All Posts

Searching for posts in the month of: February 2020

Number of blogs returned: 1 to 4 records of 4

VALE: June Dally-Watkins dead

AMAZING WOMAN: “REMEMBER, SHE IS AN ICON”.

JUNE DALLY-WATKINS, THE TRAILBLAZER WHO TURNED AUSTRALIA INTO A “POLITE AND WELL-GROOMED NATION”, DIED LAST WEEK-END, AGED 92. MAGGIE TABBERER, A CLOSE FRIEND AND FELLOW MODEL, SAID THE “ETIQUETTE QUEEN” WILL BE REMEMBERED AS AN ICON. “JUNE WAS AN AMAZING WOMAN. SHE TAUGHT MANY GIRLS HOW TO WALK, HOW TO TALK, AND TO BE THE BEST THAT THEY COULD BE”. – FM.


John Frost, the headline hunter: The newspapers are a unique record of events when they happen

JOHN FROST WITH A ‘HANDFUL’ OF HIS NEWSPAPERS. THE FUHRER EDITION IS TUCKED AWAY IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT-HAND CORNER. Below: THE DEATH OF QUEEN VICTORIA.

ONE OF FROST’S PRIZED NEWSPAPERS IS THE BLACK-BOARDED ONE-PAGE EDITON OF A GERMAN DAILY REPORTING THE DEATH OF THE FUHRER.

FRANK MORRIS

In the year 2000, I penned an article on John Frost after he forwarded me a mountain of news stuff and newspapers covering some of the intricate global events.

He went on to say that his collection had newspaper and news sheets dating back to rollicking times of the 17th century when the newspaper was in its infancy.

Frost’s fascination with newsprint started when he was a 10-year-old child in 1930. “After that I became hooked on collecting newspapers which recorded momentous events,” recalled John.

John Frost who collects – COLLECTS -- newspaper is no ordinary bloke.

The British-based Frost Historical Newspaper Collection comprises more than 60,000 British and international editions and 150,000 press cuttings dating from 1640.

In fact, Mr Peter Jones, of the Welsh (UK) Art Council, said it has been hailed as “the most remarkable collection” in the world.

Frost describes his mountain of newspapers as representing “a good slice of history”.  He is, he says, “a man who looks forward to the past”.  His business is collecting events which will become history.

The newspapers in this unique collection record everything from the day a British comedian was accused of eating a hamster, to the coronations and deaths of kings and queens.

A veteran of Normandy and now in his early eighties, Frost had been collecting since 1930.  “I was only ten and living in Notting Hill.  I remember the shouts of the newspaper vendors when the R101 airship crashed in France on its maiden voyage,” he says.

“I raced home to my mother who gave me a penny.  A few moments later I was back for another. It was a Sunday and the Sunday Express cost twopence”.

From that earth-shattering tragedy, Frost became “hooked” on collecting newspapers which recorded “momentous events”.

He was then kept busy with the rise of Hitler, the Spanish Civil War, the abdication of King Edward VIII, the Munich Crisis and so on.  His collection started to grow like Topsy.

After he was demobbed in 1946, Frost travelled for the next six years around Europe, collecting newspapers at every port of call; from Orkney Islands to Berlin.

“As a Normandy veteran I recall raiding billets evacuated by the Germans.  It paid off.  I managed to ‘capture’ a truly historic German army paper which reported the allied invasion”.

One of his prized newspapers of war years is a copy of the black-bordered one-page edition of the Lubecken Zeitung, reporting the death of the Fuhrer – Our leader has fallen – “in action”.

He has over 15,000 different newspapers, including some US editions, covering World War II from beginning to end.  And that is just the tip of the iceberg.

The collection covers the death and coronation of every British Monarch since 1751, the election of every American President since 1832 and “practically” every major event in the life of Winston Churchill.

There are thousands of British and American editions which report the American Civil War, the Boer War, Korea, Vietnam, the Falklands and Middle East wars, famous trials, major disasters, obituaries, space exploration, Royal Events and notable sporting achievements.

.........................................................................................................................................................................................
ABOUT THE OLYMPICS …
FANNY DURACK WAS GIVEN HER FARE TO MAKE SURE SHE APPEARED IN THE 1912 STOCKHOLM OLYMPICS GAMES. ACCORDING TO A NEWSPAPER ARTICLE, “FORGOTTEN HEROINES,” AUSTRALIAN OFFICALS REFUSED TO ADD THE CHAMPION SWIMMER TO THEIR FIVE-MAN SWIMMING TEAM. – FM. CONTINUED.
………………………………………………………………………………………………........................................................

His “crown jewels” include the rare colour newspaper of 1909, reporting the French aviator Bleriot’s historic flight over the English channel; the sinking of the Titanic in 1912;  The Times of 1874, announcing the birth of Winston Churchill; the Wisconsin News reporting the death of Rudolph Valentino; the death of suffragette Emily Davidson, who threw herself under the King’s horse at a race meeting in 1913;  the Neues Wiener Tagblett of 1914, reporting the assassination of Sarajevo of the Crown Prince of Austria.

Says Frost: “Whenever a big event takes place, no matter where in the world it is, a newspaper reporter will always be there. Every day in every country in the world newspapers are on sale with some dramatic story only hours, minutes even, after the event”.

