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Number of blogs returned: 1 to 10 records of 252

VIETNAM WAR: The End. The living-room war -- television brought new conflict into our lives

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

GETTING READY!

NIGHTLY WE COULD SEE THOUSANDS MARCH FOR “PEACE” IN THE STREETS OF AUSTRALIA AND AMERICA. AUSTRALIA’S INVOLVEMENT BEGAN WITH 30 MEN IN 1962 AND FINISHED IN 1972 AFTER 50,190 AUSTRALIANS HAD SERVED.

By 1972, all Australian combat troops were withdrawn from Vietnam, and after the election of the Labor government in 1972, the last advisers were also discontinued.

Counting the cost of the number of men that were killed was hard for incumbent politicos to take.

Over the ten years, they were involved in Vietnam the Australians lost 424 killed and 2369 wounded. Altogether 50,190 men serves in Vietnam, 15,542 of whom were conscripted.

Many casualties did not emerge until later. Illnesses arising from tropical diseases and the effects of chemical defoliants started to come to the fore.

Given this record, one must ask if it was worth it. In military terms, the whole episode was a failure.

As we all know, the South Vietnamese army proved incapable of turning the tide; and in 1975, Saigon was occupied by the armies of North Vietnam. In social terms the effects of the war were disastrous.

Australian society was divided by the war. One side calling the others ‘commies’ and the other imperialists.
Young men were placed in jail for the refusing to enlist and ‘draft dodging’ became a common offence.

Most importantly, the Vietnam War was the first conflict in its history that Australians felt ambivalent about.
What’s happening in America?

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RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS …
IN THE 1880s, BARON PIERRE DE COUBERTIN INTRODUCES THE IDEA THAT THERE SHOULD BE A WORLD SPORTING FESTIVAL – ALL SPORTS – TO THE PEOPLE OF THE GLOBE LIKE THOSE OF ANCIENT GREECE.  IN THE 1890s, SOME OF EUROPE’S ROYALTY AND A GREEK TYCOON, EXPRESS INTEREST AND MONEY IN THE IDEA. – FM.
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In 1961, reporters W.E. Garrett and Peter White went to Vietnam to report on how “South Viet Nam Fights the Red Tide”.

This piece, published three years before Congress passed the Resolution … authorising presidential action in Vietnam and four years before a large-scale commitment of US troops, accurately and eerily warned of what was in store.

While Garrett’s photographs were of the conventional travelogue variety, White’s text was conspicuously grim.

”Quietly and relentlessly, without the world hardly aware of it yet, the rich country in the south was slipping ever deeper into a calculatedly cruel civil war.

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RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS …
THE FIRST MODERN OLYMPIC GAMES WAS STAGED AT ATHENS IN 1896. THE KING OF GREECE PRESENTS WINNERS WITH A GOLD MEDAL AND AN OLIVE BRANCH. AUSTRALIA’S EDWIN FLACK WAS A MEMBER OF NEARLY 300 ATHLETES FROM 13 NATIONS TAKING PART. FLACK BECOMES THE WORLD’S FIRST DOUBLE GOLD MEDALLIST, WINNING THE 800M AND 1500M FINALS. – FM.
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“From dusk to dawn, the Viet Cong ruled nearly half of South Viet Nam”, wrote White.

Further on in the article, White wrote: “What will happen to Vietnam!” The person replied: “I hope for a miracle to save us.”

White ended his article this way: “As our old primers say: Man is born good, but life makes him bad.”

It is estimated that between August 4, 1964 and January 27, 1973, 8,744,000 Americans saw service in Vietnam.

Nevertheless, on April 30, 1975, South Vietnam surrendered to the communists.

SOURCE: Australian Two Hundred Years; The National Geographic Magazine.


SHAPES & SIZES: The fast clipper ships! They ruled the world with their speed and sailing prowess

This is the Flying Cloud, it was one of the winged messengers of man. The clipper ships from the 1830s through to the 1860s were also the loveliest of them all.

The Flying Cloud made a brilliant run in 1851 from New York to San Francisco in 89 days, sailing 17,597 statute miles at average of 222 miles each day.
 

COMING: Clipper Days – the winged messengers of man!


FLASHBACK: Cabbie was his name, but finding fame was not easy!

FRANK MORRIS

‘CABBIE’ WAS A GRADUATE OF HARD KNOCKS!

"‘CABBIE’ WAS A SPITTING IMAGE OF A MATE OF MINE”

He lived in Mortdale but he moved round a lot. But to set the record straight: I’ll introduce him as Sydney cartoonist John Neal.

Well, Neal is as knockabout as some of the characters that come off his drawing board.

And Cabbie, his latest protégé, is no exception.

In the short time that Cabbie’s weekly adventures have been played out, his popularity has soared.

An RSL driver told Front Lines (a column I used to write for the newspaper) that Cabbie “was the spitting image” of his best mate.

“We’re thinking of starting a fan club,” another driver said.

Neal was amused but not surprised at Cabbie’s new-found fame. “I had an idea he’d make a name for himself someday.”

Neal describes Cabbie as a “street-wise little bloke” who become the victim of situations, no matter what the circumstances.

“But Cabbie is a graduate from the school of hardknock and he keeps bouncing back for another serve,” Neal said, with a slight smile.

Since leaving school at 14, Neal’s occupations have been many and varied – printer, journalist, truckies’ labourer and part-time parrot shooter.

He started taking cartooning seriously during a stint in the Army. His work was soon in demand, and his interpretation of military life began to appear in Army publications throughout Australia and in Vietnam.

In 1970, he won the Bicentenary Award for a cartoon depicting the problems and aims of the Australian Aborigines.

For many years he drew Bert the Boardman for Surcharge, a newspaper published by the NSW Water Board Salaried Officers Union.

Bert’s antics actually averted several industrial disputes and he was finally nominated for a Walkley Award – Australian journalism’s Oscar – before he punched the Bundy clock for the last time in 1980.

In the late 1970s Neal breathed new life into the famous comic-duo Bluey and Curley for the Sydney Telegraph, following in the footsteps and Les Dixon and the late Alex Gurney.

The comic finish when Neal went on strike with the journalist’s on the newspaper. He returned to journalism.

I will always remember my mate, John. My association with John Neal goes back 33 years. 

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AT THE CLUB …
COMING SOON! CLUBS ARE ONE OF THE GREATEST HARBINGERS OF ALL-ROUND SONG AND DANCE TALENT IN AUSTRALIA. I PENNED OVER 2500 AT THE CLUB COLUMNS IN EIGHT YEARS.
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We worked together as journalists on freelance projects as well. Neal was not an only colleague but a friend and good mate too. He was generous to a fault. But Neal preferred to be known as a “knockabout cartoonist” rather than a journalist.

In an interview before he died, he explained himself: “The whole point of the exercise was to gives people a good laugh and at least for a while forget their hassles.”

John Neal’s “new chum” was called Cabbie.

Like Neal, Cabbie was a typical knockabout Aussie. This is one different, though: he’s a taxi driver. You can laugh at him. Laugh with him. It made little difference to the number one standover man.

John drew the popular Bluey and Curley strip during the late 1970s, so he knew what “having a laugh on us” really meant.

The devil has his way, in more than one.

I recall a conversation with John in which told me he experimented with the devil.

He was going to sign his name “O’Neal” -- using the devil’s “6” to form the “O”. He used “the devil’s influence” right through the Cabbie series, but nothing much seemed to happen.

“How’s the devil going in your life,” I asked.

He looked at me. Nothing had happened, so it must be working. We left it at that.

John Neal died in June, 1997. He was aged 54.

Below: Les Dixon, Eric Jolliffe and Jim Russel – all leading cartoonist. John followed Les Dixon in doing Bluey & Curely for the last time.

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RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS …
IN 1900, THE SECOND OLYMPIAD, DESPITE GREEK PROTESTS, WAS HELD IN PARIS, FRANCE. SWIMMING, FOR THE FIRST TIME, APPEARED ON THE CALENDAR. AUSTRALIA’S FRED LANE TOOK OUT THE GOLD FOR THE 200M OBSTACLE RACE. – FM.
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Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 23 August 19

MEN’S HEALTH: Men ignored doctors’ advice many years ago. It’s a bad decision, say experts!

FRANK MORRIS

MORE MEN THAN WOMEN REFUSE TO GO TO A DOCTOR.

THAT WAS A LONG, LONG TIME AGO. THE POINT IS, IT’S STILL HAPPENING. 

This is what I wrote in 2001:

The first Australian survey by AGB McNair into prostate disease over 10 years ago, showed that one in three men aged over 50 had at least one symptom of the disease.

Hard on the heels of this alarming report, the medical profession issued a stark warning – ignore it at your peril.

The upshot, it seems, the penny didn’t “drop loudly enough”. In 2001, ten thousand of the men will be, nationally, diagnosed with cancer; most of them aged over 50. Twenty-five percent, one in four of this group, will die.

“They had ignored the warning”, experts would say.

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THE GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
WESTERN FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT, WILFRED BURCHETT, IN 1945, WAS THE FIRST NEWSMAN TO ENTER HIROSHIMA AFTER THE ATOMIC BOMB WAS DROPPED. – FM.
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Here is some timely advice from the Men’s Health Week: “In the mental health realm, we encourage men to seek help when something in wrong.”

Men’s Health Week, ACT, recommends that “to improve men’s health is a two-way street involving men, women and their families – and the health services.”

When it comes to mental health problems, research shows men are more likely to die by suicide than women.

With statistics even higher for men living in “rural and remote communities”.

Gerrit Williemse, psychologist at Marathon Health, says “stereotypes that suggest men bottle-up their emotions and handle things alone are completely unrealistic and damaging”.

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THE GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
NATIVE-BORN HORSES WERE SHIPPED TO INDIA FOR USE BY THE BRITISH ARMY IN 1846. THE HORSES, KNOWN AS ‘WALERS’ – A TERM COINED IN CALCUTTA. ORIGINALLY IT MEANT THEY WERE NEW SOUTH WALES BRED, AND WERE CHOSEN BECAUSE OF THEIR STAMINA, PATIENCE AND COURAGE. -- FM.
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He says the real strength “is telling someone you trust that you aren’t doing well; it’s asking your mates if they’re okay.”

