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Les Miserables: Final. Louis Blanc writes about the characters in the play

FIERY COURAGE COMBINED WITH THE DEEP FEELING OF HUMANITY.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

PEACEFUL: ON JUNE 8, 1832, THREE DAYS AFTER THE BLOOD-BATH WAS OVER, TRANQUILITY SEEMS TO BE RESTORED AND THE LAKE AND SURROUDING PROPERTY, NEAR WHERE THE BARRICADES WERE PLACED, WERE AT PEACE. Below: GAVROCHE, A TYPICAL LES MISERABLES STREETWISE URCHIN, AGED ABOUT 12, WAS THE VILLIAN THENARDIER’S OUTCAST SON AND GAVE HIS LIFE AT THE BARRICADES.

“There were young boys present who loaded the guns, using for wadding the police notices they had stripped from the walls: when this failed, the insurgents tore up their shirts for the purpose.

“Thus, they awaited for coming events surrounded with silence and in darkness; themselves, as it seemed, the only moving things in that vast city. And, knowing well that the greater portion of them would never see the morrow’s sun.

“Their exultation was immense, and seemed to increase with the increase of danger. A boy who was fighting in the foremost ranks, was fearfully wounded in the head. He was just twelve years old. But Jean, nothwithstanding the most urgent solicitations, could not induce him to quit the post he had assumed.

“This fiery courage, on the part of the combatants of St Mery, was combined with a deep feeling of humanity.”
(Gavroche, a Les Miserables urchin, fought and died at the barricades.)

PUBLIC SPY

“Informed by a sub-officer in disguise, of the critical situation of dragoons on the Quai Morland, the colonel of the regiment left the barracks at the head of the second detachment. And, with his trumpet sounding, took the direction of the Place de l’Arsenal.”

(Policeman Inspector Javert, of Les Miserables, went behind the barricades disguised to spy on the insurgents.)

“A young man, brother of an illustrious savant, exclaimed, raising aloft a tri-coloured flag: ‘Let him who loves me, follow me!’

“We have seen in what manner Jeanne made good his retreat from the barricades. From that moment the police had had their eye constantly upon him, informed of his every movement by a traitor whose treacherous assistance they had purchased.”

(M.Thenardier -- a master the house, extortioner, exploiter, blackmailer, thief – who caused Jean Valjean to be captured.)

Louis Blanc’s conclusion!

“How many a man, perhaps, has died a peasant or a common soldier, who, if circumstances had brought him forward, would have be greater than Cromwell! At all events, however stormy the condition into which a republic might have brought our country, it would never have reduced it to what we now see: the social, the individual character debased; Frenchmen utterly indifferent under national misfortune and disgrace; the genius of the country decaying, disappearing; the nation itself dying, exhausted, corrupt and rotten.

<< Les Miserable is published by Cullen Publications Pty Ltd, l987, and the Cameron Mackintosh (Overseas) Limited.


NO NEWS! Paper forced to close: not by the revolution but by police

FRANK MORRIS

NEARLY ALL NEWSPAPERS OF THE GLOBE DID AN EXTENSIVE COVERAGE OF THE CIVIL WAR, OR INSURRECTION, OF PARIS, ON JUNE 5, 1832.

IN PARIS ESPECIALLY, SEVERAL PAPERS WERE CLOSED AND SEALS WERE PLACED BY ORDER OF THE POLICE. THE PRESSES OF THE TRIBUNE, QUOTIDIENNE, COURRIER DE L’EUROPE, THE BRID’OISON, THE MODE, AND THE PRINTERS JOURNAL, MONITEUR TYPOGRAPHIQUE, WERE SEIZED BY POLICE OFFICIALS.

SO MUCH FOR LIBERTY!

IN SYDNEY, THE SYDNEY HERALD THE HOBART TOWN COURIER, THE TASMANIAN AND THE SYDNEY GAZETTE CARRIED THEIR SHARE OF NEWS.

NEWSPAPERS IN THIS COUNTRY COVERED THE EVENTS AS LATE AS OCTOBER 14, 1832.

NEXT: SOCIAL JUSTICE: Removing barriers from employing older people.


THE VIETNAM WAR: 1965 to 1975 -- most divisive period in Australia in the 20th Century!

FRANK MORRIS

MENZIES TO SEND TROOPS: TO TELL PARLIAMENT TODAY

ACTION NEAR SAIGON: FIRST TRAINEE KILLED FIGHTING ON FOREIGN SAIL

ALL THE WITH LBJ

This is a dedicated front cover from OZ magazine.

11 PM AND THE BOMBS STOPS

No, it wasn’t the end of the war. In 1968, there are peace talks going on between Viet Cong and Saigon. It was President Johnson’s bid to turn “fighting into talking”. The war began in 1965.

COMING IN MARCH, 2019.


CLASSIC REPEAT: “Ahem, my name is Roy ‘Mo’ Rene, or ‘Mo’ McCackie or ‘Mo’ …”

MO’S FAMILY ALWAYS CAME FIRST. HE WAS HAPPY WHEN HE WAS WITH FAMILY AND ON STAGE.

FRANK MORRIS

THE THREE FUNNYMEN: LEADING TRIO OF SHOW BUSINESS – ROY RENE, JACK DAVEY, BROADCASTER, AND HAL LASHWOOD.

“Roy had a love-hate relationship with the audience,” Sam Van-der Sluice, son of the ever-great Roy Rene McCackie. He could love them and yet hate them. I remember he used to say when he got his first “belly” laugh, ‘I’ve got ‘em, I’ve got ‘em pal!’

“And he would get them too!,” said Sam. “Dad got most of the laughs.” The humour of Mo could be deadly and dangerous. Take “You dirty mug!” for instance. You didn’t know when he was having you on or being deadly serious.

Strike me lucky, you dirty mug! – it was the familiar sound-piece that Mo used mostly in the show.

Here’s a clip:

COLONEL:

Men, when the sun is on high at midday, 30,000 Swahili warriors will come swarming over the fortress wall armed with spears and clubs. But we fight them to the last man, we will fight them to the last drop of blood! Any questions?

Private MO:

Yes … Can I have the afternoon off?

LASHWOOD:

McCackie … why are you late?

MO:

I ran over a silent cop on the corner of Market and Pitt Street.

LASHWOOD:

There is no silent cop on the corner a Market and Pitt Street.

MO:

There is now!

PHILLIP:

I saw you outside the Hotel Australia.

AUBREY (MO):

That where I’m staying.

PHILLIP:

At the Australia.

AUBREY (MO):

No … outside.

PHILLIP:

You don’t tell me.

AUBREY (MO):

I just told you.

SPENCER THE GARBAGE MAN:

Do you like the perfume of my new after shave?

MO:

It’s lovely Spencer … but you’re still coming through!

AMY ROCHELLE:

Oh, Moey. We could go to the ball as “Beauty and the Beast”.

MO:

Oh, lovely. But you don’t look anything like a beast! 

MO’S FAMILY ALWAYS CAME FIRST. HE WAS HAPPY WHEN HE WAS WITH FAMILY AND ON STAGE.


Queen Elizabeth: Celebration 90th birthday – it’s been a swell time!                                        

Queen Elizabeth II, the longest reigning monarch in British history, is celebrating her 90th birthday. And the following year, her Sapphire Jubilee, marking 65 years on the throne. There have many joyful moments: royal weddings, babies galore, and, of course, a robust 70 years of marriage with Prince Philip.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 19 October 18

VALE RON CASEY: He left a wide mark on the radio dial for people who had problems!

I AM HERE TO EXPRESS MY OPINION AND THAT’S WHAT I DO, CASEY SAID.

FRANK MORRIS

RAYS OF LIGHT: THREE INTERVIEWS WITH CASEY BEHIND THE MIKE IN THE 1980s. Below: LEAGUE CLUB BAN: WHAT CASEY SAYS. Below: I DON’T THINK BRITT’S THAT CRASH HOT, SAID CASEY.

Some people like him, other people hate him. But many people disliked him once he opened his mouth.

“After leaving Channel 9, (Ron) Casey had a three-year stint with Channel 10 before talking on talk-back radio,” writes Ray Chesterton in his obituary. Casey died, aged 89, last week.

After this brief stint, he resumed a relationship that began 1967 “when he was recruited” by legendary program director to 2SM John Brennan.

Casey’s talkback career had begun.

Casey in talk-back radio was an immediate success. His broad-church approach, however, was with 2KY, a station I listened to non-stop. Over the years, I had deducted enough material to fill a book. Here are few instances of him behind the mike:

CASEY vs THE CABBIE: COMPLAINTS OVER TAXIS ‘DRIVING ON’

“Several hundred listeners of Ron Casey’s talk-back breakfast program complained that they were not getting a fair deal from Sydney taxi drivers,” I wrote in 1984.

The following is an extract from that interview:

Casey: What is the legal requirement of the taxi driver? And what is the legal right of the hirer.

Kelly (official, DMT’s Taxi Division): The driver has no right to refuse a fare. My advice to anyone who hails a cab is to get into the cab and then tell the drives where they want to go.

Casey: But some of complaints have been that the taxis weren’t pulling up. They would keep on moving, then drive off.

Kelly: Any complaints the public would like to put to the department will certainly by investigated.

Casey: If the number of the taxi that refuses a fare is taken and reported, your department will do something about it.

Kelly: Yes. But I would impress upon people that they must get the right tie cab number, location and time.

Casey: Do you get many complaints?

Kelly: We do; quite a few. No complaint is shelved or disregarded.

Casey: Is there a condition under which a taxi driver, outside of someone being objectionable or drunk, can refuse a fare?

Kelly: No. The only time if 2pm and 4pm when a lot of shifts are changing over.

“I must say that ninety-nine per cent of taxi drivers I’ve had anything to do with have been people doing a difficult job the best way they can,” Casey said. “But that one-half per cent are the people who are causing the trouble.”

DO YOU REMEMBER: The Casey bags Britt affair?

