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FROM THE PAPERS: Rediscovering Australia’s past through the pages of our newspapers

The Australian Labor Daily 1936. NEXT issue.


SHORT STORY: The Black Rabbit discovered a Mulberry Tree – the only one in La La Land!

A MULBERRY TREE: ITS THE ONLY ONE IN LA LA LAND.  Below: I FEEL LIKE DANCING AROUND IT, BLACKIE SAID.

FRANK MORRIS

JOLLY IS A HAPPY WORD. HE FEELS IT IN HIS BONES.

The Black Rabbit was feeling marvellous. Jolly marvellous.

“Absolutely, stupendously jolly marvellous!” he yelled. “That is a jolly happy word,” he said.

He could feel it in his bones.

What he could see of La-La-Land, it looked perfectly fine, too.

As he looked over La-La-Land, from his front porch, he saw that every animal was leaping around.

They must be caught up in a kind of merriment.

I wonder whether it’s something in the grass.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!,” he said, with a modicum of goodly mirth. "How ex-tra-ordinaaaary.”

The Black Rabbit felt like leaping too.

He tried it. He leapt very high.

He tried it again. He leapt even higher.

He thought he might try it again. He did. He leapt so high he thought he would never come down.

He plummeted down to earth and rolled all the way to the river.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he said.

“Those animals must be in peak form”, he muttered to himself.

With all that leaping around the Black Rabbit began to feel tired himself.

Fatigued, in fact.

He looked at the other animals and they were still leaping.

All of a sudden he stopped walking and yelled out, “Where am I, where am I. I know La-La-Land like the back of my hand, but this is ridiculous.”

He looked up-the-hill, down-the-hill and to the left and right

He sighted the Mulberry Bush. Only one. Oh, and four rabbits popped out.

The rabbits were bright-eyed and full of smiling. Each rabbit was standing around the bush holding a piece of multi-coloured tape.

And then they were off … singing and dancing.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he said, in a rather high voice.

Next, the rabbits were singing in front of a wash tub, with a new verse to the same song.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he said, in a higher voice than last time.

The four rabbits were busy hanging their clothes on the line to dry.

And all were singing a verse of the same song.

When they finished, the four rabbits darted into their house.

They emerged minutes later with a pile of school books, some wrap and string. And off to school went the four rabbits. All were singing, quite happily, “going to school on a cold and frosty morning.”

Next moment, he was alone. “I wonder how long they’ll be,” he thought.

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ABOUT US IN 1953 …
THE AVERAGE LIFE EXPECTANCY FOR MEN IN AUSTRALIA HAS RISEN FROM 50 TO 70 SINCE 1903, SAID THE MINISTER FOR HEALTH, SIR EARLE PAGE. FOR WOMEN IT INCREASED FROM 52 TO 72. HE SAID INFANT MORTALITY HAD DROPPED FROM ONE IN 8 BIRTHS TO ONE IN 40. IN 1903, THE PRINCIPAL CAUSES OF DEATH WERE DISEASES OF DIGESTIVE ORGANS, TUBERCULOSIS AND HEART DISEASE. TODAY, 2020, IT’S MAINLY IS HEART DISEASE, DEMENTIA AND CANCER. – FM.
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I hopped back to the Mulberry Bush and tried to emulate the rabbits singing and dancing.

I tried singing.

I tried skipping and hopping to the same tune.

The next thing I knew I was doing it. I was doing it … singing and dancing.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he said in a voice that would have drowned out all of La-La-Land.

At last, just over the hill I heard the four rabbits heading for home.

They were singing and dancing.

“This is the way we come out of school on a cold a frosty morning,” all four rabbits sang.

I ran to meet them. And I joined in.

They laugh at me. I laugh back.

All five of us were singing and dancing. “Here we go round the mulberry bush, the mulberry bush, the mulberry bush early in the morning …”

They were out of sight.

“I got my wish”. “How ex-tra-ordinaaaary! How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” was the familiar tone that I heard echoing from on high.

<< Grand Years.

 


AUSSIE OLD TIME FILM STARS: Let’s peek in the larder and see what we shall find!

LOTTIE LYELL WAS AUSTRALIA’S FIRST SILENT SCREEN STAR. HER LARGE, EXPRESSIVE EYES BECAME HER TRADEMARK.

THE ROMANTIC STORY OF MARGARET CATCHPOLE, MADE IN 1911, IS ONE OF THE OLDEST AUSTRALIAN FEATURE FILMS. DIRECTED BY RAYMOND LONGFORD, AND STARRING LOTTIE LYELL AS THE GIRL TRANSPORTED TO NSW FOR HORSE THEFT, EXPLAINS AUTHOR AND FILM CRITIC JUDITH ADAMSON. THE LONGFORD AND LYELL DUO WAS TO BE A FORMIDBLE COMBINATION. HE WAS AN ACTOR IN ALFRED ROLFE’S FILMS OF STAGEPLAYS THROUGHOUT 1910, THEN WENT ON TO BECOME AUSTRALIA’S MOST FAMOUS SILENT DIRECTOR. LEADING LADY WAS, OF COURSE, LOTTIE LYELL, HIS PRODUCTION PARTNER. A NEWSPAPER SAID “THIS EXCELLENT AUSTRALIAN PRODUCTION CONTAINED EXCITEMENT AND ROMANCE. -- FM.

<< Australian Film Posters, 1906-1960, Judith Adamson, 1978.

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ABOUT US IN 1923 …
DIABETES SUPPLIES OF INSULIN WOULD BECOME MORE PLENTIFUL AND CHEAPER, A STATEMENT THAT MADE THE WORLD STAND UP AND CHEER. IT WAS WELCOME NEWS! DR FREDERICK BANTING, WORKING IN MacLEOD’S LABORATORY, MADE CERTAIN DISCOVERIES AND TOOK THEM TO MacLEOD. THE RESULT WAS INSULIN TREATMENT. MacLEOD TOLD AN AUDIENCE IN BRITAIN … THAT THE PRICE WOULD DROP TO 25 SHILLINGS A WEEK. – FM.


John Frost Newspaper Collection: Final. Headlines you’ll never forget!

POSSE KILLS BONNIE AND CLYDE. THE ELUSIVE DUO WERE SHOT DEAD AS DESPERADOES. Below: THE DEATH OF MADAME CURIE.

FROST IS A MAN WHO LOOKED FORWARD TO THE PAST.

ELAINE WILLIAM        Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

John Frost’s love of his newspaper collection had continued even throughout a seven year spell in the army that spread from 1939 to 1946.

While on active duty in Normandy, Frost says he “had a rifle in one hand and an eye on collecting newspapers.” Any local papers he found were sent home.

On one occasion he had … no leave from the army for more than 12 months; his mother wrote to her son complaining about the growing pile of foreign newspapers.

When Frost left the army, it took 18 months for him to sort out the publications.

He has many types of newspapers that have become war-time treasures. The local German paper called the Lubecker Zeitung, published on May 1, 1945, reported Hitler’s suicide with the words “Unser Fuhrer Gefallen” (Our leader has fallen).

The report of the assassination in Sarajevo, of the Crown Prince of Austria, in the Neues Wiener Tagblatt, of Sunday, June 28, 1914, is another example of this world-respected collection of newspapers.

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ABOUT US IN 1971 …
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT ESTABLISHES THE AUTRALIAN FILM COMMISSION TO ENCOURAGE AN AUSTRALIAN FILM INDUSTRY … JEANS DESIGNED EXCLUSIVELY FOR WOMEN COME ONTO THE MARKET … ACUPUNCTURE TREATMENT INTRODUCED TO AUSTRALIA FROM CHINA … PHOTOGRAPHS OF GOUGH WHITLAM SHOW THAT HE IS NO LONGER USING HAIR OIL AND IS, PERHAPS, BLOW-DRYING HIS HAIR.
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One of Frost’s personal heroes is Winston Churchill. Frost has every major political event in Churchill’s life.

Newspapers of the war time, are an extra-special category of papers because of Frost’s own experience as a Normandy veteran.

Still, events such as the deaths of film stars Marilyn Monroe and Rudolph Valentino also have their place among the extra-famous personalities.

Along with more light-hearted moments with articles of the famous and not-so-famous, like the one of Freddie Starr. One tabloid front page headline records the dubious behaviour of British comedian, Starr, who was accused of eating a pet hamster.

Frost has been described as the man who looks forward to the past. He enjoys this graphic summary.
Also, he looks forward to the future and the news of important events. I had been with Frost a few minutes when the news came through of the sudden and tragic death an hour earlier of a man who was tipped to become Britain’s next prime minister.

The future is never far away!

<< Adapted from an article, Headlines we never forget! Elaine William; Frank Morris also supplied some extra words.

FROM A HIGH PEAK, SHERLOCK HOLMES AND PROFESSOR MORIARTY WRESTLE AND STUMBLE TO THEIR DEATH.

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ABOUT US IN 1972 …
MacDONALD’S BURGERS COME TO AUSTRALIA TO OPEN ITS FIRST OUTLET AT THE SUBURB OF YAGOONA, NSW. (KENTUCKY ARRIVED IN 1968) … THE LONDON ECONOMIST SURVEY LISTS THAT AUSTRALIA IS THE FOURTH-BEST PLACE TO LIVE AFTER US, CANADA AND SWEDEN.


ANNOUNCEMENT FROM MANAGEMENT …

BECAUSE OF THE CURRENT VIRUS PROBLEMS, GRAND YEARS WILL PUBLISHED EVERY TWO WEEKS. NEXT ISSUE: APRIL 17.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 02 April 20

John Frost. Newspaper collector: Part 2. Headlines we never forget!

THE UNSINKABLE TITANIC SINKS ON FIRST VOYAGE. THE TRAGEDY MADE HEADLINES ALL OVER THE WORLD. Below: THE MAN THE NAZIS MOST HATE, WINSTON CHURCHILL, INSPECTING A BOMBED LONDON AREA AND CHECKING ON THE DAMAGE.

HIS ORGANISATION COLLECTS EVENTS WHICH WILL BECOME HISTORY. NEWSPAPERS RECORD EVERYTHING. FROM THE DAY A COMEDIAN WAS ACCUSED OF EATING A HAMSTER TO THE CORONATIONS AND DEATHS OF KINGS AND QUEENS.

ELAINE WILLIAM       Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

In the leafy northern suburbs of London is a modest semi-detached dwelling which houses Britain’s only historical newspaper loan service.

It controls one of the most remarkable collection of newspapers in the world, over 60,000 British and overseas newspapers and periodicals plus more than 100,000 press cuttings of events dating from 1640.

The newspapers cover the death and coronation of every British monarch since 1751 and the election of every American president since 1832.

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JOHN, HOLD THE FRONT PAGE …
LINDA MOONEY, UK, REPORTS: FROST REMEMBERED THE CRASH OF THE R101 AIRSHIP. IT WAS ITS MAIDEN VOYAGE TO INDIA AND CRASHED WITH THE LOSS OF 48 LIVES, INCLUDING THAT OF THE AIR MINISTER. MY MOTHER GAVE ME A PENNY. A FEW MOMENTS LATER I WAS BACK FOR A SUNDAY EXPRESS, WHICH COST 2d. FROM THAT DAY, I WAS HOOKED ON NEWSPAPERS THAT COVERED A MAJOR CRITICAL EVENT. CONTINUED.
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There are thousands of papers which covered the Second World War, and reports of other major conflicts – American Civil War, Boer War, Korea, Vietnam, the Falklands and Middle East Wars.

That’s just the tip of the iceberg.

Major disasters like the Titanic sinking in 1912 and the Waco cult siege of 1993 are represented, together with a rare colour newspaper of 1909.

This rarity contains news of French aviator Bleriot’s historical flight over the English Channel.

Frost collects not only British national papers but also local papers that can give a different appeal; oftentimes, it’s a more personal viewpoint on worldwide events.

“We like to get the newspapers from where it happened”, he once said.

In l969, major American newspapers had the day that Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. The Daily Express and the majors carry the story, and other newspapers from Armstrong’s home town.

What started as a hobby for Frost, is now gradually being taken over as a “proper” business by his son Andrew. As a child, Frost was fascinated by headlines.

As a ten-years-old kid, his first newspaper covered the crash of the R101 airship in 1930. This crash led to the UK abandoning the development of airships for decades.

<< Adapted from an article Headlines we never forget! Elaine William, 1994. Frank Morris some extra words. John Frost died in 20??.

Next: Final. Headlines you never forget!

JOHN’S PILE. AMONG THESE IS THE PRIDE OF THE COLLECTION. IN THE RIGHT-HAND CORNER IS A COPY OF THE LUBECKER ZEITUNG WHICH REPORTED HITLER’S SUICIDE A SHORT TIME AFTER IT HAPPENED.

