search”.

SOURCE: Background from the Leader, Kogarah, NSW.


FOODFROLICO: Celebration, cocktail and a bit of Christmas cheer!

TRY THIS FOR TASTE: CHAMPAGNE AND DASH OF CHAMBORD. DON’T FORGET THE RASPBERRY!

FRANK MORRIS

PART 1 -- FROM TOM’S TASTING TIPS

Frequently, I am asked what I like to drink at Christmas or when I am on holiday. Naturally, of course, I do enjoy wine and a beer; but I often think that my tastebuds would also need a holiday break.

Instead, I started to make a delicious cocktail.

Years ago, I used to think that cocktails were too complicated and expensive to make. Once I started mixing cocktails for myself, I was amazed.

Over the years, I have discovered that my favourite cocktails are vodka and gin based. I enjoy them because they are clean, crisp and refreshing.

Those spirits are essentially neutral in character and I can flavour them to my liking. One liqueur that I love to use is Chambord, a brandy based liqueur. It’s infused with rich flavours of raspberries and blackberries.

CHAMBORD & CHAMPAGNE

Add a small splash of Chambord to the bottom of your glass and top it off with your favourite champagne. Finally, add a raspberry to garnish.

CHAMBORD, VODKA & SODA

Pour 40ml of Vodka and 20ml of Chambord over ice, and top it up with soda water. Garnish with a slice of lemon. Also, try Vodka, lime and soda – no Chambord – use lime cordial; or replace the soda water with lemonade.

NEXT: Part 2: Martinis – four kinds for you to try.

SOURCE: tomscellars.com.au

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FEATURES FOR NEXT YEAR + MR NOOSTI …
ALL THE FEATURES THAT DID NOT RUN THIS YEAR, WILL BE PUBLISHED IN THE EARLY PART OF NEXT YEAR. AND HERE’S ANOTHER SURPRISE. MR NOOSTI. AFTER MUCH HAGGLING WITH THE EDITOR, MR NOOSTI GOT A JOB OF COLUMNIST. THAT WAS IN 1981. IN THE COLUMN, MR NOOSTI WRITES ABOUT THE FUNNY THINGS, THE SAD THINGS, IN LIFE. MR NOOSTI MAKES A COMEBACK IN GRAND YEARS – NEXT YEAR.

HOORAY! MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL OUR READERS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 28 November 19

Britain’s Great War: Final. Harry was last survivor of the trenches

HARRY PATCH AT A POPPY APPEAL IN SOMERSET IN 2007. Below: THE GRAVE OF JOHN PARR, THE FIRST BRITISH SOLDIER TO DIE IN THE WAR.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

FOR YEARS, HARRY WOULD NOT TALK ABOUT HIS WAR EXPERIENCES OR ATTEND REUNIONS, AND EVEN AVOIDING WAR FILMS ON TV.

Harry Patch was no ordinary fella. He was a survivor. Patch died in 2009 aged 111.

He was the last surviving British soldier to have fought in the trenches of the First World War.

Born in Somerset in 1898, he was the youngest of three brothers. After school he followed his father, a master stonemason, into the building trade.

He was training to be a plumber when the war broke out. He started in the Army in 1917, after conscription was enforced.

Recruited in the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry, he spent four months as a private in Ypres.
On September 22, a shell exploded near him, killing three pals. Shrapnel pieced Harry’s lower abdomen.

While in a convalescence unit in Sutton Coldfield, 1918, he met his wife Ada Billington – knocking her over while he was running for a bus.

They were married for more than 50 years. They had two sons. Harry returned to plumbing in Somerset, later starting a business in Bath.

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THE ARMISTICE BROUGHT A HALT …
IN JANUARY 1919, THE LEADERS OF 32 COUNTRIES MET IN PARIS FOR A CONFERENCE. IT WAS DOMINATED BY THE ‘BIG THREE’ – DAVID LLOYD GEORGE, GEORGES CLEMENCEAU AND WOODROW WILSON. LLOYD GEORGE CAME UP WITH A COMPROMISE – THE FORMATION OF THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS, A FORERUNNER TO THE UNITED NATIONS. AFTER PROTESTS BY GERMANY WERE IGNORED, THE TREATY OF VERSAILLES WAS SIGNED ON JUNE 28, 1919. LLOYD GEORGE PREDICATED, “WE SHALL HAVE TO FIGHT ANOTHER WAR AGAIN IN 25 YEARS’ TIME”.
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When the Second World War started, Patch was 41. He was considered too old to fight so he worked at a US base and joined Bath’s Auxiliary Fire Service.

He retired from plumbing in 1963; Ada died in 1973; and in 1980, he moved to Wells and married Jean, who died in 1984.

He dedicated his 1999 Legion d’Honneur – France’s highest honour – to his three pals who did not make it.

Who was first Briton to die in this war? 

His name was Private John Parr and he was only 16 years old. In an extraordinary coincidence, Parr’s grave faces that of George Ellison, the last soldier to die in the war. 

Like so many keen and young recruits, he most probably lied about his age when he joined up in 1913.

The young golfing caddy, from Finchley, North London, joined the Middlesex Regiment and was soon sent to the Western Front.

It is believed he and another recruit were sent on their bikes … to locate the enemy on August 21, 1914.

The pair met a German cavalry patrol and Parr was shot as he tried to hold off the enemy; his companion went to report back.

No pictures of him have ever been found … his family … were so devastated by their loss that his name was rarely mentioned again.

SOURCE: From the WW part 1 and WW part 4 100th Anniversary, produced by the Daily Mirror, UK.


Britain’s War Years in vivid, glorious colour!