2KY’s breakfast ‘oracle’ Ron Casey, I reported, obviously does not subscribe to Emerson’s claim that “beauty is in the eye of the beholder.”

When Britt Ekland’s name was mentioned on his open-line this week, Casey began firing from the lip.

“I don’t think Britt’s that crash hot,” he said. “I watched her in the James Bond movie the other night and she had wrinkles under her eyes even then.

“With all the spare time Britt’s had on her hands, I don’t think she’s that much better at 41.”

Thank goodness Britt didn’t wear hair curlers in the movie.

THE GOOD SIDE: Casey goes in to bat for the cabbies?

Outspoken radio commentator Ron Casey, I reported, didn’t pull any punches when he went into bat for Sydney’s taxi drivers on his 2KY talk-back breakfast show.

The issue at hand was the impending introduction of a 50 cents tax on drivers at airport cab ranks by the Federal government.

“It’s obviously the brainchild of some bureaucrat in Canberra who has nothing better to do,” said Casey.

After speaking to several angry cabbies on his open-line, Casey said: “I’m with the taxi drivers all the way.

<< Written for magazines and newspapers.

COMING: SOCIAL JUSTICE – BACK TO WORK FOR WOMAN AGED 74, WHAT ABOUT THE MEN!


MR ETERNITY: The man that Sydney wondered about as he chalked the pavement

THAT SHY MYSTERIOUS POET WHOSE WORK WAS JUST A SINGLE MIGHTY WORD, SAID DOUGLAS STEWART.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

THE MAN: PAINTING CAPTURES THE ENIGMA OF ARTHUR STACE. Below: STACE IS PHOTOGRAPHED FINISHING ONE-WORD SERMON. Below: ETERNITY GETS ALL THE ATTENTION.

Since 1930, the writer with the yellow crayon had kept his identity secret except from a few close friends, wrote Tom Farrell. Stace expressed himself by scrawling a one-word sermon, Eternity, on Sydney’s footpaths, from the 1930s to 1966. Arthur Stace, until then, was an enigma.

But it was the Sunday Telegraph who first unmarked Stace to the Sydney public as Mr Eternity. Farrell said that paper scored the first press interview in 1956 with the man who had masterminded Eternity.

Eternity soon became a power word in Sydney’s mythology. 

As night fell on December 31, l999, five million Sydneysiders looked forward to hours of splendid celebrations, on the eve of the Third Millennium. There had not been a scene like it since the Bicentennial festivities of Australia Day 1988.

THE SMOKE CLEARED

By now, literally billions were watching on television, their attention fixed on Australia … the first of January 2000 would arrive, there came a massive fireworks display – perhaps the most spectacular ever seen in Australia.

And then, as the smoke cleared. It came into view … just below the apex of Bridge’s towering arch ... the first word written of the third millennium, in distinctive copperplate script: Eternity.

The crowds cheered with gusto. This was a word deeply and affectionately associated with the history of Sydney. Using chalk or crayon every day, Arthur Stace had died 32 years ago, but (his name) was far from forgotten.

May Thompson was 84 years-old on New Year’s Eve, 1999. Mrs Thompson watched the television broadcast from the comfort of her bed. She was a frail, silver-haired old lady, a widow of more three decades … had known Arthur Stace intimately in life.

For fourteen years, from 1951 to 1964, her late husband, Lisle M. Thompson, had been Stace’s beloved pastor at the Burton Street Baptist Tabernacle in the Sydney suburb of Darlinghurst. It was the Rev. Thompson, in June, 1956, who persuaded Arthur to ‘go public.’

But for Thompson, it is possible, even likely, that Arthur Stace’s identity would never have been known.

<< Tom Farrell’s The man the Sydney’s wondered about, Sunday Telegraph, 1956; Mr Eternity: The story of Arthur Stace, Roy Williams with Elizabeth Meyers, Acorn Press, Sydney, 2017.


Hazelhurst: It comes to the community as an art gallery – “I think the area love it”

FRANK MORRIS

WISE DECISION: DIX HAWK AT HAZELHURST IN 1995. OPTED FOR GOOD DECISION AT HAZELHURST. Below: ART GALLERY: SPACIOUS GARDEN HAS A SPECIAL VIEW.

What’s the story behind the Hazelhurst Art Centre? It all started in an old Gymea house, largely hidden by tall trees and intervening vines, was resolved in 1995.

After much consultation, Sutherland Shire Council decided to name the property Hazelhurst Regional Art and Crafts Centre. The council announced 80 per cent of the land would be kept as open space, the old house refurbished and new structures built.

“I think the community loves it,” John Rayner, who retired in 2015 as general manager of the council.

The owner of the property, Ben and Hazel Broadhurst “had bequeathed” the area to the council “for use as a community facility and place of culture.” They had bought the land and built a house on it in 1945. They were accused “of breaking post-war austerity rules.”

“To thwart the government and developers, they registered the property as a farm and brought in goats, chickens, a pony and cow.”

COUPLE FORM HAZELHURST

In the late 1970s, when the couple “were unable to maintain the grounds and unpaid rates were accumulating, an arrangement was reached for the council to take over the maintenance of the property on the basis Hazelhurst would be used for community purposes after their deaths.”

Ben and Hazel (his second wife) adopted three children orphaned during a bombing raid on London. Two of the children, Denise and Ralph, lived at Hazelhurst; while their sister was brought up by Hazel’s mother.

Dix Hawk, a Canadian cousin of three adoptees, also came to live at Hazelhurst “and became part of the family.”
Ben was a vegetarian and “greenie” long before it was fashionable.

<< Use of The Leader’s story as a background for this article.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 12 October 18

COOK’S ENLIGHTENMENT: Raise the Endeavour -- his famous voyages!

IN AUSTRALIA, CAPTAIN COOK HAS GONE DOWN IN HISTORY AS THE MAN WHO DISCOVERED THE EAST COAST OF OUR NATION. IT’S CAPTAIN COOK’S 290TH BIRTHDAY AND HE IS PROBABLY GRINNING LIKE A CHESHIRE CAT THAT THEY’VE DISCOVERED THE ‘BLUE-RIBBON’ ENDEAVOUR.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS 

REMARKABLE FEATS: THE THIRD SMALLEST SHIP THAT CAPTAIN COOK SAILED IN ON HIS FANTASTIC VOYAGE, WAS ONLY 97 FEET LONG. Below: SIR T.O.M. SOPWITH, AN AVIATION PIONEER, SAILED IN TWO AMERICA’S CUP RACES AND LOST THEM IN ENDEAVOUR (1934i AND ENDEAVOUR II (1937). Below: COOK WAS STRUCK DOWN AND KILLED.

When Captain Cook returned to England in 1771 from his greatest voyages, the Endeavour sank into obscurity until some Massachusetts whalers bought her, with several other English ships, writes Australian Marjorie Hutton-Neve.
Hutton-Neve is a recognised expert on Cook.

The present search is led by American archaeologist, Dr Kathy Abbass, Director of the Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project.

Dr Abbass said that “research of the Endeavour shows, the she was “renamed Lord Sandwich and used by the British Board of Transport to carry troops to North America during the American War of Independence. In August, 1778 she was scuttled.”

“Some time later, when the identity of the old hulk became public knowledge, she was practically torn apart by souvenir hunters. The rescued sternpost and a quadrant, (at the time of writing) were now in the Maritime Museum of the Newport Historical Society.

COOK WAS REMARKABLE

“The carved oak crown and some stern ornaments were held for safety in a Newport library. T.O.M Sopworth failed to win America’s Cup in 1934 with his yacht Endeavour; he was attending dinner given in his honour and presented with the old Endeavour Crown.

Lieutenant James Cook, RN, aged 34, the second child of James and Grace Cook of Great Ayton, Yorkshire, was married at St Margaret’s, Barking, Essex, to Elizabeth Batts, age 21, on December 21, 1762.
There were six children of the marriage.

Cook took command of the Endeavour in 1768. As well as an expert navigator and hydrographic surveyor Cook was a competent astronomer.

The three journeys he performed ran from 1768 and 1780; and although he is most remembered for the first, all three were remarkable feats of navigation and discovery. The first voyage in the HMS Endeavour was performed without any escorting ship.

Endeavour’s most notable achievements were the observation of the transit of Venus, the charting of the coast of New Zealand and Australia.

Cook kept his ship at sea for nearly three years without losing a single man to scurvy.

DEATH OF COOK

Endeavour was a “bark” of 370 tons, 97 feet long, 29 feet at its widest arc, was bought for 2500 pounds by the navy, refitted and armed with 10 carriage and 12 swivel guns for the voyage to Tahiti to observe the transit of Venus.

Endeavour’s journey lasted 2 years, 9 months and 14 days during which she was wrecked, and repaired by her crew on the Australian coast. This was at the present site of Cooktown, on the shores of what is now called the Endeavour River.

The reef on which she was wrecked, 24 miles from the shore, is now called Endeavour Reef.

Cook and his men spent six weeks making repairs to the ship, a far longer time than they had stayed at Botany Bay.

Captain Phillip Park King, who also lost a ship here, said he moored in the same location as Cook and even found a heap of coal left behind by him on which to operate his forge.

On his third voyage on the HMS Resolution to Hawaii, fighting broke out between white and native men over the theft of a small boat. Cook was struck down and knifed in the back. He was killed on February 14. The two ships were returned to England on October 4, 1780.

Dr Abbass’ date/figures have also been use in the article.

<< Marjorie Hutton-Neve in Captain James Cook, Historic Australian, Issue 4, 1987; The Sydney Morning Herald, September 20, 2018; Australian Pathways, Spring, 1998; The Pacific Ocean of Captain Cook, W.C. Penfold & Co Publishing, Sydney, NSW.


VALE: RON CASEY … FORMER 2KY BREAKFAST HOST AND CHANNEL 10’S LEAGUE ANNOUNCER DIED LAST TUESDAY. NEXT WEEK, I PRESENT SHORT CLIPS FROM HIS RADIO SHOWS.