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JOHN, HOLD THE FRONT PAGE …
LINDA MOONEY, UK, REPORTS: IN HOLLAND AND BELGIUM, WHEN HIS DIVISON CAPTURED LUBECK JUST TWO DAYS AFTER HITLER’S SUICIDE, JOHN MANAGED TO BAG THE BLACK-BOARDED, ONE-PAGE EDITION OF THE LUBECKEN ZEITUNG. THE PAPER REPORTED THE DEATH OF THE FUHRER.  JOHN SAID IT WAS THE “PRIDE” OF HIS COLLECTION.


THE POKIES: My father is a gambler. What’s the next step?

WARNING: NEARLY NINETY PER CENT OF AUSTRALIANS PLAYED THE POKER MACHINES OVER THE LAST THREE MONTHS. MANY OF THEM ARE SERIOUS GAMBLERS. Below: THE CASH YOU LOST ON THE POKER MACHINES WAS A SECRET UNTIL YOUR PARTNER FOUND OUT.

THERE’S AN ADAGE ABOUT THE POKIES: THE MORE YOU SPEND, THE MORE YOU LOSE. YOU CAN’T WIN! YOU CAN’T WIN!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Ms X is concerned that her recently widowed father is spending his time and money playing the pokies which, one day, “will be the ruin of him,”

“My mum and dad were always close,”.  “They did everything together. Sadly, she passed away quite  suddenly six months ago.”

Ms X continues: “For awhile I thought my dad was coping pretty well, still getting out and keeping quite busy. He lives about an hour away.

“Recently, when I visited, he’d been out and I let myself in and waited for him to return. Just last week I noticed there was a pile of red bills stuffed at the back of a drawer. When I asked him he became defensive, angry and quite hurtful.

“He said I know nothing about what he is going through. Later, I called one his friends; he told me dad was spending hours on end at the local club playing the poker machines.

I'm very concerned about his gambling habit.  But after his uncharacteristic outburst, I don't know what to say to him.  Can you advise me where I should start?

The Carers Aid said many people spend a few dollars on the pokies - and that's harmless.

As it appears your father's joining the 160,000-200,000 other Australians who have become addicted to the promise of a big win.

But, quite simply, you lose more than you win. Sadly, no one can rein him in. The back-log of bills worries him. What started out as fun with the pokies has gone too far.


AUSSIE OLD TIME FILM STARS: Let’s peek into the larder and see what we’ll find!

FRANK MORRIS

BEATRICE EINSIEDEL WAS A VERY SPRIGHTLY 80-YEAR-OLD WHEN SHE WAS INTERVIEWED BY AUTHOR ERIC READE IN THE SEVENTIES. SHE USED THE NAME OF BEATRICE DAY. SHE REMEMBERED PORTRAYING NERO’S WIFE IN THE FILM, SOLDIERS OF THE CROSS. THE FILM WAS MADE IN 19OO, CLAIMING TO BE THE WORLD’S FIRST FULL-LENGTH FILM. MOST THE FILM WAS SHOT ON THE TENNIS COURT, NEAR A SALVATION ARMY HOME FOR GIRLS, AT MURRUMBEENA, MELBOURNE, CLOSE TO WHAT IS NOW KNOWN AS CHADSTONE SHOPPING CENTRE. THE FILM WAS DIRECTED BY JOSEPH PERRY WHO WAS DE MILLE BEFORE HIS TIME. THE FILM PORTRAYS THE CHRISTIANS BEING PELTED WITH ROCKS AND STONES AND JUMPING OFF A HIGH PIT INTO BURNING LIME. A POWERFUL POINT IN THE DRAMA IS WHEN OTHER MARTYRS WERE THROWN TO THE LIONS AND THE BURNING OF POLYCARP -- A CHRISTIAN BISHOP -- AT THE STAKE.

<< Background from Eric Reade The Australian Screen.


LATE NEWS …
THE 2020 OLMYPIC GAMES IN TOKYO HAS BEEN POSTPONED UNTIL THE SAME TIME NEXT YEAR. GRAND YEARS WILL KEEP YOU POSTED. ALL FEATURES THAT TIED IN WITH THE GAMES WILL RESUME NEXT YEAR.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 26 March 20

NRMA: Thriving on 100 years of service and moments of profound change!

FORMER PRIME MINISTER BECOMES FIRST PRESIDENT OF NRMA.  

THE FIRST PATROLS, PART OF NRMA’s ORIGINAL FRONTLINE TO HELP STRANDED MOTORISTS. Below: THE 100 YEARS EDITION OF THE OPEN ROAD.

NRMA HAS ASSISTED THE COMMUNITY THROUGH THE DEPRESSION, EMPLOYED VETERANS OF WORLD WAR 1 AND 2, HELPED MOTORISTS WITH PETROL RATIONING DURING THE WAR YEARS, AND BACKED THE NATION’S FIRST ANTI-DRINK DRIVING RULES AND SUPPORTED LAWS THAT MADE SEATBELTS COMPULSORY. AND MANY MORE.

FRANK MORRIS

The first president of the NRMA changed an entire industry and brought kindness and courtesy to the new-found organisation.  His name was John Christian Watson who, at 37, became the Australian Prime Minister. 

“Many values J.C. Watson instilled over his two decades as president remain today,” says an article in the Open Road.

“His organisation was initially all about roads … he broadened its scope to include insurance, road trips, motor camps and tourism. He ended up making the NRMA one of the most powerful motoring clubs in the world”.

In December 1927, a member wrote to Open Road with the idea that J. C. Watson should be dubbed “Good Roads” Watson.

When he died at 74, on November 18, l941, Watson was given a state funeral.

It was when Watson was involved he introduced touring as the ‘must do’ parameter so that during the 1930s, and for this reason, the NRMA set up a touring office to guide people on their road trips.

One person who led the charge was A. W. Scott, who was employed under the NRMA “policy” of hiring returned servicemen.

He was a lieutenant aboard the HMS King George, according to the 1924 Open Road, at the Battle of Jutland. He took up flying and crashed somewhere in France.

In 1924, Scott was hospitalised because of war injuries. After he convalesced, he was “promoted to the touring office where he would manage the expanding market”.

Scott made it a practice to provide a regular feature, made up of weekly road bulletins, and given to the Sydney press. The weekend last minute information was broadcast by all of the radio stations.

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ABOUT THE OLYMPICS …
IN WINNING THE 80m HURDLES AT 17, THE PETITE MAUREEN CAIRD BECAME THE YOUNGEST OLYMPIC GAMES GOLD MEDALLIST IN TRACK AND FIELD. SHE BECAME THE “GOLDEN BABY” OF THE AUSTRALIAN PRESS. SHE CELEBRATED HER 17TH BIRTHDAY BY DEFEATING THE 80M WORLD RECORD HOLDER IN A PRE-OLYMPICS MEET. MAUREEN CAIRD FINISHED WITH CHEST PUFFED OUT IN THE 80m HURDLES FINAL IN RECORD TIME. PAM KILBORN WAS SECOND.
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“For motorists itching to explore, the maps and information about roads he traversed were invaluable” the NRMA noted.

As editor at the time, Scott’s occasional driving companion, A.C.C. Stevens, said he … had resourcefulness in all sorts of ticklish situations.”

Scott’s work as a patrol had clearly not been wasted.

Intrepid Scott said, “I have taken the Essex Six over roads on which no car has even been before …”

Taking over from Scott, was a gentleman who made many drivers feel far more comfortable with a Gregory’s street directory tucked away in their glovebox.

Cecil Gregory came from the Daily Telegraph as a journalist to join the NRMA as the touring and publicity manger to cater for members’ demands.

As well as being a cartographer, Gregory was the skilled editor of the Open Road for five years.
The touring office was described in Open Road as “the hub of travel” where staff gave information on the spot. By the late 1930s, the touring office issued more than 400,000 strip maps, 24,000 itineraries and 7000 letters to members a year.

And this was the time when the NRMA’s “love affair” with road trips was only just beginning.

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ABOUT THE OLYMPICS …
IN 1896, AT THE FIRST MODERN OLYMPIC GAMES AT ATHENS, EDWIN FLACK BECAME AUSTRALIA’S FIRST INTERNATIONALLY “RECOGNISED” ATHLETE. HE WAS OUR ONLY COMPETITOR. FLACK WON THE 800m FINAL AND THE 1500m FINAL. A FEW DAYS LATER, HE ALSO LINED UP FOR THE MARATHON, HIS FIRST ATTEMPT AT A LONG DISTANCE RACE.
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Frank Morris comment: The urbanisation of Australia began in earnest in the 1920s. Population had hit the 5.4 million mark; the capital cities were spreading out; new suburbs were sprouting up – and that meant lots of new streets. The motor car numbers were on the rise, over 22,000 were registered in Australia. People needed some expert guidance on how to negotiate the urban labyrinths. When Cecil Gregory left the NRMA, he decided to use the ‘Gregory’ name on the comprehensive street directory. The first edition was in 1934. It wasn’t the “first of its kind”, but it was the most popular. Hence, ever since Gregory’s became a household name “where’s the Gregory’s” is a familiar catchcry.

THE LEGEND OF THE PATROL. THIS PATROL IS CAUGHT IN THE BOG, A FURTHER STATEMENT ABOUT THE STATE OF ROADS IN NSW.

Material is an adaption of 100 YEARS OF THE NRMA; Frank Morris Comment comes from the Power of the Book, MMS.

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IT’S THE OLYMPICS …
1964 AND TOKYO PLAYS HOST TO THE “HAPPY GAMES” AND JAPAN SPENDS $2 BILLION ON MAKING IT ALL HAPPEN. THIS IS THE FIRST GAMES IN AN ASIAN COUNTRY AND ALSO WHERE AUSTRALIA’S DAWN FRASER WINS THE 100m FREESTYLE FOR HER THIRD TIME IN SUCCESSION IN AN OLYMPIC CONTEST. CONTINUED.
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KOALAS: A time for action -- when we think of the grim situation that awaits them!

“THE BUSHFIRES HAVE HIT OUR COMMUNITIES HARD AND WILDLIFE HAS SUFFERED; BUT THERE ARE THINGS YOU CAN DO TO HELP.” THAT IS A STATEMENT FROM NRMA GROUP CEO, ROHAN LUND IN THE CURRENT ISSUE OF OPEN ROAD. SEND YOUR DONATIONS TO WILDLIFE AND OTHER CHARITABLE ORGANISATIONS IN YOUR STATE.


MASON KNIGHT: YOU BE THE REPORTER. DON’T LEAVE MASON KNIGHT TO TAKE ALL THE CREDIT!

EVERYBODY’S FRIEND, UNTIL: MASON KNIGHT, ACE REPORTER HERE. I’M ABOUT TO NAIL THE RUTHLESS GANG! Below: KNIGHT WATCHED FROM THE SIDE AS THE BULLETS FLEW.

FRANK MORRIS

I got in the front door and the phone rang. “It’s Mason Knight here!” Then dead silence. “Bernie Squires, your favourite editor. I just …” Knight coughed. “… I just wanted you to know that four crooks, headed by McCann, are meeting at Towong Shopping Mall early in the morning. So be there!” Squires rang off.

Squires must think the four crooks are going to explode, thought Knight. They just as well might, you know, he thought. Four murderers with guns are down there for a reason, he thought again.

I’ll bet they are going there to gun down someone else, according to my favourite editor. Knight ran the story through his head. He could be a bastard at times, thought Knight.

Knight gleefully put his hatted figure on the unmade bed. He then went to sleep. In no time at all, he was awake. Knight lifted his sprawled figure off the bed, gave his face a wash in cold water, and a quick shave. He was already attired.

He marched to the car, a maroon 1936 Buick sedan, and was off. Knight headed straight to Towong Shopping Mall, stopped the car, and ran to an escalator coming in the opposite direction. He rode up and down before he spotted the four bandits.

Earlier on, the four men started a serious argument that resulted in a fatal shooting of one man by the others. All of the others ran away after the shot, but were eventually rounded up by police and brought to headquarters.

Knight took in all the action, including the fatal gunshot. He took in who was killed and by whom. The police brusquely rounded up the gang and an innocent man, not one of the crowd, who was unfortunately among the suspects.

Knight saw who the murderer was, who the victim was, and who the innocent man was.

McCann, the boss of a powerful gang, was an escaped convict. He was the first one found by the police. Evans, who stood behind the murderer when he fired the shot, was sure that Barker had done it. Barker, who had just met the murdered man and knew he controlled a gang, wouldn’t dare tell on the killer.

Carter is a pal of McCann’s and a cousin of the murdered man. He hated the murderer whom he had known for four years. Gates was in Melbourne with his girl the evening of the murder and hadn’t seen Carter for two years. He was arrested in Sydney two days later.