HOW GOOD IS A MEAL OF SCRUMPTIOUS FOOD FRESHLY COOKED? THESE POOR LONDON CHILDREN ENJOY A PENNY’S WORTH OF PLUM DUFF -- A SPICED SUET PUDDING MADE WITH RAISINS OR CURRANTS. THE YOUNG BRIGANDS GOT THEIR TUCKER FROM A SOUP KITCHEN AT BERMONDSEY IN 1917. SOUP KITCHENS ARE PLACES WHERE ALL PEOPLE -- HOMELESS, LOST -- AND WITHOUT ANYWHERE TO HIDE; WHO HAVE NO MONEY TO GET SOME SUSTENANCE. THIS PHOTO WAS ORGINALLY SHOT IN BLACK AND WHITE, NOW IT’S BRILLANT, SPARKING COLOUR AFTER A COLOUR SOFTWARE WAS PUT TO THE TEST.


CHEWING GUM: It still remains a very natural habit

CHEWING GUM WAS A DELICACY IN THE ANCIENT WORLD.

THE FIRST COMMERCIAL GUM WAS ENACTED BY THE AMERICAN COLONISTS.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Have you ever wondered, as you unwrap your stick of gum, where this habit had its origin? How long ago? And where gum comes from today?

Chewing gum is a habit that’s been passed on to us over the centuries.

There is something about chewing gum that made it seems perfectly right. It is a natural thing to do. Mankind has been doing it for centuries; and the gum they use is exactly a product of nature.

The chewing of gum has its origins in past civilisations when man chewed upon, but did not swallow the small lumps of natural resin. This natural resin exuded from the trees in the forests and from sweet grasses, grains, leaves and waxes.

Early man learned that the act of chewing gently … helped to clean his teeth and thus aided him to concentrate.

The Greeks, for example, chewed the resin from the small trees; or a shrub called the mastic tree. In doing so, they added the word ‘masticate’ to the modern language.

In our complex society, we still choose gum as a method of cleansing the mouth, for relaxation, and to assist concentration.

The beginning of modern chewing gum can be traced to Indian tribes who inhabited the New England area of the North American continent. In the1800s, colonists there noted that the local Indians chewed on lumps of resin which came from spruce trees once the bark had been cut.

This lump was actually sold to the colonists who in turn used it to chew upon.

Sometime later, about 1860, an ingredient known as “chicle”, a milky type of latex, which comes from the Sapodilla tree, was added. This ingredient is still used in modern chewing gum today – it’s the smooth and springy texture it produces.

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THE PRESENCE OF ULURU …
AUSTRALIA’S SACRED SUMMIT WAS NEVER CLIMBED BY SOME PEOPLE AS THEY MIGHT ANSWER, “BECAUSE IT’S THEIR’S.” ON OCTOBER 26, ULURU, THE MOUNTAIN THAT CHANGES COLOUR, IS SLAP BANG IN THE CENTRE OF THE CONTINENT, WAS OFFICIALLY CLOSED TO CLIMBERS. IT WAS RETURNED TO THE ANANGU PEOPLE IN 1985. THE PRESENCE OF ULURU, A 2-PART FEATURE, COMING EARLY NEXT YEAR.
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By the1900s, with improved manufacturing methods and stricter quality control, chewing gum became ultra-popular the world over.

The gum used today is the result of combining several different products from the various countries. The United States, Latin America, the Far East and the Australia food industry, which also provides the necessary ingredients.

When they’re put together, these make that fresh strip – or pellet shape – that people find so tasty when they pop them into their mouth to chew. The recipe is made up of chewing gum base, softeners, glucose syrups and flavours.

Gum base puts the ‘chew’ into chewing gum.

Gathered by groups of the natives who search for forests trees of the right age and size and give a good yield are recognised as the best produced of chicle. These workers are known as “Chicleros’ in Central America.

The chiclero use a rope to climb the trees. Then with a machete, cut a zig-zag pattern in the trunk, enabling the flow of latex into containers tied at the base of the tree. The latex is collected, processed and moulded in 12kg blocks.

These blocks are carried out of the jungle to the nearest seaport by either a mule-pack, elephant-back, boat or plane.

That’s only the beginning. Those blocks of latex carried from the jungle have a long way to go before they end up as little sticks of gum in a person’s pocket.

[Adapted from Chewing Gum – a product of nature; Published by Australasian Studies; 1979.]

SOURCE: Adapted from Grand Years 11, 2009.


HISTORIC HOTELS: Where yesterday meets today – but what happen in the past!

OLD SYDNEY TAVERN AS IT WAS IN ABOUT THE 1830s. Below: THE LIFE-SIZE REPLICA OF BILLY BLUE IN PLAQUE-FORM FROM THE ORIGINAL, AND SUBSEQUENT TAVERN HOTELS. 

IT’S A MEETING PLACE OF SYDNEY AND IT WAS WHEN ONCE OLD SYDNEY TOWN WAS BUZZING IN TIMES PAST!

ROY DRURY    

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Down in Blues Point Road, McMahon Point, Sydney, is the Old Commodore Tavern, the first Free Standing Tavern built.

The name of the road, on which the Old Tavern sits, was obtained per medium of that irascible character Billy Blue, a constant visitor to the tavern.

Blues Point was the home where old square riggers use to stay.

Just to visit and soak up the atmosphere of the Old Commodore Tavern is a memorable experience – just like it was in old days.

Billy Blue, who was one of the original characters of Sydney Town, arrived in Australia, likely before 1805, possibly from Jamaica.

He very soon came under the Patronage of Governor Macquarie, who nicknamed him the “Commodore”.

Besides running the Ferry Boat Service to Dawes Point, Billy Blue was also the Watchman at the Heaving Down Place, where ship were careened in Sydney Cove.

In 1817, the Commodore was given a grant of 80 acres of what was to become known as Blue’s Point at a rental of 2/- per year.

