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Number of blogs returned: 1 to 10 records of 170

OLYMPIC GAMES 1936: Owens tells about the golden moment of triumph

THE FLASH: JESSE OWENS – HIS MOUTH WAS DRY AS COTTON – BURNISHED THE FIELD IN THE 100 METRES FINAL. Below: JESSE OWENS – HE WAS COOL, CALM AND SLIGHTLY NERVOUS BEFORE A BIG RACE!

At the start of the 100 meters final, Jesse Owens was like some relaxed panther ready to burst out!

JESSE OWENS        Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

I remembered that moment nine years later when I stood at the starting line of the 100-meter race in the Olympic Stadium in Berlin, waiting to run against the finest competitors that the world had to offer.

I looked down that field to the finish 109 yards and two feet away and the I began to think in terms of what it had taken for me to get there, the number of people who had counselled and coached me; and the people who believed in me- the community from which I had come and the school which I attended.

And as I looked down at the uniform of the country that I represented and realized that after all I was just a man like any other man, I felt suddenly as if my legs could not carry even the weight of my body.  My stomach said that it wasn’t there.

My mouth was dry as cotton; the palms of my hands wet with perspiration.

VICTORY OVATION

And as we stood there, unnoticed because a German boy had won an Olympic victory in another part of the stadium, and the crowd was giving him an ovation that was due an Olympic champion; this was the sight that I saw within that wonderfully arena. 

As my eyes wandered across the field, I noticed the green grass-the red track with the white line.

A hundred-and-odd thousand people crowded into the stands.  And as my eyes looked upward, I noticed the flags of every nation represented there at the Olympic Games underneath the German blue sky.

Now, my attention was diverted from that beautiful picture, because the whistle had been blown and we were to assemble around the starter to receive our final instructions for this historic event.

After our instructions had been given every man went to his mark and adjusted hands and feet. Every muscle in his body was strained.

RAN NECK AND NECK

And suddenly the gun went off.  The athletes ran neck and neck for some yards, but our Ralph Metcalfe of Marquette University led the field at the fifty yard mark.

From then, the seventy to the ninety, Ralph and I ran neck and neck. And then for some unknown reason I cannot yet fathom, I beat Ralph, who was such a magnificent runner.

The greatest moment of all, of course, was when we knelt and received the Wreath of Victory and standing there facing the stands we could hear the strains of the “Star Spangled Banner” rise into the air and the Stars and Stripes was hoisted to the skies.

It was then that I realized the immensity of my ambition of nine years to become a member of Uncle Sam’s Olympic Team and to emerge as a victor in the Olympic Games.

Yes, this was the moment I had worked for all those years.

And let me say that as you stand there and watch your flag rise above all others because of your own efforts and you can say to yourself today, “I am an Olympic champion,” there cannot be a greater thrill.

<< Grand Years, 2008.


Natural Born Columnist: Writing can be a daunting task!

WHAT MORE IS THERE TO SAY: COLLEAGUE MATT WHITE’S COLUMN IN THE AUSTRALIAN SAYS IT ALL: “REGULAR BY-LINES IN THE DAILY PRESS WERE RESERVED FOR THE GIANTS OF JOURNALISM. JIM MACDOUGALL WAS SUPREME.”

FRANK MORRIS

MacDougall’s column was lauded a “hallmark” in Australian journalism

Jim Macdougall and Eric Kennedy were fervent mates. They were old colleagues. Macdougall wrote in his Daily Mirror column: “In a savagely completive world of newspapers, Eric Kennedy has too much humanity, too much kindness.”

The columnist who thrived on people as well as humour was the redoubtable Jim Macdougall. Jim seemed to be forever part of the Sydney landscape. The name Jim Macdougall was as well-known as any landmark in Sydney!
His long career began as a cadet reporter on the Melbourne Herald in 1924.  After a while he was sent to the paper’s London bureau.

When he returned to Australia, he was assigned to write a front-page column for The Sun, which was lauded as a “hallmark” in Australian journalism. Over the next four decades his column moved to the Daily Telegraph, and later, the Daily Mirror.

Macdougall died on his 92nd birthday in 1995.

SUPREME COLUMNIST

Colleague Matt White’s tribute in The Australian says it all. “In an age where the word columnist conjured up all the glamour of newspaper reporting, and when regular by-lines in the daily press were reserved for the giants of journalism, Jim Macdougall, columnist, was supreme.”

White describes Macdougall’s column as a “mixture of humour, humanity and some incredible predictions.” In 42 years at the job, Macdougall turned out more than 10,000 columns, many of which broke important news in a couple of paragraphs long before the stories became front-page headlines.

When Macdougall departed the Daily Mirror in 1975, it was the end of an era. His column had appeared every day for 14 years.

A few years later, he wrote: “It’s not until evening does one realise how splendid a day has been. As I look back, it has indeed been a splendid day.”

<< Grand Years, 2013.

TOMORROW: The third episode.


LET’S LAUGH!  A chuckle now and then will do you good!

Chuckle 1

“My wife was telling me you bought a car cheap the other day,” said Mr Brown. “How are you getting on with it?”

“Not at all,” said Mr Smith. “I’m just beginning to realise how hard it is to drive a bargain!”

Chuckle 2

“It was mighty nice of you to give up your seat to that robust lady,” Mr Binks. “It’s pleasant to see that there are still some polite men left in the world.”

“Sorry, Mrs Jabbers, but it wasn’t politeness at all. The man who sat next to me was quarrelsome because he said I crowded him too much, and all I did was use that robust lady as a sort of courteous retort.”

Chuckle 3

Flashback: In 1984, actor Britt Ekland, now pushing 41, revealed at her press conference, “I’ve never been with a man older that I am now.” When asked her opinion of Australian men, Britt replied: “They are the nicest, funniest men I know. They are very open and they treat me like gold.” – FM.


MAGIC FOR YOU! THE COIN TRICK -- ESPECIALLY FOR THE YOUNG AT HEART!

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 19 January 18

NATURAL BORN COLUMIST: WRITING A COLUMN FOR A NEWSPAPER – A DAUNTING TASK

 

STERN EDITOR: WRITING A COLUMN FOR THE WRITER IS “DECEPTIVELY SIMPLE”, SAYS JOHN PRINGLE. Below: CHARMIAN CLIFT  --  SHE MADE HER COLUMN INTO A GREAT PERSONAL SUCCESS.

The American historian, Jerry D. Lewis, said columnists are “the stars of the newspaper business.” Lewis also labelled the daily column as “literature in a hurry”. That’s why writing a daily column is a daunting task. John Pringle chose Charmian Clift because Clift “could maintain a good literary tone.” Charmian’s biographer wrote: “He (Pringle) was never to regret his choice of Clift … who made the column into a great personal success.”

FRANK MORRIS

Pringle describes a columnist’s writing as “deceptively simple”

The celebrated newspaper editor, John Pringle, was staunch an admirer of Ross Campbell. Pringle, in his book of essays, On Second Thoughts,* expostulated that there is no excuse “for ignoring one of Australia’s best writers.”

The editor said of Campbell, that “his writing is deceptively simple, both in style and subject matter. I say “deceptively” because, of course, this extreme simplicity conceals considerable art as well as a very shrewd perceptive view of life.”

A MASTER STROKE

Pringle, in his second tour of duty as editor of the Sydney Morning Herald, from 1965 to 1970, introduced a weekly column in the paper’s women’s pages written by the exceptionally talented Australian writer and novelist, Charmian Clift. Pringle’s choice turned out to be a master stroke.

Clift’s brief was that she could write about anything that took her fancy; and because she was a writer and not a journalist, Pringle correctly surmised that Clift’s reputation could “maintain a good literary tone”.
Writes Garry Kinnane: “He (Pringle) was never to regret his choice of Clift … who made the column into a great personal success.”

*Angus & Robertson, 1971.

Note: This series will run all through the month.


A NEWSPAPER LEGEND DIES AFTER BATTLE WITH CANCER

I’VE KNOWN RON TANDBERG FOR AS LONG AS HE’S BEEN DRAWING HIS ‘POCKET CARTOON’ FOR THE AGE AND HERALD. TANDBERG DIED AGE 74.

HE WON ELEVEN WALKLEY AWARDS, INCLUDING TWO GOLD WALKLEYS. THE REPORTER, TONY WRIGHT, DESCRIBED TANDBERG AS A  LEGEND FOR  DRAWING THE “PREFECT LITTLE “POCKET” CARTOON.

TANDBERG  SAID HE WAS EMPLOYED BY GRAHAM PERKIN, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF OF THE AGE, IN 1972. WRIGHT SAYS THAT TANDBERG WAS TO ASKED TO DRAW A “SMALL” CARTOON TO ACCOMPANY THE MAIN FRONT PAGE STORY. THAT WAS HOW THE “POCKET CARTOON” WAS BORN.


OUT ROLL THE TRUCKS: DURING A REMAKE OF PHAR LAP IN 1983, EVEN THE TINEST ITEM WAS CONSIDERED IMPORTANT TO THE SAGA – THE NEWS POSTER. Below: EVEN THE NEWSPAPERS GAVE THE CHAMPION THAT TIME HONOURED POSITION – THE FRONT PAGE.

“HE’S DEAD” … THE POSTER THAT TOLD THE WORLD CHAMPION PHAR LAP HAD DIED

These two word stopped people in their tracks and they wept. Everyone who it was. It was the mighty racehorse, Phar Lap. The classic HE’S DEAD poster, in its meaningful ways, stands our loud and clear. – FM. The poster, see below.