Mason Knight made his presence felt among the police. He introduced himself to Police Inspector McCraddock. They talked for a while, got the nitty gritty of the shootout and even eventually asked Knight for his solution.

Knight then stated: Evans was neither the murderer nor the victim, as he stood behind the murderer when the shot was fired. Barker could be neither, since he had just met the murdered man and wouldn’t dare tell on the murderer.

Gates must have been the killer. He could have been in Melbourne the evening of the murder and still committed the crime and fly from Melbourne to Sydney. There is nothing to indicate Carter’s presence at the scene so he must had been the innocent man.

McCann must have been the victim since all the others are obviously alive.

Knight was happy to receive a “well done” by some of the police. Even the Inspector joined in. “That’s the beauty of these cases,” the Inspector said. “You know what the guys ate for breakfast.” Said Knight: “Better still, you’ll be able to read my account in tonight’s Inquirer.”

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THE MYSTERY OF THE HANSOM CAB …
THIS MOVIE IN 1911, WAS ADAPTED FROM THE FIRST NOVEL WRITTEN ON CRIME IN 1886. THE INTEREST IN THE CRIME WAS NEVER ALLOWED TO FLAG. THE MYSTERY IS CLEVERLY HIDDEN UNTIL THE LAST FEW MINUTES. DEALING IN MURDER AND A MISSING WITNESS, THE COURT SCENES ARE EXCELLENT. THE MELBOURNE ARGUS REVIEW CUTS RIGHT TO THE POINT, THE MOVIE IS “WELL ACTED AND PHOTOGRAPHED.” THE MELBOURNE HERALD SAID “THIS APTLY DEMONSTRATED A HIGH STANDARD OF FILM-MAKING.”
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MASON KNIGHT’S 1936 BUICK.

<< Grand Years, 10.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 20 March 20

CHESTY BOND: Who were the people that created this “Super Man”?

TWO CHESTY BOND STRIPS. TOP, SHOWS CHESTY IS ALL SET TO WIN THE WOODCHOPPING CONTEST…

 

… HIS SECRET IS OUT!

THEY HELPED CREATE A COMIC AS AN ADVERTISEMENT. BY AND LARGE, IT WAS ONE OF THE BEST-READ “COMICS” OF THE PERIOD!

FRANK MORRIS

Chesty Bond is now 82-years young!

To gaze at him you would swear blind he doesn’t look a day over 30. The square-jawed icon, with his thatch of blond hair, rippling muscles and chiselled chin, had the enterprise of Atlas who had just lifted the world and carried it on his massive shoulders.

The two men responsible for this human dynamo were Ted Maloney, who worked at the ad agency J. Walter Thompson, and Syd Miller, who was one of Australia’s finest commercial artists.

Maloney achieved a lot of success in the advertising business. In his spare time, he was one of Australia’s best-known cooking experts. He received his share of fame as co-author of the cookery book Oh For A French Wife which was published in 1952. The book was a classic soon after its release.

He wrote several other cookery books as well as regular columns on wine and food for newspapers. The other half of the combination was Syd Miller, contributor to some of the leading publications in Australia.

Miller knew of Maloney from way back. The both were acquainted with each other when they worked in the advertising department of Smith’s Weekly. In 1938, when Miller was freelancing he met Maloney, who was now employed at J. Walter Thompson.

To his surprise, Maloney was working on the million pound Bonds account and, after much palaver, Maloney and Miller “were together again.”

Chesty Bond was created by Miller and Maloney and made his debut in the comic section of the Sun newspaper on August 10, 1938. This was Maloney’s dream, to have the newly-charged image character up against the best.

Chesty appeared five times a week and was the first advertising strip of its kind in the world.

But let’s go back to when it all stated.

“Popeye had inspired the idea for Chesty,” recalled Maloney. “Popeye had his spinach so Chesty got his strength from Bond’s singlets.”

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THIS IS 1970 …
FOR THE FIRST TIME AN ABORIGINAL DANCE COMPANY TOURS AUSTRALIA – PROFESSIONALLY … THE REVIEW, A SERIOUS WEEKLY, IS STARTED BY GORDON BARTON IN MELBOURNE … SYDNEY’S NIMROD THEATRE OPENS … EARTH DAY MARKS THE BEGINNING OF A CONCERN WITH ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES.
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Miller had to forego the history adventures series where Bond’s athletic singlets were being used in ‘historical’ situations. The ‘comic strip’ idea seems to hit the nail on the head. He started scribbling immediately to create a strip that would be successful.

“The true Chesty Bond was strong man, not your lumpy weight-lifting type,” Miller said. “He was kind, likeable and good-looking but he was not a male model. He was definitely Australian but acceptable everywhere. He was the heroic straight man.”

Chesty would be an Australian strong-man. Better still, he was made to feel transcendingly powerful whenever he wore his Bonds singlet. Miller scribbled a few heads and then one with a jaw. Chesty’s eyes changed to slits when he was facing danger.

The official Chesty Bond was born.

“During the war, Chesty battled with Hitler, Hirohito, enemy submarines, planes, spies and ships,” Miller said. “He also gave Bonds cotton cut-offs to ambulances, hospitals and volunteer defence forces.”

A prominent retail executive said “Chesty has widespread appeal right across the community. He is well loved. He represents more than just the blond bronzed Aussie. I think he appeals to all Australians, no matter what race or creed.”

Over the years, he went from tabloid cartoon to real-life TV star.

That’s Chesty Bond.

<< Grand Years 2006.

CHESTY HAS A PRESENT FOR PEGGY. AND CHESTY-LOOK-ALIKES MARCH IN THE STREET WITH CHESTY BOND.

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THIS IS 1971 …
VITAMIN SALES BEGIN TO CLIMB, UP 66 PER CENT … NATIONAL TIMES IS ESTABLISHED … AUSTRALIAN COUNCIL FOR THE ARTS FUNDING DOUBLED BY PRIME MINISTER JOHN GORTON … BRA-LESS FASHION FOLLOWS BRA-BURNING DEMONSTRATION IN THE UNITED STATES … CASSETTE RECORDINGS BECOME COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE … ABC CHILDREN’S PROGRAM, THE ARGONAUTS, GOES INTO DECLINE.


Drivers were greeted as heroes!

THE TALBOT LEFT ADELAIDE IN MARCH 1909 AND REACHED DARWIN 51 DAYS LATER.

FRANK MORRIS

Henry Dutton and Murray Aunger left Adelaide on November 15, 1909. The two men were bound to cross Australia. They were soon to find out that such a drive wasn’t just a pipedream. Dutton could cruise at 70kph. The arrival of the Talbot, the first motor car, in the tiny township of Alice Spring caused an uproar. Horses bolted and Aborigines had to climb the nearest tree to escape the monster. When excitement had calmed down the intrepid motorists were greeted as heroes; and refreshments were served. It took them 51 days to reach Darwin, the end of the odyssey. The faithful old Talbot, rescued from the outback, is still in running order. It’s now in Birdwood Mill Museum, South Australia. – FM; a newspaper report on the drive.


HISTORY REPORTED: Ulrich Ellis will be remembered as a founder of Australian Country Party

THE AUSTRALIAN COUNTRY PARTY IS DESIGNED FOR LOOKING AFTER THE COUNTRYITES. Below: ULRICK ELLIS.

AS A JOURNALIST AND HISTORIAN HE WAS A HOUSEHOLD NAME TO A WIDE GENERATION, BUT NEVER FAMOUS!

FRANK MORRIS

Everyone extols and admires fame but too few ever achieve that status. Over the last 150 years or so Australia has produced only a modicum of internationally recognised writers and a handful of Noble Prize winners.

The variety of our literature is quite remarkable for a country that only, a little more than a decade ago, celebrated “the bicentenary of white man’s history.”

Who is Ulrich Ruegg Ellis?

Born in Queensland in 1904, Ellis, a journalist and historian, was neither a household name nor famous. But, he had the privilege of being listed in the Notable Australians Who’s Who for having “achieved a level of expertise which make them notable and respected Australians.”

His older brother, M.H. Ellis, who was born in 1890, was a journalist, author and historian, whose biographies of Macquarie, Greenway and Macarthur, were acclaimed for standard and quality of historical research.

If nothing else, Ellis will be remembered by researchers and other historians as the author of A History of the Australian Country Party, which was published in 1963. It has become a classic in its own right.

His other books, New Australian States (1933) and The Country Party: A social and political history of the party in NSW (1958), were a constant reminder that change was in the air.

Between 1932 and1970, Ellis wrote stringent pamphlets and political, constitutional and development resources and scores of articles on political and water conservation and irrigation in Australia.

He was also a major contributor to the 1958 edition of The Australian Encyclopedia.

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THIS IS 197I …
GORDON BARTON BUYS THE OLDEST AUSTRALIAN PUBLISHER, ANGUS & ROBERTSON … AUSTRALIAN OPERA’S ATTENDANCE FIGURES (PER HEAD OF POPULATION), FOR THEIR FIRST FOURTEEN-WEEK SEASON, EXCEEDS FIGURES FROM OVERSEAS … WILLIAM McMAHON REPLACES JOHN GORTON AS PRIME MINISTER … CINEMA ATTENDANCES BEGIN TO RISE FOR THE FIRST TIME SINCE THE FIFTIES, WHEN TELEVISION WAS INTRODUCED, CAUSED THEM TO DECLINE.
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On the political front Ellis was associated with Sir Earle Page – leader of the Country Party, treasurer and deputy prime minister -- as an adviser for nearly 40 years. He served as Page’s political secretary from 1928 to 1936.

Ellis moved to another government sector when Page took over as Prime Minister as a “temporary arrangement” on the death of Joe Lyons in 1939. There was a great deal of personal vitriol between Page and Menzies at the time.

After three weeks, Page resigned and Menzies formed the UAP ministry and became prime minister.

Ellis was responsible for establishing the first Tourist Bureau in Canberra and served as its founding chairmen from 1937 to 1940.

He then had a stint by joining Sir Arthur Fadden’s department as head of publicity. Fadden, who was described as “a genial man”, was well like by both his political friends and foes. He became leader of the Country Party in 1940.

The next year, he was installed as prime minister for five weeks. He later became Treasurer. He resigned from all political positions and retired from Parliament in 1958.

Ellis, who later went on to spearhead the New England State Movement as chairman and patron successively from 1960, left his mark in his own special way.

He died in 1981.

Fame and celebrity had passed him by.

[Adapted from a lengthier article on Ulrich Ellis which ran in The Australian Book Collector, 2000.]

<< Adapted and rewritten from a lengthier article on Ulrich Ellis.

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THIS IS 1971 …
CANNED BEER TAKES OFF IN PREFERENCE TO BOTTLED BEER … AUSTRALIAN PIANIST, ROGER WOODWARD, IS ACCLAIMED INTERNATIONALLY … END OF REST AND RECREATION LEAVE (R & R) FOR US SERVICEMEN IN AUSTRALIA AS THE VIETNAM WAR WINDS DOWN … CHIPS RAFFERTY HAS DIED. HIS LAST FILM WAS WAKE IN FRIGHT.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 11 March 20

PEARL TURTON: Final. Queen of the surfers – a young woman who turned heads!

PEARL TURTON (CENTRE) ON THE WAY OUT TO BLITZ THE FINAL AT THE AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL TITLES AT AVALON IN 1963. Below: PEARL ON THE COVER OF TEENAGERS WEEKLY.

NOTHING COULD STOP PEARL RIDING THE WAVES NOW THAT SHE HAD A CONTEST TO WIN! IT WAS TO BECOME A FORERUNNER IN AUSTRALIA SURFING.

RON TURTON           Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

In 1963, the Interstate Surf Meet was to be run under international conditions over two days at North Avalon with senior and junior men’s and a ladies division.

This event became the forerunner of the Australian titles so it was a pretty big deal.

Pearl surfed on her heavy 9’2” Scott Dillon. She could really toss it around. Of course, with no legropes, and, if you wiped out, you swim to shore then paddle back out through the white-water; you start all over again.

You had to be fit! Anyway, in the ladies demolition derby, with countless surfers competing, Pearl prevailed and overnight she became very famous.

The pretty little 16 old became a household name. The phones didn’t stop at our house. Pearl was featured on nation television, on top-rating Bandstand rock and roll show.

They filmed it outdoors one week and they interviewed Pearl in a bikini. Absolutely, this was unheard of in those days.