And when Macquarie decided to clamp down on smuggling, it was Billy Blue who was called upon to help cut down the flourishing Rum Smuggling trade.

In October 1818, the Old Commodore himself was caught in the act with two casks of rum lashed to his boat.

The colourful Billy Blue finally died, aged 99, in 1834. He left two daughters and a son.

Is it any wonder the old Commodore still attracts customers? Billy Blue would shake his head if he had the chance!

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QUEEN VICTORIA BUILDING, SYDNEY …
1893 – A NEW DESIGN ON THE FORMER MARKETS SITE IS CONCEIVED. FINAL DESIGNS BY ARCHITECT GEORGE McRAE DETAIL A THREE-STOREY ARCADE, WITH 200 SHOPS UNDER ONE ROOF, OCCUPYING AN ENTIRE CITY BLOCK. IN 1897, A SUITABLE NAME WOULD BE AFTER THE REIGNING MONARCH, QUEEN VICTORIA “IN ORDER TO MARK, IN A FITTING MANNER, THE UNPRECEDENTED AND GLORIOUS REIGN OF HER MAJESTY, THE QUEEN”, WRITES THE COUNCIL. IN 1898, THE GRANDIOSE BUILDING IS UNVEILED WITH AN EXTRAVAGANT CEREMONY.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 21 November 19

Great Britain/Great War: Magic taste of freedom – women stepped into a man’s world!

FRANK MORRIS

COLLECTOR CHECKING THE TICKET OF A BRITISH SOLDIER AT LONDON’S VICTORIA STATION.

THE TWO WOMEN SHOW WHAT DRIVING A TRAM IS ALL ABOUT. THEY’RE LEARNING TO TAKE UP THE POST LEFT BY MEN WHO ARE SERVING WITH THE ALLIED FORCES.

A LOT OF WOMEN JOINED WITH THE NURSE MOVEMENT AS VOLUNTEER NURSES AND CARERS FOR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.

ON THE HOME FRONT, MILLIONS OF MEN WENT OFF TO FIGHT FOR THEIR COUNTRY’S NORMALITY!

The workplace beckoned for the women they had left behind. The dramatic implications for their status in society was awesome.

As millions of men were shipped to the front line, the women they left behind were engaged in important work, sometimes it was very dangerous, to work on the home front.

The terrible death of a young woman showed that it wasn’t only the battlefield where lives were being put on the line.
During the First World War, many women became volunteer nurses and carers for wounded soldiers returning home.

They were directed to stately properties which had been converted into hospitals or convalescent homes.

THERE WERE RUMBLINGS OF THE WAR YEARS, OF COURSE! BUT WITHOUT WARNING, THE FAMOUS LUSITANIA WAS TORPEDOED OFF THE IRISH COAST, KILLING AMONG THE PASSENGERS, 128 AMERICANS. SHE SANK IN MINUTES. IT IS ADVISED THAT MANY OF THE PASSENGERS HAD BEEN SAVED.

After severe rumblings, America finally stepped into the fray in 1917.

America was drawing closer and closer to the war in Europe. German’s resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare brought about a break in diplomatic relations between that country and America in February, 1917.

It was only a matter of time before the American people would demand a declaration of war against the Central Powers of Europe.

On April 6, l917, the declaration of war was made and America doughboys were soon on their way “over there”.
President Wilson had spent almost three years trying to stay out the conflict.

Germany, in American eyes, was the villain after news of atrocities in Belgium in 1914. In addition was the sinking of the British passenger liner, the Lusitania, in l915. Which killed 128 Americans.

“It’s a war to end all wars that would make the world safe for democracy”.

With America, came the start of a new newspaper, The Stars & Stripes, which would lift the lid on a number of issues about the war.

Great Britain’s/Great War: The Yank’s start a newspaper that worth its weight in gold!

FRANK MORRIS

THE FIRST EDITION OF THE STARS & STRIPES FOR 1918. IT HELP RAISED A LOT OF WAR ISSUES.  AS WAR ROLLS ON, THE STARS & STRIPES WILL BE A FAMILIAR CATCH-CRY.

The most treasured newspaper of any war from 1915 onwards was Stars and Stripes. Experts say it’s hailed as the most popular, most quoted, and most ambitious of the service newspapers around since World War II.

Meanwhile, there was an interesting array of service newspapers and magazines produced all over the world -- Yank, SEAC, Parade, Battle Dress, Victory and so on – S&S origins actually date from the Great War.

Media historian Michael Anglo said these news outlets “provided a safety valve for the vast hordes of civilians in uniform who were enmeshed in the military machine.”

The first of issue of The Stars and Stripes was produced in Neufchateau, France, on February 8, 1918. The idea that the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) published its own newspaper was promoted by an articulate but aggressive young officer, Guy T. Viskniskki.

START THE PROJECT

Viskniskki, a press officer and censor, backed up his proposal with the fact the he had organised and managed the 80th Division Training Camp weekly, The Bayonet. When the General Staff finally acquiesced to his plan, Viskniskki unearthed enough newsprint to start to project.

His next move was to find linotype machines and stereotyping equipment and suitable premises. He did. He organised the printing at the Paris plant of the London newspaper, The Daily News. Viskniskki’s position as editor was curtailed after a few issues.

He was eventually succeeded by an “editorial council”, which was headed by Harold Ross, who later co-founded the New Yorker magazine. Some of the other luminaries included Alexander Woolcott (drama) and Grantland Rice (sport).

BRITISH EDITION

The paper, which was “greatly prized” by the infantry and officers alike, continued to be published in France for the next sixteen months. It was shifted to Washington, lock, stock and caboodle to operate as “an independent weekly”.

