Grand Years with Frank Morris

Searching for posts in the month of: June 2019

Number of blogs returned: 1 to 4 records of 4

WALTZING MATILDA: A story of a film that was never made!

BY A SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

PASTORALIST LEADER, McLAGAN, WAS A DETERMINED AND UNCOMPROMISING SQUATTER. WALTZING MATILDA WAS THE EPIC TITLE OF THE SONG THAT FOUNDED A NATION.

The story begins …

When the squatters, or the landed aristocracy, were caught treating their shearers working for a pittance under extreme hardship and dreadful living conditions all hell was going to break loose.

During 1894, this conflict between the squatters and shearers reached its climax.

The central character in this rebellion was Jock Burns, son of a union shearer. Burns is good-looking, of hard-working Scottish stock who doesn’t care for his father’s union ideology.

Jock starts on his journey through the outback primarily to view the plight of how the shearers and their families lived.

The Pastoralists Association leader, McLagan, who, for 30 years of sticking to the grind and risk, has carved out three large pastoral holdings in three different colonies.

All three of the holdings were set in the lush rich of the prosperous western district of Victoria, up to the harsh and tough, unforgiving outback of NSW and Queensland.

McLagan was a determined and uncompromising squatter who was not going to give into the union demands.

…………………………………………………………………………………………….......................................................…
GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
WHO WAS THE CARTOON CHARACTER TO FIRST ATTAIN THE CELEBRITY OF THE HUMAN STAR?
…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…

There are a hard and strongly cohesive bunch of characters on both sides of this conflict and neither was used to giving up without a fight; the outback moves closer to armed insurrection.

With these events, Jock was thrust into a situation where his sense of a “fair go” compels him to take part and join the union side.

His own leadership qualities force him to take on, reluctantly, the role of a hero.

FINAL PART: Jock pals up with a top-gun shearer, the great Dave Grant, and with him develops a special mateship.

Below: Policemen were everywhere during the height of the battle.


AUSSIE CARTOONS: Images from the arrival of the First Fleet up until now!

FRANK MORRIS


A STOUCH TAKES PLACE IN A FIRST FLEET CARTOON.

INKED: AUSTRALIAN CARTOONS IS ON EXHIBITION AT THE NATIONAL LIBRARY, CANBERRA. TO CLOSE ON JULY 21, 2019.

Cartoons, it’s said, capture the moments. This is history truly in a memorable way.  The declaration of war, the dismissal of a prime minister, or a crash in the economy.

All of these can be frozen in time in several brush strokes.

As managing editor of a magazine, I attempted to join that elite bunch of people that have contributed over 14,000 cartoons for public consumption.

It all started when Prime Minister Whitlam was sacked from office by the Governor-General Sir John Kerr. The Prime Minister had even recommended him for the job as G-G.

I was at work when the news broke. I immediately told the editor to drop the cover and prepare to receive a replacement early in the morning.

The magazine was ready to go to press, when a telephone from the ‘boss’ simply said “don’t print that cover”.

…………………………………………………………………………………………..............................................................
AUSSIE CARTOON …
A SMART LADY DROPPED INTO A MOVIE HOUSE WHILE THE NEWSREEL WAS PLAYING. THEN SUDDENLY SHE SAID TO THE GENTLEMAN NEXT TO HER, “THERE’S JOHN! AT THE RACES! AND HE SAID HE WAS BUSY IN THE CITY.” YEAR 1923 (CIRCA).
………………………………………………………………………………………..............................................................…

The intended cover portrayed Whitlam as a statue, in a room with other statues of prime ministers, with Kerr racing towards Whitlam holding an evil-looking sword that was about looped his head off.

It was a scintillating cover. All of the office agreed. The editorial remained as well comment from the 12 main morning newspapers.

On show, are over 14,000 cartoons from before the arrival of the First Fleet in 1788 until now.

It showcases the work of some of Australia’s most famous cartoonists – Will Dyson, David Low, Phil May, Judy Horacek, Bruce Petty, Alan Moir, Cathy Wilcox and others.

For me: I wanted to purloin the artwork and have it framed. But it wasn’t to be found.

Below: The Australian Stock Exchange Journal, November 1975, missed out its cover of the century.


VALE: The “one and only” Bill Collins dies at home but his great knowledge of the movies lives on!

FRANK MORRIS

“MR MOVIES”, BILL COLLINS, WAS APPLAUDED FOR HIS INDEPTH KNOWLEDGE OF THE MOVIE SCENE.  HE GOES OVERBOARD ON THE FOUNTAINHEAD AS IT MANAGES TO FIND ITS WAY INTO COLLINS’ “ALL TIME” GREAT MOVIES.

Bill Collins, “Mr Movies”, died at home on Friday, June 21, aged 84. Collins favourite saying during his tenure of his much-loved Golden Years of Hollywood for Channel Seven (1966 – 1975) was to “sit and relax.”