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IT’S ABOUT OLYMPICS ….
1960, ANCIENT RUINS HAVE TO BE REVOVATED AND IT COSTS THE ITALIANS HEAPS OF MONEY -- $30 MILLION – TO STAGE THE ROME OLYMPICS. THE GAMES BECOME THE MOST WIDELY TELEVISED AND EXPENSIVE EVENT IN INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS AT THE TIME. CONTINUED.
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She was on the cover of the popular Everybodys magazine and the cover of Teenagers Weekly, a liftout-section of the Australian Women’s Weekly, which was the national top-selling magazine.

She started writing the Ask Pearl section in a surfing magazine*, with girls from all over Australia and New Zealand sending in questions for Pearl to answer.

Pearl only competed one more time after that. It was at Bondi.

When the soon-to-be iconic movie The Endless Summer came along, Pearl was asked to be a part of it when Robert August and Mike Hynson did the Australian section of the film.

She had a ball being filmed for many hours surfing with the boys.

When the movie was released in Australia, it was shock horror! All it shows is a pretty young girl looking like she’d never ridden a board at all.

That’s all.

And it didn’t show any of her good shots, or how polished her surfing was; and it didn’t even mention that she was the reigning National Champion. Sad, as it’s still widely regarded as the best surfing movie of all time.

We’d loved to have seen the rest of the footage and to have known what happened to it. I think this was all just such a rollercoaster ride for a young girl.

Pearl is still proud of the beautiful trophy these days. I think she probably appreciates it more now than she did way back then.

Frank Morris comments: The journal was Surfabout Magazine from the mid-1960s. The column, Pearl Turton Speaks to the Girls, to be published in March.

<< Adapted from Pacific Longboarder, Vol. 19, Number 1.

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IT’S ALL ABOUT OLYMPICS …
IN 1960, AT THE ROME OLYMPICS, THE AUSTRALIAN CONTINGENT “BROUGHT HOME THE GOLD” TO GIVE EVERYONE SOME ENJOYMENT! ATHLETICS: WHEN HERB ELLIOTT WON THE 1500m WITH A WORLD AND OLYMPICS RECORD-BREAKING RUN AGAINST THE ODDS. SWIMMING: JOHN DEVITT, 100m FREESTYLE, MURRAY ROSE, 400m FREESTYLE, D. THIELE, 100m BACKSTROKE, 1500M FREESTYLE, JOHN KONRADS. DAWN FRASER, 100m FREESTYLE. ALSO EQUESTRIANS, INDIVIDUAL EVENT: L. MORGAN AND THE 3-DAY TRIAL, DESPITE BILL ROYCROFT WITH A BROKEN COLLARBONE.


HISTORIC MYSTERY: The lad who would inspire The Man from Snowy River

CLIFF CRANE ON THE VERGE OF DISCOVERING THE MYSTERY RIDER THAT INSPIRED THE MAN FROM SNOWY RIVER. Below: BANJO PATERSON: WHEN HE WROTE HIS FAMOUS POEM.

FRANK MORRIS

The secret has been solved!

Researcher Cliff Crane on the ABC has revealed a factual account about the mystery, after 25 years working on the puzzle, of who was the rider that inspired Banjo Paterson’s poem, The Man from Snowy River, written in 1895.

According to Crane, it was not a man or woman but a young lad, aged 11, from in Binalong, NSW, who performed a god-fearing ride you only see in comic books.

“It was a death defying ride”, Crane told James Valentine.

He says the source of the mystery was contained in a newspaper article published in the 1900s that indicated to Crane he was on the right path.

Crane said Paterson would end up writing this epic work. This effort demonstrated the genius behind the man who would write that monumental poem.

Banjo Paterson, was just 9 at the time, witnessed an event that he found so hard to forget and Paterson would harbour this ‘secret’ until his death.

He saw the lad galloping bareback on a brassy looking young colt which bolted and descended down a rugged hill covered with undergrowth.

At the end of the ride, the horse veered and crashed into a tree and the lad, Edward Hall, was thrown to the ground. He died hours later.

Valentine asked Crane about the woman or girl who was the rider. “That certainly was a bit of teasing”, Crane replied.

Paterson wrote the famous poem, The Man Snowy River, 15 years after his mate was killed.

The Bulletin published The Man from Snowy River in 1890, but anonymously. It later used the author’s name. “It lays claim to be Australia’s most famous poem, a critic said.

In l895, the poem was published by Angus & Robertson and became their first best-seller.

<< The photo of Cliff Crane is the property of the St George and Sutherland Leader, Kogarah, NSW. Picture by John Veage.

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COMING: AT THE CLUB. STARS, OLD AND NEW, AND HOW THEY ENTERTAIN THE CLUB THRONG. PERMANENT FEATURE.


VALE: The one and only Bob Cooper, surfer, dies after battle with cancer

COOP “EL PARALELO”AT RINCON IN 1965. Below: BOB COOPER.

FRANK MORRIS

The prominent and influential Bob Cooper, who was surfing’s original beatnik, died on Sunday, February 16, after a long bout with cancer, on the Queensland’s Sunshine Coast.

He was 82.

Cooper was one of the most skilled shapers and surfers who had a major input in surfing history on both sides of the Pacific, says Pacific Longboarder News Wire.

He was a gentle, wise and a distinctive sort of character who was a guiding light to many persons of the surfing industry.

Sidney Robert Cooper was born 1937 in Santa Monica. He was one of the core crew surfing at pre-Gidget Malibu and Rincon in the 1950s.

He surfed at Malibu in 1952 and Rincon the following year. He was a contemporary of early innovators and radicals among whom was Leroy Grannis who developed into a great surfing photographer.

In 1959, Cooper visited Australia and in worked in our fledgling surfing industry with Gordon Woods and Barry Bennet where he freely shared his California ideas on production techniques.

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ON THE WAVES …
SAYS WILMER C. MORRIS IN AN INTRODUCTION TO THE DUKE: A GREAT HAWAIIAN, DUKE KAHANAMOKU TAUGHT ME TO SWIM WHEN I WAS FIVE YEARS OLD AT MY GRANDFATHER’S HOUSE AT PU’ULOA, THE ENTRANCE TO PEARL HARBOR. I HAVE HAD THE PRIVILEGE TO KNOW THE KAHANAMOKU FAMILY ALL MY LIFE.
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He was generous in sharing his knowledge, particularly to the younger generation.

He surfed many beaches in California over the years. There was hardly a beach he did not know about. He returned there many times to regather with surfing buddies and old friends. And to surf.

Cooper opened a Cooper Surf Shop at Coffs Harbour, NSW, and eventually sold up some years later. He moved to Noosa where he surfed, made boards and made countless friends.

He was visited by admirers from around the world.

In Surfabout Magazine in 1965 (Vol. 1, No. 5), there was an article by Peter Rae called On Surfari. Rae said, “Bob Cooper showed me the wonderful sights of California”. Rae was to quickly learn what makes California ticks.

Rae ended his piece by highlighting an incident that involved Cooper surfing at Malibu. He writes:
“The third ride was Bob Cooper’s at Point Conception. Bob paddled out, still dry, and waited for his wave. He picked up a six-footer, made his turn. And as the approaching tube came up, crouched through it.

“He disappeared for about three seconds, then reappeared with only his right shoulder and head wet – the perfect tube”.

The Pacific Longboarder News Wire ended with a poetic yet familiar saying: His was a life lived large.

COOP WITH JOE LARKIN, THE QUEENSLAND SURFBOARD BUILDER. THEY WERE FOREVER FRIENDS.

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ON THE WAVES …
WILMER C. MORRIS, CONTINUED: DUKE WAS PHYSICALLY IMPRESSIVE, HE WAS A MAGNIFICENT POLYNESIAN. HE WAS HANDSOME, MAGNETIC, WITH AN AURA THAT DREW ALL EYES WHEN HE ENTERED A ROOM. HIS 20 YEARS OF OLYMPIC COMPETITION DID MORE TOO PUT HAWAI’I “ON THE MAP” THAN ANYONE BEFORE OR SINCE.
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ON THE WAVES …
WILMER C. MORRIS, CONTINUED: SOME OF MY CHERISHED MEMORIES ARE OF LEANING AGAINST A CANOE, WARMED BY AFTERNOON SUN, LISTENING TO PAOA REMINISCE ABOUT GROWING UP IN KALIA; SIMPLE STORIES TOLD WITH EMOTION. CONTINUED.D

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 06 March 20

VALE: June Dally-Watkins dead

AMAZING WOMAN: “REMEMBER, SHE IS AN ICON”.

JUNE DALLY-WATKINS, THE TRAILBLAZER WHO TURNED AUSTRALIA INTO A “POLITE AND WELL-GROOMED NATION”, DIED LAST WEEK-END, AGED 92. MAGGIE TABBERER, A CLOSE FRIEND AND FELLOW MODEL, SAID THE “ETIQUETTE QUEEN” WILL BE REMEMBERED AS AN ICON. “JUNE WAS AN AMAZING WOMAN. SHE TAUGHT MANY GIRLS HOW TO WALK, HOW TO TALK, AND TO BE THE BEST THAT THEY COULD BE”. – FM.


John Frost, the headline hunter: The newspapers are a unique record of events when they happen

JOHN FROST WITH A ‘HANDFUL’ OF HIS NEWSPAPERS. THE FUHRER EDITION IS TUCKED AWAY IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT-HAND CORNER. Below: THE DEATH OF QUEEN VICTORIA.

ONE OF FROST’S PRIZED NEWSPAPERS IS THE BLACK-BOARDED ONE-PAGE EDITON OF A GERMAN DAILY REPORTING THE DEATH OF THE FUHRER.

FRANK MORRIS

In the year 2000, I penned an article on John Frost after he forwarded me a mountain of news stuff and newspapers covering some of the intricate global events.

He went on to say that his collection had newspaper and news sheets dating back to rollicking times of the 17th century when the newspaper was in its infancy.

Frost’s fascination with newsprint started when he was a 10-year-old child in 1930. “After that I became hooked on collecting newspapers which recorded momentous events,” recalled John.

John Frost who collects – COLLECTS -- newspaper is no ordinary bloke.

The British-based Frost Historical Newspaper Collection comprises more than 60,000 British and international editions and 150,000 press cuttings dating from 1640.

In fact, Mr Peter Jones, of the Welsh (UK) Art Council, said it has been hailed as “the most remarkable collection” in the world.

Frost describes his mountain of newspapers as representing “a good slice of history”.  He is, he says, “a man who looks forward to the past”.  His business is collecting events which will become history.

The newspapers in this unique collection record everything from the day a British comedian was accused of eating a hamster, to the coronations and deaths of kings and queens.

A veteran of Normandy and now in his early eighties, Frost had been collecting since 1930.  “I was only ten and living in Notting Hill.  I remember the shouts of the newspaper vendors when the R101 airship crashed in France on its maiden voyage,” he says.

“I raced home to my mother who gave me a penny.  A few moments later I was back for another. It was a Sunday and the Sunday Express cost twopence”.

From that earth-shattering tragedy, Frost became “hooked” on collecting newspapers which recorded “momentous events”.

He was then kept busy with the rise of Hitler, the Spanish Civil War, the abdication of King Edward VIII, the Munich Crisis and so on.  His collection started to grow like Topsy.

After he was demobbed in 1946, Frost travelled for the next six years around Europe, collecting newspapers at every port of call; from Orkney Islands to Berlin.

“As a Normandy veteran I recall raiding billets evacuated by the Germans.  It paid off.  I managed to ‘capture’ a truly historic German army paper which reported the allied invasion”.

One of his prized newspapers of war years is a copy of the black-bordered one-page edition of the Lubecken Zeitung, reporting the death of the Fuhrer – Our leader has fallen – “in action”.

He has over 15,000 different newspapers, including some US editions, covering World War II from beginning to end.  And that is just the tip of the iceberg.

The collection covers the death and coronation of every British Monarch since 1751, the election of every American President since 1832 and “practically” every major event in the life of Winston Churchill.

There are thousands of British and American editions which report the American Civil War, the Boer War, Korea, Vietnam, the Falklands and Middle East wars, famous trials, major disasters, obituaries, space exploration, Royal Events and notable sporting achievements.

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ABOUT THE OLYMPICS …
FANNY DURACK WAS GIVEN HER FARE TO MAKE SURE SHE APPEARED IN THE 1912 STOCKHOLM OLYMPICS GAMES. ACCORDING TO A NEWSPAPER ARTICLE, “FORGOTTEN HEROINES,” AUSTRALIAN OFFICALS REFUSED TO ADD THE CHAMPION SWIMMER TO THEIR FIVE-MAN SWIMMING TEAM. – FM. CONTINUED.
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His “crown jewels” include the rare colour newspaper of 1909, reporting the French aviator Bleriot’s historic flight over the English channel; the sinking of the Titanic in 1912;  The Times of 1874, announcing the birth of Winston Churchill; the Wisconsin News reporting the death of Rudolph Valentino; the death of suffragette Emily Davidson, who threw herself under the King’s horse at a race meeting in 1913;  the Neues Wiener Tagblett of 1914, reporting the assassination of Sarajevo of the Crown Prince of Austria.