Since its beginning, S&S has been part of every theatre of war on every front. The paper made its first appearance in North Africa as a four-page weekly in December, 1942. This edition carried a special message from the US Commander of the European Forces, General Eisenhower.

The General emphasised, once again, the importance of home news to the soldiers.
Special editions, weekly and then daily, covered the Mediterranean and Italy; and a British edition appeared in 1942, hard on the heels of the first US troops arriving in Ireland.

As the wars rolled on, “Stars and Stripes forever” has been a familiar catchcry.

ABOUT THE STARS & STRIPES …

OFFICIAL! THE AMERICAN NEWSPAPER, THE STARS AND STRIPES, FIRST MADE ITS APPEARANCE IN THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR OF I861-65. IT HAS BEEN PUBLISHED PERIODICALLY EITHER AS A WEEKLY OR A DAILY. IT WAS REVIVED AS A WEEKLY IN 1918 AND DISCONTINUED IN 1919. IT WAS SET UP AGAIN IN 1942; AND A PACIFIC EDITION IN 1945. --FM.


Britain’s War Years in vivid, glorious colour!

YOU CAN LEAD A HORSE TO WATER … BUT ALL THEY WANT TO DO IS GET OUT OF THE MUDDY HELL THEY’RE IN. LADEN WITH MUNITIONS, THESE TWO HORSES STRUGGLE THROUGH THE MUD NEAR YPRES, BELGIUM, DURING THE FIRST WAR WORLD IN 1917. THEY WERE CARRYING ARTILLERY SHELLS FOR ALLIED TROOPS FIGHTING IN THE BATTLE OF PASSCHENDAELE. ASSORTED ANIMALS WERE USED IN THE TRENCHES, THOUSANDS DIED. THIS IMAGE WAS ORGINALLY SHOT IN BLACK AND WHITE. COMPUTER SOFTWARE WAS PUT TO THE TEST. OUT SPRINGS A FORGOTTEN BRITAIN IN GLORIOUS COLOUR. SOURCE: WEEKEND MAGAZINE, ENGLAND.


YOUR DOG: Scorpio dogs show great strength of character

FRANK MORRIS

I’M A MASTER OF LOT OF THINGS EXCEPT MY NAME.

My owner keeps telling me that I am a master of things so I should behave myself all the time. Then she uttered those painful words … “Come on, Dog-dog!”

I just look at her.

My owner turns her sweet blue eyes and starts to mutter some indecipherable lines to me. She smile. I take it they were decent.

My imagination took over.

I started to roll around like a sick parrot! I felt dreadful just to think of it. My eyes turned red; my paws started to burn; my red-setter head was just about to fall off!

She, my owner, fibbed. All I did was roll around and got up. There’ll nothing wrong with that.

She bent down and patted me. “That’s a nice Dog-dog”. She’s done it again. I looked up at her with a courteous, kindly, merciful gaze and I began to have a deeply felt and sincere liking for her.

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REMEMBER THE 1960s …
1960 WAS THE CENTENARY OF THE MELBOURNE CUP. THE RAZZ-A-MATAZZ PROMOTION OF THE CUP BROUGHT 100,000 PEOPLE TO FLEMINGTON FOR THE FIRST TIME SINCE 1949. THE CENTENARY CARNIVAL WAS DUBBED, “THE FESTIVAL OF FASHIONS, FLOWERS & FAVOURITES”. TULLOCH WAS THE FAVOURITE, BUT HE WAS SO COMPLEX IN CHARACTER THAT ON THE FIELD HE WAS HARD TO HANDLE. MEANWHILE, HI JINX AND HOWSIE FINISHED FIRST AND SECOND, WITH ILUMQUH WHO RAN THIRD.
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Scorpios are supposed to forgive and forget about a minor name, Dog-dog. If I’d grown to a full-size red-setter, with paws as long a human hand, I would have trampled her into the ground. No kidding.

But now, as I up to her, looking doe-eyed at the look she gives back to me, I almost whimper in shame.

But no, I went to her like a gallant knight; I treated her like I would any female, I came and sat beside her. She bent and mouthed those words, “Good dog, Dog-dog”.

I cringed.

Scorpio is a water sign symbol representing power, I thought. The dog born under it will have great strength of character and have a sting in his tail. Sounds interesting, I thought.

Power makes you formidable. As I grow older, I spend my time pursuing but one ambition: complete self-mastery.

I would go to great lengths to stretch my powers of endurance. I can be an affectionate creature. But, I still have a prickly exterior. Some red-setters are like that.

I’m glad I am a red-setter with square head, impressive height, and unbounding red hair swaying in the wind.
I am the ‘king’ of the dog fraternity. I just wish my female owner would have named me anything but Dog-dog!


ACTION HORSES: Australia’s most intelligent cutting horses!

JULIE SKERRETT      Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

ACTION HORSES ARE BUILT FOR, SKILL, INTELLIGENCE AND LIGHTNING FAST REFLEXES!

Cutting horses are the fastest growing equines in Australia. Their sport also carries considerable prize-money for doing what they do best – cutting. But beware of the cost, it can be jaw-breaking as well; and it can send you broke.

Deep down, it’s the love of the sport rather the hopes of riches that keep its aspirants faithful.

Developed from work practices, the sport still occupies a large part in Australia and other parts of the world.

In the absence of fences, gates and yards, several horsemen hold the herd while one or two riders separate out chosen individuals.

Skilled horses and riders are needed, but the saving in time and the less cattle stress is considerable. As a sport, cutting was first seen in Australia … in which one beast was cut out from the mob in the holding yard or “camp”.