Johnny O’ Keefe: He died 40 years ago as the “king of Australian rock”

I PENNED THIS STORY IN OCTOBER, 1978, THE YEAR HE DIED, FOR A SERIES OF NEWSPAPERS.

FRANK MORRIS

ON STAGE: HE WAS A HARD ACT TO FOLLOW. Below: DOING WHAT HE’S DOING, THAT WHERE HE BELONGED.

There is a subtle similarity between the late American actor Humphrey Bogart and Australia’s “Mr Showbiz”, Johnny O’Keefe, who died suddenly last month, aged 43, of a massive heart attack in St.Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney.

When Bogart started on the road to becoming a box-office legend, Otis Ferguson, one of the most gifted and erudite film critics of the 1940s, wrote that “You had the feeling that he was writing his own parts.”

Jazz saxophonist Bob Bertles, who played in one of O’Keefe’s famous bands in the late 50s, was quoted recently as saying: “When he was on stage he definitely looked as though he belonged there.”

Johnny O’Keefe will be a hard act to follow.

Like Bogart, O’Keefe was an original.  In the past twenty years, there has been no other all-round entertainer to match him for his sheer will to entertain.

O’Keefe’s career, which spanned over 26 years, oscillated between success and failure so many times that even he lost count.

Wedged in somewhere between those hectic, roller-coaster years, were several attempts to crack the big-time in America and Britain.

He came close…

LIKE A PRIZE-FIGHTER

In recent years, O’Keefe spent most of his time promoting his “Johnny O’Keefe Show” to clubs all over NSW.

It was three hours of high-powered frenzy, and as John Clare wrote in an issue of the National Times last month, “He was…bounding on like a well-worn prize-fighter, hurling himself into it and urging the crowd to clap and sing along.”

And they did – time and time again.

In 1976, O’Keefe launched his famous “Door Deal” package to clubs – and played to packed houses.

In an interview I did with O’Keefe last year, he said: “It’s top shelf entertainment.  We have a team of entertainers who know what the business is all about.

We go into clubs and say that if you can’t afford to pay us then we’ll take the risk and help you to promote the show.

“If the show draws a good crowd we make money or, at the very worst break-even. If it fails we’ve taken the risk and the club is not out of pocket.”

O’Keefe said nostalgia played an important role in the success of his “Door Deal” shows.

HARD WORKER

“It’s only natural that it would,” he said, “mainly because some of the early songs I recorded became popular hits.”
Andrew Urban, editor of Encore, the variety industry’s news-magazine, said: “O’Keefe had deep-seated ideas about the entertainment business and was concerned about the industry.

“He was a hard worker, a dynamic promoter and would never let you down, he always delivered the goods.
Urban said that in the short time he knew him, O’Keefe was never afraid to back his own talent.

“His ‘Door Deals’ were largely responsible for increasing mid-week crowds in clubs,” Urban said.

“But O’Keefe isolated the club from any risk and stacked his confidence up against the income.”

O’Keefe knew he’d be right – nine times out of ten, because he worked at it.


JOHN LAWS: He was “resplendent” in his white suit

On the cover for Open Road’s first colour magazine in 1986, was none other than John Laws the prominent radio personality and car collector looking okay. But it doesn’t stopped there! Laws looks resplendent in a white suit with a typical serious look on his face.

“I’ve always been a sucker for MG’s,” Laws said. “You get a marvellous exaggerated sense of speed. Looking back, the first MG I ever bought was far more important to me than any car I own now.”

RESTYLED

Open Road was relaunched as a ‘quality colour magazine’ after 56 years being published as a newspaper” said a spokesperson.

According to Jim Millner, the then President of the NRMA, it was “biggest change in Open Road’s history.

Good Roads was launched in 1921. It was renamed The Open Road with colours on the cover and improved layout in 1927. The newsprint versions of The Open Road in 1971. The Open Road was back as a colour magazine in 1986.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 05 October 18

Miles Franklin, author: The last words she spoke …

PUBLISHED ON THE RED PAGE OF THE BULLETIN NOVEMBER 17, 1954.

P.R. STEPHENSEN     Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

SHE MEANT WHAT SHE SAID: MILES FRANKLIN WAS VERY CONCIOUS THAT SHE WAS GOING TO DIE SOON. “ARE YOU DONE?” SAID P.P. STEPHENSEN. “MY OATH,” REPLIED MILES. Below: “LOOKING AT MILES, IT WAS HARD TO BELIEVE,” SAID P.P STEPHENSEN.

I gave some expression, however inadequate, to feelings of personal and the Nation’s loss, when I heard of Miles Franklin’s death.

In June, l954, three months before her death, Winifred and I visited her, for the last time at her home in that Grey Street of a drab suburb of Sydney (Carlton, NSW), and had tea from her Waratah Cup.

“I’m a fallen log,” she said, and meant it. There was not a grey hair in her head. It was hard to believe that she was nearly seventy-five years of age.

“My time’s up!”

SO LONG

“You’re not done, Miles,” I argued. “You’ll never be done. You’ll live as long as you’ll be remembered, and that will be until Australia itself is a mossy log.”

“Do you believe that?”

“My oath, I do.”

Then, in the vernacular of the bushwhackers, but with question, “So long?”

“So long, dear Miles.”

<< P.R. Stephensen interviewed Miles Franklin in June, 1954. He was a best-selling writer and far-right activist and publisher and member of the Communist Party. He aided Norman Lindsay in The Franfrolico Press and edited the London Mercury magazine.

COMING: Miles Franklin tells her story of Henry Lawson and Me.


PLEASE NOTE: THE FEATURE, MR ENTERITY, THE STORY OF ARTHUR STACE, WILL BE PUBLISHED SOON.


AUSTRALIAN CHRONICLE: From 1947 to 1948 – More migrants from Europe

FRANK MORRIS

SETTLING IN: A FAMILY OF NEW SETTLERS FROM OVERSEAS.

1947

To boost Australia’s population, the Commonwealth Government decided that the 12,000 displaced persons to be brought to Australia annually from Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia should be increased to 20,000.

The first ship, General Heinzelman, arrived late February carrying 843 European migrants, 729 male and 114 female, all single and with an average age of 24.

They were accommodated in former military camps at Bonegilla, near Wodonga.

This was in addition to the general migration program.

40-HOUR WEEK APPROVED BY COURT

The Commonwealth Arbitration Court deliberated on the question of the 40-hour working week for 22 months and finally declared it approved on September 8.

Australia had worked a 44-hour week since the 1920s.

GOVT ATTACKED: STIR OVER POST

The Chifley Government was strongly attacked by the press, non-Labor politicians and the Leader of the Opposition, Mr Menzies, when it elevated the Premier of NSW, William McKell, to the Governor-Generalship in late January.

McKell was the second Australian-born appointee to take office. Sir Isaac Isaacs was the first.

Mr Menzies considered the selection not only “shocking and humiliating” and also “… the most deplorable incident in the Government’s growing record of political jobbery.”

Mr Chifley told the House of Representatives that “any Australian citizen of sufficient ability, reputation and integrity is entitled to occupy the position of Governor-General.”

TOP SCORER IN A SINGLE MATCH

In a Victorian Football League game between Melbourne and St Kilda, F. Fanning, playing for Melbourne, scored 18 goals, the highest number kicked by one player in a single match.

 

1948           

SEPARATE STATE LOBBY

A conference was held at Armidale to form another movement to make northern NSW a separate State. It has to do with the object of decentralising administration, industry and population.

The proposal had been investigated years earlier without result.

YACHTING NOW AN OLYMPIC SPORT

For the first time Australia was represented in the yachting event at the Olympic Games held in London.

A Victorian, A. S. Sturroch, jun, competed in Moorina of the international 23-foot Star class.

He came seventh.

AUSSIE CAR: The first Holden says “Hi” to all its would-be clients!

NEW HOLDEN: AUSTRALIA ON THE POST-WAR ROAD IN A BRAND NEW CAR.

When Prime Minister Ben Chifley took the wraps off the first Aussie car he stood back and declared, “She a beauty!”
General Motors-Holden unveiled its new Australian-made car, the Holden at a special ceremony attended by the Prime Minister on November 29.

At 760 pounds on the road, the price of the Holden “proved to be more than was initially thought likely,” the Melbourne Age said yesterday.

The first Holden had a six-cylinder motor and was capable of a maximum speed of over 80 mph.

THE GOVT WAR ON TUBERCULOSIS

The Commonwealth Government launched the anti-tuberculosis campaign in an effort to eliminate the disease within 20 years.

In Australia, tuberculosis was the greatest individual cause of death among adults between the ages of 20 and 40 years.

WIDER CONTROLS: REBUFF TO GOVT

The Commonwealth Government sought a referendum to gain wider control over rents and prices, the last of three unsuccessful attempts to enforce economic regimentation.

The Government was rebuffed on the same issue in 1944 and 1946.

Regarding the clear No to the 1948 referendum, the Melbourne Age said it was “… a heavy reverse for the Chifley Government and the Federal Labor Party …

“Seldom, if ever, was a proposal so firmly and unequivocally rejected in the proper democratic process ….

FIRST LADY, FIRST MINISTERIAL OFFICE

Dame Enid Lyons, widow of the former Prime Minister, Joe Lyons, and a member of the Federal Parliament, became Vice-President of the Executive Council and the first woman to assume ministerial office in Federal politics.

<< Frank Morris, The Sun, Friday, June 8, 1975.

PICTURE: FANNING WAS FANTASTIC AS A GOALIE!


SAYINGS: Where have all the readers gone? Even though the mass has declined, the readers have other ways to keep informed. There was a time – and it wasn’t all that time ago – when Women’s Weekly, Readers Digest, Woman’s Day, and a few other titles, sold over 5.5 million copies every month … INDEPENDENCE, says Mary Caldbeck-Moore, is asking for help when it is appropriate. Mary was at one time a community radio presenter on issues and concerns of older women. 