Says Frost: “Whenever a big event takes place, no matter where in the world it is, a newspaper reporter will always be there. Every day in every country in the world newspapers are on sale with some dramatic story only hours, minutes even, after the event”.

He says that to gain a “more personal perspective” on the world-wide events he likes “to get the newspaper from where it happened”.  In the case of the Apollo II moon walk in 1969, for example, he has the newspaper from Neil Armstrong’s home town.

My first contact with Frost was in 1998.  I came across an article he wrote for the MacMillan’s Press Directory.  He replied to my letter promptly.

A few days later a package of newspapers arrived, the first of many, among which was a copy of the New York Herald, reporting the death of Abraham Lincoln and various editions of British newspapers from the 1930s, reporting some major event.

“This (newspaper collecting) is a wonderful pursuit,” he says in his first letter.  “This century has certainly seen history in a hurry.  It’s wonderful seeing instant news on television.  But nothing can beat the printed word and reading the full story”.

<< Part 2. John Frost: Headlines we will never forget by Elaine Williams. Coming March 13.

COMING: Skateboarding, the pastime that leaves blood on the sidewalks, was developed as a sport in 1960s, will be introduced at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games.

 

DAILY EXPRESS: MAN ON THE MOON.

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ABOUT THE OLYMPICS …
EARLIER THIS CENTURY, FANNY DURACK ALMOST SUFFERED FROM AN UNUSAL FATE. DURACK “BECAME THE FIRST WOMAN TO WIN A GOLD MEDAL AFTER SOME PROMINENT WOMEN SUBSCRIBED TO RAISE HER FARE,” WROTE DEBORAH HOPE OF THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD. CONTINUED.– FM.


HISTORIC MYSTERY: Was it man, woman or a young person The Man from Snowy River?

BANJO PATERON SECRET REVEALED.

THE MYSTERY HAS BEEN SOLVED. THE MAN FROM SNOWY RIVER WASN’T MAN OR WOMAN. BUT AN 11-YEAR-OLD CLASS MATE OF BANJO PATERSON WHO WAS ACTUALLY THE MYSTERY RIDER. RESEACHER CLIFF CRANE HAS BEEN STUDYING PATERSON FOR 25 YEARS AND THIS IS WHEN HE REALISED THAT A SECRET WAS BURIED IN THE MAN FROM SNOWY RIVER THAT HAS TO BE REVEALED. THE FULL STORY NEXT WEEK.


SURFS UP! Fancy nameplates of surfing 60s from the board builders of Australia

NORM CASEY BEGAN TO MANUFACTURE SURFBOARDS IN 1949. IN AUGUST 1962, HE OPENED A MODERN SHOP AND FACTORY AT ROCKDALE, SYDNEY. THE FACTORY, OPERATED ON PROVEN AMERICAN METHODS, AND HOUSED SOME OF THE MOST UP-TO-DATE EQUIPMENT IN THE INDUSTRY. NORM ONCE REMARKED THAT “I’VE REALISED THE VITAL NEED OF CARRYING OUT CONSTANT RESEARCH ON THE FLEXIBILITY OF NEW MATERIALS”. THIS IS WHY NORM CONTENDED THAT HE HAD DEVELOPED THE “HIGHEST STRENGTH TO WEIGHT RATIO” OF ANY CUSTOM BOARD ON THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET. (WRITTEN FOR SURFABOUT MAGAZINE IN 1965 FOR THE NEW PUBLISHERS.) – FM.

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ABOUT THE OLYMPICS …
FANNY DURACK WON THE 100 METRES FREESTYLE IN ONE MINUTE 22.2 SECONDS, DEFEATING TEAM-MATE WILHELMINA WYLIE. THE EVENT, WHICH WAS NEW TO OLYMPIC WOMEN’S SWIMMING, WAS DESCRIBED AS “A GREAT SUCCESS”. – FM.


PEARL TURTON: Part 1.  Queen of the surfers -- the young woman who turned heads

PEARL TURTON, AWAYS IN CONFIDENT FORM, AS SHE SLICES THROUGH A BULKLY WAVE AT WHALE BEACH. Below: HOW PEARL BECOME QUEEN OF THE SURFING FRATERNITY.

PEARL TOOK TO THE SURF WITH THE BOYS. HER MATES WERE MY MATES AND SHE WAS JUST ANOTHER OF THE GANG.

RON TURTON       Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

In October 1949, Ronald and Pearl Turton Senior arrived in Australia from England, along with their children. I was four, Pearl was two and Ross was on the way.

We settled in Palm Beach at the tip of Sydney’s famous northern beaches. And although Pearl was not a big girl by any means, from the beginning she showed all the attributes of a sport star.

Palm Beach was very much a holiday destination then and was packed on the weekends in summer. But for the locals it was the sort of place where everyone knew everyone – although there weren’t too many locals our age.

During the weekdays after school we’d all play rugby league and cricket, which were “boy sports” in those days; but Pearl just joined in and was accepted.

She could run like the wind, had remarkable hand-eye coordination, and excelled at track and field, basketball and gymnastics.

But it was the surf that soon become the main attraction. Looking back, the timing was right. It was end of the 50s and we weren’t even teenagers yet. But things were starting to change – music, clothing and surfing.

Pearl took to the surf with my mates. She was just another of the gang.

We didn’t own our surfboards at first, we just bodysurfed. Then we rode these things called “surfoplanes”. You had to paddle like mad to catch a wave, the bigger the better; and then we’d lay down and hang on.

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ON THE WAVES …
WHO WAS THE FIRST WOMEN’S SURF RIDER IN AUSTRALIA TO STAND UPRIGHT ON A SURFBOARD? ISABEL LETHAM AGED 15, IN 1916. WHEN SEAS WERE POUNDING AT A BEACH CALLED FRESHWATER, NSW, HAWAIIAN DUKE KAHANAMOKU WAS DEMONSTATING HIS SURFBOARD RIDING. “COME ON!” SAID THE DUKE. HE WAS COAXING THE TEENAGER ONTO THE FRONT OF IT. “I WAS TERRIFIED … I WAS TOO SCARED TO STAND UP …” SAID ISABEL. -- FM.
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It was fantastic. Before too long Pearl decided it would be fun to ride these things like a jockey. And I can still see her flying down these waves: one hand on the handle and the other raised in the air like a rodeo rider rocketing around terrified body surfers.

It was so much fun.

Surfboards were only for the older boys and men. That was all about to change.

About half a dozen fellas my age – around 12 – bought nine-foot balsa Malibus. Some of the surf club members let us have a ride on their 16-foot hollow plywoods; but they were so heavy and awkward, compared to a fibreglass and resin balsa.

It was just a matter of time before Pearl borrowed my board. Off she went, this petite little thing … and she had confidence and raw talent to burn.

Soon, it was to become a way of life. It was more than a sport, and as Pearl had always been one of the Palm Beach gang there was none of this “what’s a girl doing our wave” stuff.

Pearl left school early in her mid-teens to work at the Palm Beach Pharmacy. She used to surf before and after work, whenever the “surf was up”.

There were no contests at the time, but, unbeknown to Pearl, there was a big surprise in store.

<< Adapted from That Pearl by Ron Turton, Pacific Longboarder, Vol 19, Number 1.

NEXT: Success was staring her in the face. She was to become a household name.

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ON THE WAVES …
SURFBOARDS HAVE HAD THREE DISTINCT ERAS: THE SOLID BOARD, USED FROM 1912 TO ABOUT 1938; THE HOLLOW LONGBOARD, FROM 1938 TO 1956; AND THE REVOLUTINNARY LIGHTWEIGHT MALIBU BOARD OF FIBREGLASS COVERED BALSA, WITH A FIN. THE MALIBU BOARDS REVOLUTIONISED BOARD RIDING. – LANA WELLS.
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ON THE WAVES …

WHEN LONGBOARD AND RIDER PARTED COMPANY, THE SWIMMERS NEARBY DUCKED FOR COVER. LONGBOARDS CAME TO A HALT IN 1956. THEY HAVE SINCE MADE A COMEBACK.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 27 February 20

READ ALL ABOUT IT! A newspaper can make a difference in your community

A GOLD COIN DONATION WILL BUY A COPY OF THE TRIANGLE, A NEWSPAPER PRODUCED BY THE COMMUNITY.

AN ESTIMATED 200 COUNTRY NEWSPAPERS IN AUSTRALIA HAVE BITTEN THE DUST. IN OTHER WORDS, THEY’VE CALLED IT A DAY. HOW WOULD YOU LIKE TO START A NEWSPAPER IN YOUR COMMUNITY? AUSTRALIA IS A BIG COUNTRY AND THERE’RE PLENTY OF STORIES TO CHOOSE FROM.

THE TRIANGLE, AFTER ALL THE HARD WORK, IS READY FOR THE PURCHASER. Below: A BOX AT A DROP-OFF POINT.

IT’S NO SURPRISE, THEN, WHEN A BEVY OF VOLUNTEERS PRODUCE THE TRIANGLE, WHICH IS PACKED FULL OF NEWS, NEWS THAT WOULD NEVER MAKE IT IN MAJOR NEWSPAPERS.

FRANK MORRIS

The Triangle has become an anticipated monthly fixture for the townspeople of Brogo, Quaama, Cobargo and Tilba, and other localities along the way.

Established in 2002, it was quickly decided The Triangle, “would have no politics” (in its strictest sense.) It would be a local, positive and a conveyance for public discussion.

And there was an editorial committee responsivity and no central editor to spread and hopefully bring different snippets, attitudes, pictures and news to the forum.

The committee will publish anything as long as it doesn’t cover “politics, sex or religion”, which, naturally, would reduce complaints.

But the paper has occasionally “raised the ire” of some of the townspeople, says a spokesperson, and mistakes are quickly corrected and disputes are resolved pretty fast.

The spokesperson admits that some of the best stories come from the pub. Letters to the editorial committee also give the locals room to share their views.

The profits from The Triangle go back to the community.

Now, do you want to your start your own community newspaper?

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READ ALL ABOUT IT …
ABOUT THE TRIANGLE: WITH A LONG HISTORY OF FARMING AND FISHING, AND A PROUD LOCAL KOORI COMMUNITY, THIS IS A PART OF THE COUNTRY WITH PLENTY OF STORIES TO TELL. THANKS TO THE TEAM BEHIND TILBA’S THE TRIANGLE, LOCALS CAN CATCH UP WITH THE COMMUNITY NEWS ON A MONTHLY BASIS.
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What your need is a lot of motivation, organisational skills and little know-how. These are of some of the tips from the crew at The Triangle.

Keep your costs low. In 2010, The Triangle charged from 60 cents to $20 for advertisement. Revenue also comes from the donation boxes at drop-off points.

Printing costs, in 2010, are around $1500 and distribution, based on the weight, about $200. After the extraction of costs, The Triangle clear about $400 a month.

A spokeswoman, in 2010, says they keep at least $2000 in the bank to the cover the next issue. Any profit goes back to the community.

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IT’S THE OLYMPICS …
1964, TOKYO PLAYS HOST AND JAPAN SPENDS $2 BILLION ON THE “HAPPY GAMES” – THE FIRST GAMES IN AN ASIAN COUNTRY. DAWN FRASER WINS THE 100m FREESTYLE FOR THIRD TIME STRAIGHT IN THE OLYMPICS. AND DAWN WON HER FOURTH GOLD. IN ATHLETICS, BETTY CUTHBERT MADE A SCINTILLATING COMEBACK AND TOOK OUT THE WOMEN’S 400m. ALSO GOLD FOR MEN’S SWIMMING: 1500m FREESTYLE. 200m BUTTERFLY. 200m BREASTROKE. YACHTSMEN ALSO WIN GOLD IN THE 5.5m.
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When you work on a country newspaper like The Triangle you must be prepared to share the load. A spokeswoman said we have a 10-member editorial committee, comprising a secretary, treasurer, designer, proof reader and copy editor.

The work-loads vary, but the secretary must commit about 25 to 30 hours a month compiling material for the editorial meeting, but the designer spends about 40 hours laying out each issue.

Frank Morris comments: Now, as a professional journalist, the raised advertising revenue is important to extrapolate your circulation to a readership figure. With the circulation of 2000 copies, 3 persons as readers, it’s better to work on 6000 readership.

The next vital step is to turn your readership figures into strong and powerful sales letter for your potential advertiser. After two or three attempts, you’ll find the advertising starts to creep up. 