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REMEMBER THE 1960s …
A USSR PATRIOTIC SONG, HOW SPACIOUS IS MY COUNTRY, WAS FADED-DOWN ON RADIO, AND A SIMPLE ANNOUNCEMENT THAT SHATTERED FOREVER MAN’S ANCIENT ISOLATION ON EARTH: “THE WORLD’S FIRST SPACESHIP VOSTOK (EAST), WITH A MAN ON BOARD, HAS BEEN LAUNCHED ON APRIL 12, 1961 … IS ON A ROUND-THE-WORLD ORBIT”. THE USSR CAME TO A HALT. STREETCARS AND BUSES CAME TO A STOP. PASSENGERS, FACTORY WORKERS AND SCHOOL KIDS WERE LISTENING. MAJOR YURI GARARIN, THE FIRST COSMONAUT, WAS WHIRLING ABOUT THE EARTH AT 18,000 MILES A HOUR. HE WENT INTO HISTORY AS THE FIRST MAN IN SPACE.
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The selected beast is usually held apart from the mob for some minutes to demonstrate the skill of the horse and rider. The points tally allocated for the “cut out” make up is 20 per cent of the total camp draft score.

Generally, Australian stock horses are used for cutting.

The skill of the horse alone, working almost entirely unaided, is judged; and it calls for exceptional intelligence and powers of concentration, and well as swift acceleration and lightning reflexes.

No other breed fits these criteria as does the American Quarter Horse. The horse’s selective breeding has concentrated and emphasized these traits.

The Quarter Horse, with its sturdily muscled hind-quarters and moderate height (14.2 to 15 hands) gives them the fast take-off necessary in sprinting races over a quarter-mile (400 metres), from which the breed takes its name.

Muscling and movement is the thing.

The same heavy muscling in chest and rear make it possible for rapid spinning motions necessary in a good cutting horse. The horse’s intelligent forward-facing eyes, set wide apart in a short broad head, fix their intent gaze on the beast in a fierce concentration not observed in any other breed.

Just as remarkable is the Quarter Horse trained for flexibility and rapidity of movement. A Quarter Horse can achieve a true pivot in the hind feet.

The forelegs, meanwhile, plunge rapidly from side to side following the movements of the unhappy steer. A young untrained Quarter Horse of approved lines can cost many thousands of dollars and take years to train.

However, you can obtain a great deal of pleasure by just becoming a spectator at the cutting events.

SOURCE: If you’re interested in becoming a member contact: Admin@ncha.com.au

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REMEMBER IN THE 1960s …
ALAN JAY LERNER AND FREDERICK LOEWE, NOW THE BEST WRITER-COMPOSER TEAM IN AMERICAN MUSICAL THEATRE, WITH LERNER THE LIBRETTIST AND LOEWE THE COMPOSER. BOTH MEN ARE INTERSELY AMBITIOUS. LOEWE SAID, “I’M A GENIUS”. THEY ALREADY PROVED THEMSELVES WORTHY OF A KING, HERE LIES KING ARTHUR, APPEARED ON THE STAGE OF BROADWAY’S MAJESTIC THEATER, ON DECEMBER 3, 1960. THEY BELTED OUT: MY FAIR LADY, BRIGADOON, PAINT YOUR WAGON, CAMELOT AND MANY OTHERS.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 15 November 19

Great Britain/Great War: Heir to the Austrian throne, and wife, shot dead

FRANK MORRIS

ARCHDUKE FERDINAND, HIS WIFE, AND FAMILY.

ARCHDUKE FERDINAND AND HIS WIFE LIE IN STATE AFTER THE ASSASSINATION. THE DEATH OF FERDINAND SHATTERED ANY HOPE OF A UNITED EUROPE.

ARCHDUKE FERDINAND HEIR PRESUMPTIVE TO THE AUSTRIAN EMPIRE, ONCE THE MOST DANGEROUS SEAT IN POWER POLITICS. IT WAS THE ROAD TO WAR.

When the Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the thrones of Austria and Hungary, and Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were motoring in an open car across the bridge in Sarajevo, Bosnia, people from all sides of the street came out to meet them.

And to top it off, it turned into a fine and bright sunny day.

Gavrilo Princip, who could have been part of the flock of people who gathered to watch the Archduke and the Duchess, stepped out on the road, facing the automobile – and halted.

The car automatically slowed down. Princip fired his pistol twice at Ferdinand’s chest; the first shot missed, and hit the Duchess; the second, well-aimed shot, hit him. He died minutes later.

In all the excitement, the Duchess cried out to the Archduke, “For God’s sake, what has happened to you?” She sank to knees, placing her head in her husband’s lap.

Said an onlooker, “Both assassination attempts and the deaths had taken place within 90 minutes”.

It was June 28, 1914, and the assassination of Fredinand was one of the main causes of World War 1. After a lot of cross-talk between the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Serbia and Bosnia – the Bosnians refused to agree with the contents -- the Empire’s government declared war on July 28.

“Tragically, other countries were drawn into the conflict,” writes Australian historian, Ronald W. Laidlaw, in Mastering Australian History. “The Tsar of Russia and his advisers … mobilised their forces against Austria-Hungary two days later.”

Germany was an ally of Austria-Hungary and France and Britain were allies of Russia. “To attack France,” wrote Laidlaw, “Germany had to march through Belgium.”

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FIGHTING FAMILY …
OF FIVE NIXON BROTHERS WHO WENT TO WAR, FOUR WERE WOUNDED, ONE WAS KILLED. ONE BROTHER WAS A TERRITORIAL, ONE A GUNNER, ANOTHER WAS AN AIRMEN. ONE OF THEM DESERTED. EVERY BROTHER WAS SCARRED.
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Britain had a treaty with Belgium but Germany, nevertheless, invaded Belgium on August 4 and Britain declared war.

When the telegram was received in Melbourne in the early hours of August 5, Australia was also at war. Other countries like New Zealand, Canada and USA, eventually, decided to assist the Allies. The Great War had been percolating for many months.