“Men aged 18 to 34 with heart problems, are more than twice as likely than their female counterparts to have four or more risk factors of heart disease”.

Tony Stubbs, ACT CEO of the Heart Foundation, says “Over 30 percent of men in Australia have high cholesterol and almost 75 percent are overweight or obese.

”Walking is a great way for men to reduce these risk factors.”

SOURCE: mensheathweek.org.au; prostate Cancer Foundation – prostate.org.au/

Below: Gentleman make an appointment with the receptionist for a check-up.


AUST v. ENGLAND: Star of the past 70 years. They were the nation’s back-stop!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

McCABE AND BRADMAN HEAD OUT IN BRIGHT SUNSHINE FOR THE START OF 1933 TEST SERIES.

Stan McCabe was a genius. McCabe was the brilliant and graceful right-handed batsmen who played three of the most glorious innings in Test cricket.

Without doubt, McCabe was one of Australia’s finest batsman.

In 1932, adventurous by instinct he made a most audacious and classic 187 n.o (25 fours) in Sydney against the blast and fury of Jardine’s English bodyline attack.

Three years later, 1935, in Johannesburg against South Africa, showing his characteristic precision of timing, he made 189 no, in 195 minutes (29 fours); his first 100 in only 91 minutes.

His most enchanting innings displaying skill, power and courage, was in the Nottingham Test in England in 1938.

He saved Australia with an innings of 232, reaching the double century in an amazing 225 minute; his last 127 runs in 80 minutes.

In 39 Tests, Stan scored 2748 runs (6 centuries) at an average of 48.21. He took 36 Test wickets with deceptive medium pacers, and held 42 catches, mainly at second slip.

In 37 Sheffield Shield matches, 24 as Captain of NSW, he made 3031 runs at an average on 55.10. No doubt World War 2 robbed him of more great innings.

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HERE’S A WORLD FIRST …
IN 1968, THE FIRST HUMAN HEART TRANSPLANT WAS PERFORMED IN SOUTH AFRICA. A SECOND TRANSPLANT WAS DONE IN 1974, BOTH PATIENTS DIED. – FM.
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SOURCE: Hall of Champions. Sports House, 157 Gloucester St, Sydney.

BELOW: Stan McCabe. Stood the blast and fury of a Jardine bodyline attack.


Come on? Taste the dried fruits of Australia! Final.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

FEEL LIKE A DRIED APRICOT, OR DRIED PEARS, OR …

IT REQUIRES 6KG OF FRESH TREE FRUITS TO PRODUCE 1KG OF PRUNES, SUN-DRIED APRICOTS, PEACHES AND PEARS.

APRICOT

Although the botanical name suggests Armenia, it is generally agreed that the apricot originated in China … 2205BC.

Apricots were introduced to Europe via the silk route through the Far East, and then through the Mediterranean area by the Arabs.

In early times, the apricot was grown on a considerable scale in Upper Egypt where the fruits were dried for sale throughout Europe.

Dried apricots have the most concentrated dietary fibre of any fruit.

They are also a valuable source of iron and provide potassium, carotene, niacin and important B complex vitamins.

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GREAT KIWI FIRST …
GO NZ! ANYONE FOR PAVLOVA? THIS RICH SWEET DISH OF MERINGUE AND MARSHMELLOW TOPPED WITH WHIPPED CREAM AND FRUIT, AND ORGINATED IN NZ; NAMED AFTER THE CELEBRATED RUSSIAN BALLERINA ANNA PAVLOVA, WHO TWICE TOURED NZ IN THE 1920s.
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PRUNE

During the reign of Henry VIII, it was advised to ‘gather damson plums and dry them in the sun or a hot oven; in this way they could be kept for a year.’

In earlier centuries, plums were dried on racks in small caves.

The Australian prune is a hybrid of the cherry plum and sloe or blackthorn, probably originating in the Caucasus region where forests of wild plum trees existed thousands of years ago.

Many other species of wild plum grew across Britain, Europe and Asia.

Prunes are an important source of dietary fibre, potassium, iron and carotene. They also contain valuable calcium and B complex vitamins.

Prunes, like all dried fruits, contain absolutely no fat or added sugar.

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HEALTH MATTERS …
AUGUST 1 TO 31: NATIONAL TRADIES MONTH – TIPS HELP YOU YOUR JOB WITHOUT ANY PAIN.
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PEACH

As the Romans found the peach growing in present-day Iran, the former country of Persia, they designated it ‘persica’.

In fact, the peach is a native of China -- like the apricot. It travelled the same silk route, it is recorded that peaches were being cultivated in China as early as 2000 BC.

As a compact and highly nutritious food, dried peaches were chosen as the fruit for Neil Armstrong and his team on their expedition to the moon in 1969.

They are a very good source of dietary fibre, potassium, iron, carotene, niacin and other B complex vitamins.

PEAR

The wild pear originally grew in large forests in Europe and Northern Asia.

There’s historical evidence of hybridisation of several Pyrus species and this may have contributed to the development of the cultivated Pyrus communis.

There is little evidence of use by early man, but the pear’s natural flavour and beauty were recognised in Roman times when they were eaten and painted frequently.

Dried pears are excellent source of dietary fibre and potassium; they contain small quantities of iron, calcium, carotene and B complex vitamins.

SOURCE: Australian Studies Magazine.

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IN THE NEWS – 90 YEARS AGO …
DURING THE PAST FEW YEARS, GAY SEABROOK VOICED MINNIE MOUSE SINCE SHE BECAME THE HIT OF THE TOWN. BUT THE FIRST GIRL WHO DID THE VOICE WAS A STAFFER WHEN MINNIE ONLY SAID A FEW WORDS. WHEN MINNIE BECAME MORE INVOLVED, SHE NEEDED LONGER DIALOGUE, AND MORE FEELING. THAT’S WHERE GAY SEABROOK TOOK OVER. MINNIE MOUSE WAS A SUCCESS. – FM.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 16 August 19

GRAND YEARS WILL RETURN NEXT WEEK

Stay tuned everyone

Grand Years will return next Friday

Many thanks

Frank Morris

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 09 August 19

1933 Australia v. England: Bodyline Bowling – It’s a menace to the game

FRANK MORRIS

STAN McCABE PUT A MARK ON HIS GLORIOUS INNINGS BY PLAYING A BALL OFF LARWOOD, ENGLAND’S MOST CONTROVERSIAL BODYLINE BOWLER.

ENGLISHMAN JARDINE INTRODUCED SOME OF THE FIERCEST TACTICS THAT HE KNEW THE LAWS OF CRICKET WOULD ALLOW!

English cricketers left nothing to chance when they came to Australia in 1932.

The blue-collar cricketers set out to recover the Ashes after suffering a humiliating defeat in the 1930 Test series in England.

Nothing but nothing was going to stand in their way – not even the magic bat of Don Bradman.

Bradman’s tremendous success during the 1930 tour had convinced the English selectors that new leadership was needed if the Ashes were to be brought back to England.

When the third test got under way in Adelaide in January, 1933, spectators didn’t realise that they were about to witness one of the most controversial sporting events of the century.

Spearheaded by Douglas Jardine, the English introduced some of the fiercest tactics the laws of cricket would allow.
Their main strategy was the infamous ‘bodyline’ bowling – a constant delivery of short-pitched fast balls which aimed at the batman’s head and shoulders.

“The batsman was like a bear in a cage being pelted with stones by naughty children,” writes historian Nic Van Oudtshoorn.

The tactics were not only frightening and difficult for the batsmen, but caused injury.  To play the ball meant the risk of being caught.  Not to play it meant the greater risk of being hit.

The Australian Captain, Bill Woodfull, was felled by a fast ball near the heart.  Bert Oldfield had his skull fractured.

Jardine’s terror tactics erupted in a public outcry.  There was fighting and riots, and Australian dockworkers boycotted British ships.

“Bodyline bowling is a menace to the game…and unsportsmanlike,” protested Australian cricket official, Mr W.Jeanes.

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IN THE NEWS …
IN THE UNITED STATES, RUSSI TAYLOR, THE WOMAN WHO VOICED MINNIE MOUSE FOR MORE THAN THREE DECADES, HAS DIED AT 75. THE CAUSE OF HER DEATH IS NOT YET KNOWN. MISS TAYLOR MARRIED THE MAN WHO SUPPLIED THE VOICE FOR MICKEY MOUSE, WAYNE ALLWINE FROM 1991. HE DIED IN 2009.
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Below: This is not cricket, its war, says Larwood.

Grimmett: There’s hope for the English team now the bodyline is dead, said Neville Cardus

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

CAPTAIN DOUGLAS JARDINE IS OUT AND THE BODYLINE EVENT IS OVER!

“Jardine’s retirement is a great loss,” says Neville Cardus. “Australians know my attitude on bodyline – I do not regret one word I have written or said on that subject.

“I oppose bodyline for two reasons.

“Firstly, because it will not go down with the public, who do not want to watch an attack directed at the batsman’s body.  Australian crowds are not singular in this respect – the Oval, Old Trafford, and other crowds similarly would resent bodyline.

“Secondly, is that bodyline spoils the beauty of cricket as a spectacle; it is an ugly form of attack.  Some pessimists said that bodyline will kill cricket, but cricket, real cricket, has killed bodyline.

“Nevertheless, this does not affect my admiration for Jardine’s cricketing qualities.  He was a great skipper before bodyline was known, and he will remain a great skipper when bodyline has been forgotten.

“It is tragic that a captain of Maclaren’s and Jackson’s class should drop out, for Jardine is a captain worthy of the Australians.

“I disagreed with his tactics, but if his retirement was due to those tactics then it merely adds another damning line in bodyline’s epitaph.

“I believe Wyatt will succeed Jardine as captain.  Valentine is still too young, but Wyatt is Woodfull’s English counterpart.  Perhaps both lack genius and inspiration, but they know cricket on and off the field.

“Woodfull’s personality and character have done much to dissolve bitterness, and I believe that the fact that he opposed bodyline greatly influenced the MCC attitude towards it,” said Cardus.