AN ARGUS SPECIAL WRITER        Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

(Melbourne, April 7):  Australian Prime Minister, Mr Joseph Lyons, when informed at Bathurst this afternoon of the death of Phar Lap said, with a regretful smile: “The death of this wonderful horse is a great sporting tragedy.”

Jockey, J.E. Pike, who was associated with Phar Lap in many of his greatest triumphs, including the Melbourne Cup of 1930, said that although he was only his rider he could not help liking such a horse.

Phar Lap would live in racing history forever.

A tribute to the gelding was also paid by the United States consul, Mr Keblinger, who said that Phar Lap’s achievements had significance beyond purely sporting considerations, in keeping Australia’s name before the American public and before the world.

Bred at the Seadown Stud, Timaru, New Zealand, in 1926, by the late Mr A.F. Roberts, Phar Lap was by Night Raid from Entreaty, by Winkie-Prayer Wheel, by Pilgrim’s Progress-Catherine Wheel, by Maxim-Miss Kate (imp.), by Adventurer.

HE WON THE AQUA CALIENTE HANDICAP

He won only one race as a two-year old, but after four unplaced starts in the following season he indicated his real worth by running second to Mollison in the Chelmsford Stakes at Randwick.

Then followed successes in the Rosehill Guineas, AJC Derby and Craven Plate and the VRC Derby.  He was third in the Melbourne Cup and the VATC St George Stakes the same season, and then he won nine races in succession, including the King’s Cup at Adelaide.

Phar Lap’s career as a four-year old was even more noteworthy.  For at this age he won 14 races. One of these was the Melbourne Cup.

As a five-year old the gelding still retained his superlative form.  Phar Lap was given 10.10 in the 1931 Melbourne Cup, but he failed under his huge burden, although he won every other race in which he was started.

The 1931 Melbourne Cup was his last race in Australia, and soon afterwards his owners decided to send him abroad.  On March 20 he carried out the task set him by winning the rich Aqua Caliente Handicap.

Including the stake his owners received for his victory in the Aqua Caliente Handicap, Phar Lap won the magnificent total of sixty-six thousand seven hundred and thirty eight pounds ($A133,476).

He won 39 races, was second three times, third on two occasions, and was unplaced in nine races.  He was third on the list of the world’s greatest stake winners, only Sun Beau (USA) and Ksar (France) being ahead of him.

Had he not come to such an untimely end there is little doubt that Phar Lap would have won enough to place him at the top of the list.

<< Adapted from the Argus, Melbourne.


EVEN THE PRESS RAISED THE QUESTION OF POISON. Below: “HE’S DEAD” -- AND PEOPLE VISIBLY WEPT.

THE NEWSPAPER STREET-POSTER THAT CAPURED THE HEART OF A NATION

FRANK MORRIS

Like the newspaper street-posters, for example, these are important forms of communication: getting the message over in a few seconds.

“YES”, underscored, truncated the Saturday Paper. It was promoting the recent victory of a tele-poll plebiscite. The news poster fills the bill.

(In the 1960s and 1970s, in particular, The Sun and the Daily Mirror relied heavily on the strength of their poster in daily battle to see came out on top. While The Sun had superb posters, the Mirror’s poster seems to beat the Sun hands down. One in particular was a notorious winner: I SEE WAS HANG, a poster which, accompanies by a photo of Ron Saw. It’s our sold The Sun by nearly 60,000 copies.)

VISIBLY WEPT

The classic HE’S DEAD poster from the 1930s stand out loud and clear. Nearly every Australian knew it was. It wasn’t some potentate and famous actor. Rather, it was a great racehorse that had captured the heart of a nation, the mighty Phar Lap.

Regaled in chucky, black wooded type, the poster’s impact was immediate. Passers-by – men, women and children – stopped momentarily and visibly wept.

This unique and timeless example of “word power” in action was created by a person who knew the craft. The “hard fact”, the message, is starkly reinforced by simple typography.

<< Extracted from Communication: Signs of the times by Frank Morris. 


MAGIC! WHEN CUSTOMERS SEE THE DIFFERENCE

ON THE BOIL: SINCE THE 1890S EDITORS HAVE BEEN GOING TOOTH AND CLAW TO GAIN DOMINATION IN THE MARETPLACE WITH GOOD POSTER WRITING.

HAPPY NEW YEAR … WISHING YOU A DAY THAT IS FILLED WITH THE BEST OF EVERYTHING.

 

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 11 January 18

NEW YEAR! Richard Hughes – when was the first newspaper published?

EPISCOPALIAN: HIS COLLEAGUES UNFAILINGLY ADDRESSED RICHARD AS ‘YOUR GRACE.’ TEXT, BELOW: IS THE DRAWING EXAGGERATED? NO-ONE WHO HAS BEEN WITH HIM BELIEVES THE ARTIST CAUGHT HIM TO A TEE. BELOW: IN THE ENGLISH SPEAKING WORLD, THE LONDON GAZETTE WOULD STANDOUT PRETTY CLEARLY AS ONE OF “THE FIRST”. AS A WORLD’S FIRST, ASIA WOULD BE THE SPOT, AS RICHARD POINTED OUT IN HIS ARTICLE.

FRANK MORRIS based on Derek Davies, Editor, of the Far Eastern Economic Review

Richard Hughes’ friends all accorded him with Episcopalian authority and, unfailingly, addressed him as “Your Grace.” Hughes was an outstanding pressman and from there an international correspondent.

From working in public relations he joined the Melbourne Star. From there he went to the Sydney Daily Telegraph, which sent him to Tokyo whence he penned warnings about the “challenges to come.”

After reporting on the Second World War, he began a long journey to the doyenship of correspondents in Asia and Korea, and a rambunctious spell as manager of the Tokyo Press Club. He worked for the London Economist and the Sunday Times, and wrote several scoops on the British traitors, Burgess and MacLean.

He wrote his weekly column in the Far Eastern Economic Review since 1971 before the Falstaffian soul of Richard Hughes went to meets its Maker in January 1983. He was 77.

RICHARD HUGHES

When and where was the world’s first daily newspaper published? Alas, The Times is not in the running. The contest, surprisingly, is between West and East: Europe and Korea.

There is, not unnaturally, some confusion about who produced the first newspaper in Europe and where. As early as 1513 a news pamphlet appeared in England giving stop-the-presses news of Flodden Field.

But it is generally agreed that the first regular newspaper did not appear until the beginning of the 17th century. The earliest was the Nieuwe Tijdingen, an early example of newspaper tautology: who would print old tidings?

This was published in Antwerp from about 1605.

There were also several early German newspapers, among them no fewer than three called the Avisa Relation oder Zeitung, published in 1609.

BRIEF SURVIVIAL

Up until now … my own belief being that German capitalists were the first with the Leipziger Zeitung published in 1660.

But the German claim is under respectful challenge by South Korean scholars, whose rival daily entrant allegedly beat Germany’s on to the streets by nearly a century; but was selling for only three months in 1577.

Its brief survival was not due to poor sales but to regal suppression. It had an executive staff of more than 30, and His Majesty’s basic anger against its “reportage of official court gazettes from Korea and China” was obviously spurred by its popular interest and sales.

A recent edition of New Korean Glimpses … also evokes a precedent of German and Korean competition in first printing with movable metal type. Herr Johannes Gutenberg had been given the credit for initiating that method when he printed the Gutenberg Bible in the 15th century.

MOVABLE TYPE BEGAN

Again there were unsubstantiated Korean claims that a 50-volume anthology on past and present social life and religious rites had been printed in 1230 during the Koryo Dynasty by moveable metal type.

The Korean book, entitled Abstruse Principles of Zen, was discovered in the French national library. It had been printed with movable metal type.

Those remarkable Koreans never gloat about their achievements in what they call “the world’s culture of letters.” But they remain confident that their publication of the first daily newspaper about a century before The Leipziger Zeitung will be proven.

Who really cares, anyway, except perhaps senile newspapermen, who usually can’t remember when their own papers were born.

<< Barefoot Reporter: The best of Richard Hughes columns, 1971- 1983.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FAREWELL: BRUCE BROWN – SURF MOVIES MAKER. HE LEFT BEHIND 55 YEARS OF SURF FILM. HE HAD IT ALL! BELOW: THE FAMOUS AD.

VALE: BRUCE BROWN – THE ENDLESS SUMMER “TRANDSFORMED” SURFING

FRANK MORRIS

In 1966, Californian Bruce Brown released surfing’s most wildly known film, The Endless Summer. With the movie “came its carefree mix adventure,” the Pacific Longboarder said.

The magazine added, “The exotic line-ups and cornball humour has hit the right romantic note. Capturing the aesthetic of wave-riding as a pure act within itself and inspiring generations of surfers to search for their own perfect wave.”

The technique of the surfers in the film was revolutionary.

The Endless Summer hit the screens in 1966, it was the perfect document of an epic surf adventure. With buoyant fun, Summer changed the way “surfers had been depicted in popular culture.”

In the formative years of The Endless Summer, I was editor of SURFABOUT magazine. “We were told by the experts that the epic film would be the “top surf movie ever made.”

RAPID SUCCESS

Before then there was Slippery when Wet, Surf Crazy, Barefoot Adventure, Surfing Hollow Days and Waterlogged, which brought to the screen all of these amazing sojourns which would leave a viewer breathless.

The Endless Summer was made on a $50,000 budget which sounds small now; but in the mid-sixties, it was a king’s ransom. The film was released in movie theatres, high school auditoriums and town halls, making it a rapid commercial success.