He says that to gain a “more personal perspective” on the world-wide events he likes “to get the newspaper from where it happened”.  In the case of the Apollo II moon walk in 1969, for example, he has the newspaper from Neil Armstrong’s home town.

My first contact with Frost was in 1998.  I came across an article he wrote for the MacMillan’s Press Directory.  He replied to my letter promptly.

A few days later a package of newspapers arrived, the first of many, among which was a copy of the New York Herald, reporting the death of Abraham Lincoln and various editions of British newspapers from the 1930s, reporting some major event.

“This (newspaper collecting) is a wonderful pursuit,” he says in his first letter.  “This century has certainly seen history in a hurry.  It’s wonderful seeing instant news on television.  But nothing can beat the printed word and reading the full story”.

<< Part 2. John Frost: Headlines we will never forget by Elaine Williams. Coming March 13.

COMING: Skateboarding, the pastime that leaves blood on the sidewalks, was developed as a sport in 1960s, will be introduced at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games.

 

DAILY EXPRESS: MAN ON THE MOON.

……………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................
ABOUT THE OLYMPICS …
EARLIER THIS CENTURY, FANNY DURACK ALMOST SUFFERED FROM AN UNUSAL FATE. DURACK “BECAME THE FIRST WOMAN TO WIN A GOLD MEDAL AFTER SOME PROMINENT WOMEN SUBSCRIBED TO RAISE HER FARE,” WROTE DEBORAH HOPE OF THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD. CONTINUED.– FM.


HISTORIC MYSTERY: Was it man, woman or a young person The Man from Snowy River?

BANJO PATERON SECRET REVEALED.

THE MYSTERY HAS BEEN SOLVED. THE MAN FROM SNOWY RIVER WASN’T MAN OR WOMAN. BUT AN 11-YEAR-OLD CLASS MATE OF BANJO PATERSON WHO WAS ACTUALLY THE MYSTERY RIDER. RESEACHER CLIFF CRANE HAS BEEN STUDYING PATERSON FOR 25 YEARS AND THIS IS WHEN HE REALISED THAT A SECRET WAS BURIED IN THE MAN FROM SNOWY RIVER THAT HAS TO BE REVEALED. THE FULL STORY NEXT WEEK.


SURFS UP! Fancy nameplates of surfing 60s from the board builders of Australia

NORM CASEY BEGAN TO MANUFACTURE SURFBOARDS IN 1949. IN AUGUST 1962, HE OPENED A MODERN SHOP AND FACTORY AT ROCKDALE, SYDNEY. THE FACTORY, OPERATED ON PROVEN AMERICAN METHODS, AND HOUSED SOME OF THE MOST UP-TO-DATE EQUIPMENT IN THE INDUSTRY. NORM ONCE REMARKED THAT “I’VE REALISED THE VITAL NEED OF CARRYING OUT CONSTANT RESEARCH ON THE FLEXIBILITY OF NEW MATERIALS”. THIS IS WHY NORM CONTENDED THAT HE HAD DEVELOPED THE “HIGHEST STRENGTH TO WEIGHT RATIO” OF ANY CUSTOM BOARD ON THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET. (WRITTEN FOR SURFABOUT MAGAZINE IN 1965 FOR THE NEW PUBLISHERS.) – FM.

……………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................
ABOUT THE OLYMPICS …
FANNY DURACK WON THE 100 METRES FREESTYLE IN ONE MINUTE 22.2 SECONDS, DEFEATING TEAM-MATE WILHELMINA WYLIE. THE EVENT, WHICH WAS NEW TO OLYMPIC WOMEN’S SWIMMING, WAS DESCRIBED AS “A GREAT SUCCESS”. – FM.


PEARL TURTON: Part 1.  Queen of the surfers -- the young woman who turned heads

PEARL TURTON, AWAYS IN CONFIDENT FORM, AS SHE SLICES THROUGH A BULKLY WAVE AT WHALE BEACH. Below: HOW PEARL BECOME QUEEN OF THE SURFING FRATERNITY.

PEARL TOOK TO THE SURF WITH THE BOYS. HER MATES WERE MY MATES AND SHE WAS JUST ANOTHER OF THE GANG.

RON TURTON       Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

In October 1949, Ronald and Pearl Turton Senior arrived in Australia from England, along with their children. I was four, Pearl was two and Ross was on the way.

We settled in Palm Beach at the tip of Sydney’s famous northern beaches. And although Pearl was not a big girl by any means, from the beginning she showed all the attributes of a sport star.

Palm Beach was very much a holiday destination then and was packed on the weekends in summer. But for the locals it was the sort of place where everyone knew everyone – although there weren’t too many locals our age.

During the weekdays after school we’d all play rugby league and cricket, which were “boy sports” in those days; but Pearl just joined in and was accepted.

She could run like the wind, had remarkable hand-eye coordination, and excelled at track and field, basketball and gymnastics.

But it was the surf that soon become the main attraction. Looking back, the timing was right. It was end of the 50s and we weren’t even teenagers yet. But things were starting to change – music, clothing and surfing.

Pearl took to the surf with my mates. She was just another of the gang.

We didn’t own our surfboards at first, we just bodysurfed. Then we rode these things called “surfoplanes”. You had to paddle like mad to catch a wave, the bigger the better; and then we’d lay down and hang on.