AUSTRALIA 1961: Ban the Bikini!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Australia was a different planet in 1961. The PBL’s intrepid Archive Detective, Ian Loading, has trawled the dusty files of the ABC for fledging TV program, Four Corners. Four minutes of one program actually sets out to prove how alien it really was then.

Said Ian: “Have a look at the autocrat with the yak black and white hat exercising his authority … I would have made his life difficult back in the day!”

This how Four Corners described the segment:

CONTROVERSIAL BIKINI

In the early years of Four Corners, there was a recurring “Voice of the People” segment in which a reporter – usually Keith Smith, who was well known for his ability to talk to just about anyone – went out into the streets.

In this segment from September 30, 196l, Keith asked the denizens of Bondi Junction and Bondi Beach whether they think the bikini should be banned? At that time, there were regulations about how skimpy the controversial bikini swimsuit could be; beach inspectors roved the sands to enforce the code.

<< pacificlongboarder.com/new


THE GLOBE pops up in Australia

HOLY WILLIAM!: COME AND SEE SHAKESPEARE AS HE REALLY WAS? IT WAS LIKE GOING TO A PARTY!

How would you like to see William Shakespeare’s plays just as they used to be? In Sydney. It’s alive, like a party. This is Shakespeare! Prices start from $29.51. Limited season. Tickets are selling fast.

The Globe Theatre, London, an Elizabethan playhouse, was associated with the plays of William Shakespeare. It was opened in 1599. Destroyed by fire in 1613. Rebuilt in 1614. Closed in 1642 by the Puritan Government.

 

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 27 September 18

COMING SOON: Titanic disaster – Carpathia to the rescue

FRANK MORRIS

SAVIOUR: THE CALL OF THE SEA. MODEL MAKER, MIKE KELLY, WITH HIS PRIZE-WINNING MODEL OF THE CUNARDER CARPATHIA. IT WAS THE CARPATHIA THAT CAME TO RESCUE THE SURVIVORS OF TITANIC IN 1912.

Wireless messages were soon received from the various ships at the scene of the disaster of the Titanic in 1912. Titanic had hit an iceberg estimated to be 30 metres high above the water and 120 metres long when the boats were ordered out at 11.45am. There was no panic or rush to join the boats.

At 12.05, there was mass hysteria. At 1.40am, water started rushing over the break between the stacks. At 1.50am, she slowly tilted straight on end … and the lights went out. At 2.20 am, with a quiet, slanting dive, she disappeared beneath the seas.

BEHAVED GALLANTLY

The Cunarder Carpathia was first to reach the spot. But the Titanic had disappeared. Eventually it picked up seven hundred Titanic passengers, mainly women. Over 1500 men and women were lost.

And the Titanic men; the men who went down with the ship behaved gallantly.

And the Carpathia?

Let us frog-leap forward to the war years. There is a drama there awaiting the Carpathia.


YOUR HEALTH & FITNESS: Exercise for grace, balance and co-ordination

MOBILITY EXERCISES OR RUNNING ON THE SPOT. THEY’LL STAND YOU IN GREAT STEAD. DO EXERCISES AT LEAST ONCE EACH DAY.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

LET’S HELP: SOME FITNESS EXERCISES TO KEEP YOUR BODY IN FINE TRIM.

This is your chance to stretch and balance and improve grace -- and co-ordination -- in your everyday stance.

SIDE BENDING

Stand with your feet apart and hands at your side. Lean first to the right, then upright again, then to the left – as far as is comfortable. Slide your hand down each leg as you lean over.

ARM SWINGING

Still with your feel apart, raise both arms in front of you. Lift them above your head, then lower them down to your sides and round behind you. Take this slowly until you develop an even gentle swing.

TRUNK TWISTING

Standing as before, hold your arms out in front of you. Keeping your eyes on your right hand, swing your right arm as far as it will comfortably to go the right, and then back again. Repeat this with your left arm.

TRUNK, KNEE AND HIP BENDS

Stand with your hands resting on the back of a chair. Raise you left knee and bring your forehead down to meet it. Do the same with your right knee.

This movement should be slow and unhurried. Eventually, when you are used to this exercise, try it without the chair. Start from a standing position, but only if you are confident that you can balance on one leg.

All these warm-up exercises can be part of the beginners’ program to improve general suppleness.

MOBILITY EXERCISES

Do these at a relaxed pace. They can done up to 10 times each at first. Keep your breathing free and easy. You will find that you are able to do more with practice. But do not attempt too much at first.

EXERCISING THE LEGS

Stand behind a chair, holding the back. Lower yourself to a squatting position. Gradually, straighten both legs, raising yourself back to a standing position. When your legs feel stronger, try this without the chair.

WALL PRESS-UPS

Stand with your hands against a wall, about 30 cm apart at shoulder height. Stand on your toes, then bend your arms until chest and chin touch the wall. Return to upright position by straightening your arms.

RUNNING ON THE SPOT

Gently run on the spot. Keep your arms loosely by your sides. Aim to raise your knees higher gradually. Start by doing this exercise for thirty seconds, then extend it slowly.

<< Retirement Pack, London.

NEXT: Mr Eternity, the story of Arthur Stace. That was his motto, Eternity, printed on the Harbour Bridge every years. It is also planned to name a new eatery on top of Central Station, the Eternity.


LES MISERABLE: Ten years of history … and the insurrection of 1832

POLICE AGENTS WOULD HAVE SILENCED LE NATIONAL, THE NATIONAL NEWPAPER. BUT THE OFFICE OF THE JOURNAL WAS SITUATED IN THE IMMEDIATE VICINITY OF THE BARRICADES.

LOUIS BLANC             Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

HAVOC: THE PRESS PLAY MAYHEM WITH THE TRUTH ABOUT THE INSURRECTION IN 1832. Below: SMASHING THE PRINTING PLATES OF THE TRIBUNE.

Louis Blanc made several references to Le National and its editor Armand Carrel.

The men of battle were left unsupported by the men of council. The office of the Tribune had been entered by the agents of police, protected by a detachment of national guards, an all the presses had been sealed up, despite the energetic protests of MM Sarrut and Boussi.

A similar visitation was made upon the Quotidienne, and would have silenced Le National, but the office of the latter journal was situated in the immediate vicinity of the barricades.

It was to the office of Le National, then, where had already assembled several persons, not connected with the party that some of the influential republicans proceeded about eight o’ clock on the evening of June 5.

Here was discussed, amid the confused sounds from without, the question of a general rising.

The start had been made, the impulse, a powerful one, given; why any delay in carrying it out? The Revolution of 1830 had not begun under auspices more favourable. Such was not the opinion of Armand Carrel.

WE’LL DIE TO THE LAST MAN

On this occasion, Armand Carrel was too eager to decide as a military man, a question which was presented to him as a conspirator; or, whereas, the principles which assure victory to an army in the field are quite different from those which give success to a popular insurrection.

Audacity … the genius of Danton, audacity is the soundest prudence for parties engaging in such struggles. For, in revolutions, confidence has all the chances in its favour.

The meeting at Le National office broke up, without any other result than that of making more obvious the fatal dissensions which prevailed among the opposition.

An order of arrest was issued against the chief editor of Les National, Armand Carrel. Several journalists were seized and the homes of honourable citizens were brutally violated. The arrests became so numerous that, to convey the prisoners, it was necessary to call the public conveyances into requisition ….

In Les Miserables, author Victor Hugo, wrote, “So much was it – the spirit of those at the barricade of Rue de la Chanvrerie – in tune with the mood of that June 6, 1832. That, at almost the same moment, defenders of the St Mery stronghold, raised their voices in a bellow that has gone down in our history. No matter whether they come to our aid or not, we’ll die to the last man! As we see, the two strongholds, separated though they were, were together in spirit.”

<< From Cullen Publications Pty Ltd, 1987. Some of the paragraphs have been changed.

Next: Louis Blanc writes about some of the actual persons recognisable as Les Miserables characters.


NATURE CALLING: Help us, help us

KOALAS NEED YOUR HELP. SIMPLY, SUPPORT YOUR FAVOURITE KOALA FUND.

 

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 21 September 18

UP, UP: Trans Australian Airways has taken to the air. Story further down.

AUSTRALIAN CHRONICLE 2: LABOR RETAINS POWER IN “A STEADINESS” OF POLITICAL OUTLOOK.

KEEPING TRACK OF NEWS FROM 1946 TO 1950.

FRANK MORRIS

1946

The Chifley Labor Government returned to office on September 28 with a substantial majority in both Houses and, according to the Canberra Times, the nation had “displayed a steadiness of political outlook …”

The new Liberal Party’s platform made little impact on the electorate, and the two Opposition parties were disunited.

Labor also held power in NSW, Queensland, Tasmania and Western Australia.

In 1946, the Commonwealth Government:

CONTINUED general demobilisation.

DEVELOPED plans to encourage immigration to build up Australia’s population.

BY a referendum obtained wider powers in regard to social services.

SET UP a Commonwealth Forestry and Timber Bureau to research the supply, production, distribution and the use of Australian timber.

INTRODUUCED a hospital benefits scheme to pay 12 shilling a day for patients in public hospitals and 8 shillings a day for other enrolled patients.

STEPPED up work on the postwar housing program, completing 25,000 homes during the year.

BOUGHT out British shares in Qantas.

TAA TAKES TO THE AIR

Trans Australian Airlines began to operate on September 9. The name was the trading name of the Australian National Airlines Commission.

The first flight was from Sydney to Melbourne in a 21-seater Douglas DC 3.

Delivery of the 44-seater Douglas Skymasters was expected later that month.

By the end of the year, TAA had services in operation in all States.

METAL STRIKE SPREADS TO ENGINEERING TRADES

A long metal-trades dispute disrupted production in Victoria. It began with an iron-makers and moulders’ dispute in two iron foundries in October and within a fortnight spread to all engineering trades.