Apart from the obvious choices amongst the players who visited Australia and India, Mr Cardus believes that J. Iddon (Lancashire) may force his way into the Tests.

Cardus declared that the more he studies the Australian team the more he respects its ability.

AUSTRALIA V. ENGLAND FOR THE ASHES, 2O19. WE WISH ALL THE AUSTRALIAN PLAYERS THE VERY BEST IN THEIR CURRENT BID FOR VICTORY.

Below: Harold Larwood describes himself as “the hangman”.


GREAT KIWI FIRST: America Cup’s – NZ wins classic with “flawless” sailing!

FRANK MORRIS

THIS WAS A DRUBBING.

BY 1995, NEW ZEALAND HAD WORKED THEIR MAGIC.

For 132 years the Americans have proved their invincibility by whipping challenger after challenger to keep one of the world’s oldest and best known international trophies, the America’s Cup.

It seemed that the baroque silver ‘mug’ was to be permanently encased at the New York Yacht club.

Writing in a major publication on the Cup’s history, Sir James Hardy, who helmed two Australian challengers, said “One might have felt that the America’s Cup looked unattainable such was the consistency and thoroughness of the Americans.

After several campaigns beginning in 1967, the Australians struck it lucky. In 1983, Australia II had a four to three victory over Liberty.

The Americans weren’t invincible, after all. Challengers came from near and far. The New Zealanders worked their magic for the first time in 1995, by impressively snatching the Cup in Black Magic I from Dennis Connor’s Young America, 5-0, at San Diego.

The Kiwi victory was described as “a team effort from stern to stern”.

In 1999, the world’s best sailors descended on Auckland Harbour to decide who will challenge Team New Zealand for the 2000 America’s Cup. In the end, Italy’s Prada team proved no match for the Kiwis. The Italian challenger, Luna Rossa, was thrashed by New Zealand 5-0.

Writes Time magazine of the victory: “There were echoes of 1995…the same winning margin and with the same crushing flair”. With their flawless sailing, Team New Zealand made history too.

That win made New Zealand the smallest country ever to compete in the Cup and only the second to take it from the US, Time reported.

Could the Kiwis do the unthinkable again in 2003?

As it turns out, the Kiwis were defeated soundly in the series.
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THE GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
IN 1955, ROBERT TUDAWALI, OF JEDDA FAME, BECAME THE FIRST ABORIGINAL FILM STAR. JEDDA LEAVES HER NICE SAFE EXISTENCE … WHEN KIDNAPPED BY AN OLDER STRANGER. “TADAWALI’S STUNNING PERSONALITY ADDS TO THE FILM ABOUT LIVING FULLY AND TAKING THE CONSEQUENCES”. – FM.
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HOME-CARE A-Z: A case of depression – it slowly gets on top of you!

“LOUISE”    

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

I UNDERSTAND THE SAYING: I WAKE AND FELL INTO DARKNESS.

THIS STORY IS TAKEN FROM HER OWN EXPERIECE WITH DEPRESSION.

Here I am, in my early fifties, living on my own. Never before have I been afraid.

I was aware, at this stage, that my sleep was being interrupted, and it worried me. It was beginning to breakup into short, sleeping modules.

I wake up at 1.30 am; then 3.30 am; And then 5.30am. And the darkness. It was a black cloud pervading my being.

Thing worsen. For a time the darkness lifts by noon, and I can forget those terrible early hours without sleep. I dread going to sleep, to face that wakeful night. Now I understand the saying: “I wake and fell into darkness”.

I visit two different doctors … and I act with preconceived … indignation and horror … at the thought of taking hormones and antidepressants.

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THE GREAT FIRST …
IN 1917, THE SURF WAS AUSTRALIA’S “WORLD FIRST SURFING” MAGAZINE. AFTER 20 ISSUES, IT FOLDED IN 1918. THE GREAT WAR WAS TO BLAME. THE SURF WAS POSSIBLY ONE OF THE FIRST IN THE WORLD TO FOCUS PRIMARILY ON SURF-RIDING AND BEACH ACTIVITIES. – FM.
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Surely, I need to assert – yes -- my will power. And –yes -- my positive thinking!

My decision is to try hormones. But their effect is negative. I become more and more depressed. Each day – darkness. And something new appears: anxiety. I have nothing to worry about specifically, and yet I feel anxious all the time.

Soon, my stomach starts to be painful; burning after every meal. I have not slept through the night for a couple of months. Another trip to the doctor and then to a specialist, but this time they reveal incipient ulcers.

Then follows three months of the elimination of foods. Nothing seems to help. Every day is ridden with pain. Soon I am having almost no variety of foods. My anxiety level increases. I experience some horrible thoughts that cross my mind. Even the house haunted me.

When I looked back over the months, the matter is well and truly out of hand. I feel I am getting worse. But, stubbornly, I still refuse to consider taking medication. My nights are a horror of sleeplessness. People are kind in offering me advice on what to do.

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THE GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
IN 1934 ACTRESS, JOURNALIST AND NOVELIST MARY MARLOWE, WHO HAD HER OWN SESSION ON RADIO, WAS THE FIRST TO INTRODUCE “INFORMAL” INTERVIEWS ON THE MEDIUM. – FM.
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Now, I go to a psychiatrist. My resistance to antidepressants remains firm. My depression has lifted a little during the early stages of my appointments. The need for antidepressants seems small.

Then, a lot has started to happen. I would wring my hands in agitation. I cannot make a simple decision. I cannot concentrate. Afraid of doing anything, even getting on a bus. Being alone causes complete panic.

I finally decided to try antidepressants, but it takes time to find the right level. There was a lot of grief in the early periods.

Now, my brain is starting to function correctly. My stomach pains lessen; and I can eat a variety of foods again. I have hope that I will be well again.

Depression, I am told, is a chemical imbalance in the brain. For months, I resisted this view. But slowly change occurs. My anxiety lessens.

The psychiatrist, who showed such patience and understanding and compassion, taught me to have tender regard for all with mental health problems.

The experience of depression has brought me a deeper understanding for anxiety, depression and mental illness.
SOURCE: Adapted from the International Mental Health, America.

Below: My condition taught me how to value good health.

COMING: Home Care, A-Z – Australians are sleeping less than they used to; how much sleep do we really need?

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COMING FEATURES …
SURFER PEARL TURTON, FANTASTIC VOYAGE, HEADLINE HUNTER JOHN FROST, ROAD CCCCRASH, CHANGING MEN, HISTORIC HOTELS AND VICTORIA AFTER THE GOLD BOOM.
NEXY WEEK: Come on! Taste some of Australia’s dried fruits!

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 02 August 19

DONATE AN ORGAN: This occurs only after death!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

BEFORE YOU DIE, HAVE YOUR ORGANS PASSED ON TO SOMEONE IN NEED.

BRAIN-DEATH HAPPENS WHEN THE BRAIN STOPS FUNCTIONING.

More than 30,000 Australians have received transplants in the last 60 years.

For people with serious or life threatening illness, organ or tissue donation may mean a second chance at life.

Improved survival rates now mean that most recipients of organs or tissue can look forward to a better quality of life.

Organ and tissue donation can only occur after death.

Usually, organ donation is only considered after several tests have been carried out by two appropriately qualified senior doctors to establish whether brain death has taken place.

Brain-death occurs when the brain stop functioning and there is no possibility of recovery.
The way in which a person dies will generally determine what they are to donate.

In most cases, organs – heart, lungs, liver, pancreas, kidney – can only be donated if a person has died in a intensive can unit under special circumstances. Less than 1% of all people who pass away died this way in hospital.

Generally, organ donation may be possible after a person’s heart has stopped beating; but this is rare.

People are sometimes concerned or confused about the difference between brain death  or coma. Both organs are very different.

A patient in a coma is unconscious because their brain is injured in some way, although their brain continues to function and, in all likehood, may heal.

Medical tests on a patient can clearly show the difference between brain and coma death.

A greater number of people have the chance to donate tissue for transplantation -- eye, heart valves, bone and skin. The reason: tissue donation does not require the same special treatment as organs do for transplantation to be successful.

[The Australian Organ Donor Register 1800 552 152. Email:aodr@medicareaustralia.gov.au/organ
Address: Reply Paid 711 Hobart, TAS 7001]

SOURCE: Contact the Donation Register in your state.

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GREAT KIWI FIRST …
GO NZ! INVENTOR JOHN BRITTEN’S SUPER-BIKE, THE BRITTEN V1000, IS A SYMBOL OF “GREAT KIWI INGENUITY”, CLAIMS HISTORIAN RICHARD WOLFE.
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SHAPES & SIZES: Chinese junk! What our demi-craft grew into becomes a giant of the sea

A JUNK IS A TYPE OF ANCIENT CHINESE CRAFT THAT WAS BUILT DURING THE 2ND CENTURY AND DEVELOPED RAPIDLY DURING THE SONG DYNASTY. SAILORS REFERRED TO THEM AS “JUNKS”. THEY HAVE CLOTH SAILS WHICH ARE “STRENGTHENED WITH BAMBOO POLES”. LARGE JUNKS HAVE FIVE MASTS. JUNKS WERE THE FIRST SHIPS “TO HAVE A RUDDER” FOR SAILORS TO BE ABLE TO STEER THEM.


VALE: Margaret Fulton dies at 94; she “opened the world of flavours”, said a newspaper

FRANK MORRIS

MARGARET AND WOMAN’S DAY WHICH, AFTER SPENDING 19 YEARS AS COOKING EDITOR, LEFT TO JOIN RUPERT MURDOCK ‘S NEW IDEA.

THE FEISTY COOKBOOK QUEEN, MARGARET FULTON, BECAME A LEDGEND OF HER TIME.

The pioneer cookbook writer, Margaret Fulton, who led Australian women to cook meals of great exotic flavours, died on Wednesday, (July 24) aged 94.

It was the end of an era.

Her Margaret Fulton Cookbook inspired generations to cook like they never cooked before, bringing home cooking to a fine art.

The Australian book publishing industry was rocked by revolutionary change in the 1960s. “The swing to paperbacks…powerful new groupings that have emerged through takeovers, and foreign invasions are changing the old order,” reported The Bulletin's Michael Baume in 1966.