He worked as a movie commentator for Channel Nine, 1975-1979; and Channel Ten from 1980-1993. Collins moved to Foxtel in October 1995.

He was a film critic with a vast knowledge of his subject.

A profile on Collins’ “undiscriminating admiration” of Hollywood didn’t pass without notice. A fellow commentator, David Stratton, considered him “a national treasure.”

He wrote hundreds of magazine columns and articles on the movie scene around the world.

Collins went berserk every time he had the honour to present The Fountainhead on television. Here is the full article which was published in 2011 or thereabouts:

Professional movie buff Bill Collins tends to go overboard every time he presents The Fountainhead on his Golden Years of Hollywood.

He never fails to wax lyrical about the story, the script and the stars – Gary Cooper and Patricia Neal –- in his usual profound fashion.

Although the film, which is an uneven adaptation of Ayd Rand’s novel (she did it herself) of the name, was released in 1949. The film is somewhat ‘campy’ these days but it still manages to find its way into Collins’ ten “all-time” great movies.

But that’s another story.

However, Mr Collins will be pleased to learn last that at last negotiations are under way in Hollywood to produce a television mini-series based on Rand’s block-buster novel Atlas Shrugged.

(It was eventually made into a 3-part film and released on September, 2011.)

Rand was one-quarter into the script when she died in March, 1982.

In the course of her 77 years, Ayn (pronounced Ein) Rand was acclaimed as “the most creative thinker alive”.  Although her elephantine novels, The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged were deprecated by most critics, they sold millions of copies.

The capstone of Rand’s literary career was Atlas Shrugged published in 1957. It’s a “apocalyptic fantasy”, which takes place in America a generation or two hence.

“Combining elements of Buck Rogers, Mickey Spillane and the Rover Boy, it pre-visions the horrors awaiting humanity unless it mends its ways,” was how John Kobler described Altas Shrugged in a 1960s profile of Rand.

…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…
GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
THE FIRST RADIO MAGAZINE IN AUSTRALIA WAS IN 1923. WHAT WAS IT CALLED?
…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…

He moved to Foxtel in 2013 and, at same time, marked his own 50 years in television. “It was pleasure to work with our longest serving commentator on air from our launch date,” said a Foxtel spokesperson.

“Those who worked alongside of him learnt so much from his rich catalogue of movie history.”

Collins top ten are: Gone With the Wind, 1939; The Band Wagon, 1953; The Wizard of Oz, 1939; Vertigo, 1958; All About Eve, 1950; The Voice of the Turtle, 1947; The Razor’s Edge, 1946; The Picture of Dorian Gray, 1945; Brief Encounter, 1945; Waterloo Bridge, 1940.

SOURCE: From Grand Years online in 2011.

Below: “Mr Movies” gets a plug!


WATZLING MATILDA: Final. A story of a film that was never made!

BY SPECIAL CORRESSPONDENT

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

LIZ BATHES IN THE GROWING ATTACTION WITH JOCK’S BURNS.

Within this big canvas, is the growing attraction between Jock and McLagan’s daughter Liz. She is a woman ahead of her time. She see Jock’s unique talents and care were something to be regarded.

The chemistry between them was often stormy and is played out against the historic event which was about to be unfurled.

Jock and his travels would bring increased mateship with the great Dave Grant. Grant was a top-gun shearer and past hero of the union movement.

This is to be Dave’s last season as a shearer. He had promised his wife, Mary, to make the first payment on their own land.

Though, within the shearer’s camp, Dave’s is the voice of reason when it comes to violence. He is a counter-weight to the heavily armed radicals who want nothing less than revolution.

While trying to dissuade a certain group of scabs into coming over, Dave is shot down by hired gunmen and dies in Jock’s arms.

Jock realises at that moment that he must tread a path in Dave’s footsteps and begins organising to find a solution to this over-bearing conflict.

…………………………………………………………………………………………….......................................................…
GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
SHE WAS CROWNED THE FIRST MISS AUSTRALIA IN 1926. ALTHOUGH SHE WAS 19, SHE WAS A RANK OUTSIDER. WHAT WAS HER NAME?
........................................................................................................................................................................................

His meeting with Banjo Paterson restores his distant dreams of being something else other than a shearer.

Against big scenes of burning river boats, woolshed fires and attacks in trains loaded with scabs and other armed hangers-on, the night certainly turns into a crazy emotional coaster ride.

Strong as the love affair is, Waltzing Matilda is not light on humour and the mateship which sustained men in a hard country like Australia.

The shearers, who were born independent and stubborn people, were democrats to the final core, with an instinctive feel for what constituted a “fair go”.

Jock and the leaders forge an agreement with the rich and powerful which will change society forever.

LATER: These ideals were carried over into Federation in 1901. Which means, simply, the establishment and formation of the first Labor Government in the world. They were passed into law, and many innovations towards a fairer, more just society, were achieved.