The dispute lasted until May, 1947. As a result prescribed margins were considerably increased. Other industries obtained similar increases.

BOOST TO RESEARCH: DEDMAN PLAYED A KEY ROLE

A mayor advance in Australian education and research was the establishment of the Australian National University, created by an Act of Parliament.

The original purpose of the University was for post-graduate studies of physics, medicine, social services and Pacific matters. Its scope quickly widened. The foundation-stone of the university building was laid in October, 1949.

Mr John Dedman, the Minister for Postwar Reconstruction, played a significant part in launching the project. Dedman was to return in his sixties as the university’s oldest student.

RECORD CLIP: Fleeces were a breakthrough in history

The Australian wool clip, estimated at three million bales, brought nearly 80 million pounds at the September wool sales, the first in seven years.

It was a world record clip.

A pastoral journal described the season as “the most momentous in the history of the wool-growing industry” and predicted it would help place Australia’s economy on a sound and satisfactory basis.”

THE HOUSE IN EVERY HOME

By a Special Writer

The Minister for Immigration and Information, Mr Calwell, asked Parliament to consider a bill which would authorise the Australian Broadcasting Commission to broadcast parliamentary proceedings.

Mr Calwell said the views expounded in both Houses should be heard in the homes of most Australian families.

Mr Calwell told Parliament that New Zealand adopted the practice in 1936 and “the debates have become a popular feature of broadcasting programs in that country.

“And it’s enabled the people to become better informed.”

AIR ROUTE, JOBS SERVICE

The air service by Qantas to England had been kept up during the war by flights via Perth, Cocos Island and Ceylon. In 1946, flights resumed on the route via Singapore.

Locally, the Commonwealth Employment Service was inaugurated.

CENTRE FOR TESTING MISSILES

The Prime Minister, Mr Chifley, announced the joint venture with Britain to build a missile-testing complex at Mt Elba, in South Australia at the estimated cost of eight million pounds. The project later to be known as Woomera.

<< Australian Chronicle, 1946, by Frank Morris.

NEXT: Les Miserables – Louis Blanc’s History of ten years. Coming: Australian Chronicle from 1948.


MAEVE BINCHY:  Final. The Irish Times and long after. She loved being a columnist!

I FEEL ESPECIALLY LUCKY THAT WE MET!

GORDON SNELL          Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

SHE’S ABOUT: GORDON SNELL – “I CAN STILL FEEL HER PRESENCE. Below: MAEVE BINCHY – MY CHILDHOOD WAS IMPORTANT.

No wonder her readers were delighted with Maeve Binchy. She told it all with the eagerness and enthusiasm of someone who says, “Just wait till I tell you what happened …”; and she goes on to tell an enthralling and often hilarious tale.

She brought the same directness to her many serious reports for the paper: on the bombs in London and other cities, the capsized ferry disaster, and the savage war in Cyprus.

Maeve followed the advice she often gave to aspiring writers – to write as you speak.

Her view of the world and the people in it was the same in her writing as was in her life: she was compassionate and perceptive; she treated everyone with the same considerate interest; and her humour was uproarious but never sneering or cruel.

VERY HAPPY WE MET

Her capacity for friendship seemed limitless, and hundreds of people from all over the world, who never knew her, have written to say that they thought of her as a friend.

I can almost hear her say, ”That’s enough of that! You make me sound like some kind of saint!” Indeed as a schoolgirl, sainthood was a role she considered aiming for, but decided against – partly on the ground that it could involve martyrdom, but really because it just wasn’t her style.

We must all be glad she took on the roles she did, as teacher, writer and friend to so many; and I above all feel especially lucky that we met and spent so many happy and loving years together.

I hear her voice and feel that she is back with us again, in all the vivacious joy that she created around her. In her words, and in her many novels, short stories, plays and films, Maeve lives on – and always will.

<< Gordon Snell’s Introduction is taken from Maeve’s Times, Orion Publishing Group, London, UK.


AUSSIE POEM: I’m going to be as joyful as I can …

BERYL THOMPSON as told to Frank Morris

MY POETRY: I WAS ALWAYS IN TOUCH WITH REAL LIFE, SAYS BERYL. Below: BOND A FRIENDSHIP, LIKE I DID.

My mother stood by me through the dark times. My dear late mother Ella. She lavished me with love, devotion and with wisdom in abundance. Mum never stopped encouraging me to do the very best I could manage.

Looking back now, my endeavours were ahead me. She regarded it as her responsibility, and hers alone, to make sure I prized the value of every minute of my pursuit. The sage, Dr Samuel Johnson, once remarked, a few hundred years ago, “let not a particle of time fall useless to the ground.”

I never forgot that saying. Or was about. I wanted to be a fur buyer for a large department store. I was introduced to Mr Ken Cook at Farmer’s-Myers. He was to launch me on my career; it was job I aIways wanted.

It was Farmer’s, later Myers, where I started anew. I was literally overjoyed. And, admittedly, I had my poetry will keep in touch with ‘real’ life.

SMILE A WHILE

Life is sweet, however short;

Why don’t we live the way we ought?

Why do we fight and row all day?

Instead of showing each the way

To peace and happiness.

The gloom that overshadows life,

The suffering and endless strife

Could easily be made much lighter,

The bonds of friendship so much tighter

If the right path we but chose.

As the years go winging by,

Dearest don’t you sit and sigh;

But scatter smiles along the way

So all mankind will pause to say

You make my lot much lighter.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 14 September 18

RUTH PARK: New stage version of play wins the hearts and minds of the audience!

“WOMAN WINS MAJOR AWARD IN NOVEL PRIZE”, THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD SHOUTED.

FRANK MORRIS

THE BACKSTREET: AUTHOR RUTH PARK TOURED THE STREETS OF SURRY HILLS TALKING TO RESIDENTS IN THE 1950s. IMAGE: FAIRFAX. Below: RUTH PARK HAS A LAUGH WITH A RESIDENT. Below: SURRY HILLS WAS A QUEER… LITTLE VILLAGE HALF HIDDEN BY A PROPEROUS CITY.

Controversial Ruth Park did not make public appearance until 1947. That’s when Park won the Herald inaugural annual award for the novel The Harp in the South and received two thousand pounds from newspaper’s editor Hugh McClure Smith.

The paper was soon inundated with angry letters “claiming Sydney has no slums.”

Written in New Zealand, the author airmailed The Harp in the South to reach Sydney just before closing time of the competition.  The newspaper announced the winner in December; and that The Harp in the South would be serialised during January.

In her book, Park describes the backstreets of Surry Hills in the 1950s as “a queer, disreputable little village, half hidden under the hem of a prosperous city … places of scrawny terraces, ruinous cottages far older that the terraces, sagging roofs, snaggletooth fences and warped green shutters that always dangled idly from one rusty bolt.

SUCH NEGLECT

She went on to compare the many houses like the one that the Darcy’s lived in at twelve-and-a-half Plymouth Street.

“There were many houses … smelling of leaking gas, and rats, and mouldering wallpaper which has soaked up the odours of a thousand meals … Such neglect! Such disrepair!

“No one had cared for Surry Hills since Victoria was on the throne.”

Living at twelve-a-half Plymouth St, the Darcy’s had grown up and grown old “amid brothels and sly grog, the pious and the violent, the opportunists and the desperate,” the Sydney Theatre Company said.

DIFFERENT TWIST

The play was adapted from the trilogy -- Missus, The Harp in the South and Poor Man’s Orange – by celebrated playwright Kate Mulvany.

In part one, the Darcy family saga begins with a love story in the 1920s. It’s a rural, dusty NSW town where young Margaret Kilker falls for one called Hugh Darcy. Newly married, and in search of a brighter future, they move to Sydney’s Surry Hills.

The play takes a different twist in part two. Amid the changing world in the 1950s, the shadow of the war lingers. And, suddenly, there is a new threat on the horizon. The homes of Surry Hills’ poor are threatened by government plans for redevelopment.

Playwright Mulvany says: “I hope this play makes you look at the person next to you and smile”.


FLASHBACK: Gwen Plumb setting the pace as Gran

FRANK MORRIS

ACCLAIM: GWEN PLUMB PLAYED THE PART OF GRAN IN THE TOP-RATING SERIES THE HARP IN THE SOUTH. Below: FIRST AUSSIE WOMAN TO TACKLE AN OVERSEAS ASSIGNMENT.

Actress Gwen Plumb had been at the forefront of Australian TV and theatre for over 60 years or more. In the 80s, she won acclaim for her part of Gran in the top-rating mini-series of Ruth Park’s The Harp in the South. Ms Plumb became professional actor in 1948.

After studying drama at Doris Fitton’s Independent Theatre, her first role that year was in the farce See How They Run at the Minerva Theatre, King Cross.

In her radio days, Ms Plumb played Emmie in the Australia’s longest-running serial, Blue Hills.

BITTERSWEET

In 1953, she went to London for 2GB to cover the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth 2 and stayed there for 5 years for sending back tapes of main celebrity events. She was the first woman in Australian broadcasting to tackle such an assignment. She was awarded the British Empire Medal in 1973.

The Harp in the South was one of the best television programs adapted from a book, ever, in the annals of television. As far as Gwen Plumb’s role was concerned, looking deeply into Grans’ eyes: they express the bittersweet outcome of the Darcys. Gwen Plumb as born in 1912; died in 2002.

<< The Sydney Theatre Company; part of Frank Morris’s article on Gwen Plumb which was done in 1988.


NEXT: A NATION REBORN – The Australian Chronicle (new edition), which begins at 1901, will continue with its news items. Each year will be random … LES MISERABLES will continue the week after.


MAEVE BINCHY: Part one. The Irish Times and long after! She loved being a columnist!

THE COLUMN WAS THE START OF HER BRILLIANT WRITING CAREER.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

A GAME: AUTHOR MAEVE BINCHY TAKES TIME OUT TO PLAY A CHESS GAME. Below: GORDON AND MAEVE -- VERY HAPPY.