A typical invader was Englishman Paul Hamlyn, who “stormed the world, selling to people who had never bought books before.”

Australian publishers were slow to recognise that through creative and imaginative marketing and packaging it was possible to sell books like soap!

The Hamlyn books had a unique “buy-me” appeal.

Hamlyn's approach, says Kevin Weldon, was to exploit high traffic areas in major department stores, impulse buying “and all the modern marketing techniques the book world had studiously ignored.”

Until the Hamlyn Group utilised television in Australia, Weldon says, “nobody in the world had ever promoted a book on TV before.”

And, of course, the legendary Margaret Fulton Cookbook, which ended up selling over 1.5 million copies.
A profile on Margaret Fulton in the Good Weekend magazine, says that “Paul Hamlyn cleverly chose Margaret (Fulton) to write the cookbook.”

According to Kevin Weldon, the first Margaret Fulton Cookbook was a compilation of Fulton's articles from the Woman's Day magazine.

The re-using of such material had been arranged with Tom Farrell, the chief editorial director of the Fairfax Group, who was also responsible for the company's magazine subsidiary, Sungravure.

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GREAT KIWI FIRST …
GO NZ! NEW ZEALAND WON THE AMERICA’S CUP, SAILING’S HOLY GRAIL IN HISTORY-MAKING STYLE IN 1995 AND 1999; WINNING 5-0 ON BOTH OCCASIONS. NZ WAS NOT ONLY THE SMALLEST COUNTRY TO COMPETE, BUT ONLY THE SECOND TO TAKE IT FROM THE US.
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BE ADVENTUROUS: Margaret Fulton Cookbook -- she writes the forward for a run-away bestseller!

Selected by FRANK MORRIS

I have always believed that good food and good cooking are part of all that is best in life, all that is warm, friendly and rewarding; and that love is as essential an ingredient to a good meal as it is to a good marriage.

The most vivid memories of my youth are linked with my mother's kitchen – coming home to the warmth of a log fire and good food, lovingly prepared; the fragrance of freshly-baked shortbread or Dundee cake and, in winter, the pot of welcoming soup.

The highlight of each day was the evening meal, when the family gathered to share not only the food, but the day's happenings. A trying day never seemed so bad at the end of that meal and a good day turned into a celebration.
In my own home I find that a meal, cooked well and with love, works the same magic as it did a generation ago.

Cookery is now accepted as one of the creative arts, and one by which women can express their own individuality.

Never look on this cook book as a set of rigid rules, but rather as a starting point.

Once a dish has been mastered, be adventurous - give it the stamp of your personality by adding your favourite flavours or your choice of garnish.

When preparing this book it was heartwarming to find so many people all over the world wanting to share their recipes and knowledge of food with me. I am very grateful to you all.

I am grateful also to the cooks in Woman's day kitchen who have tested and perfected these recipes with me.

Beginners should not be discouraged from trying out 3-star recipes – just be prepared to give them more time and concentration.

I hope that new cooks will learn these recipes and that experienced cooks will appreciate my interpretation of the classic dishes included in this book.

Bon Appetit

Bonne Cuisine

Margaret Fulton

SOURCE: The Margaret Fulton stories, Grand Years.
Below: Margaret Fulton at the launch.

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AUSTRALIA v. ENGLAND FOR THE ASHES …
FROM AUGUST 1, AUSTRALIA AND ENGLAND WILL BATTLE FOR ONE OF CRICKET’S MOST PRESTIGOUS PRIZES, THE ASHES. IT IS ON THE NINE NETWORK. SEE IT ‘LIVE’ ON ANY DEVICE YOU HAVE AT YOUR FINGERTIPS!
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Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 26 July 19

Come on? Taste the dried fruits of Australia! Part 1.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

THERE ARE MANY DRIED FRUITS GROWN THROUGHOUT AUSTRALIA, AND THEIR VARIETY IS A MAIN ATTRACTION.

DRIED GRAPES ARE THE MOST DELECTABLE FRUIT YOU’LL FIND ON ANY MENU.

A PERSON WAS MUNCHING INTO A VITAMIN LADEN PEACH, AND I SAID “WHAT DO YOU THINK OF AUSTRALIAN DRIED FRUITS?” AND THE PERSON REPLIED, “I DON’T KNOW, I HAVEN’T TRIED ANY!”

SEEDED RAISIN

Raisins, together, with apricots, are probably the oldest dried fruits known to humankind and have been enjoyed since ancient times.

Acinatisius was a raisin wine esteemed by the Romans. This fruit was also used at their banquets. Raisin cakes are mentioned in the Old Testament.

Raisins being a dried grape of the large berried Waltham cross or Muscat Gordo Blanco varieties contain seeds. With the help of modern technology, the dried grape can be mechanically seeded; which is of great benefit to the modern cook.

Raisins are a valuable source of dietary fibre and potassium and contain small amounts of iron, calcium, carotene and B complex vitamins.

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GREAT KIWI FIRST …
ALLAN SUTHERLAND, NEARLY 60 YEARS AGO, WROTE: “FIRST EVENTS MAY BE REGARDED AS THE MILESTONE … OF ACHIEVEMENT AND PROGRESS OF A COUNTRY AND ITS PEOPLE. WE LIVE IN A WORLD OF CHANGE. NOTHING HAS CHANGED…”
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CURRANT

Currants were cultivated in Greece. From early times they were dried quickly in the sun due to their size. As this particular grape grew near Corinth, they were given the name ‘currants’.

One of the first accounts of fruit drying in Western Europe was given by the Greek poet Homer, during the period 900-800 BC.

Currants were not generally used in Europe until the Crusades, when they became popular as a valuable alternative to honey.

These tiny purple grapes are related to the sultana and the raisin, coming from the small seedless Zante currant, also known as Black Corinth and the Carina, the new product of Australian vine breeding.

Currants are an excellent source of dietary fibre, as are all dried fruits. They contribute valuable potassium, calcium, carotene, iron and B complex vitamins.

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GREAT KIWI FIRST …
OSCARS GALORE! IN 1993, JANE CAMPION’S THE PIANO WON FOUR OSCARS AND THE COVETED PALME D’OR AT CANNES. SHE WAS THE FIRST WOMAN DIRECTOR TO DO SO. RUSSELL CROWE AND HIS FILM, GLADIATOR, SCOOPED THE OSCAR POOL IN 2001.
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SULTANA

Traditionally, the grape was cultivated in Europe and has been with us a long time.

Vines grew wild in the forests of Asia Minor and the Caucasus regions, and were cultivated in the Middle East and North Africa for thousands of years.

In Europe fossils vines have been found, as well as seeds in Central Europe, that show the grape was used as food by early humankind.

Grape culture spread to the Mediterranean countries of Spain, Italy and France; and from there to the rest of world.

Today, in Australia, the sultana grape is cultivated in rows of special trellises, awaiting picking and sun-drying on racks to become a plump, golden dried fruit.

Sultanas are an important source of dietary fibre and provide potassium, iron and small amounts of calcium, carotene and B complex vitamins.

SOURCE: Australian Studies Magazine.


LET’S LAUGH! …

 


SPACE RACE: It’s been 50 years since Apollo 11 touched down on the moon!

FRANK MORRIS

MAN’S GREAT LEAP: NEIL ARMSTRONG’S GHOSTLY FIGURE EMERGED FROM THE SPACECRAFT, HIS LEFT FOOT HOVERED ABOVE THE MOON SURFACE AS HE SPOKE THE WORDS FROM A WORLD AFAR. PICTURE FROM NASA.

IT’S BEEN HALF A CENTURY SINCE BUZZ ALDRIN ADDRESSED THE WORLD FROM THE MOON, MARKING HUMANKIND’S GREATEST FEAT IN FLIGHT.

On July 21, 1969, at 12.56 pm, American astronaut Neil Armstrong became the first man to put his footprint on the moon.

That’s 50 years ago. Time waits for no man.

Watched by more than 600 million people around the world, Armstrong’s ghostly figure emerged from the spacecraft.

Armstrong’s first words as he gingerly slithered his feet across the moon’s surface were: “That’s one step for man but a giant leap for mankind.”

Twenty minutes later he was joined by his space companion Buzz Aldrin.

 


YOUR DOG: I’m a Leo see, and sometimes I feel I could reach the sky!

“SUE” AND FRANK MORRIS

ENOUGH OF TALKING ABOUT MYSELF. I’M GOING TO GET SOME SHUT-EYE.

Harvey the Leo! Harvey the Leo! I like it.

That’s what I’m called on the home-front! Ever since the boss lady discovered I was a Leo. I knew I was generous, energetic and assertive. They’re ok.

And proud. That’s ok too.

I remember when I young I got my boss lady into panic mode.

I was at the vet. I didn’t know why. The man and woman in their coats gazed at me with a sad look on their faces.

But, silly me, I kept up my jumping, my hiding, thumping my tail, and my usual run-a-muck antics. Then something bizarre -- quite strange, it was -- took place. I chased my tail around the room for hours!

It seemed like hours, until the boss lady picked me up. I was in her arms only a couple of minutes when she uttered the word … operation. The alarm bells started ringing; the word of dread. I nearly died. Me. Going under the knife …

My stimulation did something wrong to my tummy. Even now, I still do it – only it’s more exciting. But it safer. My personality features just lean back and laugh.
Ah well, I was only young then.

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GREAT KIWI FIRST …
IN 1919, EARNEST RUTHERFORD, BORN IN 1871, HAILED AS THE ‘FATHER OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS’ SPLITS ATOMIC NUCLEUS BY ALPHA-RAY BOMBARDMENT. “WHATEVER HE TOUCHED TURNED TO GOLD,” COMMENTED A FORMER COLLEAGUE. RUTHERFORD DIED IN 1937.
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Here comes the boss lady.

Harvey is a Leo at heart! says Sue.

The Leo personality is a natural born leader with a flair for the dramatic. Harvey never does anything by halves. He is ruled by the fiery sun, Leos can’t help but shine; and be larger than life.

And Harvey is a classic example!