SOUCED: The contents have been adapted from the Waltzing Matilda Film Presentation Booklet produced in 2001.

Below: Shearers versus the police.

Next: More language you don’t often see.


GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …

THE FIRST BOOK TO USE THE WORD ‘AUSTRALIA’ WAS IN THE TEXT OF ZOOLOGY OF NEW HOLLAND.

WHAT DATE WAS IT PUBLISHED?

THE ANSWERS: FELIX, WIRELESS WEEKLY, BERYL MILLS, 1794.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 28 June 19

WALTZING MATILDA: Part 2. Out of this vortex came a remarkable song!

FRANK MORRIS

IT WAS ANOTHER PERIOD OF MAYHEM.

THE SHEARER’S STRIKE WOULD UNFURL THE GREATEST STORM-CENTRE OF AUSTRALIAN HISTORY.

It was the worst of times. Australia was caught up in the depression of the early 1890s, the scar of which had contributed directly to the origins of a political labour movement and Federation.

By the 1880s, Australia was well and truly riding on the sheep’s back.

The country’s burgeoning riches emanated largely from the bales of fine wool which were shipped to the woollen mills in America, Europe and England.

When the depression hit, the pastoralists resolved to reduce wages, starting in the shearing sheds.

This intense antagonism, which had been simmering between capital and labour, finally exploded. Strikes and lockouts were the order of the day.

The Shearers’ Wars had begun.

The powerful and wealthy pastoralists (squatters) mustered their forces; they decided that it was their right to hire anyone they choose – scabs and non-union labour. The pastoralists were aided and abetted by the colonial governments, the military, troopers and police.

In one small Queensland centre alone, Barcaldine, over 1500 troopers with cannons and Gatling guns confronted one thousand armed shearers who were attacking a train loaded with scabs. Over 800 shearers were arrested, twenty of their leaders were sentenced to seven years hard labour.

After several violent clashes between shearers, police and unionists, seven woolsheds were burned to the ground. The last property in Queensland to suffer was Dagworth Station at Kynuna. A band of militant shearers torched the woolshed incinerating up to 140 lambs.

............................................................…………………………………………………………………………………………..
BACK TRACK …
FELIX, A CARTOON CREATED BY PAT SULLIVAN, AN AUSTRALIAN RESIDING IN AMERICA. BUT EVEN THOUGH HE DREW FELIX FOR THE FLICKS, THE STRIP WAS DRAWN BY OTTO MESSMER AND APPEARED IN MANY PUBLICATION.
…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…

The lawyer and bush poet Banjo Paterson was in Winton at the time visiting the fiancé he never married, Sarah Riley. He visited Dagworth Station.

For two years, from 1892, Paterson and Henry Lawson staged a “rhyming match” in the bushman’s newspaper. They regarded it as a bit of a lark, and both poets “slam-banged” away at each other until, says Paterson, “they ran out of material.”

During this historic literary fray Lawson, who was also touched by the plight of the shearers, wrote Freedom on the
Wallaby, which heralded the call for mass resistance, brotherhood and the struggle against greed.

Paterson became involved in the Queensland conflict as a mediator. He composed Waltzing Matilda, its pure and captivating verses signalling the fundamental shift in the romantic rhetoric and ethos of the bush workers.

One hundred years on the song Waltzing Matilda has transcended the war-cry of the shearers, pastoralists, unionists and rebels, to become one of the best remembered songs -- Australia’s unofficial anthem.

BAGS OF WOOL BEING WHISKED AWAY. Below: “I WONDER IF THE WOOL WILL ARRIVE,” SAID THE SHEARERS.

WALTZING MATILDA: Glossary of terms that crop up in this project

FRANK MORRIS

A fair go: Giving a person an equitable opportunity; a fair choice

Billabong: An arm of a river, made by water flowing from the main stream, after rain or a flood; a pool or lagoon is formed when the water level falls.

Federation: The formation of the colonies into the commonwealth of Australia on January 1, 1901.

Jumbuck: A sheep

Labor Party: Formed out of the continuing defeats of the big strikes in 1890s, led union officials to press for the forming of a labour party “as an additional means of seeking union objectives.” The first Federal Labor Party was elected in 1904, but it could not pass its own legislation; the Ministry resigned four months later.

Mate: A comrade, fellow-worker; habitual companion.

Mateship: A bond between equal partners; an inviolable mateship is regarded a characteristic Australian virtue.

Swagman: An itinerant worker, carrying a swag, in search of employment.

Tucker bag: A bag to carry food and drink; usually carried by swagmen/women.

Waltzing Matilda: To carry one’s swag; to travel the road.

MORE AUSTRALIA SLANGUAGE! IMAGINE THESE TERMS BEING EXPRESSED IN A BROAD, AUSSIE DRAWL!

Akubra: A brand of bushman’s hat made from rabbit skins. It is widely used now to describe any form of bushman’s hat.

Bag: To knock or disparage.

Banker: Overflowing river.