After The Endless Summer, as soon as surfers saw ‘Bruce Brown’ on the poster they couldn’t resist it. A rejigged version came out to represent 50 years since the film was made.

The cache of movies Brown’s turnout still carry that hypnotic splendour; the perfect world that he would have sought for most of his life.           

Bruce Brown died of heart failure at his home at California. He was aged 80.

<< Background help came from The New York Times and The Pacific Longboarder.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FAST FERRY: PROGRESS HAS CAUGHT UP WITH THE FAST RIDE TO  COSMOPOLITAN MANLY. BELOW: PEOPLE ENJOYING THEMSELVES. BELOW: ON THE WAY, THROUGH TO RAIN, TO MANLY.

FLASHBACK, 1984: GOING TO MANLY WAS ALWAYS A BIT OF AN ADVENTURE … AND MORE!

Ferries, not always names we know, today travel all day to a cosmopolitan beachside maze that is a wondrous sight. Workers and visitors doing their own thing. Today, there are higher buildings, finer streets, brighter pubs and more bars and nightclubs. Manly is a must!

FRANK MORRIS

There's no better way - or place - to find some solace then paying a visit to Manly. As the famous old saying goes, "you'll be seven miles from Sydney and a thousand miles from care." Sydney writer, Joseph Glascott, described going to Manly as 'an adventure."

Some years ago he wrote "A trip to Manly retains the special flavour of a visit to the seaside. "Manly evokes the charms of the sea rather then the pounding of the beach waves."

The hub of Manly, apart from the holiday-style sea side attractions, is The Corso. Its mall, with pavement cafes, fish shops and coloured awnings, had become the focal point of the village.

Maly's history is also a fascinating talking point. The first life-saving club, the Manly Surf Bathers, was founded in 1907.

GOCHER

Earlier this century, newspaper publisher, William Gocher, defied the law by bathing at daylight "and won the freedom for the public to bathe" in the ocean after 6am.

Were the natives a manly lot?

Governor Phillip could not be blamed if he looked back on his vist to Manly with some displeasure. It was there that Phillip was speared by a native Willemering while speaking to another native, his new-found friend Bennelong.

Luckily, at Phillip's side was the colony's assistant surgeon-general, William Balmain, who extracted the spear. Phillip refused to punish the offender. 

Manly was so named because of the "manly appearance" of the natives first encountered there. So come to Manly, where, as the music hall refrain goes, "you'll be beside the sea, beside the sea"

 

<< This article was written in 1984..

 


MAGIC FOR YOU! THE MAGIC PAPER TRICK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR … AND MAKE YOUR DREAMS COME TRUE!

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 05 January 18

The Great War: My Grandad - He Had the Taste of What Was to Come!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FARAWAY: GRANDAD HAVING SOME TIME OFF.

My grandad always like to hear tales of escaping from tight spots. The younger ones never let him down.

Adapted by Frank Morris

Grandad was fed up. It was no use telling him he was a marvel for his age. He only grumbled more about his legs and not being as young as he used to be.  He was a rifleman during the 1914-18 war and won several medals for doing so.

He called it, with some indignation, the great hullabaloo.

He said it was a young man’s world, and other things like that. Granny lost her patience.

“You’re hale and hearty,” she said. “What’s got into you love.” The fact was the war had got to grandad.
His little house was on the country road near the camp at Ballarat, Victoria. And many a time he leaned over the gate and watched the troops walking into town. “Wish I was young enough to my bit again,” he said wistfully.
“What’s the good of an old chap like me?”

One warm evening a young soldier was passing the house and called out, “Looks cool in your garden, mister!” And grandad called backed eagerly, ”Well, come in a sit a bit.” He was called the young soldier “pal” as they passed each other.   
Soon they were under the tree munching on some juicy golden peaches.

GRANDAD IS HAPPY!

“Come on in!” he shouted. And you couldn’t see the grass for the bevy of khaki coloured soldiers. Grandad was in his element.

That started it.

“Drop in any time,” said grandad. “Grandma and I will be glad to see you.” And most nights you will find half a dozen or more soldiers making themselves at home. Writing letters at the round table in the dining room, or playing the old piano; it was very relaxing.

Meantime, grandma darns a sock or sews on a button for someone. Grandad is happy. In fact, he and grandma are so happy to feel like they’re doing something for “the young ‘uns.” It doesn’t need wealth or strength to give true service to others.

It’s the willing spirit that really counts.

My Grandad suffered from a crook heart just after he returned from World War 1. But somehow he always managed beat it. Finally, it took him in July, 1999. He was a spirited 99.

Picture. Tight spot. My grandad loved hearing about adventures of escape. He told a few of them himself.


DEAR READERS …

THIS IS MY LAST PAGE FOR THE YEAR. IN THE NEW YEAR, ON JANUARY 5, 2018, WE START UP AGAIN.    WE’LL CONTINUED WITH THE FEATURES WE MISSED OUT IN DECEMBER. WE’LL INTRODUCE A LOT OF INTERESTING AND VARIED CONTENTS. THERE’S A CHANGE COMING TO GRAND YEARS, TOO. I AND THE GRAND YEARS TEAM BEG YOU TO DRIVE SAFELY HAVE A MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEARS. – FRANK MORRIS

 


HEY BOY! I THINK ‘PAKEHA’ MEANS EUROPEAN

There’s a lot of people in our street and a lot of things are happening all the time. Here’s one thing that will really surprise you: Maoris in NZ don’t usually all live together!

JANE HILL, BERNIE HILL      Adapted by Frank Morris

(Long) before the pakeha came here, and for a long while after that, Maori used to live together in tribes, in big pas. “Pa” is the Maori word for village. I know a few Maoris words, but only the old people in our street can speak Maori properly.

And I think ‘pakeha’ means European.

Anyway, in the old days, families and friends always stuck together; and the strong tribes used to spend a lot of their time fighting the other tribes. Now, most Maoris live in the pakeha way, in separate houses, and sometimes a long way from their relatives.

That’s why we’re so lucky in our street because we all live together.

CHURCH ON SUNDAY

The reason why we’re lucky: we all used to live in an old pa down by the sea. It wasn’t like a real Maori pa, because the houses were mostly wooden shacks with corrugated-iron roofs.

All the buildings in the pa were pretty old, and there weren’t any proper washhouses and bathroom in most of them. The church and the meeting-house were the two most important buildings; and we all went to church on Sundays; we had the meeting-house on other evenings.

I don’t remember the pa myself, because I was only one year old when the Government decided to build us a whole new street of houses on the hill above the pa. We all moved up there a few years ago, and the Government pulled down the whole pa, except for the church and cemetery.

They tidied up the land and sowed grass, and this is the park where we play. Everybody liked their new houses and felt proud of them. But they didn’t build fences and grow hedges around them like the pakehas do.

The only thing wrong with the street is that it’s a long way to the church; and we haven’t got a meeting-house any more.

>> Hey Boy by Jane and Bernie Hill; Whitcombe and Tombs Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Picture: The two youngest: Ben and Andre are the babies of the family. They often try to help but that usually means that I have clean up the mess they make.


CHATTER: SPIDERS – PAINFUL BITE, VENOMOUS TO BOOT

 

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 18 December 17

HAPPY CHRISTMAS! Farm memories -- Pudding is 200 years old says the recipe!

MERRY CHRISTMAS: TUCK INTO IT … YOU’LL BE ENJOYING A PUD THAT DOESN’T SHOW IT’S AGE!

You can make this star Christmas pudding this year. Jennie Hill, from Miles, Queensland, said, Addi Hill, was the precursor of the star recipe. Not another Christmas pudding? Hang on, wait until you hear what’s in it! Alison Francis has the facts.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Another Christmas pudding! I’m assured by Jennie Hill … that she is armed with a recipe that will change your attitude. Steeped not only in rum but tradition, Jennie says she learnt the recipe from her mother-in-law, who learnt it from her mother, who learnt it from her mother -- Addi Hill -- and it “could easily be 200 years old.”

This archetypal country lady was known far and wide as “Mother Hill”; and, just like her title, this recipe was not to be messed with.

“I certainly haven’t made any changes because I think that is a really nice pudding,” Jennie says. “Like a lot of cooks in her era, she used to make the Christmas pudding in October and it would hang in a cloth until you were ready to heat it up again for lunch.

“Now you can just pop a slice in the microwave which is a little different from what they did in those days. They would have been there slaving over a hot stove, or even pots over a fire, like in my great-great- grandmother’s day.”

SELF-CONFESSED

While most pudding makers worth their salt will tell you that you must soak fruit overnight to keep the cake moist. Jennie takes this tip to the next level.

“My secret is that I might soak my fruit for a month, but that doesn’t always mean that it all makes it into the pudding mixture! It’s soaking in rum and so it really is very nice to eat on its own,” Jennie says.

For someone who is a self-confessed “non-cooker”, Jennie says this recipe has been a godsend.

GRANDMA’S CHRISTMAS PUDDING

Soaking ingredients:

1/2lb butter, 1lb plain flour, ¾ lb sugar, ¼ tsp of salt, ¼ tsp spice, ½ tsp cinnamon, ½ sp nutmeg, ¾ lb sultanas, 1/4lb currants, 1/4lb peel., 6 dates, 6 almonds, 4 walnuts.

Other ingredients

5 or 6 eggs, ½ tsp baking soda, 1tbs boiling water.

Method:

1.To prepare the cloth, soak in boiling water. Squeeze excess moisture from cloth when removed from water.