He IS charismatic. He charms women and children alike every-time he sets foot outside the door. So much so the 30 minute walk can often take up over an hour. He stops and takes all the attention dished up to him.

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ON ITS WAY …
WALT DISNEY DOESN’T HAVE DEPRESSED MOODS, HE SAYS. THIS ENLIGHTENING YARN TELLS HOW IT IS: I’M GOING TO THE TOP! HIS FIRST SUCCESS WAS MICKEY MOUSE. WALT HAD TO TAKE THE MORTIMER OUT OF MICKEY -- SO WALT AND HIS WIFE LILLIAN PUT ON THEIR THINKING CAPS! SOON.
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He’s proud. You can tell. His tail points to the sky and gives something of a “Royal Wave” when he passes other dogs. He has absolutely no concept of his smallness compared to other dog species. Just as well they don’t eat him for breakfast!

He’s powerful. He know what he wants and how to get it! He also exerts his strength but in one direction only – the café. He loves a Puppa-chino!

He’s dramatic. Well, what can I say? All I can say is he takes after his owners. Just ask any of our friends – they adore him; everything about him. He get abundant love and gives it back tenfold.

Harvey: I agree with everything!


FILMBIZ: 60th Anniversary of the Gidget movie!

MRS MOVIES

SANDRA DEE PLAYED KATHY KOHNER, THE REAL-LIFE GIDGET.

YES, IT’S BEEN 60 YEARS SINCE GROMMET KATHY “GIDGET” KOHNER TOLD HER SCREENWRITER DAD ABOUT HER ADVENTURES ON THE BEACH AND THE WATER WITH A CREW DOWN FROM MALIBU. INADVENENTLY, SHE LAUNCHED HER SURFING TO THE MASSES WORLDWIDE.

Two movies were made of the original Gidget, the first being released in 1959. The calibre of actors selected for the part made this possible.

The Who? Who? includes James Darren, Sandra Dee, Cliff Roberton, Doug McClure, Arthur O’Connell and many others.

The reviewer at the time said a “fluffy teenage comedy-adventure” with Sandra Dee in the title role.

“She makes goo-goo eyes at a surfer, played by James Darren – but mum and dad are sceptical of the romance”.

All the actors are first class.

SOURCE: Adapted from PLD News Wire.

KATHY KOHNER WHO LAUNCHED HER SURFING TO A WORLDWIDE AUDIENCE.

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YOUR HEALTH …
NATIONAL DIABETES WEEK, JULY 13 TO JULY 20. DISCUSSED FULLY IS LIVING WITH DIABETES 1 AND 2 AND THE FOOD THAT IS REQUIRED. CONTACT DIABETES ASSOCIATION IN YOUR STATE.
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Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 19 July 19

THE VIETNAM WAR: Final. The battle of Long Khan and Operation Overlord

BOB FRESHFIELD

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

TANKS WERE READY FOR THE ASSAULT.

THE MAIN ENEMY POSITION IDENTIFIED, BUT THEY APPEARED TO BE AVOIDING OPEN COMBAT WITH THE AUSTRALIANS.

B Company landed about 1000 metres into their designated landing zone and took firing from nearly in front of A Company’s position.

The firing eased after a short while, allowing the remainder of the 3 RAR force to land.

Aggressive patrolling and a company sized sweep of the area led to the discovery that 3 RAR had been dropped to within 500 metres of a major enemy bunker system.

It became apparent that there was a strong presence of large Viet Cong and NVA troops moving away from 3 RAR, and a few contacts had been reported by the blocking forces.

The enemy, it appeared, seemed to be avoiding open combat with the Australians.

The main enemy position had been identified by nightfall on June 6; and at dawn on June 7 a heavy Artillery bombardment began for almost an hour.

Then 5 Platoon, B Company (3RAR), began to advance – but had only gone 100 metres. It was pinned down by volleys of firing from its front and both flanks.

They had stumbled onto the edge of well concealed and strongly defended bunkers, and called in helicopter gunships rather that run the risk of receiving more casualties by withdrawing.

With the rest of B Company trying to link up with its beleaguered 5 Platoon, D Company, with tanks and APCs, began an assault to what was thought to be the rear and flank of the bunker system.

However, they began to realise that the system was much larger anyone expected. The tanks were forced to halt while the infantry troops were brought up to begin an assault.

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GREAT AUSSIE FIRST...
IN 1933, DOROTHY JORDON BECAME THE FIRST WOMAN RADIO ANNOUNCER IN AUSTRALIA. JORDON TOLD HOUSEWIFE MAGAZINE: “I DIDN’T KNOW HOW IT WOULD TURN OUT FOR ME. BUT IT TURNED OUT TRUMPS”. –FM.
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By mid-afternoon, the B Company had stabilised its position with 5 Platoon survivors; and D Company had been repositioned to commence another assault.

Pushing through the dense jungle from the north-east, with Centurion tanks in close support, it was slow going.

Each bunker, at first located by troops was then crushed by the tanks, along with any occupants.

Therefore, D Company painstakingly searched each bunker systematically. It was later found that the area of bunkers covered almost a square kilometre.

During this final assault, C Company, which had been deployed to the south, located and captured a second bunker system that had been hastily abandoned with weapons and ammunition left behind by the fleeing Viet Cong.

Australia lost 3 killed and six wounded. Although official records show that only 5 bodies of the Viet Cong and NVA regulars were recovered; it is believe that many more lay in the crushed bunkers.

American Pioneers and Australian Engineers later demolished both bunkers sites, depriving the Viet Cong of a major resource.

SOURCES: Adapted from The Vietnam Veterans Federation, March 2017. Written by Bob Freshfield.

Next: The Vietnam War: By 1972, all Australian combat troops were withdrawn from Vietnam, the “unwinnable” war.

Below: Ready for the occasion.

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ON ITS WAY …
MEN’S HEALTH: YOU’RE STILL EMBARRASSED ABOUT GOING TO THE FAMILY DOCTOR? WHAT OLDER MEN SHOULD CONSIDER IS THAT EMBARRASSMENT CAN KILL OLDER AND WELL AS YOUNGER MEN. SOON.
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Great Aussie First: Good heavens, Doctor Balmain!

FRANK MORRIS

TRANSPORTER ALEXANDER ON WHICH BALMAIN SERVED.

DR BALMAIN WAS AN ASSISTANT SURGEON IN THE FIRST FLEET. HE WAS ALSO A NORFOLK ISLAND MAGISTRATE.

The Russians sold Alaska to the Americans; the Indians sold most of the land on which New York stands. They were both regrettable transactions, to be sure.

But Dr William Balmain’s bizarre land sale in 1801 is certainly one for the books.

Balmain was an assistant surgeon in the First Fleet transporter, Alexander. He served the colony in this role for three years. The proficient Balmain soon got transferred to Norfolk Island to take charge of medical services there, under the administration of Lieut-Governor Philip King.

Balmain also served as the island’s magistrate. As such, in 1793, he signed a proclamation by King “fixing prices for labour and foods, and providing the duty on spirits to be spent on schools.”

Indeed, it was a landmark edict for, not only Norfolk Island but for Australia. As one historian pointed out: “This was the first case of price-fixing … and the first time public money was devoted to education.”

Two years later Balmain returned to Sydney as principal surgeon. Aside from his medical responsibilities, he also continued in his position as a magistrate.

In 1800, he donned a naval uniform and was appointed registrar of imports and exports. He did the job expected of him, and for that was rewarded handsomely.

That year, Balmain was given several grants of prime land by Governor Hunter – 172 hectares at Field of Mars (now Marsfield), 110 hectares at Windsor and 222 hectares at what is now Balmain.

It is said that apart from conferring his name upon the district, his connection with the latter “was slight.” Located on a peninsular west of Sydney, this area was one of the earliest settled sections of the colony.

“It has always been a mixed community, with the early merchants’ and industrialists’ mansions on the foreshore and their workers’ cottages behind,” says The Oxford Literary Guide.

About twelve months after receiving the grants he sold up everything and headed back to England.

The land at Balmain was sold to a friend for a “token” amount of five shillings ($1)! There were no questions asked; no reasons given. When he left Sydney, Balmain was wracked by failing health.

He died in London in 1803.

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ON THE WAY …
IN 1937, THE MYSTERY OF AMELIA EARHART DEEPENED! LEADING SEARCHERS COVERED A GREAT PORTION OF THE PACIFIC OCEAN IN THEIR EFFORT TO TRACK THE WHERE-ABOUTS OF THE PIONEER PILOT AND HER CREW MEMBER. SOON.
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SOURCE: Grand Years, 2008.

Below: Dr William Balmain.


IN THE 1970s: The call for plastic film to replace glass, metal in packaging

FRANK MORRIS

THE PRINTING OF FLEXIBLE FILM DID REPLACE OTHER MATERIALS IN PACKAGING.

AUSTRALIA WILL ALSO BE CONSCIOUS OF THE PACKAGING APPEAL OF PLASTIC!, SAID DON AUSTIN.

“It is not science fiction,” said Don Austin, “to predict that by the end of the century plastic flexible films may have eventually replaced glass and metal in packaging.”

This is the way Austin, an expert on flexible film production, penned the article in GO Creative in Packaging, a newspaper which ear-marked a well-known packaging companies on how they would tackle the 70s.

Austin said that this will be brought about by “development of other versatile plastic films with suitable physical and chemical properties to meet the demands of the food processing industries throughout the world”.

He pointed out that the extension of the range of plastic films “will lend far more scope to pouches, packs and containers”.

He stressed that the permeability of a certain pack can be varied … according to the type of product it contains and its intended life”.

Austin said that a unique breakthrough for the 1970s “will be the ‘cook in pouch’ packaging concept for pre-cooked meals if it can be economically produced!”

He said its ideal for Australia conditions and will almost certainly find its own level of consumer acceptance.

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ON ITS WAY …
JOHN FROST COLLECTS NEWSPAPER WHICH WILL BECOME HISTORY. HIS NEWSPAPERS RECORD EVERYTHING LIKE WHEN A COMEDIAN WAS ACCUSED OF EATING A HAMSTER TO THE DEATH OF KINGS AND QUEENS. SOON.
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“It is understandable that the flexible packaging industry in Australia will never be able to use all the flexible materials on the market today.