Barney: Fight or brawl.

Battler: Someone who keeps trying and deserves better of life.

Bitser: Mongrel dog.

Bloke: A male; also “The Boss” in a shearing shed.

Blue Heeler: Australian cattle dog renowned for its quick reflexes.

........................................................................................................................................................................................

BACK TRACK …THE FIRST FEDERAL NEWSPAPER CORRESPONDENT WAS REG LEONARD … THE SUN WAS FIRST DAILY NEWSPAPER IN AUSTRALIA TO CARRY NEWS ON ITS FRONT PAGE … FIRST ABC POLITICAL COMMENTATOR WAS E.A. MANN -- OR “THE WATCHMAN”.………………………………………………………………………………………..................................................................

Bluey: A blanket; also a parking fine.

Hump a bluey: Carry the swag.

Boggi: Shearer’s handpiece.

Bowyang: String that bush workers have tied around their trouser legs.

Brumby: A wild horse named from either booramby, native for horse; or from James Brumby, an early settler, known for his horses.

Next: More names you may know, or not know!

SOURCE: Adapted from the book, Australian Folklore.


YOUR DOG: Cancer -- wherever the dingo goes, I will. “Oh, my god!”

FRANK MORRIS

THAT YAPPY, MY BROTHER.

AM I THAT DIFFERENT FROM A DOG? EVEN PEOPLE SKIRT AROUND ME. AFTER ALL, I AM REFERRED TO AS “OUR NATIVE DOG.” HOW’S THAT FOR A LAUGH!

I was bred by a fellow who loved dingoes. My mother and father were bred by the fellow. So was grand-dad and gramma too. In fact, all my family was for the last 25 years.

He wanted to domesticate the dingo.

In the hundreds of kilometres around us he was simply called, “there’s the guy who loves dingoes!”

I am a dingo through and through. I love being a dingo. It suits me. Being a dingo matches all the qualities that I possess.

I am a tenacious sort of beast — all dingoes are; I love that word because it shows what we really are about. If dingoes weren’t, they would have starved. They don’t give up. When their family haven’t eaten for a few days, I’m told, the pack of them would hunt down a kangaroo* or some other marsupial.

I’m patient – it’s another trait. I am told that dingoes will sit for a long time hidden away by undergrowth until the prey returns. There is usually a protracted fight but, by and large, the dingoes are the victors.

I’m very sympathetic: that is because I am privately bred. When I was small people used the pick me up and play with me as if I were their ‘native’ dog.

.......................................................………………………………………………………………………………………………
ON THE WAY …
IN THE 1840s THE DINGO WAS DECRIBED AS AN “UNPLEASANT NEIGHBOUR”. THESE CREATURES WERE ROAMING IN VAST NUMBERS. JULY.
…………………………………………………………………..........................................................…………………………

Whereas, my ancestors would eat the person alive; and look for more.

Even today, I feel influential. But my ancestors – they would yell or howl in an unearthly kind of tone; and be dangerous to anyone and anything in sight. Being influential for a wild dingo had a serious outcome – live or die.

Let’s say this before I go: the dingo came to Australia about 4000 years ago as an Asiatic Wolfe or Indian Wolfe dog.

Most of the dingo breeds roam wild country, especially in the Northern Territory. Today it’s different. Most of the dingoes are roaming near the cities where there is no drought.

That’s when people attempted to raise them as a fully-fledged dingo. (June 20 – July 20.)

*The pack of dingoes only attacked a large kangaroo when they were starving; otherwise, on a normal day, they would concentrate on the joey.

Below: Looking for prey: A wild dingo, and its cub.


ARTBEAT: Ike referred to his painting as “daubs – nothing else”

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

IKE ADMITTED THAT HE WAS A ‘RAINY DAY PAINTER’.

The nearest Ike ever came to an art course was mechanical drawing at West Point. In Ike’s paintings, you would see a deep love of colour, beauty, and most of all, life itself.

“The beginning of Ike’s painting as a hobby is really quite a story”, said Mamie Eisenhower. “It was in 1947.”

On the thirty-second anniversary of their engagement, Mamie gave Ike a set of paint equipment. “He painted everything.

“He painted landscapes and portraits. He’d make up things and paint them.

“It didn’t make any difference to him at all.  He loved to mix colours.

“I never dreamed that he would start painting as a hobby. It was a gift and joy to him”.

IKE PAINTED EVERYTHING. HE EVEN MADE THINGS UP.

CAMP DAVID – THEY HAD UPROARIOUS TIMES

Everybody loved Camp David. It was hard to understand why anybody would not like up it up there. It was far away from all the hubbub and executive life.

Ike used it for fun. He would have his own groups of friends come up play to golf and bridge. He would drive a ball from the back of the yard … up to a putting green near the main cabin.