………………………………………………………………………………………………........................................................
ON THE WAVES …
WHO WAS THE FIRST WOMEN’S SURF RIDER IN AUSTRALIA TO STAND UPRIGHT ON A SURFBOARD? ISABEL LETHAM AGED 15, IN 1916. WHEN SEAS WERE POUNDING AT A BEACH CALLED FRESHWATER, NSW, HAWAIIAN DUKE KAHANAMOKU WAS DEMONSTATING HIS SURFBOARD RIDING. “COME ON!” SAID THE DUKE. HE WAS COAXING THE TEENAGER ONTO THE FRONT OF IT. “I WAS TERRIFIED … I WAS TOO SCARED TO STAND UP …” SAID ISABEL. -- FM.
…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…

It was fantastic. Before too long Pearl decided it would be fun to ride these things like a jockey. And I can still see her flying down these waves: one hand on the handle and the other raised in the air like a rodeo rider rocketing around terrified body surfers.

It was so much fun.

Surfboards were only for the older boys and men. That was all about to change.

About half a dozen fellas my age – around 12 – bought nine-foot balsa Malibus. Some of the surf club members let us have a ride on their 16-foot hollow plywoods; but they were so heavy and awkward, compared to a fibreglass and resin balsa.

It was just a matter of time before Pearl borrowed my board. Off she went, this petite little thing … and she had confidence and raw talent to burn.

Soon, it was to become a way of life. It was more than a sport, and as Pearl had always been one of the Palm Beach gang there was none of this “what’s a girl doing our wave” stuff.

Pearl left school early in her mid-teens to work at the Palm Beach Pharmacy. She used to surf before and after work, whenever the “surf was up”.

There were no contests at the time, but, unbeknown to Pearl, there was a big surprise in store.

<< Adapted from That Pearl by Ron Turton, Pacific Longboarder, Vol 19, Number 1.

NEXT: Success was staring her in the face. She was to become a household name.

……………………………………………………………………………………………….......................................................
ON THE WAVES …
SURFBOARDS HAVE HAD THREE DISTINCT ERAS: THE SOLID BOARD, USED FROM 1912 TO ABOUT 1938; THE HOLLOW LONGBOARD, FROM 1938 TO 1956; AND THE REVOLUTINNARY LIGHTWEIGHT MALIBU BOARD OF FIBREGLASS COVERED BALSA, WITH A FIN. THE MALIBU BOARDS REVOLUTIONISED BOARD RIDING. – LANA WELLS.
……………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................

ON THE WAVES …

WHEN LONGBOARD AND RIDER PARTED COMPANY, THE SWIMMERS NEARBY DUCKED FOR COVER. LONGBOARDS CAME TO A HALT IN 1956. THEY HAVE SINCE MADE A COMEBACK.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 27 February 20

READ ALL ABOUT IT! A newspaper can make a difference in your community

A GOLD COIN DONATION WILL BUY A COPY OF THE TRIANGLE, A NEWSPAPER PRODUCED BY THE COMMUNITY.

AN ESTIMATED 200 COUNTRY NEWSPAPERS IN AUSTRALIA HAVE BITTEN THE DUST. IN OTHER WORDS, THEY’VE CALLED IT A DAY. HOW WOULD YOU LIKE TO START A NEWSPAPER IN YOUR COMMUNITY? AUSTRALIA IS A BIG COUNTRY AND THERE’RE PLENTY OF STORIES TO CHOOSE FROM.

THE TRIANGLE, AFTER ALL THE HARD WORK, IS READY FOR THE PURCHASER. Below: A BOX AT A DROP-OFF POINT.

IT’S NO SURPRISE, THEN, WHEN A BEVY OF VOLUNTEERS PRODUCE THE TRIANGLE, WHICH IS PACKED FULL OF NEWS, NEWS THAT WOULD NEVER MAKE IT IN MAJOR NEWSPAPERS.

FRANK MORRIS

The Triangle has become an anticipated monthly fixture for the townspeople of Brogo, Quaama, Cobargo and Tilba, and other localities along the way.

Established in 2002, it was quickly decided The Triangle, “would have no politics” (in its strictest sense.) It would be a local, positive and a conveyance for public discussion.

And there was an editorial committee responsivity and no central editor to spread and hopefully bring different snippets, attitudes, pictures and news to the forum.

The committee will publish anything as long as it doesn’t cover “politics, sex or religion”, which, naturally, would reduce complaints.

But the paper has occasionally “raised the ire” of some of the townspeople, says a spokesperson, and mistakes are quickly corrected and disputes are resolved pretty fast.

The spokesperson admits that some of the best stories come from the pub. Letters to the editorial committee also give the locals room to share their views.

The profits from The Triangle go back to the community.

Now, do you want to your start your own community newspaper?

………………………………………………………………………………………………........................................................
READ ALL ABOUT IT …
ABOUT THE TRIANGLE: WITH A LONG HISTORY OF FARMING AND FISHING, AND A PROUD LOCAL KOORI COMMUNITY, THIS IS A PART OF THE COUNTRY WITH PLENTY OF STORIES TO TELL. THANKS TO THE TEAM BEHIND TILBA’S THE TRIANGLE, LOCALS CAN CATCH UP WITH THE COMMUNITY NEWS ON A MONTHLY BASIS.
…………………………………………………………………………………………...............................................................