In October, 1968, the Irish Times got a new Women’s Editor. It was Maeve Binchy.

As a young teacher she had loved both her job and her holiday travels; she had been a favourite contributor ( to the Irish Times) since her first travel letter, sent in by her father, was published a few years earlier.

On her appointment, the then News Editor Donal Foley, declared, “Won’t she be a great crack to work with? And she’s a brilliant writer!”

Both proved true over a career which lasted the best part of fifty years.

Maeve Binchy wrote for and edited the daily Women First page until 1973. She transferred to the London office as a columnist, feature writer and reporter. She balanced the day job with her rapidly growing career as a writer of fiction and drama.

FUTURE GENERATIONS

In the 1980s, when she resigned … from the Irish Times, she retained her close association with the paper as a regular contributor. Maeve and her husband, Gordon Snell, moved back to Ireland.

In  2013, Gordon Snell, wrote the Introduction to the Maeve Binchy book, Maeve’s Times, because he knows the writings of Maeve Binchy are “universally cherished” and “will be for generations to come.”

Gordon Snell said:

From her earliest childhood, Maeve loved stories – and wanted to be part of them. When her father started to read her some tale of two children wandering through a wood, she asked at once, “Where was I?”

SETTING THE SCENE

He would say, patiently, “You were sitting in a tree beside the path.” And with Maeve happily located the story could go on.

When she grew up and became a storyteller herself, she made her readers feel that, like little Maeve in the tree, they were on the scene, among the action and the characters. She did the same in her journalism, writing with on-the-spot directness of the people and events with whom she come into contact.

It was her father’s enthusiasm that led to Maeve becoming a journalist in the first place. As a teacher she used her long holidays to travel all over the world, on cargo ships, cheap flights, trains and hitch-hiking.

She worked in school and holiday camps, on a kibbutz. And as a tourist guide, in North America, the Middle East and Asia. Her father sent some of her long, lively letters … to the newspapers who published them as articles.

HUMAN BEHAVIOUR

That was the start of her career as a columnist. It was a job she kept doing happily even after she had become a celebrated novelist.

Whether she was observing a couple having an angry but icily polite disagreement, or a feeling the panic – including her own -- brought on by the trials of air travel, or watching the outlandish fantasies of the fashion industry; she had a unique ear for the quirks, intensities and absurdities of human behaviour.

No wonder her readers were delighted with her; for she told it all with the eagerness and enthusiasm of someone who says, “Just wait till I tell you what happened …” and goes on to tell and enthralling and often hilarious tale.

NEXT WEEK: Final. “Her capacity for friendship seemed limitless,” wrote Snell.


BRIGHT SPARKS: This is what happened in 2018

FRANK MORRIS

 A LONG WAY: COUNCILS HAVE COVERED SOME DISTANCE SINCE MY COVER STORY ON THEIR PROGRESS IN THE 1960s.

A plan to “replace” high-emitting street lighting in Parramatta is nearly completed. A more effective LED lights program, which is part of the street-light replacement scheme, is one of Western Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils projects.

“We are currently working with a number western Sydney councils who need further lighting upgrades, solar installations and energy efficiency measures.”

Councils have come a long way in 60 years. In the 1960s, it was “plastics in lighting” test installation that was tried out by the Electricity Authority of NSW. It was a huge success. I recall, in The Plastics Retailer magazine, I published a glowing article by our staff writer on the project.

REWARDING ADDRESS

“It is estimated that over the next few years one hundred and seventy six thousand pounds will be spent yearly on street lighting in Sydney alone, and that a considerable portion of this sum will go on plastic components,” the writer said.

“The same speaker pointed out that the use of acrylics in lighting had doubled since 1958 … Plastic diffusers had increased 60 per cent since 1960. The plastics diffusers can be used up to a number of years.”

The writer said it was “the most rewarding address I had heard for some time.”

LED. Not a bad leap forward. 

<< Sydney Morning Herald. September, 2018; The Plastics Retailer, August, 1961.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 07 September 18

NOW, WE ARE SIXTY: Now is the time to have fun!

PITH, WIT AND PLEASURE! EACH MUST BE TEMPERED WITH THE MEREST TOUCH OF MELANCHOLIA, SAYS THE AUTHOR.

CHRISTOPHER MATTHEW

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

HOW WOULD A DOG FEEL?:  HAVING JUST TURNED SIXTY, I WONDER WHAT IT WOULD BE LIKE TO BE AS OLD AS MY PARENTS. WHO WAS I KIDDING. I’LL GO ON AND IMPERSONATE THE DOG! SKETCHES BY DAVID ECCLES.

The film actor Tony Curtis was once asked by the host of an American TV chat show how he would sum up his life.
‘When I was a very young man,’ Curtis said, ‘I arrived in Hollywood without any money, checked into a cheap motel, showered, shaved and then I came here to talk to you.’

Having recently turned sixty, I know just how he feels. One minute I was looking at my parents and their friends and wondering what it would be like to be as old as them; the next thing I knew, I was.

Mind you, in their day sixty-year olds were old. Elderly, certainly, and resigned to a slow, slippered twilight. I, on the other hand, am nothing if not a product of my age, and thus do not feel a second older than I did ten years ago – or even twenty.

Who am I kidding, though? Another ten years and my Biblical quota will be up. Like it or not I have joined the ranks of the zimmer brigade. This collection is by way of marking, if not celebrating, my new-found status.

THE BEST OF THE POEMS

I could have waited for a year or two to ensure a first-hand account of the pleasures and pains of being an oldie, but decided I’d better crack on while the going is good and before someone asks me to show my bus pass.

How best, though, to run the unfamiliar gamut of geriatricity? A vade mecum for the elderly, however liberally laced with jokes, could all too easily decline into a catalogue of whinge and woe.

Pith, wit and pleasure are more the order of the day – tempered with the merest touch of melancholia.

And then it suddenly occurred to me. Here I am, even more baffled by life than when I was a small boy.

I had already purloined A.A.Milne’s title and twisted it to my purpose, so why not pick the best of the poems he wrote for six-year olds and re-write them for sixty-year olds?

So I have.

<< Adapted from the book Now We Are Sixty, first published by John Murray in 1999.

NEXT: MAEVE BINCHY -- ONE OF THE GREAT IRISH WRITERS.


NEW MEN’S CLINIC: Offers the “silent way” to solve his problems

After much carping from doctors and other men’s health professionals over the past thirty years, the problems have started to turn for the best. A new hospital, Waratah Private in Hurstville, NSW, has launched a men’s clinic “as part of its many services”.

“Research shows 86 per cent of men aged older than 65 have a chronic disease,” said the hospital. “One in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer.”

The hospital said it “focuses on identifying men’s health problems and they can be treated under the same roof.”

Thirty years ago, Mr X was over 50. He was just one of hundreds of men nationally who remain the “silent” types.

FEAR, SUFFERING

Many men used to go to the bathroom at least three times at night. Without access to a toilet for men with prostate disease it became a nightmare. Literally!

In 1993, the American Medical Association released a report from the Gallup Organisation which showed that men over 50 “often try to tough” their way through fear and suffering without telling their doctors about ‘unmentionable’ medical problems …”

An Australian Men’s Health researcher said this is a “dangerous attitude” and may be equally prevalent in this country where ‘being tough is strongly promoted in men.

For men, these were vexing times. But ahead are the good times; things have changed.–FM


BITS & PIECES

Phar Lap’s career as a four-year-old was even more noteworthy for his age when he won 14 races straight. One of these was the Melbourne Cup in 1930 … The jockey who rode Phar Lap, Jim Pike’s contribution to racing still lingers, a legacy that he passed on through the ages. He was the complete rider. A great hand-and-heel rider, Pike pulled the whip to prove to one and all the horse was beaten. (In a radio interview, jockey Darren Beadman, reveals the “secrets” of Jim Pike) … Phar Lap’s “mystery” death, not long after he won the Aqua Caliente Handicap, to this day, even though there have been a number of inquiries, is still unsolved. – FM.


 

LES MISERABLES:  The characters -- were they real or not?

THE INSURRECTION OF THE 5th AND 6th OF JUNE BRINGS A CLIMAX TO THE MANY THEMES OF LES MISERABLES. 

FRANK MORRIS

LES MISERABLES: THE TYPE OF PEOPLE MENTIONED AS PARTICIPATING IN THE INSURRECTION ARE RECOGNISABLE AS LES MISERABLES CHARACTERS. Below: THE NATIONAL GUARD, SHOWN WITH RIFLES, CAME TO THE INSURGENT’S AID. Below: THE BESIEGERS: THE INSURGENTS BEGAN TO WORRY AS THE BARRICADE WOBBLES DUE TO THE CONSTANT FIRING OF THE ARTILLERY.

Les Miserables, the musical Newsweek claims had audiences overseas leaping to their feet “cheering, applauding and often weeping with emotion”, is soon for Australia, and has not been only the musical sensation of the decade … but of a lifetime.

“Cameron MacKintosh, Les Mis’s London producer and probably the greatest impresario of our time, realised it was the stuff dreams are made as soon as he heard a French recording of the show. Said MacKintosh: “I heard the opening bars and thought: God, this is wonderful.” – A couple of weeks before the show opened in Australia in 1988.

....

The musical production of Les Mirerables closely follows Victor Hugo’s novel. It covers the life of the saintly yet worldly Jean Valjean for over 30 years. Pursued by the law as well as by villains for his wealth; but, nevertheless, he maintains continued assistance to those in need.

He pays in cash for the adoption of little Cosette from her scurrilous guardians, the Thenardiers. And, when years, later Cosette falls in love, he saves her man, Marius, from death. Marius was struck down in a Paris street and lies wounded.

The insurrection of the 5th and 6th of June brings to a climax the many themes of Les Miserables. The people rise against their King and his government; they fight bravely against the troops at the barricades.