…………………………………………………………………………………………….......................................................…
ON ITS WAY …
CHANGING MEN: PUTTING AN END TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE. ANDREW IS JUST ONE OF THOSE MEN WHO SEEK DESPERATELY TO CHANGE. JUNE.
………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................……

They’d have uproarious times   you never heard such laughter and carrying on. In the evening, Ike would go out in the backyard and cook all the steaks.

It was always a good time. When Ike left office after eight years as president, the only thing I missed about those years was Camp David.

THE RED BARN WAS USED ON A CHRISTMAS CARD

The Red Barn was one of Ike’s favourite paintings. As a boy in Kansas, he remembered barns like this. Unlike some of his paintings, The Red Barn was something that he dreamed up in his mind; it was not a copy. He used The Red Barn as a Christmas card one year for the White House staff. But, in order to print the Christmas cards, the painting has be borrowed from Chief West, a Navy gardener at Camp David. He admired the painting on Ike’s easel one day, next it was his! Mrs Eisenhower said, “I have a print of The Red Barn hanging on the sunporch at the farm.”

………………………………………………………………………...........................................................……………………
HAVE A LAUGH …
FATHERS MUST NOT GET TOO DISCOURGED IF THEIR SONS REJECT THEIR ADVICE. IT WILL NOT BE WASTED. YEARS LATER, THE SONS WILL BE OFFERING THEIR OWN OFFSPRING THEIR ADVICE.
…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…

DAVID EISENHOWER AT FORT BENNING, GEORGIA

Anytime Ike painted David, it was one of his favourites! And the fact is, if he liked a certain picture he would paint it several times. There are two painting of David playing golf: one hangs in Eisenhower son’s house; the other is in Mamie Eisenhower’s cabin at the Augusta National Country Club.

SOURCE: Adapted from Ike’s Paintings: The ones I love the most, SEPost, March 1974.

COMING: The Art Warriors: George W. Bush and his paintings.


HISTORY LIVES:

IT’S BEEN 100 YEARS SINCE THE SS TUGGERAH SANK OFF WATTAMOLLA, NSW, IN MAY 1919. ON BOARD WERE THE CAPTAIN AND FIVE CREW MEMBERS. THE 56 METRE LONG COASTAL COLLIER LEFT FROM BULLI JETTY, THERE WAS A SLIGHT LIST TO PORT, INDICTATING THE COAL WASN’T EVENLY DISTRIBUTED. THE COLLIER “TURNED TURTLE” IN ROUGH SEAS, SAID ONE NEWSPAPER. REPORTING THE TRAGEDY, OFFICALS SAID THAT JUST AFTER 4PM, OFF MARLEY BEACH, THE SHIP WAS HIT BY A SIX METRE HIGH WAVE. WITHIN MINUTES, THE TUGGERAH HAS VANISHED. – FM.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 21 June 19

WALTZING MATILDA: Part 1. It was a simple ditty that roamed round the world!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

WALTZING MATILDA WAS WRITTEN FOR THE ITINERANT WORKER. BUT IT DIDN’T TAKE LONG FOR THE REST OF WORLD TO CATCH ON!

AUSSIES DIDN’T KNOW WHEN THEY SANG THE SONG IT WAS ABOUT THE SWAGMAN … BUT, NEVERTHELESS, THEY LEFT US WITH A LEGACY.

The swagman, sundowner, bagman, battler and whaler were itinerant Australians of varying kinds who roamed the tracks of the bush either in search of work; or merely seeking enough food and nutriment to keep themselves alive.

Usually, the whaler kept to the banks of the larger rivers like the Darling and Murrumbidgee. Most of these outback types have almost disappeared.

There were considerable numbers of them from the time of the sixties. After the alluvial gold had petered out in the main fields and onwards until the First World War period.

They had a common bond that associated this group: they carried a “swag”, “drum” or “matilda”.

To “hump the bluey”, “hump the drum” or “waltz matilda” meant simply to carry a swag.

Matilda, as an expression, was not coined by Banjo Paterson for his famous song, Waltzing Matilda, but it does not seen to have had a wide currency before that song really made it nationally known.

Of the song itself, much has been written.

Banjo Paterson, the Australian troubadour who wrote the words, died in 1941. He had no knowledge he had written one of the celebrated ballads sweeping through bombed Britain.

We didn’t know about the defiant swagman at the “local” …  whether the minstrel boy of the bush country had just passed on and left us a legacy, a drinking song, that went as well with old and mild as it does with Australian ale.

…………………………………………………………………………………….....................................……………………..
ON THE WAY …
WAVE RIDER: IN 1963, PEARL TURTON BLITZED TO FAME BY WINNING A NATIONAL TITLE AT AVALON. HOW THE PRETTY 16 YEAR OLD BECAME A NAME. JULY.
…………………………………………………………………………………….....................................……………………..

All we knew was that we couldn’t sing Waltzing Matilda … without thinking of … the wide-brimmed Digger hats of Tobruk “Rats” and … the aircrews of RAAF.