What your need is a lot of motivation, organisational skills and little know-how. These are of some of the tips from the crew at The Triangle.

Keep your costs low. In 2010, The Triangle charged from 60 cents to $20 for advertisement. Revenue also comes from the donation boxes at drop-off points.

Printing costs, in 2010, are around $1500 and distribution, based on the weight, about $200. After the extraction of costs, The Triangle clear about $400 a month.

A spokeswoman, in 2010, says they keep at least $2000 in the bank to the cover the next issue. Any profit goes back to the community.

………………………………………………………………………………………………........................................................
IT’S THE OLYMPICS …
1964, TOKYO PLAYS HOST AND JAPAN SPENDS $2 BILLION ON THE “HAPPY GAMES” – THE FIRST GAMES IN AN ASIAN COUNTRY. DAWN FRASER WINS THE 100m FREESTYLE FOR THIRD TIME STRAIGHT IN THE OLYMPICS. AND DAWN WON HER FOURTH GOLD. IN ATHLETICS, BETTY CUTHBERT MADE A SCINTILLATING COMEBACK AND TOOK OUT THE WOMEN’S 400m. ALSO GOLD FOR MEN’S SWIMMING: 1500m FREESTYLE. 200m BUTTERFLY. 200m BREASTROKE. YACHTSMEN ALSO WIN GOLD IN THE 5.5m.
………………………………………………………………………………………………........................................................

When you work on a country newspaper like The Triangle you must be prepared to share the load. A spokeswoman said we have a 10-member editorial committee, comprising a secretary, treasurer, designer, proof reader and copy editor.

The work-loads vary, but the secretary must commit about 25 to 30 hours a month compiling material for the editorial meeting, but the designer spends about 40 hours laying out each issue.

Frank Morris comments: Now, as a professional journalist, the raised advertising revenue is important to extrapolate your circulation to a readership figure. With the circulation of 2000 copies, 3 persons as readers, it’s better to work on 6000 readership.

The next vital step is to turn your readership figures into strong and powerful sales letter for your potential advertiser. After two or three attempts, you’ll find the advertising starts to creep up. 

My suggestion would be is to lift the circulation for the holiday maker. There are a number of rewards that you could be striving for. Some of those ‘holiday’ people have been coming to these havens for years. Local or non-local? That is the question.

In 2020, printing and advertising costs have risen a fair bit.

Remember, the more creative you become the better your project will be in the market place. << Adapted from Australia Today. Australia Post, 2010.


NEXT: THE PEARL TURTON STORY: SHE WAS THE QUEEN OF THE SURFING FRATERNITY. SHE WAS ASKED TO APPEAR IN AN ENDLESS SUMMER MOVIE? THEN ALL HELL BROKE LOOSE.


READ ALL ABOUT IT …
ABOUT THE TRIANGLE: “A BOMB COULD HAVE GONE OFF HERE AND THEY WOULDN’T KNOW ABOUT IT IN BEGA”, A WOMAN READER SAID. THOSE ON THE EDITORIAL COMMITTEE MEETING ENJOY THE TASK OF DELIVERING THE NEWSPAPER BECAUSE OF THE FEEDBACK THE FROM THE LOCAL READERSHIP. THE PRINT RUN IS STABLE DURING THE HOLIDAY SEASON WHEN THE TOURISTS COME TO TOWN. “BECAUSE IT ISN’T FOR THEM, IT FOR LOCALS,” ACCORDING TO A COMMITTEE MEMBER.


FLASHBACK: To keep Tarzan of the Jungle hunting criminals will keep the enduring franchise going!

TARZAN (CHRISTOPHER LAMBERT) MINGLES WITH A BUNCH OF APES, TALKING THEIR LANGUAGE. Below: JOHNNY WEISSMULLER AS TARZAN WITH THE FAMILY.

MANY ACTORS HAVE ENJOYED PLAYING THE KING OF THE JUNGLE OVER THE YEARS. TWO OF THE FINEST ACTORS TO PLAY TARZAN, IN MY OPINION, JOHNNY WEISSMULLER AND CHRISTOPHER LAMBERT WERE OUTSTANDING.

FRANK MORRIS

It’s over 100 years since Edgar Rice Burroughs’s Tarzan sagas of the enduring ape man became so popular that the author went on to write two dozen sequels.

Hollywood was quick to jump on the successful Tarzan bandwagon and produced the first film, Tarzan Of The Apes, in 1918. A silent film, it starred Elmo Lincoln and Enid Markey.

In fact, Lincoln went on to star as Tarzan a second time that year in The Romance Of Tarzan.

The best known and most easily recognised actor to play the role was Johnny Weissmuller. Weissmuller had been one of the world’s fastest swimmers in the 1920s. He won five Olympic gold medals, but it was playing Tarzan that propelled him to international stardom.

He played the character twelve times and earned an estimated $4 million.
Weissmuller was the first actor to use the famous Tarzan yell. He explained in an interview that it was actually a recording of three diffentent vocalists – a soprano, an alto and a hog caller. The three vocalists were spliced together to get the effect.