During the arrest and retribution, many were arrested and the remainder were hanged.

Gavrilo Princip, for instance, in order to protect other fellow conspirators, claimed that he was acting alone.

Princip, aged 19, told the examining judge that he regretted killing the Duchess.

When all the cross-blame had dissipated, Princip was one of the individuals who wasn’t hanged.

SOURCE: From Grand Years. But this time a same ending but rewritten.


Britain’s War Years in vivid, glorious colour!

A FACE IN THE CROWD! HE WALKED THROUGH THE BUSY STREET OUTSIDE BUCKINGHAM PALACE. IT’S EDWARD, PRINCE OF WALES, PASSING THROUGH A CROWD OF ONLOOKERS – UNNOTICED – DURING THE FIRST WORLD WAR IN 1914. THE PRINCE IS WEARING AN INFANTRY OFFICER’S UNIFORM OF THE ELITE GRENADIER GUARDS REGIMENT WHO SERVED ON THE WESTERN FRONT. THIS IMAGE WAS SHOT IN BLACK AND WHITE. COMPUTER SOFTWARE WAS PUT TO THE TEST. AND OUT SPRINGS FORGOTTEN BRITAIN IN SPARKLY GLORIOUS COLOUR. SOURCE: WEEKEND MAGAZINE, ENGLAND.


FAMILY HISTORY: English Wills – the “last will and testament” …

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

TRACING YOUR FAMILY TREE AND YOU’VE HIT A BUMPY ROAD? IN A GLOBALISED WORLD, THERE IS A DESIRE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT OURSELVES, THE INDIVIDUALS AND PLACES WHERE WE COME FROM.

HOW TO TRACE YOUR FAMILY TREE AND FIND RELATIVES IN ENGLAND, IRELAND, SCOTLAND AND WALES BY USING THE INTERNET. GO TO THE RIGHT PLACES JUST LIKE THE ONES WE POINT OUT HERE. NOW, SINCE THE PEACE TREATY HAS BEEN SIGNED BY ALL THE NATIONS IN 1919. IT’S ABOUT TIME YOU RESEARCHED THE WORLD WAR 1 FILES TO SEE IF ANY RELATIVES SURVIVED.

Most people are familiar with the phrase “last will and testament”. It shows the distinction made between land, which cannot be moved, and other goods, which can. The will covers the disposal of estates and property, and the testament deals with movable goods, chattels and money.

A history of wills can be a complex business.

Until 1858, when a national system was introduced, probate was mainly administrated by church courts. But “peculiars” and some manors also had the right to prove wills. During the Commonwealth period, 1653 to 1660, a government court handled them.

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REMEMBER …
THE FILM, THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, WITH YUL BRYNNER, IS SUPPORTED BY A TRIBE OF LEGENDARY NAMES, AND DIRECTED BY JOHN STURGES. HE IS A MASTER AT OVERSEEING THE WESTERN AND MAKING THEM A HIT OF ALL TIME. REMEMBER GUNFIGHT AT THE OK CORRAL AND LAST TRAIN FROM GUN HILL? BOTH WERE STURGES’ FILMS. WITH THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, THERE ARE NOT MANY STORIES THAT COULD BE ADAPTED TO A WESTERN. RELEASED IN 1962.
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Before 1838, when nuncupative wills became illegal, a statement of how a person wanted to dispose of his or her possessions could be accepted. They were usually dictated when the person was dying and there wasn't enough time to call in a lawyer or someone experienced in writing a proper will.

Although it was witnessed, it was not signed.

Such wills usually start with “Memorandum”, rather than stating that this is the last will and testament, are to be found with the other wills of the court in which they were proved.

What happened to wills before 1858?

The proving of wills was done by a church court, which charged for this service. It’s been estimated that in the 19th century only 5 per cent of people’s estates went through probate, so the family historian must be prepared not find a will.

When they do exist, however, they can supply a great deal of information.

What happened after 1858?

The authenticity and validity of wills were proved by the state system on a national basis. The will was taken to the local probate office, which made its own copy, and then sent another to the Principal Probate Registry in London, now called the Probate Service.

In addition to being the probate office for the south-east of Britain, it also deals with wills that present problems from everywhere in the country and the national scene as well.

The original will was given back to the executor(s) after a note that probate had been granted and was added to it. This conferred on the executor(s) the power to administer the estate.

SOURCE: Family History Made Easy; Kathy Charter; Southwater, an imprint of Anness Publishing Ltd 2004.


MELBOURNE CUP: 1919 – packed crowds returned to the Cup after years of shallow memories!

MAURICE CAVANOUGH       Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

ARTILLERYMAN, STANDS MEAN AND LEAN, KNOWS WHAT TO DO AND WHEN TO DO IT, PARTICULARLY ON THE TRACK. CANCER DIDN’T STOP HIM WINNING THE MELBOURNE CUP.

MANY COMPETENT JUDGES SAID ARTILLERYMAN WAS THE BEST-LOOKING HORSE EVER SEEN ON AN AUSTRALIAN RACE-TRACK!

Racing, in common with most forms of amusement, entered into a boom period in 1919. In a reaction from the austere years of the war, the people spent freely on all forms of diversions.

And the Melbourne Argus put it rather primly, “The desire for pleasure is more noticeable than the will to work”.
On Melbourne Cup day, there was a good deal of argument as to whether Artilleryman or Richmond Main was the colt of the year.

There was a tremendous crowd at Flemington on Cup Day. Officials estimated the figure at more than 105,000 spectators.

The Cup running settled any doubt – Artilleryman scored the easiest victory -- as to which was the better colt.