For many of us, this wryly excitable, sadly rollicking Australian song was the first stimulus to a new curiosity about the far-flung land.

To the un-Australian or pre-Australian ear, Waltzing Matilda is strange and fascinating; for migrants, it is the Excelsior of their great adventure.

SOURCE: Read the full version of Larry Boys in Bill Wannan’s The Australian, page 133.

Below: Waltzing Matilda swept the world.


HUGGING: There’s a bear in there, but some adults are collecting them too!

FRANK MORRIS

HOW DO YOU FIND THAT SPECIAL BEAR?

Teddy Bears come in all shapes and sizes!

Children love them, and so do adults. There’re big bears and little bears, tall bears and short bears, soft and cuddly bears, firm-jointed bears and “dignified” growler bears.

Although there are about 270 varieties of teddies, says one toy show owner, “pink teddies are the most popular. Usually, these are bought for little girls.”

How do you find that special bear?

“Teddy bear collectors love to find Australian-made bears from old family collections,” said a spokesman for the Dolls Collectors Club. “At the same time, a wonderful selection of choices of early German, English, French and American teddies are on offer.”

LITERARY BEARS POPULAR

Currently popular, are bears from the German firm Shuco renowned for their “small mechanical teddies and toys.” The spokesman said the key-wind bears can walk and roller skate; and there are other bears with two faces, others nod ‘yes/no’.

“While others hide ladies’ compacts or perfume bottles.”

Among the great bears are the German-made Steiffs which are in high demand. They are made in all sizes. Literary bears such as Winnie-the-Pooh and Rupert, according to the spokesman, “are popular.”

A large array of bears are very hard to pass by.

Why not hug a bear?

There’s nothing like a quick cuddle from a teddy bear that makes you feel good.

The Teddy Bears were named after Theodore Roosevelt, who was the US President at the beginning of the 20th century. People called him “Teddy”. Everyone knew who you were talking about.

Archaeologists believe that ancient Egyptians had a similar theory.

Below: Have a bear hug, it’s something you won’t forget.


D-DAY: The 75th Anniversary -- Australia too was in the campaign and suffered severe losses

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

TWO AIRMEN, LOOKING WORN OUT, BROUGHT THEIR BOMBER BACK AFTER AN EXHAUSTING RAID ON D-DAY.

Few people today realise that Australians were a part of D-Day. They were, predominantly, members of the Royal Australian Air Force and Royal Australian Navy, and actively contributed to the operation. By 1944, Australian forces and personnel were fighting the war on multiple fronts. The stories of Australians of both sexes who participated in the Normandy battle aren’t well-known. Yet more than 3,300 Australians were active in the D-Day landings; while thousands more served during the subsequent Normandy campaign. Thirteen Aussies were killed on June 6, but the campaign lasted beyond that one day. On June 7, twenty Australian airmen were killed; on June 8, another 22 died –and the losses continued until August.

SOURCE: Background for the article came from Lachlan Grant, a senior historian at the Australian War Memorial, “The Australian contribution at D-Day.” Shapes & Sizes, next week.


Galvanise the Nation: The glory days of the steam locomotives

FRANK MORRIS

ALL THAT’S LEFT IS A MANGLE OF STEEL AFTER THE TRAGIC COOTAMUNDRA TRAIN CRASH IN 1885.

EPIC NEW RAILWAY BOOK WILL CERTAINLY BRING SOOT TO THE READERS EYE!

Tim Fischer, former Federal MP and railway enthusiast, has written a new railway book, Steam Australia – Locomotives That Galvanised the Nation, that will no doubt stir childhood memories.

This book will crystallise one’s thoughts about how steam used to dominate the Australian railway system.

At age 10, Fischer remembers witnessing a locomotive zooming toward him.

Fischer, in the strikingly illustrated book, writes: “It appeared as a tiny speck way off to the east, coming over the big hill on the horizon.

“Gradually, it grew in size until it could be made out as a hard-working steam locomotive, hauling the South West Mail passenger train into Narrandera station.

“The train was a sight to behold.

“Smoke and steam billowing as it click-clacked along this key regional standard-gauge line of the NSW Government Railways …”

This event was to take part in Tim’s school holidays in 1956. He was doing some trainspotting and was standing on the Newell Highway overbridge.

“I craned my neck to observe all the colour, action and movement. From my vantage point I could look down directly onto the footplate where the fireman was hanging up his shovel.

…………………………………………………………………………………….....................................……………………..
BACK TRACK …
WHO IS THE “FATHER” OF AUSTRALIAN JOURALISM? CAPTAIN GILDLEY KING OR GEORGE HOWE? BOTH. THEY WERE ASSOCIATED WITH THE PUBLICATION OF THE FIRST NEWAPAPER, THE SYDNEY GAZETTE, OF WHICH GEORGE HOWE WAS EDITOR.…………………………………………………………………………………….....................................……………………..

“The hard work is done now as the driver applied the brakes.”

This event for a ten year-old youngster is a memory of a lifetime.