2. Sprinkle 1tbs of flour over the cloth and shake off surplus.

3. Soak all the soaking ingredients overnight or for longer in 2 tbs rum and 1 tbs treacle.

4. To prepare the pudding, cream the butter and sugar.

5. Add eggs, one at a time, and beat well.

6. Add sifted flour and fruits, alternating them.

7 Add baking soda, dissolved in the boiling water.

8. Put pudding mix in the cloth.

9. Tie the cloth about an inch above the pudding.

10. Put pudding in boiling water.

11 Simmer pudding for 6 hours on the first day.

12. Cook for a further 2 hours on the day pudding is to be eaten.

13. Carefully remove the cloth while the pudding is hot to keep skin intact.

<< From Alison Francis’s Grandma’s star pudding, Land newspaper, February 27, 2014.

Picture: Very similar. Not the same, though. Our recipe is 200 years old!


BEHINDS THE NEWS!

Vale: British beauty icon Christine Keeler dies

Christine Keeler, who was at the heart of the “Profumo Affair in 1963, has died. She was 75. The scandal ended Profumo’s career and contributed to the end of the Tory government the following year.

Vale: TV’s erstwhile wit Gomer Pyle dies

Jim Nabors was 87 when he died at his home in Honolulu. Nabors starred as “bumbling hayseed” Gomer Pyle on the Andy Griffith Show before doubling up on Gomer Pyle, USMC, one of the drawcard comedies of the 1960s. “Nabors had never acted before Griffith saw him perform at a nightclub,” portraying a bumpkin style of humour. He changed to an “operatic baritone when he broke into song,” said The Washington Post. Nabors debuted in 1963, but the sitcom had been running since 1960. The spin-off ran for 5 years and never finished out of the top 10.

Vale: Bishop farewells her “gentle giant”

Television personality Angela Bishop has endured for the last 22 months as she managed to juggle her public career with the private heartache of watching her husband, Peter Baikie go through his relentless treatment for cancer. Bishop, and their 10-year-old daughter, Amelia, bid farewell to Baikie when the “gentle giant” died.

Picture: Sad occasion. Angela Bishop, TV personality, prepares to farewell her husband.


THE AUTHORS: PUBLISHER DISCOVERED A RICH VEIN IN THE MARKETPLACE

FRANK MORRIS

Two Australian publishers uncovered a rich vein in the marketplace forty years apart, but only one has been accorded any form of recognition. In 1914, Alfred Cecil Rowlandson, of the NSW Bookstall, was one of them.

Rowlandson broke new ground in Australian publishing by introducing an ‘everyman’ series of paper-covered editions of local authors printed on newspaper which sold for a shilling, ten cents.

More than five million copies of 250 titles, spanning seventy well-known writers had been sold by 1922, the year of Rowlandson’s death.

Although he was ridiculed during the early years of his venture, writes Rowlandson’s biographer Carol Mills, “Rowlandson established a new market” for the established Australian scribe.

LEADING WRITERS

Rowlandson was born in Daylesford, Victoria, on June 15, 1865. He was educated at Northcote State School and Superior Normal School, Brisbane. He was employed at the NSW Bookstall Company where he progressed from a tram ticket seller to managing director of the Company, which he purchased, in 1897.

Eight years later, “Rowly”, as he was often called, launched the Bookstall Series which was to promote Australian writing.

He secured the likes of Arthur Wright, “Steele Rudd” and Vance Palmer; and signed up Norman Lindsay, David Low and Will Dyson to colourfully illustrate such works. Throughout the company’s eight bookshops and railway stalls, the “Bookstall” series went on sale for one shilling.

In 1909, he wrote the novel The Rival Physicians under the pen-name of “Paul Cupid.” He died on June 15, 1922, in Wellington, New Zealand.

<< Frank Morris unpublished title, History of the Book, 2002.

Picture: Nick name. Steele Rudd wrote under this name but his actual name was Arthur Hoey Davis. Rudd was one of the Australia writers he sign up.


WITH ALL THAT FOOD: HERE’S A CHAP WHOSE BOUND TO SUFFER FROM A MALADY CALLED JETLAG.

JETLAG: EXPERTS THROW SOME LIGHT ON A MALADY THAT SICKENS MOST US!

One side of jetlag is an overwhelming feeling a fatigue caused by disrupted sleep patterns.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

A passenger flying non-stop from Australia to Europe, wrote to Traveller magazine, wondering if jetlag could be worse if I have a two-day stop-over? The passenger was told by having a two-day stop-over on this trip it is definitely a good idea for reducing jetlag.

However, travelling west to Europe means you will be going to bed later that your body clock is used to; short naps are fine if that helps. The same advice applies when you land in Europe.

Most people who have travelled overseas know the experience of jetlag. However, it needn’t upset your holiday or business plans if it is managed carefully.

An overwhelming feeling of fatigue is the main symptom of jetlag, caused by the disruption to normal sleep patterns and biological functions, which are influenced by the multiple time zone changes of trans-meridian.

Other significant symptoms include impaired physical performance, disorientation, insomnia. anxiety, lack of concentration, exhaustion, loss of appetite, bowel movement and headaches.

The quickest way to overcome that jetlag feeling is to change to your sleep times as soon as you arrive on board.

JETLAG BURDEN

Travellers should ensure that they have plenty of rest before flying; eat sensibly, and take the opportunity to exercise or walk around the terminal during stop-overs; or stroll up and down the aircraft aisle; or consult your doctor or chemist.

How to ease the jetlag burden:

MEALS – Deep sleep is difficult after a large meal. You will feel tired but sleep will be light and not refreshing. In particular avoid strong coffee or tea.

ALCOHOL – Maybe yes, maybe no. Alcohol can be stimulating or it can be depressive. Its best to limit your intake or abstain.

READING -- A few minutes of reading is restful and promotes the onset of sleep.

SOFT MUSIC – Low music is relaxing.

REGULAR SLEEP

WARM BATH – A pleasant way to relax. Indulge in a bath or warm shower.

BEDROOM – Ideally a dark, comfortable and quiet room with plenty of good quality air.

SLEEPING – Try and get back to your regular sleep periods as soon as possible.

SLEEPING PILLS – Take pills that have been prescribed by doctor or chemist.

Jetlag cannot be avoided. After all do you mind walking around like a zombie in a trance for a day or two, three and four?

<< Jetlag is from Grand Years, 2013.

Pictures: Sound asleep. This pair will sleep for hours, both on and off the plane. Symtoms. All the complaints will add up to jetlag..     


INSIDE NEWSPAPERS: INTERNATIONAL EXPRESS -- TOLD YOU GRAN WILL LOOK DOWN ON US …

It might seem a little quackers but when an amateur photographer captured a picture of geese and ducks at a lake, clouds in the background looked like …a goose. Margaret McEwan, of Sandhurst, Berkshire, was snapping birds at a local lake when she noticed the bird shape in the sunset sky. “I live close to the lake and was taking photos when they came over to feed.”

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 07 December 17

GHOST SHIPS: Final! The Mary Celeste and other derelicts

RISE FROM THE DEEP: STARK PICTURES, HERE AND BELOW, ARE TAKEN FROM THE DEPTHS OFF ANZAC COVE. REVEALED ARE LONG-FORGOTTEN REMNANTS OF THE BATTLE THAT BROUGHT A SOBERING REALITY OF THE HUGE LOSS OF AUSTRALIANS AT GALLIPOLI. PHOTO: SUNDAY HERALD SUN, 2011.

The Sapphire’s survivors patch her up as best they could then 800 miles to Gladstone.

ALAN LUCAS      Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Another derelict found was the barque Edward L. Maybury in 1905. She was photographed by a passing ship in the North Atlantic, only two of her masts still stood and the third was missing entirely; while her foremast still flew its course.

She was another reminder that abandoned vessels could drift for ages and be serious navigational hazards for a long time. Australia had her own amazing case of a timber-laden wooden ship that remained afloat long enough to be sailed in an immersed state for a considerable distance.

The story started with the emigrant ship Sapphire in September 1859. The Sapphire was carrying horses to Madras from Gladstone, Queensland. Soon after leaving Gladstone she crashed onto a northern Great Barrier Reef; her crew leaving her in longboats to head north.

When a number of the crew were killed by natives they turned around and headed south, en route they sighted an abandoned ship that proved to be the 529-ton Marina.

NIGHTMARE TO HANDLE

She had been seriously holed and abandoned, but thanks to her wooden hull and cargo of logs she remained marginally buoyant.

The Sapphire survivors patched her up as best they could then, and sailed her 800 miles in a waterlogged stated to Gladstone; and taking three months in a vessel that must have been an unbelievable nightmare to handle.

In Gladstone they met the crew of Marina who’d abandoned her months earlier; they had reached Gladstone in her longboats.

Marina was repaired in Gladstone after which she headed south to Sydney but, inexplicably, she opened up and foundered off Cape Moreton. It must be presumed that this time there were no logs in her hold to keep her afloat.

<< Afloat Magazine, August 2017.

COMING EARLY NEXT YEAR: Two parts. Ghost Ships –amazing wrecks in the Baltic Sea. Dr Stephen Gapps, gives an overview of the sunken ships which he believes is a maritime graveyard packed with remarkably well-preserved shipwrecks. Series start in February.

Illustration: Anzacs sunken treasure. Amazing pictures show a team of Australian divers and marine archaeologists with Turkish counterparts preparing to survey a ghost ship, a hidden remnant of the Gallipoli campaign. Beneath the waters off Anzac Cover lie this barge, one of many, which was found 2.4km off shore in 55m of water.