“This, in my opinion, suggests that we must be more selective … always conscious of product protection and package sales appeal.”

He said this will allow the producer “to main a sensible pricing structure”.

Frank Morris comments: Mr Don Austin knew the flexible packaging industry when it comes down to plastic film. I know his name and that his reputation spread far and wide. His article explains all the things that were to happen – from glass bottles, dishes, and other utensils, to pouches, packs, straws and containers and plastic bags. Now, fifty years later, we’re endeavouring to REPLACE plastic. It might be cheaper BUT notable scientist are concerned about the environment. Plus, it is menacing our wide-spread oceans too.

Below: Go Creative in Packaging newspaper.


BACKTRACK: Plastic in peril or perils of plastic – the 1962 and 2010 special reports

FRANK MORRIS and TIME MAGAZINE

In Plastic Retailer, a trade magazine, in the 1961 edition, I wrote an article titled “plastic in peril”. It read in part: “Housewives are using plastic for a variety of reasons and grossly over-estimating their durability.

“For instance, pouring boiling fat into a plastic bowl; or putting hubby’s dinner on a plastic plate and putting it into the oven to heat it up were unexaggerated examples, which aptly illustrated the maltreatment of plastics’ houseware.

“Consumer plastics are in dire peril. Someone is slipping.”

In 2010, TIME had to say in a Special Report on the ‘peril of plastic’: Chemicals in plastics and other products seem

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GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
LOLA MONTEZ, WHO HAD BEEN MISTRESS TO COMPOSER FRANZ LISZT, AND THE NOVELIST ALEXANDRE DUMAS AND OTHERS, WAS THE FIRST TO PERFORM THE SPIDER DANCE IN AUSTRALIA IN 1856. MINERS WERE THRILLED.
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harmless, but mounting evidence links them to health problems – and Washington lacks the power to protect us.

Recycling codes can help to identify problematic chemicals.

Some examples … reports TIME, were shampoo bottles, cups, containers and water bottles.

Type of plastic used was PVC, among others.

SOURCE: Plastic Retailer, August 1961.

Below: The Plastic Retailer magazine which a story the maltreatment of plastic homewares. Those were the days!


ON ITS WAY …
CCCCCCCCCRASH CRISES! TWO IMPORTAN INSTANT PROBLEMS THAT CAUSE CAR CRASHES ARE COMPLACENCY AND DRIVER DISTRACTION. PEOPLE WHO HAVE DEMENTIA – ARE THEY FIT TO DRIVE. SOON.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 12 July 19

THE VIETNAM WAR: The battle of Long Khan and Operation Overlord

BOB FRESHFIELD

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

BRAVERY WAS PUT TO THE TEST AS DIGGER DRAGS A WOUNDED MATE BACK TO THE COMPANY POSITION.

OPERATION OVERLORD WAS PUT INTO EFFECT WITH SOME TREPIDATION AMONG THE LOWER RANKS.

The Australian government began reducing troops at the end of 1970. Left were 2 battalions at 1ATF Nui Dat, along with substantial support of armour, artillery and RAAF air support.

By the end of 1970 Phuoc Tuy province was almost free of NVA and Viet Cong large scale movements, and a lot of the security of the provincial towns went to the South Vietnamese ARVN troops to administer.

With 8RAR going home, and not replaced, 3RAR arrived for its second tour to join 7RAR, who were also in the process of returning to Australia.

And 4RAR/NZ, with a contingent of a Company from New Zealand, arrived in March 1971 as the last elements of 7RAR departed.

Thus, Phuoc Tuy province became the responsibility of just 2 battalions for the remainder of the war.

Patrolling was by Australian Special Air Service, (SAS), in the north of Phuoc Tuy province, near the border with Long Khan province.

It began to show signs of the presence of large numbers of Viet Cong D445 Regiment in the vicinity of the Courtenay rubber plantation.

Indeed, when given permission to extend patrolling 4 kilometres into Long Khan province, intelligence … found D445 and the 33NVA regiment were attempting to disrupt local security, using the area to refit and retrain.

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HEALTH MATTERS …
NATIONAL DIABETES WEEK JULY 13-20 – GET INFORMATION ON HEALTHLY EATING TIPS, HOW OTHERS MANAGE THEIR DIABETES, DIABETES EDUCATORS AND MANY OTHERS. 1300 136 588.
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Operation Overlord was put into effect with some trepidation from among the lower ranks.

They realised the name and loading zones as well as the date of commencement, were the same as those used during the WW2 Normandy D-day landings; this might telegraph Australia’s intentions.

However, the operation was launched on June 6, 1971, with 3RAR and C Squadron Centurion Tanks given the task of driving the Viet Cong and North Vietnamese into a blocking combination of 4RAR/NZ, A Squadron 3 Cav Regiment, and 8th Battalion 3rd US Cavalry Regiment.

Next: There was a large group of enemy troops hidden in a bunker system. They had been avoiding open combat with the Australians.

SOURCE: Adapted from Vietnam Veterans Journal from a series by Bob Freshfield.
Below: A digger urges his mates to take cover.


GREAT AUSSIE FIRST: Election stood in the way of the monorail!

FRANK MORRIS

BRITISH INVENTOR BRENNAN’S MONORAIL.

BRENNAN WAS A DEAD ISSUE POLITICALLY.

Australia’s first monorail system could have been up and running in the early 1900s had it not been
for an untimely federal election.

British inventor Louis Brennan, who lived in Australia from 1861 to 1880, designed the first gyroscopic monorail system which he offered to the Australian Government in 1907.

But before Brennan’s unique transportation system could be discussed with the other states, the then Prime Minister Alfred Deakin was voted out of office.

Deakin’s successor, Labour’s Andrew Fisher, was keen to press on with the idea but nothing came of it.
By 1909, when Deakin was re-elected Prime Minister for yet a third time, Brennan’s monorail was a dead issue politically.

That same year Brennan held public demonstrations of his monorail in London with spectacular success.

GREAT AUSSIE FIRST: Going to the “flicks” and the death of the cinema

FRANK MORRIS

THE MOVIES WERE AN EXPERIENCE THAT BELONGED TO A GREAT MASS OF CINEMAGOERS.

“The flicks” was short for “the flickers”. It peterer out in the mid 1950.

It’s a hangover from those magical early days when the movies were black and white images that flickered on cinema screens in the city, suburbs or the back of the beyond.

It is an appellation that obviously came from the pages of the movie fan magazines like Silver Screen, Photoplay, Modern Screen, Screenland, and dozens of others, which were around when Tinseltown was America’s dreamland.
The movies were an experience that appealed to a great mass of people. In pre-television days tens of thousands of families would pile into the roadster and head for the nearest cinema.

By the 1920s there were over 750 cinemas in Australia -- that’s not counting halls, tents, and former live theatres. The bulk of cinemas, invariably in the art deco style, was built in the 1920s and 1930s, particularly when the ‘talkies’ came on the scene.

In the first year of sound, theatre attendances went through the roof. “Every amusement except film recorded a drop in patronage,” writes one leading historian. It is safe to claim that almost every suburb and country town in Australia had a cinema.

The Depression years 1929 to 1933, movie patronage took a severe tumble as unemployment hit the 30 percent mark. By the late 1930s attendances doubled to over 126,000,000, and kept soaring.

In 1955, twelve months before the introduction of television, there were over 1700 theatres and 166 other “film showing” venues.

When television sank its teeth into the film market, audiences plunged overnight and many theatres were unceremoniously closed. By 1960 there were only about 1590 theatres; and by 1970 only 970-odd, which included 230 drive-ins.


SHAPES & SIZES: Viking Ships -- How yester-year crafts grew to become to giants of the sea!

LONGSHIPS WERE SLEEK WOODEN CRAFTS WITH A SINGLE SQUARE SAIL, USED FOR EXPLORING AND LAUNCHING RAIDS. ABOUT 1000 YEARS AGO, VIKING WARRIORS ROWED THEIR LONGSHIPS WHEN THE WIND BLEW FROM THE WRONG DIRECTION; OR STOPPED BLOWING ALL TOGETHER.
SOURCE: Mighty Machines Parragon, Bath, UK.

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GREAT AUSSIE FIRST DAYLIGHT SAVING WAS FIRST TRIED IN 1917; AND THEN IN 1942. TASMANIA’S DAYLIGHT SAVING HAPPENED IN 1968. IN 1971, NSW, SA, AND CANBERRA FOLLOWED TASMANIA. WESTERN AUSTRALIA, QUEENSLAND AND NORTHERN TERRITORY DON’T OBSERVE DAYLIGHT SAVING. – FM.
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Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 04 July 19

WALTZING MATILDA: A story of a film that was never made!

BY A SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

PASTORALIST LEADER, McLAGAN, WAS A DETERMINED AND UNCOMPROMISING SQUATTER. WALTZING MATILDA WAS THE EPIC TITLE OF THE SONG THAT FOUNDED A NATION.

The story begins …

When the squatters, or the landed aristocracy, were caught treating their shearers working for a pittance under extreme hardship and dreadful living conditions all hell was going to break loose.

During 1894, this conflict between the squatters and shearers reached its climax.

The central character in this rebellion was Jock Burns, son of a union shearer. Burns is good-looking, of hard-working Scottish stock who doesn’t care for his father’s union ideology.

Jock starts on his journey through the outback primarily to view the plight of how the shearers and their families lived.

The Pastoralists Association leader, McLagan, who, for 30 years of sticking to the grind and risk, has carved out three large pastoral holdings in three different colonies.

All three of the holdings were set in the lush rich of the prosperous western district of Victoria, up to the harsh and tough, unforgiving outback of NSW and Queensland.

McLagan was a determined and uncompromising squatter who was not going to give into the union demands.

…………………………………………………………………………………………….......................................................…
GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
WHO WAS THE CARTOON CHARACTER TO FIRST ATTAIN THE CELEBRITY OF THE HUMAN STAR?
…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…

There are a hard and strongly cohesive bunch of characters on both sides of this conflict and neither was used to giving up without a fight; the outback moves closer to armed insurrection.

With these events, Jock was thrust into a situation where his sense of a “fair go” compels him to take part and join the union side.