For Tim Fischer, though, it is a clear, incisive and graphic picture he dishes up when discussing these mighty behemoths.

Steam Australia covers the start of the iron monsters in the 20th century, to the diesel and electric complex system of the networks.

SOURCE: Tim Fischer’s Steam Australia – Locomotives That Galvanised the Nation, NLA Publishing. RRP $39.99.

COMING: Crashes, changes, VIP’s and Mark Twain.

BELOW: Dame Nellie Melba steams to its destination billowing, literally, reams of smoke.


HISTORY LIVES ON …
WORLD WAR 1 NURSE, EDITH BLAKE, IS TO GET A RESERVE NAMED AFTER HER IN SOUTH STREET, KOGARAH, OPPOSITE ST GEORGE PRIVATE HOSPITAL, NSW. BLAKE IS BELIEVED TO HAVE LIVED IN BLAKEHUST, ABOUT 8KM AWAY. BLAKE WAS KILLED AS A DIRECT RESULT OF ENEMY ACTION. SHE WAS SERVING ON THE HMHS GLENART CASTLE WHEN IT WAS TORPEDOED BY A GERMAN SUB ON FEBRUARY 26, 1918. –FM.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 14 June 19

Waltzing Matilda: It became a song to remember

FRANK MORRIS

THE OLD TIN SHEARING SHED WHERE CLANCY WAS BORN.

PASTORALISTS BEGAN TO MUSTER THEIR FORCES.

In 1894, the Shearers Strike came to end after four years on the trot.

The bard of Australia, Banjo Patterson, brought to the Australian idiom Waltzing Matilda, which has become our own “unofficial” anthem.

Paterson was a mediator hired to bring the warring sides of the Shearers Strike in Queensland together.
In 1890, the powerful and wealth pastoralists began to muster their forces against the fractious shearers. The pastoralists were abetted by the colonial governments.

The last property to suffer was Dagwood Station in Winton, Queensland.

Out of this vortex came Banjo Paterson’s Waltzing Matilda.

At the Overflow Station, in the outback of NSW, is an old shearing shed where Banjo Paterson partly penned Clancy of the Overflow.

Who was the Clancy that Paterson immortalised in verse?

After much discussion, it turned out to be Glancy McNamara, a well-known drover in the north of the state who lived to the ripe old age of 95.

Glancy had been yarning about the “good old days” and says that the Overflow was a tributary of the Lachlan River.
The ballad was published by the Bulletin in 1889.

…………………………………………………………………………………….....................................……………………..
ON ITS WAY …
THE WALTZING MATILDA STORY -- THE EPIC SOJURN THAT FOUNDED A NATION. PLUS – THE FILM STORY, WALTZING MATILDA. NEXT.
…………………………………………………………………………………….....................................……………………..

Below: Sarah Riley – she and Banjo were together in Queensland during the strike.

PART 1. Waltzing Matilda – It was coined by Paterson for his famous song, but, nevertheless, it has wide appeal. Next week.


SHAPES & SIZES: How yester-year boats grew to become the giants of today!

It was a simple chore, indeed, for people who wanted to venture afar. Ancient people made dug-out canoes by hollowing out tree trunks. The scraped and chipped the wood out with simple tools. The dug-out canoes were among the first types of boat. Dug-out canoes are still used today.


Flashback 2008: Vale. Michael Pate dies and leaves behind thousands of fans

FRANK MORRIS    Questions by Karen Nixon

MICHAEL PATE AS VITTORIA.

AS FOR MY BEST PART, THE BEST PART WAS DEFINTELY THE ROLE OF VITTORIA, THE INDIAN, IN THE MOVIE HONDO, SAYS PATE.

From 1946, after his return from World War II, he starred in radio plays and serials; he also got a call to do major films and these include Forty Thousand Horsemen, Sons of Matthew and Bitter Springs.

Later, in the 50s, Pate went to Hollywood to do Bonaventure (released as Thunder on the Hill) and over 50 feature films and more than 300 TV shows as guest-star.

In 1970, he starred in Matlock Police and Power without Glory; and produced the films, the Mango Tree and Colleen McCullough’s Tim, which he adapted and directed, winning the Australia Writers Guild award for the Best screenplay.

From 1982 he starred in the film The Return of Captain Invincible and two plays, one with his son Christopher; and the other, The Wild Duck, featuring Liv Ullman.

Pate was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia in 1990.

Actor, writer and director, Michael Pate had died September 1, 2008.  He was 88.

He was working on a film script before he died and it was likely his son would finish off his father’s work.

GREATEST INSPIRATION

You have done some amazing work, which would you say was most memorable?

In radio it would be The Eagle has Two Heads, in theatre, I would say Dark of the Moon and in film Sons of Matthew.  As for the best parts, the best part was definitely the role of Vittoria, the Indian, in the movie Hondo.

Who has been your greatest inspiration?