COMING EARLY NEXT YEAR: Art-beat. The art warriors – George Bush, Dwight Eisenhower and Winton Churchill, apart from being a saviour to the country which they ran, was to flex their untrained muscle at the world of art. Eisenhower referred to his paintings as “daubs – if nothing else”, but one saw deep colour and beauty and, as he said, he “painted for pure enjoyment.” His painting of David Eisenhower, using a set of golf clubs, is one of my favourite works. In the First Lady’s foreword to George Bush’s Portraits of Courage she writes that she would say “no way” if someone had asked whether the former President would be a painter someday. Winston Churchill was 40 before he realised the pleasure of painting.


FROM ON HIGH: HEARD THE BUZZ – THE DRONES ARE COMING. THERE’S A DRONE TO SUIT YOU.

HEARD THE BUZZ: DRONES ARE EVERYWHERE!

FRANK MORRIS

A specialist said that drones are whatever you want them to be. “If you use them for filming, it’s a gadget. Or you can use them as toys. It’s up to you.”

Drones have been around for years. “The origin of drones can be traced to military use and later civilians using drones as a remote-control device,” said the specialist. “For serious hobbyists they are of niche buying.

It’s common for ground-pilots of all ages to be seen using drones to fly them to many places. “We’ve all seen one, and now everybody wants one.

MIND DOES LEAPS

“Today, drones are available at all prices. -- some as low as $20.”

Drones are good for anything -- from military manoeuvres, sending messages, doing photography – yes, anything. And now the technology is improving many new models have one-button take-off and landing and the safety gets better with each new release.

The specialist says that a lot of people want a camera drone. Today, their minds leap with joy at the full-featured models which are available.

<< Frank Morris uses the drone that was advertised in the SMH.

Illustration: Drones galore. The most extensive of drones are available – from drones with cameras, to WiFi drones, rollcage drones and more.


MY MUM: HAZEL AND DAUGHTER/CARER, SUE, WHO WILL CONTINUE HER MOTHER’S WORK IN RAISING AWARENESS OF “THE BIG A” – ALZHEIMER’S.

REFRAMING DEMENTIA: EXPERT DISCUSSES BEST CARE PRACTICES

FRANK MORRIS

Sue Pieters-Hawke, a high-profile advocate for Alzheimer’s disease, is now committed to convey her voice to the issues connected with dementia. Pieters-Hawke has had a long journey associated with the disease when her mother Hazel Hawke was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

She will explore the issues surrounding dementia – suitable for health professionals, carers, family and friends.

A spokesperson for the event said, “The discussion will focus on how we can support and care for people living with dementia … how to ensure they are still experiencing life to the full.”

Hazel, the wife of former Prime Minister, Bob Hawke, declared that she had dementia. She talked about the disease publicly and her speech was very moving. She was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2001.

With Jenny Brockie, on Insight, we started to understand Hazel’s condition. Brockie said to Pieters-Hawke “everyone knows your mother, Hazel Hawke … now you live next door. How are you dealing with all this … shift in responsibility being the daughter.”

TOO PATRONISING

Pieters-Hawke replied: “I still make mistakes about being patronising. With the dementia, or some form of progressive mental disability, which is what we’re dealing with … it’s different because you are changing relationship of responsibility.”

After being in Pieters-Hawke care for many years, Hazel was admitted a nursing home in Sydney in 2012.

In 2003, Sue Pieters-Hawke wrote a book called Hazel’s Journey: A personal experience of Alzheimer’s.  It tells of fear and anger and the “gentle happiness” of her life until her death in at 83 in 2013.

FREE – Reframing dementia featuring Sue Pieters-Hawke, Thursday, December 7, at 11 am. Contact 02 9256 5644 or email stpatricks@green.com.au

Illustrations: Complicated. Hazel spoke publicly and movingly about her Alzheimer’s condition. The real Sue Pieters-Hawke. Committed to dealing with dementia.


AT THE PIANO: HAZEL FINISHED WITH AN UP-BEAT MELODY AND BOB “TRIED” TO JOIN IN WITH THE SINGING.

HAZEL HAWKE: “ONE IN A MILLION” SAYS FORMER PM BOB HAWKE

Hazel Hawke, one of Australia’s high-profile figures, has died at age 83. Mrs Hawke spent her last days as she finally succumbs to “complications of dementia,” peacefully, surrounded by family. Here are episodes in Mrs Hawke’s life that brings so much joy and sorrow to the reader.

FRANK MORRIS

When she was told she had contracted dementia Hazel was rather shocked. “It’s a bugger. It’s just bad luck.” But let face it Hazel Hawke “could have easily been your mum, your sister, your aunty or your friend,” the Sydney Morning Herald said.

Hazel became a formidable figure in her own right.

In her last days, Hazel was timid and slightly petulant. According to last night’s program, Australian Story, when Sue Pieters-Hawke handed her a crochet gift, Hazel raised her head and uttered “Thank You.”  

Mrs Hawke had been suffering from advanced dementia for many years and she no longer recognised the family. In 2003, Sue Pieters-Hawke released the book, Hazel’s Journey: A personal experience of Alzheimer’s. Sue Pieters-Hawke has this to say about dementia:

BUGGER IT

“Although mum is naturally reticent about personal difficulties, and also worried that people might see her as a ‘silly old thing, losing her marbles, she was drawn to the idea of going public if it would decrease the stigma of the disease and help others.

“She just wasn’t convinced it really would do any good. It’s that terminal modesty again! We told her we were sure it would be helpful.

“She listened to us, thought about it and finally said, “I think you’ve probably overrating the difference I could make, but if you really think it could be useful than yes, bugger it, I’ll do it.’”

In Diane Langmore’s book the Prime Minster’s Wives, Hazel Hawke, as First Lady, said she hoped that she could become involved in public affairs. That was a job she could do very well. And that exactly is the way it turns out.

In the end Hazel was widely respected in our community. When she was finally diagnosed a few years ago with Alzheimer’s, she threw herself into the fray of speaking publicly about her life with the disease.

TUMOUR FOUND BENIGN

The thing she did was organise the Hazel Hawke Alzheimer’s Research and Care Fund which has proven a great success with the Alzheimer’s Foundation.

Langmore’s book says: “On the February 1992, Hazel entered St Vincent’s Hospital for the removal of a brain tumour. The van-loads of flowers and the stacks of letters and cards that flooded the hospital were testimony to the affection in which she was held by many Australians.

“There was widespread relief when the tumour was found to be benign. Three days later Bob Hawke announced his resignation from parliament, giving as the main reason the needs of his wife and family.

“He said that Hazel was one thousand per cent behind his retirement.”

Frank Morris comments: Bob Hawke was right. Hazel was one in a million. Hazel had a strongly Christian background and she felt for others. She had power and strength within her. Her daughter: “If Hazel could speak for herself.” What would she say? We’ll never know.

<< Repeated from Grand Years 2013.

Illustration: Luck ran out. When she got caught up by dementia, Hazel didn’t even recognise her family. When luck was in. Hazel and Bob enjoy life together.

COFFEE-BREAK CROSSWORD – NO. 4. SOLUTION NEXT WEEK

The last of Coffee-Break Crosswords for this year. They will resume early in 2018.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 30 November 17

BOOKSHOP: The season’s best books are ideal for Christmas!

CARTOON IMPRESSION: CHARLES MEERE’S SERIOUS WORK AUSTRALIA’S BEACH PATTERN WHICH WAS DONE 1940. MEERE WAS BORN IN 1890 AND PASSED AWAY IN 1961.

SELECTED BY FRANK MORRIS

CAROLINE CHISHOLM: AN IRRESISTIBLE FORCE

Sarah Goldman

She was a well-proportioned and determined woman, who was strikingly attractive. – Frank Morris.

What do we know of one of Australia’s most influential historical figures -- Caroline Chisholm?

Sarah Goldman’s lively biography offers a portrait of a complex and determined woman who advocated passionately and successfully for the rights and welfare of Australia’s earliest female immigrants.

EARLIST ACTIVISM

She also, left a lasting legacy on our approach to multiculturalism, employment and education. This is a timely and engaging interpretation about early activism; one can’t but wonder how Chisholm would respond to modern-day injustices.

She appeared on the five-dollar note, had suburbs named after her and even inspired a character in Dicken’s Bleak House. – Gleebooks.

Special price -- $34.99.

Illustration: Lasting legacy. She did her best for human kind.

ADVENTURES OF A YOUNG NATURALIST -- DAVID ATTENBOROUGH

David is on everybody lips! – Frank Morris.

First published in the 1950s, this is the enjoyable and engaging account of the explorations of a young David Attenborough.

Working as a television presenter, Attenborough was given the opportunity of a lifetime – to travel the world in search of unusual animals. They were for the London Zoo’s collection. David was set to present his new show, Zoo’s Quest for the BBC.

NATURAL WORLD

Written with Attenborough’s distinct humour and charm, the stories for Zoo’s Quest were not just tales of gripping adventure; but together form a fascinating portrait of the man who changed the way we value the natural world.

Now published in a beautiful gift hardback, this compelling and gently funny memoir will inspire and entertain. – Gleebooks.

Special price -- $34.99.

Next year: Sir David Attenborough: Dolphins surf for the sheer exhilaration of it.

Illustration: He’s the one. Attenborough knows more about animals than the average person.

KEATING

Kerry O’Brien

Here’s the book that should entertain the political mainstream. – Frank Morris.

Though it’s been more than 20 years since he left office, former Prime Minister Paul Keating is yet to release an autobiography or memoir. Fortunately, this book of revelations fills the gap.