Joining Weissmuller was the talented actress Maureen O’Sullivan as Jane. Then there was the famous Cheeta, the chimpanzee, although no chimpanzee actually appeared in the original Edgar Rice Burroughs novels.

Perhaps the long-running Tarzan saga needed something new to appeal to filmgoers in 1984.

A French actor who spoke no English, Christopher Lambert, had to train for six months to play the part – learning to behave like a chimp in the afternoon, having English lessons in the evening. All his hard work paid off. The critics loved his interpretation of the leading character.

And the box-office loved him, too. In the first eight weeks, Greystoke, The Legend Of Tarzan, took over $35 million; a record.

.........................................................................................................................................................................................
IT’S THE OLYMPICS …
IN 1968, MEXICO CITY WAS NAMED FOR THE OLYMPIC GAMES. BUT THERE WAS TWO DISTINCT FALL-OUTS WHICH OCCURRED: HIGH ALTITUDE AND BLACK POWER. DESPITE THE ANXIETY ABOUT THE FORMER, IT WAS MAINLY THE POLICITICAL ATMOSPHERE THAT MARRED THE MEXICO CITY OLYMPICS GAMES. AUSTRALIAN SPRINTER PETER NORMAN FINISHED THIRD – BEING OUT SPRINTED BY TOMMIE SMITH AND JOHN CARLOS WHO CAME FIRST AND SECOND. CONTINUED.
..............................................................………………………………………………………………………………………….

“Greystoke is worth a trip to the cinemas, one critic told his readers. “Forget about all the other Tarzan movies, this is the authentic one”.

Tarzan turns predator. He could stalk his prey with unerring accuracy.

The films opens with the boy Tarzan and an ape friend Droopy Ears up high in a tree, Tarzan cooing and the ape copying the cooing in harmony.

Even as a youngster, Tarzan and Droopy Ears produce a wonderful sound.

Lambert said, “half of me is the Earl of Greystoke and the other half is wild”.

Up until 2016 there have been various mixtures of Tarzan, both in real-life and cartoons.

TARZAN THE APEMAN: Actors who have played the great wild man...

Elmo Lincoln, 1918; Gene Pollar, 1920; James Pierce, 1927; Frank Merrill, 1929; Herman Brix and Bruce Bennett, 1935, 1938; Johnny Weismuller, 1932 to 1948; Buster Crabbe, 12-chapter-movie serial, 1934; Glenn Morris, 1938; Lex Barker, 1949 to 1953; Denny Miller, 1959; Gordon Scott, 1955 to 1960; Jock Mahoney, 1962 to 1963; Mike Henry, 1966 to 1968; Miles O’Keeffe, 1981; Christopher Lambert, 1984; Casper Van Dien, 1998.

<< The Peoples Friend, UK, and Frank Morris.

…………………………………………………………………………………………...............................................................
IT’S THE OLYMPICS …
MEXICO CITY BOASTED A RECORD 113 NATIONS AND OVER 6000 ATHLETES. ENREQUITA BASILO WAS THE FIRST WOMAN TO LIGHT THE OLYMPICS FLAME. SWIMMING: WHEN MICHAEL WENDEN SCORED A “DOUBLE” FOR AUSTRALIA BY WINNING HIS SECOND GOLD MEDAL IN THE 200m FREESTYLE AND BREAKING AN ENDURING RECORD IN OLYMPICS HISTORY. THE RECORD HAD BEEN SET IN 1900. THE 200m WAS TAKEN OFF THE PROGRAM IN 1904. IT REAPPEARED IN 1968. THE 800m MEN’S LONG DISTANCE WON GOLD. THE WOMEN’S 80m HURDLES, WAS WON BY M. CAIRD. SWIMMING: BOTH 200m 100m MEN’S FREESTYLE WON GOLD. THE 100m WOMEN’S BUTTERFLY.
……………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................

COMING: LILLIAN NEVILLE’S GIRLS HAD A BIG PART TO PLAY IN THE 1956 OLYMPICS GAMES, NOT ONLY AS COMPETITORS BUT BEHIND THE SCENES AS WELL.


YOUR DOG: A dog wants to know everything!

AXLE CATCHES UP ON HIS EXPLOITS IN THE NEWSPAPER. Macedon Ranges Leader, Melbourne.

…………………………………………………………………………………………..............................................................
ABOUT THE OLYMPICS …
DESPITE PROTESTS FROM THE GREEKS, THE SECOND OLYMPIAD WAS HELD AT PARIS IN 1900. SWIMMING APPEARED HERE FOR THE FIRST TIME AS AN OLYMPIC EVENT. THE RUGGED FREDDY LANE WON AUSTRALIA’S GOLD MEDALS BY WINNING THE 200m FREESTYLE AND THE 200m ‘OBSTACLE’ RACE. WHICH WAS DESCRIBED AS AN “AMUSING AFFAIR”. FREDDY LANE WAS THE FIRST AUSSIE SWIMMER TO WIN AN OLYMPIC GO

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 21 February 20

TENNIS CHAMPS: Margaret Court is voted Australia’s greatest women’s tennis player

MARGARET COURT … ONE OF THE BEST ALL-ROUND WOMEN’S TENNIS PLAYERS AUSTRALIA HAS PRODUCED.  Below: BILLY JEAN KING AND MARGARET COURT HAD SEVERAL DOUR STRUGGLES IN THE GAME.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

TALL AND ATHLETIC, COURT PLAYS MORE IN THE STYLE OF MEN’S TENNIS PLAYERS.