The Paris of 1832 is the Paris of Delacroix and Ingres, Balzac and Chateaubriand, Dumas and Berllioz; the year of the birth of Manet and Eiffel.

THE SLAVE TRADE

In 1832, Paris was the Paris of poverty, hunger, suppression and injustice, according to story of Les Miserables. However, each of Victor Hugo’s characters, in spite of such conditions, eventually finds a contentment of his own; even the despised Thenardier, who invested his new wealth in the (growing) slave trade.

Les Miserables follows history closely, particularly so for the events of the people concerned with the insurrection. Next week, you will read brief extracts from the scholarly text of Louis Blanc’s History of Ten Years, written in 1845 and well before Victor Hugo published Les Miserables in 1862.

The types of people mentioned as participating in the insurrection are recognisable as being eventual Les Misearbles characters. The Louis Blanc text also reveals how closely associated with the insurrection was Le National, the Paris newspaper around which this publication is based.

Louis Blanc became a prominent member of the new government, which forced the abdication of Louis Philippe and proclaimed the Second Republic, in 1848.          

<< Rewritten from Cullen Publications Pty Ltd, Edgecliff 2027, Sydney, Australia.

NEXT: Excerpts from History of Ten Years by Louis Blanc dealing with the insurrection of 5th and 6th of June.


PRISON: The last resort …

“The oppression is constant and extreme. Word is passed around to all the prison officers,” said a prisoner.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 30 August 18

HOW FIT ARE YOU?: Spring is in the air – how about enjoying the outdoors!

COMING OF AGE – CELEBRATE BEING HEALTHY. EXERCISE, EXERCISE, EXERCISE. IT’S EASIER THAN YOU THINK.

FRANK MORRIS and the Retirement Pack Group*

ALL IN A ROW: THIS IS THE PERFECT EXERCISE TO KEEP THE BODY FLOWING. Below: DO A SPOT OF SLOW RUNNING OVER SHORT DISTANCES. Below: FOR THAT CONSTANT CRICK IN THE BACK YOU CAN EXERCISE OR SEE A DOCTOR.

Work to maintain your posture and stability, and to safeguard you against falls. Those are your exercise aims for the over 60s!

Why?

There is a growing body of evidence that physical activity can play an important part in your life. It can help prevent stroke, osteoporosis and arthritis. Decline in levels of physical activity with age is not inevitable.

In many South-East Asian countries daily group routines such as Tai Chi (already in Australia), which focus on principles fostering natural postural alignments, and to reinforce proper body mechanics, are the cultural norm.

If Tai Chi is not for you, a simple selection of balance exercises, with emphasis a standing on one leg at a time for 10, 15 and 30 seconds, can be highly beneficial. Focus on flexibility and exercises that “open” the chest, by retracting the shoulders and stretch the hips and the muscle at the front of the thigh, will give aid to the pain.

WHAT AN AGE …

This is a good age to start using momentum to get up out of low chairs and sofas. Get into the habit of always using your leg muscles, so you maintain their strength. If you suffer from arthritis, rest during severe flare-ups, but avoid prolonged inactivity. This leads to weak muscles, stiff joints, reduced range of motion and decreased energy and vitality.

This is a good age to stop exercising in water that is too warm; the heat can aggravate some of arthritis and muscle inflammation. If possible, seek out cooler swimming pools.

Don’t think it’s all over. Physical activity can help improve your emotional and mental wellbring, as well as being effective in treating depression and enhancing mood.

It really is never too late to start exercising.

<< Best Years newsletter; and the Retirement Pack Group, London.

COMING: As we get older, it becomes more and more important to take regular exercise. COMING: Exercises and diagrams to give you stretch your limbs, stand upright, stretch out your arms, and much more, especially if you are incapacitated. COMING: Safe bushwalking – it’s fun for any age, including persons over 60.

NEXT: MAEVE BINCHY: HER TIMES ON THE IRISH TIMES AND HER LIFE AS AN IRISH WRITER.


LES MISERABLES: Final. Inside of a furnace; to watch young soldiers go through red haze

IT WAS THE VEDA WHO CALLED IT “THE FOREST OF SWORDS.”

VICTOR HUGO      Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

DEFENDING THE BARRICADE: A SUPREME ASSUALT WAS LAUNCHED BY THE MILITARY AND THIS TIME SUCCEEDED. Below: THE DEATH AT THE FALL OF THE BARRICADES; THE INSURGENTS HAD LITTLE CHANCE. 

The form an idea of that conflict one must imagine a terrible pyre of courage set on fire and oneself watching the blaze. It was not a battle but the inside of a furnace; mouths breathed out fumes; faces were extraordinary.

It was awe-inspiring to watch those salamanders of battle move to and fro in the red haze.

We shall NOT seek to depict the successive stages of the slaughter. Only an epic is entitled to fill twelve thousand lines with an account of battle. It might have been that Hell of Brahmanism, the most awful of the seventeen abysses, which the Veda calls “the forest of swords”.

They fought body to body, hand to hand, with pistol-shots, sabre-thrusts, bare fists, from above and below, from all quarters, the roof of the house, the windows of the tavern, the vent-holes of the cellars … they were one against sixty.

The façade of Corinth, half pounded to rubble, was made hideous. The window, peppered with grapeshot, had lost both glass and frameworks, and was nothing but a shapeless hole hastily blocked with paving stones.

Bossuet, Feuilly, Courfeyrac, Joly – all were killed. Combeferre, pieced by three bayonet thrusts, had only time to look up to the sky before he died.

Marius, still fighting, was covered with wounds, particularly on the head; that his face was smothered with blood as though he had a red scarf tied round it. Enjoiras, alone, was unscathed. When he was weaponless, he reached to right or left, and a blade of sorts was placed by a fellow rebel in his hand.

THE TIME WAS OVER …

Of four swords, one more than Francois I had had at Marignano, he had only the stump of one left.

When only two of the leaders were left alive, Marius and Enjoiras at either end of the barricade, the centre, which for so long had been sustained the other five men, gave away. The cannon-fire, without making an effective breach in the wall, had sufficiently damaged it.

The top had been shot away, falling on either side, so that the debris formed two inclines, one within the stronghold and the other outside it. The one outside (was) providing a ramp for the attackers.

A supreme assault was launched and this time it succeeded. The mass of soldiery, bristling with bayonets and advancing at the double, was irresistible, and the dense front line of the attacking force appeared amid the smoke on top of barricade.

This time it was over.

<< Cullen Publications Pty Ltd, Edgecliff, Sydney, 2027.

LES MISERABLES: Victor Hugo yet again stirred the world’s passions

PARIS, 1862

BY A STAFF WRITER

A man who had almost become a legend in his lifetime due to the omnipotence of his genius and the strength of his beliefs, Victor Hugo had once again stirred the world’s passions. Les Miserables has run for three editions in less than a month; it has been translated into all the languages of Europe.

We shall review it as soon as the tenth and last volume is published and reveals the final purpose of the poet.

In the meantime, whoever you may be, you may welcome or, on the contrary, reject the reformer of our literature, but you must bow before the genius, the relentless worker, the strangest and most powerful writer of this century.

Victor Hugo is the Michelangelo of French literature.

<< Cullen Publications Pty Ltd; Edgecliff, Sydney, 2027, Australia.


BIT’S & PIECES: A trip from Sydney to Brisbane cost $14 and took 5 hours. I recall that amount when I was going to Brisbane to cover the 18 foot Championships in 1958 … The new Parliament House was constructed on Bushrangers Hill … Retirement village or hostel: Stay in your home? Or move into a new residence? … Medications – Don’t take any medicines that were not prescribed for you. It could make you very sick indeed.  – FM.


QUEEN ELIZABETH AT 95: The wind are changing at the Royals constabulary

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

THE EARLY YEARS: ELIZABETH, CUDDLED BY HER MOTHER, SEEMS TO BE HAVING A CONVERSATION WITH HER FATHER, THE FUTURE KING.

Princess Elizabeth was born on April 21, 1926. The little princess came into a world still reeling from World War 1. When she was then third in line for the throne, Elizabeth’s parents never expected that, one day, their ‘Lilibet’ would become queen.

Described by her grandmother, Queen Mary, as “a little darling with a lovely complexion”.

Elizabeth was born at 2.40 am at the Mayfair house of her maternal grandmother the Duchess of York, youngest daughter of the Scottish Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, and the Duke of York, second son King George V.

Elizabeth Alexandra Mary, baptised in the private chapel of Buckingham Palace, was named after her mother, Elizabeth and great-grandmother, Alexandra; it was she who died six months earlier and her grandmother, Queen Mary.

<< The Women’s Weekly 85 years Celebrating the Royals, Souvenir Edition, Bauer Media Limited, Sydney.


FOODFROLICO:  Pomegranate has more antioxidants going for it than red wine

THE SUPER JUICE

Pomegranate juice’s excellent antioxidant properties have about three times more antioxidants than red wine and green tea; they helps to lower both cholesterol and blood pressure. Many people also enjoy its rich taste, making it a welcome beverage. The Pomegranate Salad, another favourite, is explained below.

HOW TO EAT THEM

Many grocery stores and green grocers sell pre-packaged pomegranate seeds; but if you start with the full fruit, cut it in half and spoons the seeds into a bowl to munch or add to salads. SALADS Your next green salad can be a nutritional superfood! Start with base of raw spinach leaves and arugula and add pomegranates and walnuts. Drizzle a little on lemon juice on top and every single part of this salad is a superfood. Another delicious and healthy option: finish your salads with a vinaigrette. CUCUMBERS For a family, Cucumbers are low in calories. Mix with several handfuls of pomegranate seeds. FOODFROLICO will cover other pomegranate delights later on.

NEXT: A true Pork Pie, 1940s style. Have something different for dinner. – FM.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 23 August 18

LES MISERABLES: The insurrection and the barricades

FEARS OF WATER POISONING SPREAD THROUGH THE CROWDED QUARTERS.