Its author Kerry O’Brien, former host of the 7.30 Report and Four Corners, spent many hours with Keating teasing out stories and testing the man’s memories and assertions.

What emerges is a treasure chest of anecdotes, insights, reflections and occasional admissions from one of the most colourful political leaders Australia has known. -- Gleebooks.

Special Price -- $16.95.

lIIustration: A bag of tricks. Kerry catches up with a former Prime Minister Paul Keating.

Next month: More books for you to glean.


CLIMBING: THE ENOLA GAY AND THE DESTRUCTION OF HIROSHIMA.

ENOLA GAY PAPERS WERE AUCTIONED IN NY – DROPPED THE FIRST BOMB ON HIROSHIMA

“My God, what have we done?” The Enola Gay co-pilot’s log book, recording the dropping of the `bomb on Hiroshima on May 6, 1945, fetched a record price at the auction of US historical documents in 2002.

Next year: This will be published early next year.


THE AUTHORS: THIS BOOK HAS BEEN DESCRIBED AS “DENNING’S MONUMENT”

Denning reported the opening of the first Parliament House in 1927.

FRANK MORRIS

The year 1931 was a period to remember in Australian politics.

Since 1929 the Scullin Labour Government had been bogged in “the quicksands” of the Depression, and was sinking fast. After a further damaging series of setbacks an election was called, Scullin was defeated, the Depression raged on.

On the sidelines in Canberra was the veteran political reporter, Warren Denning. Denning reported the opening of Parliament House in 1927; and cut his teeth on reporting the Depression years for Sydney newspapers.

Two years after Scullin resigned the leadership, Denning wrote one of the first indigenous analyses of a political downfall – Caucus Crisis: The rise and fall of the Scullin Government, published in 1937.

AN INPEDENT NEWS SERVICE

The book was reissued by Hale & Ironmonger in 1982, with a contribution by Alan Reid. Reid called it a “little classic … Denning’s monument.”

Another well-known historian opined that the book was “a vibrant and a well-informed account of the downfall of a … government; a classic.”

He went on to become the first staff correspondent of the ABC and largely responsible for establishing the Commission’s independence as a news service.

Denning died, aged 68, in 1975, the year of the “overseas loans” scandal.

Writes Frank Morris, in Australian Book Collector: “(This) was the most startling sequence of events in modern Australian history and Australia’s best political story in decades,(but Denning would not be around to enjoy the spectacle!)”

lIIustration: Bogged: Prime Minister Scullin


GENTLY: EASY DOES IT!

FEELING INSPIRED? TAKE A LEAF OUT OF ANDREA’S BOOK!

Andrea Morris, retail manager, counts trekking Kokoda in 2012 as her most life-changing experience.

ANDREA MORRIS       Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

It was Peter Fitzsimons book Kokoda that first inspired me. I’d always had an interest in military history and after my marriage ended I decided it was time to do something for me. Kokoda was the itch I chose to scratch.

Before my first trek, I was already going to the gym. But I added regular weekend visits to the 1000 Steps in Victoria’s Dandenong Ranges. Up and down, up and down, carrying a backpack with weights; and on weeknights, I would run the local hills to make my legs as hard as possible!

My trek was led by Back Track Adventures and we had 17 trekkers, our leader and 30 porters. My second trek was with a private group of five other trekkers. We crossed the Owen Stanley Ranges and took a three-day sojourn in a village called Naduri to experience village life with the families of our porters.

I HOPE TO GO BACK

This was an incredibly enriching and rewarding experience.

The treks made me feel a connection with our war history and such an appreciation for the 39th battalion and our Armed Forces and all that they gave up. And the friendships I made with my fellow trekkers and the Papuans are wonderful.

I’ve been able to conquer fears and doubts I had about myself. After my first trek I got a small tattoo that reads “Courage Endurance Mateship Endurance” – it reminds me every day that I can do whatever I set myself to and that belief and strength comes from within.

The trek has been the most life-changing thing I’ve ever done. I hope to go back soon …

<< Fernwood, April 2017.

Illustration: Fateful fall? One step sideways! But a porter was there to break her fall.


COFFEE-BREAK CROSSWORDS – NO. 3. SOLUTION NEXT WEEK

SOLUTION NO. 2

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 24 November 17

GHOST SHIPS: Part 2. The Mary Celeste and other derelicts

GHOST SHIP: SUPER TANKER PRESTIGE, FULLY LADEN FROM BAHAMAIN, WHICH SANK OFF THE COAST OF SPAIN IN 2002. THE TANKER WAS SNAPPED IN TWO. AS LONG AS THEIR BULKHEADS HOLD, STEEL SHIPS ARE KNOWN TO HAVE BECOME DRIFTING DERELICTS. PAINTING: BY ALAN LUCAS.

Resolven was found some time later by a boarding party from HMS Mallard.

ALAN LUCAS

Almost on par with Mary Celeste, in the annals of mystery ships, was the brig Resolven. In 1884, she was sailing out to load fish from the Grand Bank schooners when her people completely disappeared.

She was later found and boarded by a party from HMS Mallard who noted that the port and starboard lights were still alight, the galley fire was still burning, and in the cabin was a bag of gold ready to pay the fishermen for their catches.

There was nothing wrong with Resolven; yet the fate of her missing people was never solved.

In 1881, an even stranger mystery derelict was that of the American sailing vessel Ellen Austin. That year, she was found abandoned in perfect order by a passing schooner whose skipper and crew felt confident of receiving a fair salvage settlement once they got her into port.

To this end they put a salvage crew aboard to sail her to the nearest American port, and en route both vessels encountered a moderate storm that separated them. Incredibly, when they met again, the crew of the prize ship had completely disappeared for no logical reason.

DISMASTED AND LEAKING BADLY

As to how two separate crews on the same ship could so completely disappear in such a short time, it was a double-whammy mystery never solved.

There was a no mystery attached to the schooner W.L. White for she was very willingly abandoned in a blizzard in Delaware Bay in 1888 after her crew hoisted her ensign upside down to signal distress. Abandoned, she then become famous for her long distance drift along a course later carefully plotted by the US Hydrographic Department.

The schooner drifted over 5000 miles in eleven months, which is about 15 miles a day. In which time no fewer that forty ships reported her before she finally went ashore in the Hebrides, northern Scotland.

Drifting 5000 miles in eleven months might be something of a record. Another vessel took nineteen months for the same distance. In 1895, the schooner Alma Cummings crew were taken off by a steamer after being dismasted and found to be leaking badly.

No-one would believe she could have floated for nineteen months, but that’s exactly what she did. During that time she was a nightmare for every navigator who knew of her but had no idea where she might be encountered.

It was especially worrying during the long night hours; this fact inspiring a passing steamer’s crew to go aboard and burn her. This they did. But then she became an even more dangerous obstacle because instead of sinking she floated just below the surface.

<< Ghost Ships – the Mary Celeste and other derelicts by Alan Lucas; Afloat Magazine, August, 2017.

Next fortnight: Final part. Alan Lucas touches on two more derelicts in our wide, wide ocean.

Illustrations: Hard life. The barque Edward L. Maybury is seen drifting in the North Atlantic long after being abandoned. Did not go down. The barque Manicia abandoned in the North Sea in the late 1800s. She was found heeling to starboard, obviously in a sinking state. But she didn’t sink. She became a shipping hazard for a long time.


WELL, YOUR GATSBY IS READY TO GO.

NOW, YOU DRIVE A GATSBY!

FRANK MORRIS

“I feel like a drive in the Gatsby,” he said. “I don’t think you should; you are just getting over the stroke?” said I.

“It a not a whopping big car. It only recently brand new. It’s a Gatsby mobility scooter. “And you know what,” he said, “Gatsby is an impressive model. The high standards of workmanship, to say the least, puts this mobility scooter on a very high plane.

“It’s a touring scooter and elegantly mobile. It was an excellent choice,” he said. Jay Gatsby would have been ahead of the crowd.

THERE’S NOTHING LIKE IT

The name Gatsby lives up to its individuality. “We are combining style with advanced technology and that adds a new dimension to the advanced world of mobility scooters,” said a spokesman.

If you love to go travelling, and be seen in style, there only one way to go – it’s a Gatsby.

“There nothing like it,” said the spokesman. And it comes in either red or black.”

<< Scooters Australia; 1300 622 633; www.scootersAus.com.au

Illustration: All the mod cons. The Gatsby is equipped with the modern touch. It has a stand-out dial base and pump-up tyres. Just two of the many features.


GOLD, GOLD, GOLD: BETTY CUTHBERT AND HER GOLD MEDALS.

FAMOUS CELEBRITY: FINAL. HOW BETTY CUTHBERT WAS DISCOVERED!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

There is such a similarity in the careers of Betty Cuthbert and Marjorie Jackson. Such a comparison is unavoidable but it is hardly fair to come to a formal judgement until the careers of each is finished. Marjorie has retired and Betty Cuthbert would appear to have several years ahead of her.

Cuthbert has no nerves once she goes to her mark for the start. It isn’t a hard-boiled nervelessness, or familiarity with strain of top level competition; it is merely that she refuses to believe the fate of the world hangs on the result? Cuthbert runs without the tension that affects so many women sprinters.

ESSENTIALLY FEMININE

Her high knee lift and what a few overseas critics describe as “an exaggerated ugly style” are merely an indication of the looseness of limb that relaxation allows.

In the usual press interviews after her victory when microphones were thrust at her and cameras thrust in her face her composure and modesty were remarkable.