His own leadership qualities force him to take on, reluctantly, the role of a hero.

FINAL PART: Jock pals up with a top-gun shearer, the great Dave Grant, and with him develops a special mateship.

Below: Policemen were everywhere during the height of the battle.


AUSSIE CARTOONS: Images from the arrival of the First Fleet up until now!

FRANK MORRIS


A STOUCH TAKES PLACE IN A FIRST FLEET CARTOON.

INKED: AUSTRALIAN CARTOONS IS ON EXHIBITION AT THE NATIONAL LIBRARY, CANBERRA. TO CLOSE ON JULY 21, 2019.

Cartoons, it’s said, capture the moments. This is history truly in a memorable way.  The declaration of war, the dismissal of a prime minister, or a crash in the economy.

All of these can be frozen in time in several brush strokes.

As managing editor of a magazine, I attempted to join that elite bunch of people that have contributed over 14,000 cartoons for public consumption.

It all started when Prime Minister Whitlam was sacked from office by the Governor-General Sir John Kerr. The Prime Minister had even recommended him for the job as G-G.

I was at work when the news broke. I immediately told the editor to drop the cover and prepare to receive a replacement early in the morning.

The magazine was ready to go to press, when a telephone from the ‘boss’ simply said “don’t print that cover”.

…………………………………………………………………………………………..............................................................
AUSSIE CARTOON …
A SMART LADY DROPPED INTO A MOVIE HOUSE WHILE THE NEWSREEL WAS PLAYING. THEN SUDDENLY SHE SAID TO THE GENTLEMAN NEXT TO HER, “THERE’S JOHN! AT THE RACES! AND HE SAID HE WAS BUSY IN THE CITY.” YEAR 1923 (CIRCA).
………………………………………………………………………………………..............................................................…

The intended cover portrayed Whitlam as a statue, in a room with other statues of prime ministers, with Kerr racing towards Whitlam holding an evil-looking sword that was about looped his head off.

It was a scintillating cover. All of the office agreed. The editorial remained as well comment from the 12 main morning newspapers.

On show, are over 14,000 cartoons from before the arrival of the First Fleet in 1788 until now.

It showcases the work of some of Australia’s most famous cartoonists – Will Dyson, David Low, Phil May, Judy Horacek, Bruce Petty, Alan Moir, Cathy Wilcox and others.

For me: I wanted to purloin the artwork and have it framed. But it wasn’t to be found.

Below: The Australian Stock Exchange Journal, November 1975, missed out its cover of the century.


VALE: The “one and only” Bill Collins dies at home but his great knowledge of the movies lives on!

FRANK MORRIS

“MR MOVIES”, BILL COLLINS, WAS APPLAUDED FOR HIS INDEPTH KNOWLEDGE OF THE MOVIE SCENE.  HE GOES OVERBOARD ON THE FOUNTAINHEAD AS IT MANAGES TO FIND ITS WAY INTO COLLINS’ “ALL TIME” GREAT MOVIES.

Bill Collins, “Mr Movies”, died at home on Friday, June 21, aged 84. Collins favourite saying during his tenure of his much-loved Golden Years of Hollywood for Channel Seven (1966 – 1975) was to “sit and relax.”

He worked as a movie commentator for Channel Nine, 1975-1979; and Channel Ten from 1980-1993. Collins moved to Foxtel in October 1995.

He was a film critic with a vast knowledge of his subject.

A profile on Collins’ “undiscriminating admiration” of Hollywood didn’t pass without notice. A fellow commentator, David Stratton, considered him “a national treasure.”

He wrote hundreds of magazine columns and articles on the movie scene around the world.

Collins went berserk every time he had the honour to present The Fountainhead on television. Here is the full article which was published in 2011 or thereabouts:

Professional movie buff Bill Collins tends to go overboard every time he presents The Fountainhead on his Golden Years of Hollywood.

He never fails to wax lyrical about the story, the script and the stars – Gary Cooper and Patricia Neal –- in his usual profound fashion.

Although the film, which is an uneven adaptation of Ayd Rand’s novel (she did it herself) of the name, was released in 1949. The film is somewhat ‘campy’ these days but it still manages to find its way into Collins’ ten “all-time” great movies.

But that’s another story.

However, Mr Collins will be pleased to learn last that at last negotiations are under way in Hollywood to produce a television mini-series based on Rand’s block-buster novel Atlas Shrugged.

(It was eventually made into a 3-part film and released on September, 2011.)

Rand was one-quarter into the script when she died in March, 1982.

In the course of her 77 years, Ayn (pronounced Ein) Rand was acclaimed as “the most creative thinker alive”.  Although her elephantine novels, The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged were deprecated by most critics, they sold millions of copies.

The capstone of Rand’s literary career was Atlas Shrugged published in 1957. It’s a “apocalyptic fantasy”, which takes place in America a generation or two hence.

“Combining elements of Buck Rogers, Mickey Spillane and the Rover Boy, it pre-visions the horrors awaiting humanity unless it mends its ways,” was how John Kobler described Altas Shrugged in a 1960s profile of Rand.

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GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
THE FIRST RADIO MAGAZINE IN AUSTRALIA WAS IN 1923. WHAT WAS IT CALLED?
…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…

He moved to Foxtel in 2013 and, at same time, marked his own 50 years in television. “It was pleasure to work with our longest serving commentator on air from our launch date,” said a Foxtel spokesperson.

“Those who worked alongside of him learnt so much from his rich catalogue of movie history.”

Collins top ten are: Gone With the Wind, 1939; The Band Wagon, 1953; The Wizard of Oz, 1939; Vertigo, 1958; All About Eve, 1950; The Voice of the Turtle, 1947; The Razor’s Edge, 1946; The Picture of Dorian Gray, 1945; Brief Encounter, 1945; Waterloo Bridge, 1940.

SOURCE: From Grand Years online in 2011.

Below: “Mr Movies” gets a plug!


WATZLING MATILDA: Final. A story of a film that was never made!

BY SPECIAL CORRESSPONDENT

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

LIZ BATHES IN THE GROWING ATTACTION WITH JOCK’S BURNS.

Within this big canvas, is the growing attraction between Jock and McLagan’s daughter Liz. She is a woman ahead of her time. She see Jock’s unique talents and care were something to be regarded.

The chemistry between them was often stormy and is played out against the historic event which was about to be unfurled.

Jock and his travels would bring increased mateship with the great Dave Grant. Grant was a top-gun shearer and past hero of the union movement.

This is to be Dave’s last season as a shearer. He had promised his wife, Mary, to make the first payment on their own land.

Though, within the shearer’s camp, Dave’s is the voice of reason when it comes to violence. He is a counter-weight to the heavily armed radicals who want nothing less than revolution.

While trying to dissuade a certain group of scabs into coming over, Dave is shot down by hired gunmen and dies in Jock’s arms.

Jock realises at that moment that he must tread a path in Dave’s footsteps and begins organising to find a solution to this over-bearing conflict.

…………………………………………………………………………………………….......................................................…
GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
SHE WAS CROWNED THE FIRST MISS AUSTRALIA IN 1926. ALTHOUGH SHE WAS 19, SHE WAS A RANK OUTSIDER. WHAT WAS HER NAME?
........................................................................................................................................................................................

His meeting with Banjo Paterson restores his distant dreams of being something else other than a shearer.

Against big scenes of burning river boats, woolshed fires and attacks in trains loaded with scabs and other armed hangers-on, the night certainly turns into a crazy emotional coaster ride.

Strong as the love affair is, Waltzing Matilda is not light on humour and the mateship which sustained men in a hard country like Australia.

The shearers, who were born independent and stubborn people, were democrats to the final core, with an instinctive feel for what constituted a “fair go”.

Jock and the leaders forge an agreement with the rich and powerful which will change society forever.

LATER: These ideals were carried over into Federation in 1901. Which means, simply, the establishment and formation of the first Labor Government in the world. They were passed into law, and many innovations towards a fairer, more just society, were achieved.

SOUCED: The contents have been adapted from the Waltzing Matilda Film Presentation Booklet produced in 2001.

Below: Shearers versus the police.

Next: More language you don’t often see.


GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …

THE FIRST BOOK TO USE THE WORD ‘AUSTRALIA’ WAS IN THE TEXT OF ZOOLOGY OF NEW HOLLAND.

WHAT DATE WAS IT PUBLISHED?

THE ANSWERS: FELIX, WIRELESS WEEKLY, BERYL MILLS, 1794.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 28 June 19

WALTZING MATILDA: Part 2. Out of this vortex came a remarkable song!

FRANK MORRIS

IT WAS ANOTHER PERIOD OF MAYHEM.

THE SHEARER’S STRIKE WOULD UNFURL THE GREATEST STORM-CENTRE OF AUSTRALIAN HISTORY.

It was the worst of times. Australia was caught up in the depression of the early 1890s, the scar of which had contributed directly to the origins of a political labour movement and Federation.

By the 1880s, Australia was well and truly riding on the sheep’s back.

The country’s burgeoning riches emanated largely from the bales of fine wool which were shipped to the woollen mills in America, Europe and England.

When the depression hit, the pastoralists resolved to reduce wages, starting in the shearing sheds.

This intense antagonism, which had been simmering between capital and labour, finally exploded. Strikes and lockouts were the order of the day.

The Shearers’ Wars had begun.

The powerful and wealthy pastoralists (squatters) mustered their forces; they decided that it was their right to hire anyone they choose – scabs and non-union labour. The pastoralists were aided and abetted by the colonial governments, the military, troopers and police.

In one small Queensland centre alone, Barcaldine, over 1500 troopers with cannons and Gatling guns confronted one thousand armed shearers who were attacking a train loaded with scabs. Over 800 shearers were arrested, twenty of their leaders were sentenced to seven years hard labour.

After several violent clashes between shearers, police and unionists, seven woolsheds were burned to the ground. The last property in Queensland to suffer was Dagworth Station at Kynuna. A band of militant shearers torched the woolshed incinerating up to 140 lambs.