Adapted by FRANY MORRIS

ACTION!: THE AREA (OPEN STAR) SHOWING LES MISERABLES BARRICADES AT RUE DE LA CHANVRERIE, PARIS.

It was Tuesday, June 5 …

Paris is in a feverish state. The devastating effects on the poor suffering from unemployment, cholera, and rumours of plots and counter-plots from Bonapartists, legitimists, republicans and police provocateurs, it was not a healthy state of affairs.

Royalists, who supported the grandson of Charles X, Henry V, were stirring up rebellion in the west and south. Fears of food and water poisoning sent panic through the crowded quarters.

These condition have … caused thousands of students, workers, soldiers and foreigners to come out to honour the memory of General Lamarque, a strong supporter of the poor, who had been a leader of the opposition to Louis Philippe.

He had described Louis Philippe and his government as a “halt in the mud.”

A horseman carrying a red flag and a cap of liberty, the symbols of 1792, mysteriously appeared at the ceremony. Shots rang out. Troops clashed with the crowd. Barricades, like an electric current, spread through the greater part of the city; and there were many fierce and heroic clashes between the insurgents and the troops.

This was, indeed, a tragedy. Frenchman again Frenchman. Many are wounded, many are dying. The next few hours will affect the future of the nation.

Smashing the printing plates. The newspaper, The Tribune, was seized before it was brought out.

LES MISERABLES: Stop Press – Support failed, absence of leaders

THE WAR ENDED WITH A BLOODY REPRESSION.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

DEATH: THE FALL OF THE BARRICADES GAVE THE INSURGENTS LITTLE CHANCE OF COMING OUT ALIVE. THE OUTCOME WAS INFLUENCED BY ARTILLERY FIRE AT CLOSE RANGE.

The insurgents were eventually defeated by the repeated infantry charges and close range artillery fire. The uprising failed, not for lack of support, but for the absence of leaders.

Neither the young editor of Le National newspaper, Armand Carrel, nor the ailing General Lafayette, both admirers of the American republic, were ready to take the chance and lead the insurrection.

The insurrection is not well-known as a historical revolution. It was an important spontaneous event expressing the feeling of the populace, rather than being well prepared and led by dedicated men.

It ended on June 6 with the bloody repression on the rue St Mery.

RENEWED VIGOUR

Although beseeched by the opposition, the King blamed the troubles on conspirators and refused to alter his policies. There were later 80 attempts on his life. Martial law was declared in four departments.

There were many arrests, but jurors acquitted all but a handful of those brought to trial. Rather than discouraging the republicans, the events filled them with a renewed determination to continue and to educate and organise the people in obtaining better conditions; like, civil liberties and a democratic government.

Repressed again in 1834, they triumphed in the revolution of February, 1848, which inaugurated the Second Republic.

<< Background from Cullen Publications Pty Ltd, Sydney.

Will it hurt? Soldier has a dressing.

LES MISERABLES: Victor Hugo and the common people in Les Miserables

PEOPLE, THINGS: THE MICHELANGELO OF FRENCH LITERATURE, VICTOR HUGO, SAID THE SINGLE, FATEFUL WORD – LES MISERABLES. THEY’RE THE OUTCASTS, THE UNDERDOGS. WHO IS TO BLAME?

The author, wrote the classic, Les Miserables, around the barricades events. The musical production also follows his novel accurately. It contains striking scenes at the barricades. Victor Hugo describes part of the fighting:

VICTOR HUGO

The ground within the barricades was so covered with used cartridge-cases that it might have been a snowstorm. The attackers had the advantage of numbers; the rebels had the advantage of position. They were defending a wall whence they shot down at point-blank range the soldiers staggering amid their dead and wounded; or enmeshed in the barricade itself.

The barricade, constructed as it was and admirably buttressed, did indeed present one of those positions where a handful of men could defy a legion.

Nevertheless, being constantly reinforced and expanding under the hail of bullets, the attacking column inexorably moved forward; with certainly, the army was compressing the barricade like the screw of a winepress.

THE ASSAULTS CONTINUED

There ensued, on that heap of paving-stones in the Rue de la Chanvrerie, a struggle (that would have been) worthy of the ruins of Troy.

That handful of haggard, ragged, and exhausted men, who had not eaten for twenty-four hours, who had not slept, who had only a few shots left to fire, so that they searched their empty pockets for cartridges.

Nearly (all) were wounded, with head or arm swathed in rough, blackening bandages; having holes in their clothing through which the blood flowed; ill armed with sufficient muskets and old, worn sabres, became Titans.

The barricade was ten times assailed and climbed, but still it did not fall. Adapted by FRANK MORRIS.

Next: Victor Hugo -- striking scenes at the barricades.

Defending the barricades. The outcasts and soldiers fight tooth and claw.


NEXT WEEK: Queen Elizabeth ll at 95 – the winds of change. Meanwhile …

AT AGE 90, THE QUEEN REMEMBER THE POMP AND PAGENTRY OF HER MARRIGE.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

WEDDING DAY: NOVEMBER 20, 1947 WAS THE GRANDEST DAY IN THE QUEEN’S 90 GLORIOUS YEARS WHEN SHE WAS TO MARRY PHILIP, THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH. ON THE MORNING OF HER WEDDING DAY, SHE TOLD CRAWFIE HER GOVENESS. “I CAN’T REALLY BELIEVE IT IS HAPPENING.”

A fairy-tale wedding. On July 9, 1947, three months after Princess Elizabeth’s 21st birthday, the world learned her very thrilling secret: she was officially engaged to dashing Philip Mountbatten who was the love of her life.

In accordance with royal protocol, he was created His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh shortly before the wedding.

The wedding reception was at Buckingham Palace and in honour of the happy couple the dinner included Fillets de Sole Mountbatten to start and Bombe Glace Princess Elizabeth as dessert. They honeymooned in the UK at Broadlands, the home of Philip’s uncle, Lord Louis Mountbatten.

Perhaps not surprisingly, the bride close to take her favourite corgi Susan with them.

END OF A LIFE

The young naval couple lived first at Windlesham Moor near Windsor Castle and then in Clarence House in London. But Philip was still a serving naval officer, the second in command of the destroyer HMS Chequers, which was based at Malta.

She spent her stays there at Villa Guardamangia, another home owned by Lord Mountbatten.

Almost a year to the day after her wedding, the Queen gave birth to Charles on November 14, 1948, at Buckingham Palace. Princess Anne was born on August 15, 1950, at Clarence House.

Life was cut short for George VI. He was becoming frailer so Elizabeth was increasingly involved as a stand-in at royal events. In 1952, she and Prince Philip were on their way to Australia and New Zealand … when news was received on February 6 that lung cancer had ended the King’s life.

His health undoubtedly suffering from the strain of being a dutiful king through the difficult war years.

<< 90 Glorious years, a YOURS Souvenir Edition; Bauer Media Pty Limited, Sydney.

lIIustration: The King and I: George VI and Princess Elizabeth share a few words.

COMING: Bushranger – Ned Kelly meets his doom; Historic Pubs – A farmer builds a pub.


QUEEN VICTORIA BUILDING: 120 glorious years for this icon of Sydney!

THE POPULATION HAS WITNESSED SOME ENORMOUS CHANGES TO THE FACE OF ITS CAPITAL CITY.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

PICTURE: THE DOMED SHAPES OF THE QUEEN VICTORIA BUILDING FILLS THE SKY WITH WONDERMENT THAT PEOPLE HAVE NEVER SEEN BEFORE. 

The Queen Victoria Building, built 120 years ago, first captured the public’s imagination in 1898. The building, in all this time, has remained an edifice unparalleled in Australia. For its scale and architectural air of distinction, the level of detail and craftsmanship, was second to none.

Over the past century, this majestic Romanesque arcade has become a symbol of a flourishing city and one true constant in a world moving at a modern pace.

Described as “this iconic jewel” in the heart of Sydney, it has been witness to enormous change, and, at one time, faced a real threat of being torn down. Yet it seemed that survival was always in her sights and it continues to thrive. Is it rare that a Victorian-era building so resiliently stands the test of time as our beloved QVB?

It will inspire generations with her enduring beauty and grace.

MYSTERY, INTRIGUE

A touch of local heritage is also part and parcel of the grand, ‘young’ building. By unlocking the secrets, for instance, you’ll discover the little-known details of Australia’s largest and grandest Victorian arcade. As befits this building, which has amassed a 120 year-old history, wants to share her mystery and intrigue.

For instance, the ghost of a former tenant wandering thought the arcades at night; and the extraordinary tale of how the long-abandoned Queen Victoria statue found its way to Sydney. There’s more to this majestic building that you might think.

Question: In the building’s inaugural years, a Chinese-merchant opened the Elite Hall tea house, which went on to be one of the most popular restaurants of the Victorian era. His spectre was reportedly seen walking the arcades at night?

Who was it?

<< Background to this story from Celebrating an Icon; to mark its 120 years of history.

TO EXPERIENCE THE GRANDEUR OF THE QUEEN VICTORIA BUILDING, BOOK A GUIDED TOUR WITH THE CONCIERGE OR CALL 02 9264 9209.


SHOP WINDOW: Heritage Places -- A gift of a nation 

FRANK MORRIS

Collingrove in the Barossa Valley, SA. In a magnificent section of the Barossa Valley, complete with English country garden, is a homestead called Collingrove. The Angus family, which built it 1856, Collingrove stands as a rare specimen of how our pioneers attempted to recreate the ‘Old Country’ atmosphere of their origins. The homestead is the perfect place to step back in time. It’s ideal for accommodation, homestead tours and weddings.

The first school in Alice Springs. The school was established in temporary accommodation on the Old Hartley Street site. This took place shortly after the railway reached the township in 1929. The school underwent some restoration since 1980; and it was opened for the Bicentennial program in l988.

<< Backgrounds for the two articles came from a Gift to the Nation, Historic Australia, No 4. 1987.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 17 August 18

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