My suggestion would be is to lift the circulation for the holiday maker. There are a number of rewards that you could be striving for. Some of those ‘holiday’ people have been coming to these havens for years. Local or non-local? That is the question.

In 2020, printing and advertising costs have risen a fair bit.

Remember, the more creative you become the better your project will be in the market place. << Adapted from Australia Today. Australia Post, 2010.


NEXT: THE PEARL TURTON STORY: SHE WAS THE QUEEN OF THE SURFING FRATERNITY. SHE WAS ASKED TO APPEAR IN AN ENDLESS SUMMER MOVIE? THEN ALL HELL BROKE LOOSE.


READ ALL ABOUT IT …
ABOUT THE TRIANGLE: “A BOMB COULD HAVE GONE OFF HERE AND THEY WOULDN’T KNOW ABOUT IT IN BEGA”, A WOMAN READER SAID. THOSE ON THE EDITORIAL COMMITTEE MEETING ENJOY THE TASK OF DELIVERING THE NEWSPAPER BECAUSE OF THE FEEDBACK THE FROM THE LOCAL READERSHIP. THE PRINT RUN IS STABLE DURING THE HOLIDAY SEASON WHEN THE TOURISTS COME TO TOWN. “BECAUSE IT ISN’T FOR THEM, IT FOR LOCALS,” ACCORDING TO A COMMITTEE MEMBER.


FLASHBACK: To keep Tarzan of the Jungle hunting criminals will keep the enduring franchise going!

TARZAN (CHRISTOPHER LAMBERT) MINGLES WITH A BUNCH OF APES, TALKING THEIR LANGUAGE. Below: JOHNNY WEISSMULLER AS TARZAN WITH THE FAMILY.

MANY ACTORS HAVE ENJOYED PLAYING THE KING OF THE JUNGLE OVER THE YEARS. TWO OF THE FINEST ACTORS TO PLAY TARZAN, IN MY OPINION, JOHNNY WEISSMULLER AND CHRISTOPHER LAMBERT WERE OUTSTANDING.

FRANK MORRIS

It’s over 100 years since Edgar Rice Burroughs’s Tarzan sagas of the enduring ape man became so popular that the author went on to write two dozen sequels.

Hollywood was quick to jump on the successful Tarzan bandwagon and produced the first film, Tarzan Of The Apes, in 1918. A silent film, it starred Elmo Lincoln and Enid Markey.

In fact, Lincoln went on to star as Tarzan a second time that year in The Romance Of Tarzan.

The best known and most easily recognised actor to play the role was Johnny Weissmuller. Weissmuller had been one of the world’s fastest swimmers in the 1920s. He won five Olympic gold medals, but it was playing Tarzan that propelled him to international stardom.

He played the character twelve times and earned an estimated $4 million.
Weissmuller was the first actor to use the famous Tarzan yell. He explained in an interview that it was actually a recording of three diffentent vocalists – a soprano, an alto and a hog caller. The three vocalists were spliced together to get the effect.

Joining Weissmuller was the talented actress Maureen O’Sullivan as Jane. Then there was the famous Cheeta, the chimpanzee, although no chimpanzee actually appeared in the original Edgar Rice Burroughs novels.

Perhaps the long-running Tarzan saga needed something new to appeal to filmgoers in 1984.

A French actor who spoke no English, Christopher Lambert, had to train for six months to play the part – learning to behave like a chimp in the afternoon, having English lessons in the evening. All his hard work paid off. The critics loved his interpretation of the leading character.

And the box-office loved him, too. In the first eight weeks, Greystoke, The Legend Of Tarzan, took over $35 million; a record.

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IT’S THE OLYMPICS …
IN 1968, MEXICO CITY WAS NAMED FOR THE OLYMPIC GAMES. BUT THERE WAS TWO DISTINCT FALL-OUTS WHICH OCCURRED: HIGH ALTITUDE AND BLACK POWER. DESPITE THE ANXIETY ABOUT THE FORMER, IT WAS MAINLY THE POLICITICAL ATMOSPHERE THAT MARRED THE MEXICO CITY OLYMPICS GAMES. AUSTRALIAN SPRINTER PETER NORMAN FINISHED THIRD – BEING OUT SPRINTED BY TOMMIE SMITH AND JOHN CARLOS WHO CAME FIRST AND SECOND. CONTINUED.
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“Greystoke is worth a trip to the cinemas, one critic told his readers. “Forget about all the other Tarzan movies, this is the authentic one”.

Tarzan turns predator. He could stalk his prey with unerring accuracy.

The films opens with the boy Tarzan and an ape friend Droopy Ears up high in a tree, Tarzan cooing and the ape copying the cooing in harmony.

Even as a youngster, Tarzan and Droopy Ears produce a wonderful sound.

Lambert said, “half of me is the Earl of Greystoke and the other half is wild”.

Up until 2016 there have been various mixtures of Tarzan, both in real-life and cartoons.

TARZAN THE APEMAN: Actors who have played the great wild man...

Elmo Lincoln, 1918; Gene Pollar, 1920; James Pierce, 1927; Frank Merrill, 1929; Herman Brix and Bruce Bennett, 1935, 1938; Johnny Weismuller, 1932 to 1948; Buster Crabbe, 12-chapter-movie serial, 1934; Glenn Morris, 1938; Lex Barker, 1949 to 1953; Denny Miller, 1959; Gordon Scott, 1955 to 1960; Jock Mahoney, 1962 to 1963; Mike Henry, 1966 to 1968; Miles O’Keeffe, 1981; Christopher Lambert, 1984; Casper Van Dien, 1998.

<< The Peoples Friend, UK, and Frank Morris.

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IT’S THE OLYMPICS …
MEXICO CITY BOASTED A RECORD 113 NATIONS AND OVER 6000 ATHLETES. ENREQUITA BASILO WAS THE FIRST WOMAN TO LIGHT THE OLYMPICS FLAME. SWIMMING: WHEN MICHAEL WENDEN SCORED A “DOUBLE” FOR AUSTRALIA BY WINNING HIS SECOND GOLD MEDAL IN THE 200m FREESTYLE AND BREAKING AN ENDURING RECORD IN OLYMPICS HISTORY. THE RECORD HAD BEEN SET IN 1900. THE 200m WAS TAKEN OFF THE PROGRAM IN 1904. IT REAPPEARED IN 1968. THE 800m MEN’S LONG DISTANCE WON GOLD. THE WOMEN’S 80m HURDLES, WAS WON BY M. CAIRD. SWIMMING: BOTH 200m 100m MEN’S FREESTYLE WON GOLD. THE 100m WOMEN’S BUTTERFLY.
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COMING: LILLIAN NEVILLE’S GIRLS HAD A BIG PART TO PLAY IN THE 1956 OLYMPICS GAMES, NOT ONLY AS COMPETITORS BUT BEHIND THE SCENES AS WELL.


YOUR DOG: A dog wants to know everything!

AXLE CATCHES UP ON HIS EXPLOITS IN THE NEWSPAPER. Macedon Ranges Leader, Melbourne.

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ABOUT THE OLYMPICS …
DESPITE PROTESTS FROM THE GREEKS, THE SECOND OLYMPIAD WAS HELD AT PARIS IN 1900. SWIMMING APPEARED HERE FOR THE FIRST TIME AS AN OLYMPIC EVENT. THE RUGGED FREDDY LANE WON AUSTRALIA’S GOLD MEDALS BY WINNING THE 200m FREESTYLE AND THE 200m ‘OBSTACLE’ RACE. WHICH WAS DESCRIBED AS AN “AMUSING AFFAIR”. FREDDY LANE WAS THE FIRST AUSSIE SWIMMER TO WIN AN OLYMPIC GO

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 21 February 20

TENNIS CHAMPS: Margaret Court is voted Australia’s greatest women’s tennis player

MARGARET COURT … ONE OF THE BEST ALL-ROUND WOMEN’S TENNIS PLAYERS AUSTRALIA HAS PRODUCED.  Below: BILLY JEAN KING AND MARGARET COURT HAD SEVERAL DOUR STRUGGLES IN THE GAME.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

TALL AND ATHLETIC, COURT PLAYS MORE IN THE STYLE OF MEN’S TENNIS PLAYERS.

In Australia, the administrators of tennis were lucky. Even though the top players kept joining the professionals, equally brilliant players continued to come along to take their place.

Margaret Court won her first Australian singles titles in 1960. At this point, she was described as one the best tennis players Australia had produced.

Court was certainly the greatest Australian woman player of her time. Her record is extraordinary. She was the second woman to win a Grand Slam.

Over 14 years, she won all the major championships a number of times.

Tall and athletic, Court … played an attacking game which owed a lot to men’s style of tennis more than to women’s. She was a serve/volley player who would take more chances; staked more on being able to make that first volley count.

She played more volleys that any woman player up to her time.

In 1970 she emulated the feat of the late Maureen Connolly, of the US, by winning the Grand Slam – the Australian, French, Wimbledon and US singles titles.

On three occasions she won three out four in 1962, 1969 and 1973. Overall – singles, doubles, and mixed – an unprecedented 61 “big four” titles.

She played overseas numerous times (Italy, South Africa and Germany) and the total jumped from 61 to 90. Court won the Australian singles crown a staggering 11 times – seven in a row.

Against the famous Billie Jean King, Court had many dour struggles. She came out victorious in 21 of 34 tournament matches played.

Court had no weakness in any facet of her game, even though she had been on the world circuit since 1960. No woman played the game like Margaret Court – exceptional dedication, determination and domination.

She was born in Albury in 1942. She later settled in Perth. She was awarded an OBE in 1967.

<< Adapted from Tennis: The Greats–1920 to 1960, by Adrian Quist and Jack Egan, 1984, ABC Books, Sydney; Hall of Championship, Sport House, Sydney.  Watch for Tennis Champs later in the year.

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IT’S THE OLYMPICS …
AUSTRALIA WAS THE VENUE, AND MELBOURNE WAS HOST CITY, FOR THE FIRST TIME IN 1956. OUR OWN BETTY CUTHBERT IS THE “GOLDEN GIRL”. WHILE VLADIMIR KUTS, ATHLETE, GIVES THE USSR TWO GOLD WHEN HE TOOK OUT THE 5000m AND 10,000m WITH A MINDBOGGLING PERFORMANCE. CONTINUED.
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COMING: ARTBEAT. MOVED TO MARCH 6.


FLASHBACK: Final. Fantastic Voyage – La Balsa charts a long journey on mountainous-sized seas

THIS UNIQUE 1970 PRESS PHOTO WAS TAKEN AFTER THE CREW LANDED AT MOOLOOLBALH, QUEENSLAND.  Below: THE MUCH-PRAISED LA BALSA RAFT NOW ENSCONCED AT THE BALLINA MUSEUM.

IT WAS A GREAT RELIEF WHEN THE MADNESS AND MAYHEM OF THE SEAS WOULD EVENTFULLY RELENT. BUT THE MEN WEREN’T CERTAIN FOR HOW LONG. SOME OF THE WAVES STILL CAME RUMBLING DOWN WITH A ROARING, EAR-SHATTERING SOUND!

FRANK MORRIS

La Balsa’s adventure began on a dark moonless night at 2am on May 29, 1970. It quietly slipped away from the dock on the unpredictable tidal currents of the “brackish” Rio Guayas River, with the help of a dumpy tugboat whose captain had plenty of local knowledge of the river.

The 120-mile journey alone down the Rio Guayas across the turbulent palm-fringed Gulf of Guayaquil took almost three days before the expedition confronted the open sea.

For the next five months they would battle over 5000 miles of ocean that “would be both friend and foe” -- treacherous, unrelenting and unforgiving.

Its huge coral reefs, often hundreds of miles long, Alsar wrote in his diary, were “blocking our path like jagged petrified monsters half-submerged in a perpetual spray of angry waves.” And tropical squalls blowing at full gale force, creating waves as tall as mountains, “whirling La Balsa around like a matchbox.”

It was a great relief when the madness and mayhem would eventually relent. But they were never certain for how long.

In his diary, Alsar recorded that some of the waves thundered towards La Balsa at such high speed that “they would build to a giant crest of thrashing foam, then come rumbling down with a roaring, ear-shattering noise; there was power enough in each wave to light a small city for an hour.”

When the hundreds of well-wishers at the dock in Mooloolaba Harbour got a closer look at the raft, there were gasps of astonishment: 8564 miles of this!

Alsar said he and the crew were “very proud” of the condition of the raft. “Magnfico La Balsa” he said.

The 30ft raft was constructed from balsa logs, which were bound together by hemp ropes. It was fitted with a main mast, supported by bamboo guys, and a missen mast. No nails, bolts or other metal parts were used in its construction.

At first sight La Balsa looked in remarkable condition for a raft which had such an incredible journey, reported one newspaper.