In Australia, the administrators of tennis were lucky. Even though the top players kept joining the professionals, equally brilliant players continued to come along to take their place.

Margaret Court won her first Australian singles titles in 1960. At this point, she was described as one the best tennis players Australia had produced.

Court was certainly the greatest Australian woman player of her time. Her record is extraordinary. She was the second woman to win a Grand Slam.

Over 14 years, she won all the major championships a number of times.

Tall and athletic, Court … played an attacking game which owed a lot to men’s style of tennis more than to women’s. She was a serve/volley player who would take more chances; staked more on being able to make that first volley count.

She played more volleys that any woman player up to her time.

In 1970 she emulated the feat of the late Maureen Connolly, of the US, by winning the Grand Slam – the Australian, French, Wimbledon and US singles titles.

On three occasions she won three out four in 1962, 1969 and 1973. Overall – singles, doubles, and mixed – an unprecedented 61 “big four” titles.

She played overseas numerous times (Italy, South Africa and Germany) and the total jumped from 61 to 90. Court won the Australian singles crown a staggering 11 times – seven in a row.

Against the famous Billie Jean King, Court had many dour struggles. She came out victorious in 21 of 34 tournament matches played.

Court had no weakness in any facet of her game, even though she had been on the world circuit since 1960. No woman played the game like Margaret Court – exceptional dedication, determination and domination.

She was born in Albury in 1942. She later settled in Perth. She was awarded an OBE in 1967.

<< Adapted from Tennis: The Greats–1920 to 1960, by Adrian Quist and Jack Egan, 1984, ABC Books, Sydney; Hall of Championship, Sport House, Sydney.  Watch for Tennis Champs later in the year.

…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…
IT’S THE OLYMPICS …
AUSTRALIA WAS THE VENUE, AND MELBOURNE WAS HOST CITY, FOR THE FIRST TIME IN 1956. OUR OWN BETTY CUTHBERT IS THE “GOLDEN GIRL”. WHILE VLADIMIR KUTS, ATHLETE, GIVES THE USSR TWO GOLD WHEN HE TOOK OUT THE 5000m AND 10,000m WITH A MINDBOGGLING PERFORMANCE. CONTINUED.
.........................................................................................................................................................................................

 


COMING: ARTBEAT. MOVED TO MARCH 6.


FLASHBACK: Final. Fantastic Voyage – La Balsa charts a long journey on mountainous-sized seas

THIS UNIQUE 1970 PRESS PHOTO WAS TAKEN AFTER THE CREW LANDED AT MOOLOOLBALH, QUEENSLAND.  Below: THE MUCH-PRAISED LA BALSA RAFT NOW ENSCONCED AT THE BALLINA MUSEUM.

IT WAS A GREAT RELIEF WHEN THE MADNESS AND MAYHEM OF THE SEAS WOULD EVENTFULLY RELENT. BUT THE MEN WEREN’T CERTAIN FOR HOW LONG. SOME OF THE WAVES STILL CAME RUMBLING DOWN WITH A ROARING, EAR-SHATTERING SOUND!

FRANK MORRIS

La Balsa’s adventure began on a dark moonless night at 2am on May 29, 1970. It quietly slipped away from the dock on the unpredictable tidal currents of the “brackish” Rio Guayas River, with the help of a dumpy tugboat whose captain had plenty of local knowledge of the river.

The 120-mile journey alone down the Rio Guayas across the turbulent palm-fringed Gulf of Guayaquil took almost three days before the expedition confronted the open sea.

For the next five months they would battle over 5000 miles of ocean that “would be both friend and foe” -- treacherous, unrelenting and unforgiving.

Its huge coral reefs, often hundreds of miles long, Alsar wrote in his diary, were “blocking our path like jagged petrified monsters half-submerged in a perpetual spray of angry waves.” And tropical squalls blowing at full gale force, creating waves as tall as mountains, “whirling La Balsa around like a matchbox.”

It was a great relief when the madness and mayhem would eventually relent. But they were never certain for how long.

In his diary, Alsar recorded that some of the waves thundered towards La Balsa at such high speed that “they would build to a giant crest of thrashing foam, then come rumbling down with a roaring, ear-shattering noise; there was power enough in each wave to light a small city for an hour.”

When the hundreds of well-wishers at the dock in Mooloolaba Harbour got a closer look at the raft, there were gasps of astonishment: 8564 miles of this!

Alsar said he and the crew were “very proud” of the condition of the raft. “Magnfico La Balsa” he said.

The 30ft raft was constructed from balsa logs, which were bound together by hemp ropes. It was fitted with a main mast, supported by bamboo guys, and a missen mast. No nails, bolts or other metal parts were used in its construction.

At first sight La Balsa looked in remarkable condition for a raft which had such an incredible journey, reported one newspaper.

“The balsa wood logs are virtually free of weed, and the hemp ropes which bound the logs together were covered with some slime”, the newspaper said.

When it docked the raft, commented the lens-man, look strangely pre-historic.”