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RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS ...
THE AUSTRALIAN OLYMPIC TEAM IS A NEVER-ENDING STREAM OF FACES AND MOMENTS THAT STRETCH … FORWARD INTO HISTORY, SHAPING US AS WE HAVE SHAPED THEM. THEY ARE THE AUSTRALIAN OLYMPIC TEAM … THEY ARE THE STARS OF THE SOUTHERN CROSS. TEXT: PART OF A HOMILY PRODUCED BY THE DAILY & SUNDAY TELEGRAPH.
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With Bobby Lewis, the great rider in the saddle, Artilleryman did as was told in the Cup. Lewis has him going kindly about sixth or seventh all the way to the straight entrance; then he gave him his head.

The colt bounded away and scored with ridiculous ease.

Artilleryman was first, an official six lengths, to Richmond Main second and Two Blues, who cut Lucknow out for a place, finished third.

Bobby Lewis scored his third Cup by his win on Artilleryman; and a fourth Cup on Trivalve in 1927.

Lewis learned to ride horses on the common at the Clunes, a small town Ballarat. He was born there in 1878.

He was 10 year old when he rode his firse winner at Clunes. It was 50 years later, in July 1938, that Lewis handed his jockey’s licence.

SOURCE: Melbourne Cup, 1861-1982; the end-piece came from 200 Years of Australian Sport, by Heads and Lester.


RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS …
WOMEN PLAYED A BIG PART IN THE 1956 OLYMPIC GAMES. NOT ONLY AS COMPETITORS BEHIND THE SCENES AS WELL. ONE OF THESE WOMEN WAS LILLIAN NEVILLE. LILLIAN HAD BEEN CONNECTED WITH WOMEN’S ATHLETICS FOR OVER 25 YEARS. SHE WAS A SELECTOR SINCE 1948. SHE FEELS THAT HAVING THE GAMES IN OUR COUNTRY IS A WONDERFUL INCENTIVE. TWO-PART FEATURE COMING IN 2020.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 08 November 19

Great Britain/Great War: Great Britain declares war on Germany!

THE DAILY MIRROR       Adapted BY FRANK MORRIS

HUGE CROWDS, MEN OF ALL AGES, LINE UP AT ONE OF THE RECRUITING CENTRES FOLLOWING THE OUTBREAK OF WAR.

HUGE CROWDS CHEER THEIR MAJESTIES AT THE PALACE. REPLY TO THE BRITISH ULTIMATUM “UNSATISFACTORY”.

Great Britain is in a state of war with Germany.

It was officially stated at the Foreign Office last night (August 4) that Great Britain declared war against Germany at seven o’ clock. The British Ambassador in Berlin has been handed his passport.

War was Germany’s reply to our request that she should respect the neutrality of Belgium, whose territories we were bound in honour and by treaty obligations to maintain inviolate.

Speaking in a crowded and hushed House, the Premier yesterday afternoon made the following statement:
“We have made a request to the German Government that we shall have a satisfactory assurance as to Belgian neutrality before midnight tonight (Tuesday).”

The German reply to our request, it was officially stated last night, was unsatisfactory.

It was reported yesterday evening that Germany had taken the first hostile step by destroying a British mine-layer.

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KING GEORGE V …
AT THIS GRAVE MOMENT … I SEND TO YOU AND THROUGH YOU, TO THE OFFICERS AND MEN OF THE FLEETS, OF WHICH YOU HAVE ASSUMED COMMAND THE ASSURANCE OF MY CONFIDENCE, THAT UNDER YOUR DIRECTION, THEY WILL REVIVE AND RENEW THE OLD GLORIES OF THE ROYAL NAVY …THE SURE SHIELD OF BRITAIN AND OF HER EMPIRE IN THE HOUR OF TRIAL.
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At the present time Germany is in a state of war with Great Britain, France, Russia and Belgium.

It would seem as if Germany, in her ambition to control the destiny of the whole of Europe, was ready to embark on any grandiose scheme of adventure, however precarious her chances.

So far as Great Britain is concerned, her attitude has always been plain, straight-forward and perfectly intelligible.

She was prepared to stand aside from the conflict which has now involved practically the whole of Europe.

But she insisted and had to insist on two things.

These were that Belgium’s neutrality should be respected; and that the German fleet should not bombard defenceless French towns.

Germany tried to bribe us with peace to desert our friend and duty.

But Great Britain has preferred to path of honour.

SOURCE: The Daily Mirror, August 5, 1914.

NEXT WEEK: The assassination of the heir to the throne, Archduke Ferdinand.

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A WORD FROM DOWN UNDER …
WHEN PRIME MINSTER ANDREW FISHER JUMPED ON THE BANDWAGON HE SAID: “AUSTRALIANS WILL STAND BESIDE OUR OWN TO HELP AND DEFEND HER (BRITAIN) TO OUR MAN AND OUR LAST SHILLING”.
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BRITAIN’S WAR YEARS IN GLORIOUS COLOUR …

FOOTBALL FANATICS WERE APLENTY. THEY CAME FROM THE NEAR AND FAR OF THE UNITED ENGLAND. SPECTATORS MAKE USE OF ANY VANTAGE TO WATCH BURNLEY v LIVERPOOL FA CUP FINAL AY CRYSTAL PALACE, LONDON, WON BY BURNLY BY I GOAL, ON APRIL 25, 1914. WAR WAS ONLY FOUR MONTH AWAY. COMPUTER SOFTWARE TEASES OUT THE COLOUR TO MAKE THIS FASCINATING SERIES SPRING VIVIDLY INTO LIFE. THE AGE OF INNOCENCE AND SIMPLICITY – HERE IT IS, FORGOTTEN BRITAIN, IN SPARKLY, GLORIOUS COLOUR. SOURCE: WEEKEND MAGAZINE, ENGLAND.


RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS: The Games in 1904 were not a success. Was it because they were held in conjunction with the World Fair!