No one gained more gold medals than she did. No gold medallist was younger, and none was prettier nor more essentially feminine. And none more fully deserved the adulation of the crowd.

<< Olympic Saga. The Track and Field story, Melbourne, 1956; Keith Donald and Don Selth; Futurian Press, Sydney. First Edition, 1957.

Illustration: Extra close. Betty Cuthbert and her sister, Maria.


PEOPLE ARE OBESE: ARE YOU ONE OF THEM?

FOUR RISKS TO WORRY ABOUT – A SHORT LIST OF DEATH AND DANGER

Most health threats come as a big surprise. In the olden days, the skull and crossbones would adhere itself in obvious way! But not today; it’s left up to statistics.

FRANK MORRIS

Risk – it’s a dangerous word. It’s a word which seems to have everybody’s measure. So, what will cause your death? And what are your approximate chances? Statistics always seems to make death probable.

“We’re all told that death is certain. But even with something that ought to be as clear-cut as dying, it turns out that numbers (statistics) are an unreliable guide at best,” said Dr Holt.

“What are your odds of dying from any single cause? You can look them up in the chart below. But these statistics are no better than the data behind them. And sometimes that data is not strong, or is sketchy.

“The statistics are probably wrong. (This is) because the relationship between statistics and any individual is always shaky.

“People are different and researchers use statistics primarily to overcome this inconvenient fact,” said Dr Holt.

Here is Dr Holt’s batch of true life-and-death dangers.

OBESITY - More the one-quarter of Australian adults are obese and at increased risk for early disability and premature death. A low-carb diet and a reasonable exercise program, along with an understanding doctor, are your best allies.

MRSA - At the moment they tell us that bacteria are here to stay. Wash your hands, use antibiotics as prescribed, and consider avoiding meat and dairy from livestock fed antibiotic-laced food. This stands for methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus bacteria (MRSA), an organism known as a skin infection. MRSA is a deadly infection. One source has calculated the infection has hospitalised over 80,000 people; 11,000 have died.

DEMENTIA - The odds are one in three that you’ll lose your mental faculties. It’s not a good way to go. Your best defences: Lifelong learning. Avoid alcohol abuse and head trauma, control your blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol.

DISTRACTED DRIVING - If you’ve been paying attention on the roads lately, you’ve probably noticed a lot of other drivers who aren’t. Drive defensively (or you to could be involved.)

Dr Holt maintains that one of the “difficult aspects of finding a killer has to do with random chance and how it plays into the well-known human tendency to find patterns where none exist.” For instance, he comes up with the rough odds that an asteroid will annihilate you are a 1 in 500,000 chance.

There are cluster of asteroids winging their way towards Mother Earth at this moment and one wonders what the outcome will be.

<< Adapted from Risk by Dr T.E. Holt; Australian Men’s Health; February, 2014.

Illustration: Oooops! Distracted driving is a danger to all people that drive – even the passengers.


COFFEE-BREAK CROSSWORDS – No. 2.  SOLUTIONS NEXT WEEK

SOLUTION – NO 1

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 17 November 17

The Festivals are coming – especially the Jacaranda festivals!

GLORIOUS COLOUR: JACARANDA AVENUE, GRAFTON, FORMS A CANOPY OF MAUVE

In Australia, including the Grafton District, NSW, of course, everybody has admired the Jacaranda’s 82 years as part of the Grafton festival. In fact, Jacarandas were planted in the 1800s. Hence, the brilliant canopy of a mauve backdrop of the festival city.

FRANK MORRIS

There is a long-standing tradition in many Australian towns and cities of celebrating the local harvest or a blossom-time of flowers with organised festivals.

The various festivals usually have exhibitions, street displays, processions and social and sporting events which attract thousands of tourists from all over Australia. And, of course, the crowning of a “festival queen” is also an integral part of the festivities.

Eighty-two years ago, the first Grafton Jacaranda Festivals was held on October 30, 1935.

“Grafton has that awesome looking Clarence River bisecting the city,” wrote a colleague. “Thousands of Jacarandas and other trees lining its streets and filling its national parks.

“Scores of lovely historic homes, public buildings and numerous old pubs. The ‘capital’ of the Clarence Valley has a beauty and charm that’s worth stopping to sample.”

The event has not only become one of national renown but it is today recognised as Australia’s foremost floral festival.*

CANOPY OF MAUVE

Needless to say, the city is gearing up to celebrate this historic event in grand style. In the early 1800s, Jacarandsa were planted in the Grafton district. In the 1900s, a citizen names Volkers, in the cause of civic pride, planted an avenue of jacaranda trees which is now referred to as Jacaranda Avenue.

“As these trees grew to their full height – up to 15 metres – they embowered the avenue in the spring time with a canopy of mauve and carpeted the roadway with blossoms,” said a spokesperson for the Council.

“At festival time the jacarandas contrast with the colour and greenery of flame, white cedar, fig, pine and flowering gum trees.”

The festival was inaugurated by Mr E.H.Chataway, and it received “whole-hearted support from the community,” said the spokesperson.

A CHART OF NSW’S FESTIVALS AND WHERE ARE THEY FROM

Dahlia, Mittagong; Lasiendra, Wauchope; Orchid’s, Ballina; Wattle Time, Cootamundra; Tuplip, Bowral; Apple Blossom, Batlow; Spring Flowers, Katoomba/Leura; Cherry Blossom, Young; and the Rhododendron, Blackheath.

Picture: Original. The actual Jacaranda plant, in Grafton in the early 1800s, is a shading device on a hot day.


ALL THE NEWS!

BEN SANDILANDS, THE AVIATION JOURNALIST, WHO “OOZING PROFESSIONALISM”, DIED OF CANCER LAST MONTH. SANDILANDS ALWAYS ASKED THE IMPORTANT QUESTIONS. IN 1973, HE WAS CORRESPONDENT FOR THE ABC; AND FOLLOWING YEAR HE WAS REPORTING FOR ABC FROM LONDON. IN 1979, HE COVERED THE AIR NEW ZEALAND MT EREBUS CRASH. SANDILANDS CAREER LATER ON TOOK HIM TO THE BULLETIN, THE AUSTRALIAN FINANCIAL REVIEW, THE GUARDIAN, TRAVEL WEEK AND AIRCRAFT. HE WAS 74.


WHEN I LAST LOOKED: IS YOUR MEDICINE CUPBOARD BARE OF THOSE PRESCRIPTIONS THAT ARE OUT OF DATE.

DANGER BEWARE: BAD MEDICINE – THE CUPBOARD IS BARE!

The best way to keep out of trouble is don’t take any risks.

FRANK MORRIS

No matter how careful you are around the home or in the garden trying to avoid having an accident, it also pays to be aware of the risks of taking unprescribed medicines or out of date medicine. There are potentially more dangers lurking in the medicine cupboard that you realise.

The best way to keep out of trouble is don’t take any risks.

If you’re unsure about a medicine, your doctor or pharmacist will tell you exactly want you ought to know. To keep you on the right track, here’s some good advice from Department of Health Services:

DON’T take out of date medicines. Always check  the expiry date on the label. These medicines may have no effect; or an entirely unexpected consequence could come later.

FOLLOW the instructions. If you’re confused about the dosage stop there! Ask your doctor or chemist how to take your medicine and what precautions, if any, you need to take.

ALWAYS complete the entire course of the medicine prescribed.

WEBSTER PAK IS THE GO

ASK about possible side effects. Most reactions are not serious. If you do have a serious problem with a medicine, head for your doctor immediately.

BE CAREFUL if you’re taking other medicine. There may not be any danger, but one medicine may cancel out the positive effects of another medication.

DON’T take prescription medicines that are not prescribed for you. And don’t share your medication with somebody else. A definite no-no. Different medicines, say the expert, may affect people in different ways. Only your doctor can give you a medicine which will benefit your symptoms.

DON’T always expect antibiotics for viral infections. Your doctor may not prescribe an antibiotic if you have a common cold or flu. The best prescription may be resting, drinking plenty of fluids and keeping warm. Warning: if you are prescribed an antibiotic, make sure your know how to take it, what the likely side effects may be, and when to stop or review the medicine.

Dina Bowman, a heath consultant and author of The Care Book, said a Webster Pak (or similar device) is popular at the local chemist.

Webster Pak “is a multiple dosage blister package which is filled with your tablets, labelled and sealed by the pharmacist.

To take the tablets you push them out through the foil. You don’t have to worry about making a mistake. Good for people who suffer from arthritis.”

Picture: Modern. Men and ladies – they want their medicine organised!


COFFEE-BREAK CROSSWORD – No. 1                                                                  SOLUTION NEXT WEEK

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 10 November 17

THE GREAT WAR: The spirit of the Anzacs – How Albert Jacka managed to seal it

BRAVE SOLDIER: LANCE CORPORAL ALBERT JACKA WAS A STEADY AND ENDURING FIGURE WHO WON THE FIRST VICTORIA CROSS FOR CONSPICUOUS BRAVERY IN WW1.

He rose quickly through the ranks.

JOHN MCNAMEE, Editor of Go55s

Lance Corporal Albert Jacka, had only four men left with him in the small section of bloodied trench at Courtney’s Post above the beaches of Gallipoli. He was 21.

It was May 19, 1915, and his 14th AIF Battalion had only been in Gallipoli for three weeks. The Turks had launched a fierce counter-attack and threatened to over-run Jacka’s hard-fought position. As the heavy fire burst overhead, suddenly a group of seven Turkish soldiers rushed the trench and a fierce fight began.

Four Diggers were killed or badly wounded.