.........................................................................................................................................................................................
IT’S THE OLYMPICS …
IN 1956, BETTY CUTHBERT WON HER FIRST THREE GOLD MEDALS. SHIRLEY STRICKLAND ADDED ANOTHER TWO. MURRAY ROSE WON HIS FIRST OLYMPIC GOLD AND DAWN FRASER MADE HER FIRST “TRIUMPHANT” OLYMPIC APPEARANCE. UNTIMATELY, SHE WON EIGHT GOLD MEDALS, MORE THAN ANY OTHER AUSTRALIAN TO DATE. THE MEDIA DESCRIBED THE GAMES AS “BELOW THE EQUATOR AT LAST’. THE NUMBER OF COMPETITORS WAS, DUE TO “AUSTRALIA’S REMOTENESS”, ONLY 3342 BUT IT ATTRACTED 69 NATIONS TO DO THEIR STUFF. CONTINUES.
……………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................

 

Where is La Balsa today?

Ballina, located on the Richmond River, NSW, is a major port for fishing and recreational vessels in the region.

At one of the town’s main attractions, the Ballina Naval and Maritime Museum, is the “showpiece La Balsa”, say Chris Whitelaw, of AFOAT magazine.

“Many people of all ages will know of Thor Heyerdahl’s legendary Kon-Tiki expedition in 1949. But few … will be familiar with the La Balsa expedition 20 years later that eclipsed Heyerdahl’s feat by a proverbial country mile.

In AFOAT magazine, Whitelaw said “in 1970, the Spaniard Vital Alsar and three companions sailed a balsa wood raft from Guayaquil, Ecuador to Mooloolaba on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast.

“The trip was an amazing feat of seamanship, spanning six months and the world’s largest ocean”.

Ballina’s museum has as excellent display of numerous vessels to enthral boaties of all ages. It is open 7 days a week from 9am to 4pm.


BUSHFIRE RELIEF: Liquor industry get its reward 

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

NATIONAL LIOUOR NEWS

Adelaide Hills winemakers and producers are working together to assess the damage caused by the devastating Cudlee Creek fire that tore through the region just before Christmas.

Around one-third of the Adelaide Hills’ vineyards stood in the path of the fire, including more than 60 grape growers and producers, many of which are small family businesses that are now dealing with the shock of having lost everything.

Many of the grape growers that have been affected have no public profile, no brand to get behind and no wine to sell. Some of these family businesses are considering their future --destroyed vineyards can take years to regenerate.

The devastation is also great for many apple, pear and cherry growers, equally so for dairy and beef farmers in the Adelaide Hills.

A Viticulturist and Co-Director at Henschke said … new growth is already beginning to peek through the badly burned vines and that the Adelaide Hills community has rallied to rebuild and prepare for the future.

The liquor industry is one of the many to have shown its generous nature with suppliers, producers and individuals who are giving time, money and resources to those need it most.

Below: A GROWER VISITING HER PARTIALLY BURNT OUT VINEYARDS.

……………………………………………………………………………………………….......................................................
‘BLACK FRIDAY’ BUSHFIRE …
‘BLACK FRIDAY’, JANUARY 13, 1939, THE FULL HAVOC OF BUSHFIRES WERE REVEALED BY NEWSPAPERS AUSTRALIA-WIDE. THE NATION WAS REELING FROM THE HUGE LOSS OF LIFE AND PROPERTY IN VICTORIA AND NSW. IN VICTORIA, 66 SOULS PERISHED AND NSW LOST 5. SOME RAIN WAS A RELIEF FOR SEVERAL AREAS IN BOTH STATES. A HORRENDOUS SIGHT WAS STILL AHEAD. IN VICTORIA, THE WIND INCREASED TO MIGHTY GALE-FORCE STRENGTH WHICH DID LOADS OF DAMAGE. IT WAS A PERIOD OF TERROR. – FRANK MORRIS.
………………………………………………………………………………………..................................................................

IT’S THE OLYMPICS …
IN 1956, ALSO WINNING THE GOLD ON THEIR HOME SOIL. WERE ATHLETES N. CROCKER AND F. ELLOR, WHO, WITH SHIRLEY STRICKLAND AND CUTHBERT, WON THE 100m RELAY. SWIMMERS: JON HENRICKS, D. THIELE. THE MEN’S 200m. RELAY TEAM: J. DEVITT, K, O’HALLORAN, M.ROSE AND J.HENRICKS. THE 100m WON BY L.CRAPP. THE WOMEN’S RELAY: DAWN FRASER, L.CRAPP, F. LEECH AND S. MORGAN WON THE 100m. CYCLISTS: WON THE 2000m TANDEM.


THE SHOW-OFF!

THE END.
<<
From the 1968 issue of Surfabout Magazine.

…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…
NZ: TREATY OF RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES
THE TREATY OF WAITANGI HAS A PERMANENT PLACE IN HISTORY, WAS SIGNED ON FEBRUARY 6, 1840. THE FACT THAT ONLY THREE MAORI WOMEN WERE ALSO ALLOWED TO SIGN THE TREATY AT THE BAY OF ISLANDS, WAS CONSIDERED “A PRIVILEGE OF SIGNIFICANCE.” SHORTLY AFTERWARDS, ONE OF THE WOMEN’S HUSBAND, CHIEF NOPERA PANAKAREAO, UTTERED THE NOW FAMOUS WORDS: “THE SHADOW OF THE LAND GOES TO THE QUEEN; THE SUBSTANCE REMAINS WITH US”. FRANK MORRIS.
.........................................................................................................................................................................................