“The balsa wood logs are virtually free of weed, and the hemp ropes which bound the logs together were covered with some slime”, the newspaper said.

When it docked the raft, commented the lens-man, look strangely pre-historic.”

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IT’S THE OLYMPICS …
IN 1956, BETTY CUTHBERT WON HER FIRST THREE GOLD MEDALS. SHIRLEY STRICKLAND ADDED ANOTHER TWO. MURRAY ROSE WON HIS FIRST OLYMPIC GOLD AND DAWN FRASER MADE HER FIRST “TRIUMPHANT” OLYMPIC APPEARANCE. UNTIMATELY, SHE WON EIGHT GOLD MEDALS, MORE THAN ANY OTHER AUSTRALIAN TO DATE. THE MEDIA DESCRIBED THE GAMES AS “BELOW THE EQUATOR AT LAST’. THE NUMBER OF COMPETITORS WAS, DUE TO “AUSTRALIA’S REMOTENESS”, ONLY 3342 BUT IT ATTRACTED 69 NATIONS TO DO THEIR STUFF. CONTINUES.
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Where is La Balsa today?

Ballina, located on the Richmond River, NSW, is a major port for fishing and recreational vessels in the region.

At one of the town’s main attractions, the Ballina Naval and Maritime Museum, is the “showpiece La Balsa”, say Chris Whitelaw, of AFOAT magazine.

“Many people of all ages will know of Thor Heyerdahl’s legendary Kon-Tiki expedition in 1949. But few … will be familiar with the La Balsa expedition 20 years later that eclipsed Heyerdahl’s feat by a proverbial country mile.

In AFOAT magazine, Whitelaw said “in 1970, the Spaniard Vital Alsar and three companions sailed a balsa wood raft from Guayaquil, Ecuador to Mooloolaba on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast.

“The trip was an amazing feat of seamanship, spanning six months and the world’s largest ocean”.

Ballina’s museum has as excellent display of numerous vessels to enthral boaties of all ages. It is open 7 days a week from 9am to 4pm.


BUSHFIRE RELIEF: Liquor industry get its reward 

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

NATIONAL LIOUOR NEWS

Adelaide Hills winemakers and producers are working together to assess the damage caused by the devastating Cudlee Creek fire that tore through the region just before Christmas.

Around one-third of the Adelaide Hills’ vineyards stood in the path of the fire, including more than 60 grape growers and producers, many of which are small family businesses that are now dealing with the shock of having lost everything.

Many of the grape growers that have been affected have no public profile, no brand to get behind and no wine to sell. Some of these family businesses are considering their future --destroyed vineyards can take years to regenerate.

The devastation is also great for many apple, pear and cherry growers, equally so for dairy and beef farmers in the Adelaide Hills.

A Viticulturist and Co-Director at Henschke said … new growth is already beginning to peek through the badly burned vines and that the Adelaide Hills community has rallied to rebuild and prepare for the future.

The liquor industry is one of the many to have shown its generous nature with suppliers, producers and individuals who are giving time, money and resources to those need it most.

Below: A GROWER VISITING HER PARTIALLY BURNT OUT VINEYARDS.

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‘BLACK FRIDAY’ BUSHFIRE …
‘BLACK FRIDAY’, JANUARY 13, 1939, THE FULL HAVOC OF BUSHFIRES WERE REVEALED BY NEWSPAPERS AUSTRALIA-WIDE. THE NATION WAS REELING FROM THE HUGE LOSS OF LIFE AND PROPERTY IN VICTORIA AND NSW. IN VICTORIA, 66 SOULS PERISHED AND NSW LOST 5. SOME RAIN WAS A RELIEF FOR SEVERAL AREAS IN BOTH STATES. A HORRENDOUS SIGHT WAS STILL AHEAD. IN VICTORIA, THE WIND INCREASED TO MIGHTY GALE-FORCE STRENGTH WHICH DID LOADS OF DAMAGE. IT WAS A PERIOD OF TERROR. – FRANK MORRIS.
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IT’S THE OLYMPICS …
IN 1956, ALSO WINNING THE GOLD ON THEIR HOME SOIL. WERE ATHLETES N. CROCKER AND F. ELLOR, WHO, WITH SHIRLEY STRICKLAND AND CUTHBERT, WON THE 100m RELAY. SWIMMERS: JON HENRICKS, D. THIELE. THE MEN’S 200m. RELAY TEAM: J. DEVITT, K, O’HALLORAN, M.ROSE AND J.HENRICKS. THE 100m WON BY L.CRAPP. THE WOMEN’S RELAY: DAWN FRASER, L.CRAPP, F. LEECH AND S. MORGAN WON THE 100m. CYCLISTS: WON THE 2000m TANDEM.


THE SHOW-OFF!

THE END.
<<
From the 1968 issue of Surfabout Magazine.

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NZ: TREATY OF RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES
THE TREATY OF WAITANGI HAS A PERMANENT PLACE IN HISTORY, WAS SIGNED ON FEBRUARY 6, 1840. THE FACT THAT ONLY THREE MAORI WOMEN WERE ALSO ALLOWED TO SIGN THE TREATY AT THE BAY OF ISLANDS, WAS CONSIDERED “A PRIVILEGE OF SIGNIFICANCE.” SHORTLY AFTERWARDS, ONE OF THE WOMEN’S HUSBAND, CHIEF NOPERA PANAKAREAO, UTTERED THE NOW FAMOUS WORDS: “THE SHADOW OF THE LAND GOES TO THE QUEEN; THE SUBSTANCE REMAINS WITH US”. FRANK MORRIS.
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IT’S THE 0LYMPICS …
1960, AND THE OLYMPICS COME TO ROME. IT COST THE ITALIANS $30 MILLION TO STAGE IT THERE. THE OLYMPIC’S BECOME THE MOST WIDELY TELEVISED EVENTS AT THE TIME, AND ALSO THE COSTLIEST OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS. THIS IS WHERE THE AUSTRALIAN CONTINGENT “BROUGHT HOME THE GOLD”. MOST OF THE SWIMMERS WERE CHUFFED AT THEIR RECORD-BREAKING EVENTS. EQUESTRIAN, BILL ROYCROFT, WON GOLD DESPITE HAVING A BROKEN COLLARBONE.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 14 February 20

Fantastic Voyage Part 1 – raft La Balsa ended a five-month journey from Ecuador

LA BALSA NEARING THE END OF THE TRIP AFTER SIX MONTHS FIGHTING BOISTEROUS SEAS. Below: THE EXHAUSTED CREW BEING WELCOMED BY QUEENSLAND. VITAL ALSAR (LEFT) WAVED BACK.

IN 1970, WHEN THE RAFT HAS DOCKED, IT LOOKS “STANGELY PRE-HISTORIC”. YES, MOST PEOPLE AGREED. LA BALSA HAD 8542 MILES ON ITS CLOCK – THE JOURNEY FROM ECUADOR TO QUEENSLAND.

FRANK MORRIS

Thousands of spectators were ferried to the public jetty. Excitement was building up. Then the noise turned into a mighty roar, the La Balsa’s motley crew had joined the crowd.

They were glad to have reached land.

La Balsa had travelled from Ecuador to Mooloolaba, Brisbane; not bad for a pre-historic raft.

“The oceans of the world provide a chronicle of life and death,” an old seafarer said. Since remote antiquity, seafarers and explorers have defied the dangers and made voyages that were thought to be impossible.

Vital Alsar, one of the heroes of the story, recalled later that his father was probably right when he said that “men who take to the sea are touched with madness.”

In 1970, four men and a cat sailed into Mooloolaba Harbour, on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast, ten minutes before midnight, on Thursday, November 6. They had just completed the longest raft voyage in history: an 8600-mile journey across the Pacific from Ecuador, South America.

They had drifted for five months “to prove” a 1000-year old theory that South Americans could have migrated to Australia.

When the four men in tattered clothes, the battered raft La Balsa, and a cat named Minet, entered the harbour, there was a huge crowd to greet them. They clasped their hands above their heads, cheered, laughed and waved.

The Spanish skipper, Vital Alsar, and his three crew mates “were fit and well and in a jubilant mood” when they were discovered twenty miles (40kms) from the Queensland Coast, reported the newspaper.

La Balsa “bobbed” the rest of the journey on the blue pacific to Mooloolaba “at the end of a 300ft tow rope” which was tethered to a charted press launch.

Alsar and his crew later described their five-month sea voyage “as incredible”.

They had faced many treacherous storms. Some waves almost engulfed the raft. And the nights “were very bad”.

The great danger, reported Alsar, was being knocked overboard by the tremendous power of the waves. They harnessed themselves to the raft. “We all fell overboard many times but were able to get back,” he said.

He said Minet the cat “fell overboard” many times but “we dived in and saved her.”

In his book three years later, Alsar wrote: “On our ninety-seventh day at sea, a violent storm almost destroyed our wooden raft. (I) watched my three crew members stubbornly holding onto the mast, which was on the verge of collapsing in a howling gale.”

Alsar and the crew had many narrow escapes from death. They saw hundreds of sharks. “Sharks came around La Balsa all the time,” the skipper said.

A BIBLICAL REDITION OF A ‘RAFT’ BEING TOSSED LIKE A TOY IN THE HEAVY SEAS.

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IT’S THE OLYMPICS CONTEST …
IT WAS TOKYO IN 1964. TOKYO WAS TO BE THE HOST BUT WITHDREW IN 1940. THE SECOND CHOICE, HELSINKI, IS INVADED BY RUSSIA. WORLD WAR II CANCELED ALL HOPE OF FURTHER GAMES. BUT TOKYO WAS CHOSEN TO HOST THE OLYMPICS GAMES IN 1964, AUSTRALIA WON 18 MEDALS, SIX OF THEM ARE GOLD.
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NEXT: From Ecuador and across the Pacific.


YOUR DOG: We Capricorn’s share a birthday together and have a great time …

FOR ME, TO CELEBRATE TWO BIRTHDAYS AT ONCE, IS SOMETHING I DON’T RECOMMEND. Below: MY PAL, ROUGHIE, HE NEVER FORGETS.

… I SHOULD KNOW. I WAS THERE!

FRANK MORRIS

Every Christmas, I started counting the time left before the Birthday Bash. Whoosh, the month goes quickly. Suddenly, the big day is upon us.

My owner is full of glee. “It’s time to organise a bash you would not believe”, he shouted. “Pick an age? That’s how old I’ll be! And don’t forget, Chrissy, you will one year older”, he whispers in my ear.

My owner is a big-wig journalist on a newspaper. He’s knows all. He’s invited everyone who crossed his path in the last month. He often tells me that he knows all “the people who matter”.

“On with the show,” he jumped for joy, smiling voraciously. He was getting the pool all spruced up. My owner is divorced. He knows what he was up too!

All I can tell you, there was usually were more unattached women than I expected.

I can still recall the day, six years ago. Uncle Ralph was busy talking to this man and they were coming towards the kennel. I was walking all over my mum in a playful way and not taking any notice.

The other gentleman was my potential owner. Personally, I liked him.

He lent on the wooden fence. “How old is she now, Uncle Ralph,” he asked. “She turned nine months today,” Uncle replied.

Uncle Ralph pushed the gate open and strolled towards me. His big hands – Uncle was a coal miner – and picked me up. Hey, that’s me they were chattering about. I hope mum’s coming too.

But mum didn’t come. I never saw her again.

“There you are, Chrissy, meet your new owner,” Uncle said, with tears in his eyes. That was that. We have come a long way since those days.

When my owner showed his wife what a little bundle of fluff he had secured for her, she said, “Don’t bring that mutt anywhere near me. You know I hate them!”

That was six years ago. And the divorce? Well, it followed shortly after that. Things got a bit out of hand. It was painful.

People started to arrive at the party, pushing and shoving, screaming and yelling. Most of the souls who rolled up were either important people or famous people all tarted up in vivid colours of the rainbow.

I’d heard a growl at the side gate. It was my mate Roughie. He had a sign around his neck with “Happy Birthday” – meaning me.

So, now we’ll have a good time too. We drank and ate our way like there was no tomorrow. Roughie was busy eating some leftover dessert. I looked at him. He looked at me.

Wearing my scarlet tiara, I asked, are you happy. You betcha, replied Roughie.