The only survivor, Lance Cpl Jacka, took advantage of a diversion created by bomb throwers at one end of the Turkish position to counterattack the seven enemy single-handedly, killing the whole party: five by rifle fire and two with the bayonet.

For this conspicuous act of bravery he was awarded the first Victoria Cross of the First World War.

The young ANZAC, from the Melbourne suburb of St Kilda, soon became a national hero and his photo was used on recruiting posters and his exploits were well chronicled in local newspapers. He was widely described as “the symbol of the spirit of the Anzacs.”

RETURNED OF A HERO

He rose quickly through the ranks. And after Gallipoli when 14th Battalion was shipped to France in 1916, he had been promoted to captain.

His later acts of courage soon earned him more fame. He was awarded the Military Cross at Pozieres in what famous Australian war historian Charles Bean described as “the most dramatic and effective act of individual audacity in the history of the AIF.

In the bitter fighting at Pozieres, Captain Jacka recaptured a section of heavily defended trench, freed a group of recently captured Australians, and forced the surrender of 50 Germans.

Despite several serious injuries Captain Jacka survived the war and returned to a hero’s welcome along the streets of St Kilda in September 1919. He later became Mayor of St Kilda. Captain Albert Jacka died of kidney disease in 1931.

Captain Jacka and his awe-inspiring story was one of many featured in the recent Spirit of ANZACS exhibition. It ended in Sydney on April 27. The exhibition was on the road for two years. More than 350,000 people went through the gates. This month – Grand Years will publish a run-down of some other myriad exhibitions at the show.

<< First appeared Go55s newspaper by John Mcnamee. Web: www.go55s.com.au

Illustrations: Follow me. Jacka and his men steal the enemy’s thunder. A patient. Albert Jacka in hospitals overseas.


VALE: TONY MADIGAN, BOXER, DEAD – HE HAD A FEARSOME REPUTATION

Tony Madigan, the former Australian amateur boxer, who twice fought Muhammad Ali (Cassius Clay at the time), died last weekend. He was aged 87. He attended Waverley College where he learned to box and play Union. But it was boxing where he excelled. Winner of two Empire Games gold medals as a light-heavyweight in Cardiff in 1958 and Perth in 1962, and an Olympic Bronze medal in the division in Rome in 1960. Many of the spectators thought he had won, but in his semi-final in Rome Madigan dropped his hotly disputed point’s decision to the eventual Gold Medallist called Cassius Clay.


WALER: BILL THE BASTARD WAS ONE OF THE WALERS WHO WENT TO THE GREAT WAR. HE KNEW EVERY TRICK IN THE BOOK. BILL WAS A LUCKY, THOUGH. HE FOUND A RIDER WHOM HE TRUSTED:  MAJOR MICHAEL SHANAHAN OF THE LIGHT HORSE.

THE GREAT WAR: THE STORY OF A HORSE THAT WAS ONE IN A MILLION

FRANK MORRIS

This is the story of a lifetime. It concerns a horse. The bravest horse you’ll ever know and he was called Bill. He was ear-marked with a name for which he became famous: Bill the Bastard. The name stuck with him forever.

To make matters worse, horses like Bill, were often called mongrels; and it’s easy to see why. Bill the Bastard was a solid horse, weighing 730-kilograms; and he was a chestnut, standing about 16 hands high. He stood his ground.

Bill was built for power.

There was no other horse who could match him for performance and character.

Like 136,000-odd Walers, he was sent from Australia to the Great War; he was, alas, a strange horse indeed.

At the corral where he was housed, Bill had a serious problem. No one could ride him. A riderless nag, said one trooper. He tried and failed. Some troopers thought that Bill has a gleeful smile when a trooper ‘bit’ the dust.

“Bill the Bastard”, they would yell. Bill lived up to his name.

Until one day, Bill had discovered a mate. He was a rather tall looking figure and his name Major Michael Shanahan, of the Australia’s Light Horse. Bill had the intelligence to know if anybody could ride it be him.

The Major strode around the corral, taking a careful look at the chestnut. The chestnut stared back him.

BILL EDGED CLOSER

The corral medical orderly came over to the Major and shook his hand.

“That’s Bill the Bastard you’re looking at,” said the orderly. “Nothing usual except no one can ride him. That’s why we had a bet on him. You guessed it. Old Bill let go, hammer and tongs.”

The upshot, however, was that Bill sent many a-trooper sky high. It seemed to take ages for them to fall to earth. Now, not a single trooper would have a go.

Bill the Bastard edged closer to the Major. This was the first time Bill had looked into eye of Major Shanahan. The Major sensed this was a horse who had caught the glint in his eye. Bill had a deep-seated feeling about the Major.

He was gentle when he touched Bill. It made him shiver. The medical orderly watched closely. He then said: “Bill’s made a damned good packhorse. He never complains. When Bill in a mood it’s best to steer clear!”

The Major patted Bill. “You’re a real mate, aren’t you Bill.”

BILL, A TRUE ANZAC

The Major, unlike an executioner or victor, more simply a friend, stroked his face. He had an uneasy feeling as he looked at Bill. The Major was destined to this ride horse: he a determined Major and it a quarrelsome mount.

It’s a crazy name to give a horse, but it’s honest. Bill the Bastard. The Major dug dig deep into the book of prayer.

He was satisfied.

These two misfits, Bill and the Major, would join up and fight together.

They depended on each for their survival. And when men and horses were falling all around them, Bill’s own superior demigod qualities saved The Major and a section of his men from death. Bill had an unbreakable will, it was said.

He became known far and wide by members of the Desert Mounted Corps. He had become a legend. He had become a true Anzac.

Major Michael Shanahan died on October 12, 1964, at the age 94. Bill the Bastard was buried in Gallipoli.
There’s much more to this horse than you would realise.

<< Repeated from Grand Years 3 years ago.

Illustrations: Hospital-bound. The Major in a wheelchair. Five on a horse. Bill the Bastard carried the men back to base without a scratch.                                                                             


THE CHARGE: EVERYONE OF THE 800 MEN KNEW WHAT THEY HAD TO DO FOR VICTORY.

THE GREAT WAR: GUTS AND GLORY – REMEMBERING THE BATTLE OF BEERSHEBA 100 YEARS AGO!

FRANK MORRIS

The 800 light horsemen, 6 kilometres south-east of Beersheba, were preparing to turn the tide of war. The Battle of Beersheba was going to be a legend of the light horsemen who were playing a pivotal role in Britain’s Palestinian campaign against the German and Ottoman empires.

In 1917, the light horsemen knew the “importance of the coming action and that success must be achieved before darkness gave safety to the enemy.”

The official historian had “speculated that Brigadier William Grant must have felt that if strong, fast horses urged on by great-hearted men, ably led and careless of their lives counted for anything then surely they must triumph.”

A MASS OF HORSES

The horse soldiers moved off at 4.30pm. They knew that surprise and speed were their main weapons. Soon the horseman broke into a gallop. They topped the rise of the ridge and hundreds of mounted men set their horses at Beersheba.

The Turks opened fire but their target was still 5 kilometres away. “As they neared the enemy positions, British gunners covered their exposed flanks.” Suddenly, a mass of horses jump over the Turkish soldiers in the front trenches as they took aim and a number were hit.

The rest is history.

Never in their lives did the Australian countrymen ever ride in a race like this. They all rode for victory and for Australia. The Turk had been severely destroyed by the ruthlessness of the attack.

“Within an hour from the start of that wild ride the Australians were in command of Beersheba,” said Henry Gullet, in the Official History of the War, 1914-1918.

The role of the Indigenous soldier has been overlooked in the past in the Battle for Beersheba. “They were brilliant horsemen and they played a remarkable part,” said a spokesman for the Australian Light Horse Association.

<< Australians in Britain: Two World Wars, 2003, Department of Veterans Affairs; Frank Morris.

Illustration: The horsemen. After the battle, the 4 horsemen took time out for their horses and themselves.

WE’LL SHOW YOU: THE MEMORIAL OF THIS GREAT HORSE IS IN ANZAC SQUARE, BRISBANE.

THE GREAT WAR: READERS CAN VISIT THE FAMOUS WAR MEMORIALS

This is the first time this was done as a feature – the line-up of the famous war memorials. We’ll travel to every State of Australia and select what are considered are the best sites. Remember, WW1 ended in November 11, l918, and this is a splendid way of ending four-and half-years of heartaches and misery.


MATE, THERE’S A WAR ON HERE …

How people live? Milestones from 1900. The “black” plague raged in 1900 and claimed almost 500 lives. To combat the disease, tonnes of garbage were cleared away and thousands of rats slaughtered.

1901 – White Australia spiralled to 3,773,801. And on January 1, Australia became a federation. The East of Hopetoun took office as the first Governor-General; and Edmund Barton the first Prime Minister. On March 30, the first federal elections were held. Two months later, May, the first Federal Parliament was opened.

SHOOT STRAIGHT!

1902 – In February, the execution of “Breaker” Morant met with cries of anguish and protest in Australia. As soon as the rifleman raised their guns, Morant was heard to screech out: “Shoot straight, you bastards” The Boer War ended on My 31. About one in 32 soldiers did not return home. On June 12, Australian women won the right to vote.

1903 – The first crematorium in Australia was opened in Adelaide.

1904 – The famous singer Nellie Melba, who won the hearts and souls of many fans, let them know that her voice was available on record. The Australian public were outraged by Norman Lindsay’s drawing Pollice Verso.

Illustration: The truth at last. “Breaker” Morant let it be known what happened and paid for it dearly.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 03 November 17

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