FRANK MORRIS

LATE NEWS. THE WINNER OF THE MARATHON WAS LATER DENOUNCED BY OLYMPIC OFFICIALS AS A NON-WINNER.

THE GAMES WERE ORIGINALLY FOR CHICAGO. A MEETING WITH THE MAYORS RULED THAT ST LOUIS WAS HOST CITY OF THE WORLD FAIR AND SO THE QLYMPIC GAMES WERE HELD THERE.

The 1904 Olympic Games in St Louis were described as “the flattest and most drawn out” in the modern Olympic Games era.

That’s why more than half the countries rejected the move in competing for world honours.

Staged between May 14 and October 29, only 496 men – no women – from 10 nations competed.

Neither Britain nor France felt able to send a single competitor. Apart from the US and Canada, the only other countries to take part were Australia, Cuba, South Africa, Germany, Ireland and Greece.

The long programme caused interest to wane in the Games, and there were never more than 5000 spectators at any one session.

According to a recently published history of the Olympics, the Games were originally scheduled to take place in Chicago.

But the IOC, in its wisdom, transferred the Games to St.Louis to be held in conjunction with the Louisiana Purchase Exposition.

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RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS …
WHO WAS THE FASTEST MAN IN THE WORLD IN 1936? HE WAS AN AMERICAN. HIS NAME WAS JESSE OWENS, AND HE REPRESENTED AMERICA IN THE 1936 OLYMPIC GAMES HELD IN BERLIN. HE WON 4 GOLD MEDALS – 100m, 200m, THE BROAD JUMP THE 400m RELAY. THE FIRST TWO MEDALS HE WON, THE SPRINTS, HE SET NEW RECORDS IN BOTH. HE DASHED HOME WITH ASTONISHING PERFORMANCES.
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As a result the Games were in reality of very little importance compared with the exhibition itself.

There was no official accommodation for competitors, except for a “tent camp” in the exhibition park.

The stadium included a grandstand and some scattered buildings used for dressing rooms and administrative offices.

The Games had no international flavour, and there was unbridled rivalry between the American clubs.

Etienne Desmarteau, a Montreal policeman, was the only “foreigner” to win a gold medal. The US scooped the pool by winning 21 of the 22 track events.

But the Games did produce four triple champions.

Archie Hahn, the Milwaukee Meteor, lowered the record for the 200 metres sprint to 21.6 seconds, which was not bettered until 1932.

Fred Lorz of Mohawk, was banned for life after hoaxing his victory in the marathon.

As he entered the stadium to a hero's welcome, it was revealed that Lorz had been disabled by cramps at the 9 mile mark.

He got a lift in a car which broke down so decided to run the last five miles to the finish.

The only Australian to compete was the national schoolboy hurdling and jumping champion Corrie Gardner, from Melbourne Grammar.

Corrie wrote an article for an Australian newspaper from St Louis criticising the direction of the Games organisation and labelling it a as “gigantic fake”.

If Edwin Flack and Corrie Gardner has not competed in the 1896 and 1904 Games, Australia would not “possess its unflawed attendance record”.

SOURCE: Grand Years, 2005.


FOCUS ON CCCCRASHED: Part 1. Road rage from village people who don’t heed the warning

FRANK MORRIS

EARLY CCCCRASH – THE EXAMPLE OF CAR CRASH WHICH TOOK PLACE IN BOWRAL, NSW, 1908. NOTHING EVER CHANGES. CARS HAD BEEN ON THE ROAD ONLY FOR FEW YEARS. PHOTO: SYDNEY MAIL.

WHAT CAUSES A ROAD SMASH? TRY THIS: COMPLACENCY, DRIVER DISTRACTION, CAR SAFETY, ALCOHOL OR DRUG USE, P-PLATERS, RISK-TAKING BEHAVIOURS OR SOME PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA?

It would pay retirement village managers to heed the warning from road accident experts that there are drivers who believe they are still safe and competent behind the wheel but, in reality, they are accidents waiting to happen.

A leading defence driving specialist said the fact that seniors had decades of driving experience behind then, and had never had an accident was a case of “good luck” rather than safe driving skills.

He said, “Some seniors feel insulted that after forty or so years of driving they have to correct their safe driving habits.

“Even though they are quite surprised at how traffic rules have changed. Which only goes to highlight their lack of road safety”.

He said with changing road rules “and the increase in speed and performance of cars” the senior driver is finding it difficult to handle the problem of “road rage” from other motorists.

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POINTS TO REMEMBER …
BEFORE YOU ENTER OR EXIT A PARKING SPOT, TURN YOUR HEAD AND LOOK OVER YOUR SHOULDER – DON’T RELY ON YOUR MIRRORS – TO MAKE SURE YOU CAN DO SO SAFELY.
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”There are many seniors who should not be driving,” he said. “And many more who will be involved in a major accident long before they have to do the Aged Driving Test”.

A study by a prominent care group, revealed that there are people with dementia who were “judged unsafe to drive but continued to do so”.

A rehabilitation specialist at a leading regional hospital described the situation as, “It’s going to be an increasing problem”.

Other studies have shown that less than half of people with dementia give up driving before they are involved in a crash.

According to the driving specialist, a majority of carers fail to act on warning signs until an accident actually happens.

The specialist’s warning: “If you see signs that a person is losing the ability to drive safely, tell the person’s family.

NEXT: CCCCRASHES – They’re waiting to happen. Coming soon.

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POINTS TO REMEMBER …
IF YOU’RE GETTING INTO CAR … CHECK AROUND IT FOR ANY HAZARDS. MAKE SURE, FOR EXAMPLE, THERE ARE NO SMALL CHILDREN OR DOGS NEARBY THAT YOU COULD RUN INTO.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 01 November 19

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