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SOME OLYMPICS CHATTER …
FANNY BLANKERS-KOEN, OF THE NETHERLANDS, WAS THE “STAR” OF THE 1948 OLYMPICS. BLANKERS-KOEN WAS A REMARKABLE ATHLETE. SHE COMPETED IN THE HIGH JUMP AT THE BERLIN OLYMPICS. AT THE AGE OF 30, THERE WERE PEOPLE WHO SAID “SHE WAS TOO OLD TO WIN THE OLYMPIC SPRINTS”. BUT COMPETE SHE DID. SHE WON GOLD MEDALS FOR 100 AND 200 METRES, THE 80 METRES HURDLES AND THE 4 X 100 METRES RELAY. BLANKERS-KOEN FINISHED HER CAREER AS HOLDER OF SIX WORLD RECORDS.
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TENNIS CHAMPS: Norman Brookes – the man and the player

NORMAN BROOKES SHOWED THE CONCENTRATION NECESSARY WHEN YOU PLAY AN OPPONENT WHO IS PRONE TO DASHING AROUND THE COURT. Below: NORMAN BROOKES, OUTSTANDING SPORTMAN.

FRANK MORRIS

HIS CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT WAS THE 1914 WIMBLEDON CHAMPIONSHIP WHEN HE WAS PITTED AGAINST A PLAYER WHO WAS A 4 TIMES WINNER OF THE TITLE.

Tennis critics summed up the 1914 Wimbledon Championship as the “triumph of the tactician over the athlete”.

Brookes’ Wimbledon tussle was just like an act of war had landed on his doormat. It was his first in seven years.

Anthony Wilding, of New Zealand, has been the Wimbledon champion the last four times. The final time was 1913.

During the match, Wilding relied principally on the strength of his drives and his dashing ability around the court.

Whereas Brookes played with splendid judgement. He used his drop-volley angle shot magnificently and, overall, showed a vast superiority in tactics.

On the scores, the German player, O. Froitzheim, who Brookes defeated with some difficulty in the semi-final (five sets), was a much different proposition to Wilding. Brookes won the final 6-4, 6-4, 7-5.

The Sydney Mail cable report said that “the last game was the most thrilling ever seen on the centre court at Wimbledon”.

“Twice Brookes came within a point of winning the set, Wilding saves on each occasion. Brookes won the match with an untakeable drop volley off a fast drive”.

Born in Melbourne in 1877, Brookes received a top-flight education and joined his father’s business, Melbourne Paper Mills.

He played interstate tennis from 1896. At Wimbledon, in 1905, he won the Allcomers’ singles title.

In 1907, Brookes and Wilding won the Davis Cup in great style. Brookes in singles, and with Wilding won the doubles and mixed doubles – a historic first Davis Cup for Australasia.

Brookes captained six winning teams for Australasia in the Davis Cup until 1921.

He was the first president of the Lawn Tennis Association from (1926-1955), and was responsible for raising the tennis standards throughout Australia. Much of the eventual revival of the Davis Cup was influenced by Brookes.
He was a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour and knighted in 1939. He died in 1968.

<< Sydney Mail newspaper.

Next: Margaret Court was named Australia’s greatest woman tennis player.

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IT’S THE OLYMPICS …
IN 1952, FINLAND, DENIED THE GAMES IN 1940, PLAYS HOST TO A RECORD NATIONS ATTENDANCE IN HELSINKI. RUSSIA SHOWS UP AFTER IGNORING THE CONTEST FOR 40 YEARS. AUSTRALIA’S MARJORIE JACKSON POCKETED TWO GOLDS – 100M AND 200M SPRINT. WHILE SHIRLEY STRICKLAND TOOK OUT HER FIRST MEDAL IN THE 80M HURDLES. AUSTRALIA WON GOLD FOR THE 200M BREASTSTROKE; RUSSEL MOCKRIDGE WON TWO GOLDS IN THE 1000M TIME TRIAL, AND THE 2000M TANDEM.
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THE SHOW-OFF!

CONTINUED.

<< From the 1968 Surfabout Magazine.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 07 February 20

Live and kicking: Protect yourself from lightning when caught in a storm!

LIGHTNING JUMPS FROM THE OBJECT TO THE VICTIM. Below: LIGHTNING STRIKES, SO BE CAREFUL. READ BELOW.

FRANK MORRIS

A news flash on ABC radio reported that a man and woman, who were rescued from lightning near their property, are both in a critical condition in hospital.

According to the National Weather Service, there are 5 ways lightning strikes people.

Direct strike is when a person is struck directly by lightning and becomes a part of the main lightning discharge channel. Most often, the people are in open areas.

Side flash occurs when lightning strikes a taller object near the victim and a portion of the current jumps from a taller object to the victim.

Ground current is when lightning strikes a tree or other object, much of the energy travels outward from the strike in and along the ground surface.

Conduction is when lightning travels long distances in wires or other metal surfaces.

Streamers, while not as common as other types of lightning, people caught in ‘streamers’ are at risk of being killed or injured by lightning.

Other points to be aware of:

IF outdoors, you must try and seek shelter in a hard-top vehicle or some solid building; and never shelter underneath trees. What looks safe is not necessarily true.

IF you are driving, slow down or park away from trees and falling powerlines; don’t touch any mental sections or objects.

IF you find yourself far from shelter, crouch, feet together – preferably in a hollow place.

REMOVE all metal objects from your body, for example, watches, rings, bill change, etc.

DON’T fly kites or model aeroplanes with control wires. STAY AWAY from metal poles and fences.

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SOME OLYMPICS CHATTER …
THE 1968 OLYMPICS WAS “BIG TIME” FOR MAUREEN CAIRD, HURDLER. PAM KILBORN HAD BEEN UNDEFEATED SINCE THE 1964 TOKYO OLYMPICS. BUT AFTER A POOR START, SHE COULD NOT CATCH THE 17 YEAR OLD MAUREEN CAIRD, THE YOUNGEST WOMAN TRACK GOLD MEDALLIST IN HISTORY. PAM KILBORN WON A SILVER MEDAL.
......................................................................................................................................................................................

DON’T ride a bicycle, horses, or travel in open vehicles. IF you are swimming, leave the water immediately.

IF you are boating, go ashore to shelter as soon as possible. Make sure the mast and stays of a sailing boat are adequately ‘grounded’ to the water.

IF you are indoors, disconnect all power leads to TV, computers and radios. Draw the curtains and keep clear of windows, electrical appliances, pipes and other metal fixtures.

DON’T use the bath, shower or sink.

AVOID touching the brick or concrete walls. DON’T stand bare-foot on concrete or tiled floors. AVOID using any fixed-line phone.


TENNIS GREATS: Monica Seles knew more of Monica than we do …

DON’T MESS WITH ME, AS MONICA STRETCHS FOR A FOREHAND RETURN. Below: MONICA, ARCHED AND READY.

FRANK MORRIS and Correspondent

SHE WAS THE WORLD’S BEST FEMALE TENNIS PLAYER UNTIL SHE WAS FELLED BY A KNIFE-WIELDING NUTTER WHO SUSPENDED HER CAREER.

When Monica Seles was 19, she was literally sitting on top of the world. She had won $10 million in prize-money, eight grand slam tennis titles, and then, the bubble burst. Her life was shattered.

Gunter Parche, an unemployed German lathe operator, stuck a kitchen knife “half an inch into my back” as she rested during a changeover of a match in Germany.

She was the youngest number one ranked player in tennis history and she was one of the hardest hitters in the sport. Her fans loved her and her opponents showed their respect.

The stabbing no doubt left the merciless teenager’s career hanging.

Seles career could not have been sweeter with rapid progression -- and making lots of money -- until the stabbing.

Seles kept away from player politics. She did not hug the limelight.

Seles says that Parche’s face still makes her a bit jittery.

“I can see the hate in his face,” said Seles. “He pulled (the knife) out of my back and he was going to do it again.

“When I heard I would have to sit in the courtroom with my back to him, I knew (that not testifying at the trial) was the 100 per cent right decision.

“I mean the man stabbed me.”

......................................................................................................................................................................................
SOME OLYMPICS CHATTER …
WHEN MOSCOW HOSTED THE OLYMPICS GAMES IN 1980, CRITICS SAID IT IS “THE SAGA OF THIS OLYMPICS THAT WILL CONTINUE WITH OUTSTANDING OCCASIONS TO THE SPORT”. CAN IT COMPARE WITH THE LAVISH, WESTERN OPULENCE WE SAW IN THE SEVENTIES? WILL IT RETAIN ITS ORIGINAL PHILOSOPHY THAT TAKING PART IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN WINNING?
......................................................................................................................................................................................

Seles said that “everything, I thought, would be OK was not.” She lives by the philosophy where “I treat every day of my life like it’s the last”.

What did the stabbing cost you financially? “I had over $10 million US in earnings. My legal bills against Parche alone were unbelievable – hundreds of thousands of dollars. Then there’s the millions I lost in prizemoney, endorsements and exhibitions …”

Seles competed in the Peters International in 1996 and played Lindsay Davenport, also an American, in the final. Seles won. << Sydney Weekly 19-25 December 1995; Frank Morris.

Next: Norman Brookes win is a crowning achievement.

MONICA FEELS THE PAIN. GUNTER PARCHE WHO DID THE DAMAGE.


John Frost, headline hunter: Keep papers away from the sunlight

THE DAILY GUARDIAN WAS STARTED BY JAMES JOYNTON-SMITH, OF SMITH’S WEEKLY FAME, IN THE 1920s. HE  LAUNCHED THE FIRST MISS AUSTRALIA CONTEST. (FM COLLECTION).

FRANK MORRIS

JOHN FROST IS A PERSON WHOSE THIRST FOR NEWS IS NEVER ENDING!

What started as a hobby sixty years ago has become a “proper” business, which is recognised world-wide as “Britain’s only historical newspaper loan service”.  It is managed by John Frost in association with one of his sons, Andrew.

The bulk of the collection is stored in two large sheds at Frost’s semi-detached home in the leafy northern suburb of London; and the remainder is housed in two rented garages.

The oldest and rarer “crown jewels” of the collection are lovingly stored in Frost’s specially fitted ‘conservatory’ in London.

Says John: “We don’t sell or buy newspapers, but exchange.  Most requests for newspapers can be handled in a matter of minutes”.

John Frost’s collection is not stored in any special way.  He says “the basic essential is to keep the newspapers flat and away from strong sunlight and to handle with care at all times”.  A dirty newspaper, he says, can be satisfactorily cleaned by rubbing the surface lightly with a piece of soft white bread.

In 1997, W.C.F. Butler, of London, went to the British Newspaper Library at Colindale, to do some newspaper research. He later reported “on the unfitness of papers in the Library”, especially those of last century.

Mr Butler added, “I was told that damage to those and other newspapers had deteriorated”.

Mr Butler wrote to The Times that “seven out of ten of the south London and other newspapers I wished to consult from 1893 could not be produced”.

Mr Butler went on to say that they were “sitting on the shelf, but in such poor condition that they could not be read without unacceptable risk of damage.”

The staff advised me, said Mr Butler, that the library contains literally thousands of volumes in this condition.

FEB 28: Part 1. John Frost, headline hunter.

THE FIRST ISSUE OF THE WORLD, WHICH CAME IN THE EARLY 1930s, DID NOT HAVE THE CASH TO SURVIVE. (FM COLLECTION).

......................................................................................................................................................................................
SOME OLYMPICS CHATTER …
AT THE 1952 OLYMPICS, AUSTRALIAN SHIRLEY STRICKLAND WON THE 80 METRES HURDLES, BEATING A LEGENDARY FIELD OF HURDLERS, STRICKLAND SET A WORLD RECORD OF 10.9 SECONDS. SHE ALSO WON BRONZE IN THE 100 METRES SPRINTS.
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SOME OLYMPICS CHATTER …
AT THE 1912 STOCKHOLM OLYMPICS, THERE WAS A LEGEND BORN. HER NAME WAS FANNY DURACK. SHE BECAME THE NATION’S FIRST FEMALE GOLD MEDALLIST IN THE 100M FREESTYLE, AND ESTABLISHED HERSELF AT THE HEAD OF AN ARISTOCRATIC PROCESSION WHICH INCLUDES WOMEN LIKE DAWN FRASER, BETTY CUTHBERT, SHIRLEY STRICKLAND, MAJORIE JACKSON, MAUREEN CAIRD AND OTHERS.


PART 1. THIS CARTOON APPEARED IN THE 1968 EDITION OF SURFABOUT MAGAZINE. THE CARTOONIST COMES UP WITH THE PERFECT LOVE-HATE RELATIONSHIP!

CONTINUED.

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SOME OLYMPICS TALK …
WHICH WAS THE NATION WITH A NOUGHT ON THE END? IT WAS WHEN AUSTRALIA’S TEAM OF 255 WAS THE LARGEST THAT EVER LEFT THIS NATION. NOTHING BIGGER WOULD BE ASSEMBLED FOR ANOTHER 20 YEARS. TWO WOMEN WOULD ACHIEVE THE STATUS OF NATIONAL ICONS. NEXT WEEK ANSWER.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 31 January 20

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