............................................................…………………………………………………………………………………………..
BACK TRACK …
FELIX, A CARTOON CREATED BY PAT SULLIVAN, AN AUSTRALIAN RESIDING IN AMERICA. BUT EVEN THOUGH HE DREW FELIX FOR THE FLICKS, THE STRIP WAS DRAWN BY OTTO MESSMER AND APPEARED IN MANY PUBLICATION.
…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…

The lawyer and bush poet Banjo Paterson was in Winton at the time visiting the fiancé he never married, Sarah Riley. He visited Dagworth Station.

For two years, from 1892, Paterson and Henry Lawson staged a “rhyming match” in the bushman’s newspaper. They regarded it as a bit of a lark, and both poets “slam-banged” away at each other until, says Paterson, “they ran out of material.”

During this historic literary fray Lawson, who was also touched by the plight of the shearers, wrote Freedom on the
Wallaby, which heralded the call for mass resistance, brotherhood and the struggle against greed.

Paterson became involved in the Queensland conflict as a mediator. He composed Waltzing Matilda, its pure and captivating verses signalling the fundamental shift in the romantic rhetoric and ethos of the bush workers.

One hundred years on the song Waltzing Matilda has transcended the war-cry of the shearers, pastoralists, unionists and rebels, to become one of the best remembered songs -- Australia’s unofficial anthem.

BAGS OF WOOL BEING WHISKED AWAY. Below: “I WONDER IF THE WOOL WILL ARRIVE,” SAID THE SHEARERS.

WALTZING MATILDA: Glossary of terms that crop up in this project

FRANK MORRIS

A fair go: Giving a person an equitable opportunity; a fair choice

Billabong: An arm of a river, made by water flowing from the main stream, after rain or a flood; a pool or lagoon is formed when the water level falls.

Federation: The formation of the colonies into the commonwealth of Australia on January 1, 1901.

Jumbuck: A sheep

Labor Party: Formed out of the continuing defeats of the big strikes in 1890s, led union officials to press for the forming of a labour party “as an additional means of seeking union objectives.” The first Federal Labor Party was elected in 1904, but it could not pass its own legislation; the Ministry resigned four months later.

Mate: A comrade, fellow-worker; habitual companion.

Mateship: A bond between equal partners; an inviolable mateship is regarded a characteristic Australian virtue.

Swagman: An itinerant worker, carrying a swag, in search of employment.

Tucker bag: A bag to carry food and drink; usually carried by swagmen/women.

Waltzing Matilda: To carry one’s swag; to travel the road.

MORE AUSTRALIA SLANGUAGE! IMAGINE THESE TERMS BEING EXPRESSED IN A BROAD, AUSSIE DRAWL!

Akubra: A brand of bushman’s hat made from rabbit skins. It is widely used now to describe any form of bushman’s hat.

Bag: To knock or disparage.

Banker: Overflowing river.

Barney: Fight or brawl.

Battler: Someone who keeps trying and deserves better of life.

Bitser: Mongrel dog.

Bloke: A male; also “The Boss” in a shearing shed.

Blue Heeler: Australian cattle dog renowned for its quick reflexes.

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BACK TRACK …THE FIRST FEDERAL NEWSPAPER CORRESPONDENT WAS REG LEONARD … THE SUN WAS FIRST DAILY NEWSPAPER IN AUSTRALIA TO CARRY NEWS ON ITS FRONT PAGE … FIRST ABC POLITICAL COMMENTATOR WAS E.A. MANN -- OR “THE WATCHMAN”.………………………………………………………………………………………..................................................................

Bluey: A blanket; also a parking fine.

Hump a bluey: Carry the swag.

Boggi: Shearer’s handpiece.

Bowyang: String that bush workers have tied around their trouser legs.

Brumby: A wild horse named from either booramby, native for horse; or from James Brumby, an early settler, known for his horses.

Next: More names you may know, or not know!

SOURCE: Adapted from the book, Australian Folklore.


YOUR DOG: Cancer -- wherever the dingo goes, I will. “Oh, my god!”

FRANK MORRIS

THAT YAPPY, MY BROTHER.

AM I THAT DIFFERENT FROM A DOG? EVEN PEOPLE SKIRT AROUND ME. AFTER ALL, I AM REFERRED TO AS “OUR NATIVE DOG.” HOW’S THAT FOR A LAUGH!

I was bred by a fellow who loved dingoes. My mother and father were bred by the fellow. So was grand-dad and gramma too. In fact, all my family was for the last 25 years.

He wanted to domesticate the dingo.

In the hundreds of kilometres around us he was simply called, “there’s the guy who loves dingoes!”

I am a dingo through and through. I love being a dingo. It suits me. Being a dingo matches all the qualities that I possess.

I am a tenacious sort of beast — all dingoes are; I love that word because it shows what we really are about. If dingoes weren’t, they would have starved. They don’t give up. When their family haven’t eaten for a few days, I’m told, the pack of them would hunt down a kangaroo* or some other marsupial.

I’m patient – it’s another trait. I am told that dingoes will sit for a long time hidden away by undergrowth until the prey returns. There is usually a protracted fight but, by and large, the dingoes are the victors.

I’m very sympathetic: that is because I am privately bred. When I was small people used the pick me up and play with me as if I were their ‘native’ dog.

.......................................................………………………………………………………………………………………………
ON THE WAY …
IN THE 1840s THE DINGO WAS DECRIBED AS AN “UNPLEASANT NEIGHBOUR”. THESE CREATURES WERE ROAMING IN VAST NUMBERS. JULY.
…………………………………………………………………..........................................................…………………………

Whereas, my ancestors would eat the person alive; and look for more.

Even today, I feel influential. But my ancestors – they would yell or howl in an unearthly kind of tone; and be dangerous to anyone and anything in sight. Being influential for a wild dingo had a serious outcome – live or die.

Let’s say this before I go: the dingo came to Australia about 4000 years ago as an Asiatic Wolfe or Indian Wolfe dog.

Most of the dingo breeds roam wild country, especially in the Northern Territory. Today it’s different. Most of the dingoes are roaming near the cities where there is no drought.

That’s when people attempted to raise them as a fully-fledged dingo. (June 20 – July 20.)

*The pack of dingoes only attacked a large kangaroo when they were starving; otherwise, on a normal day, they would concentrate on the joey.

Below: Looking for prey: A wild dingo, and its cub.


ARTBEAT: Ike referred to his painting as “daubs – nothing else”

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

IKE ADMITTED THAT HE WAS A ‘RAINY DAY PAINTER’.

The nearest Ike ever came to an art course was mechanical drawing at West Point. In Ike’s paintings, you would see a deep love of colour, beauty, and most of all, life itself.

“The beginning of Ike’s painting as a hobby is really quite a story”, said Mamie Eisenhower. “It was in 1947.”

On the thirty-second anniversary of their engagement, Mamie gave Ike a set of paint equipment. “He painted everything.

“He painted landscapes and portraits. He’d make up things and paint them.

“It didn’t make any difference to him at all.  He loved to mix colours.

“I never dreamed that he would start painting as a hobby. It was a gift and joy to him”.

IKE PAINTED EVERYTHING. HE EVEN MADE THINGS UP.

CAMP DAVID – THEY HAD UPROARIOUS TIMES

Everybody loved Camp David. It was hard to understand why anybody would not like up it up there. It was far away from all the hubbub and executive life.

Ike used it for fun. He would have his own groups of friends come up play to golf and bridge. He would drive a ball from the back of the yard … up to a putting green near the main cabin.

…………………………………………………………………………………………….......................................................…
ON ITS WAY …
CHANGING MEN: PUTTING AN END TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE. ANDREW IS JUST ONE OF THOSE MEN WHO SEEK DESPERATELY TO CHANGE. JUNE.
………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................……

They’d have uproarious times   you never heard such laughter and carrying on. In the evening, Ike would go out in the backyard and cook all the steaks.

It was always a good time. When Ike left office after eight years as president, the only thing I missed about those years was Camp David.

THE RED BARN WAS USED ON A CHRISTMAS CARD

The Red Barn was one of Ike’s favourite paintings. As a boy in Kansas, he remembered barns like this. Unlike some of his paintings, The Red Barn was something that he dreamed up in his mind; it was not a copy. He used The Red Barn as a Christmas card one year for the White House staff. But, in order to print the Christmas cards, the painting has be borrowed from Chief West, a Navy gardener at Camp David. He admired the painting on Ike’s easel one day, next it was his! Mrs Eisenhower said, “I have a print of The Red Barn hanging on the sunporch at the farm.”

………………………………………………………………………...........................................................……………………
HAVE A LAUGH …
FATHERS MUST NOT GET TOO DISCOURGED IF THEIR SONS REJECT THEIR ADVICE. IT WILL NOT BE WASTED. YEARS LATER, THE SONS WILL BE OFFERING THEIR OWN OFFSPRING THEIR ADVICE.
…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…

DAVID EISENHOWER AT FORT BENNING, GEORGIA

Anytime Ike painted David, it was one of his favourites! And the fact is, if he liked a certain picture he would paint it several times. There are two painting of David playing golf: one hangs in Eisenhower son’s house; the other is in Mamie Eisenhower’s cabin at the Augusta National Country Club.

SOURCE: Adapted from Ike’s Paintings: The ones I love the most, SEPost, March 1974.

COMING: The Art Warriors: George W. Bush and his paintings.


HISTORY LIVES:

IT’S BEEN 100 YEARS SINCE THE SS TUGGERAH SANK OFF WATTAMOLLA, NSW, IN MAY 1919. ON BOARD WERE THE CAPTAIN AND FIVE CREW MEMBERS. THE 56 METRE LONG COASTAL COLLIER LEFT FROM BULLI JETTY, THERE WAS A SLIGHT LIST TO PORT, INDICTATING THE COAL WASN’T EVENLY DISTRIBUTED. THE COLLIER “TURNED TURTLE” IN ROUGH SEAS, SAID ONE NEWSPAPER. REPORTING THE TRAGEDY, OFFICALS SAID THAT JUST AFTER 4PM, OFF MARLEY BEACH, THE SHIP WAS HIT BY A SIX METRE HIGH WAVE. WITHIN MINUTES, THE TUGGERAH HAS VANISHED. – FM.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 21 June 19

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