In acting I was influenced by Spencer Tracy and by Paul Newman’s work.  Cagney was very good but overall I found Olivier with a meticulous approach to his craft my greatest inspiration.

You have had a challenging and exciting life, do you have any regrets?

No, I haven’t regrets about my professional life.  I started fairly early doing things of an amateur sense at school and then got my start professionally with a break during the war, but that time wasn’t wasted when you are defending your country.

…………………………………………………………………………………….....................................……………………..

ON ITS WAY …
FANTASTIC VOYAGE: IN 1973, LAS BALAS CHARTS ITS LONG VOYAGE FROM ECUADOR TO BRISBANE, IS NOW AT THE BALLINA NAVAL MUSEUM. JUNE/JULY.
…………………………………………………………………………………….....................................……………………..

The only thing I would say is a shame, is that older people are ignored not adored.  The problem is that there aren’t many acting roles for older folk and I honestly feel that the older actors could be utilised to master classes in our craft.

I think that it would be wonderful to be able to share the great experiences and skills.  That way they are not lost and the community and industry could all benefit.  That would be my only regret, a personal regret only.

What made you decide to live here on the Central Coast?

In the later stages of my career, I was starting to do more narration and documentary roles.  We were living in Bellevue Hill and thought we could get an apartment in the city from the sale of Bellevue Hill, even a small place on the Central Coast – and Id just live between the two places.

My wife and I both enjoy fishing and we both like the ocean.  Basically I’ve always visited the Central Coast, even as a boy I would visit Woy Woy to fish and prawn with my uncle.

SOURCE: From Grand Years, 2008.


SHARK ATTACK! Final. The dangers lurking in Australian waters!

ALAN LUCAS             Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

LEGALLY KILLED, THESE BULL SHARKS ARE ONLY PUPS OF AROUND 0NE METRE LONG. SEE PANEL.

A TEN-FOOT SHARK ATTACKED A GIRL WHO WAS WAIST-DEEP IN WATER AND ONLY METRES OFF A MACKAY BEACH.

In 1962, the pearling lugger Sari Ritzah, owned by Bert Cummings and skippered by travel writer Peter Pinney, won the Mackay district contract for shark meshing.

Statistics showed that 38 people had died from shark attacks in Queensland waters during the previous 60 years.
Conviction that meshing was necessary may have finally come after a ten-foot shark snatched the girl in waist-deep water five metres of a Mackay beach in 1961.

The shark tore off both her arms and savaged her right thigh, then bit off her companion’s hand as he fought to drive the shark away from his fatally wounded girlfriend.

During the same year that Peter Pinney started shark meshing with Sari Ritzah, I anchored outside the Lockhart River, far north Queensland, and rowed upstream close to the mangroves trailing a line for an evening meal.

On the way back, while crossing the shallow entrance, I saw a huge mud crab standing like an angry praying mantis on the sandy bottom.

Reaching under water to pick up the crab without losing a finger was a heck of a gamble.

While pondering this dilemma I became aware of an express train coming out of nowhere. It knocked the oar out from under me before zooming off with most of my crab.

…………………………………………………………………………………….....................................……………………..

THE BULL SHARK, ONCE THEY LATCH ONTO A VICTIM THEY DON’T LET GO, RANKING THEM AMONG THE WORLD’S FOUR MOST DEADLY SHARKS. MORE THAN ANY OTHER SPECIES, BULL SHARKS TEND TO TURN PINK AS THEY DIE.

Source: Bulls Shark illustration from Shark Attack by Mike Edmonds; Five Miles Press, Victoria.
…………………………………………………………………………………….....................................……………………..

The train was, of course, a shark, probably around two metres long. The abrasion of its rough skin leaving me with bloodied shins.

My immediate horror was not that the shark might circle back to attack me, but that I was now lying face down in shallow water looking point-blank at a still-articulating giant crab claw.

Since that day outside the Lockhart River I have dived (but never swum) … hundreds of times despite never really feeling comfortable in the water; the anticipation of suddenly being torn apart by a shark dulling its pleasure.

SOURCE:  Shark Attack by Alan Lucas, AFLOAT January 2019. This article was edited. Please read fuller version in the magazine.

Below: A dangerous way to test your metal is by swimming in open water.


ON ITS WAY …
HISTORIC HOTELS: BUILT IN 1918, ADELAIDE CAN REALLY BOAST A HOTEL IN 1976 THAT’S REALLY INTERNATIONAL IN CHARACTER. JUNE/JULY.
…………………………………………………………………………………….....................................……………………..

ON ITS WAY …
ARTBEAT: MRS MAMIE EISENHOWER SAID THE BEGINNING OF IKE’S PAINTING AS A HOBBY MAKES QUITE A STORY. NEXT.
…………………………………………………………………………………….....................................……………………..

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 07 June 19

Stay Informed

Receive eNews & Special Offers

Brochure Request Order

Tour Reviews Read

Last 12 months


Tags