IT’S THE 0LYMPICS …
1960, AND THE OLYMPICS COME TO ROME. IT COST THE ITALIANS $30 MILLION TO STAGE IT THERE. THE OLYMPIC’S BECOME THE MOST WIDELY TELEVISED EVENTS AT THE TIME, AND ALSO THE COSTLIEST OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS. THIS IS WHERE THE AUSTRALIAN CONTINGENT “BROUGHT HOME THE GOLD”. MOST OF THE SWIMMERS WERE CHUFFED AT THEIR RECORD-BREAKING EVENTS. EQUESTRIAN, BILL ROYCROFT, WON GOLD DESPITE HAVING A BROKEN COLLARBONE.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 14 February 20

Fantastic Voyage Part 1 – raft La Balsa ended a five-month journey from Ecuador

LA BALSA NEARING THE END OF THE TRIP AFTER SIX MONTHS FIGHTING BOISTEROUS SEAS. Below: THE EXHAUSTED CREW BEING WELCOMED BY QUEENSLAND. VITAL ALSAR (LEFT) WAVED BACK.

IN 1970, WHEN THE RAFT HAS DOCKED, IT LOOKS “STANGELY PRE-HISTORIC”. YES, MOST PEOPLE AGREED. LA BALSA HAD 8542 MILES ON ITS CLOCK – THE JOURNEY FROM ECUADOR TO QUEENSLAND.

FRANK MORRIS

Thousands of spectators were ferried to the public jetty. Excitement was building up. Then the noise turned into a mighty roar, the La Balsa’s motley crew had joined the crowd.

They were glad to have reached land.

La Balsa had travelled from Ecuador to Mooloolaba, Brisbane; not bad for a pre-historic raft.

“The oceans of the world provide a chronicle of life and death,” an old seafarer said. Since remote antiquity, seafarers and explorers have defied the dangers and made voyages that were thought to be impossible.

Vital Alsar, one of the heroes of the story, recalled later that his father was probably right when he said that “men who take to the sea are touched with madness.”

In 1970, four men and a cat sailed into Mooloolaba Harbour, on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast, ten minutes before midnight, on Thursday, November 6. They had just completed the longest raft voyage in history: an 8600-mile journey across the Pacific from Ecuador, South America.

They had drifted for five months “to prove” a 1000-year old theory that South Americans could have migrated to Australia.

When the four men in tattered clothes, the battered raft La Balsa, and a cat named Minet, entered the harbour, there was a huge crowd to greet them. They clasped their hands above their heads, cheered, laughed and waved.

The Spanish skipper, Vital Alsar, and his three crew mates “were fit and well and in a jubilant mood” when they were discovered twenty miles (40kms) from the Queensland Coast, reported the newspaper.

La Balsa “bobbed” the rest of the journey on the blue pacific to Mooloolaba “at the end of a 300ft tow rope” which was tethered to a charted press launch.

Alsar and his crew later described their five-month sea voyage “as incredible”.

They had faced many treacherous storms. Some waves almost engulfed the raft. And the nights “were very bad”.

The great danger, reported Alsar, was being knocked overboard by the tremendous power of the waves. They harnessed themselves to the raft. “We all fell overboard many times but were able to get back,” he said.

He said Minet the cat “fell overboard” many times but “we dived in and saved her.”

In his book three years later, Alsar wrote: “On our ninety-seventh day at sea, a violent storm almost destroyed our wooden raft. (I) watched my three crew members stubbornly holding onto the mast, which was on the verge of collapsing in a howling gale.”

Alsar and the crew had many narrow escapes from death. They saw hundreds of sharks. “Sharks came around La Balsa all the time,” the skipper said.

A BIBLICAL REDITION OF A ‘RAFT’ BEING TOSSED LIKE A TOY IN THE HEAVY SEAS.

……………………………………………………………………………………..............................................................……
IT’S THE OLYMPICS CONTEST …
IT WAS TOKYO IN 1964. TOKYO WAS TO BE THE HOST BUT WITHDREW IN 1940. THE SECOND CHOICE, HELSINKI, IS INVADED BY RUSSIA. WORLD WAR II CANCELED ALL HOPE OF FURTHER GAMES. BUT TOKYO WAS CHOSEN TO HOST THE OLYMPICS GAMES IN 1964, AUSTRALIA WON 18 MEDALS, SIX OF THEM ARE GOLD.
………………………………………………………………………………………............................................................…..

NEXT: From Ecuador and across the Pacific.


YOUR DOG: We Capricorn’s share a birthday together and have a great time …

FOR ME, TO CELEBRATE TWO BIRTHDAYS AT ONCE, IS SOMETHING I DON’T RECOMMEND. Below: MY PAL, ROUGHIE, HE NEVER FORGETS.

… I SHOULD KNOW. I WAS THERE!

FRANK MORRIS

Every Christmas, I started counting the time left before the Birthday Bash. Whoosh, the month goes quickly. Suddenly, the big day is upon us.

My owner is full of glee. “It’s time to organise a bash you would not believe”, he shouted. “Pick an age? That’s how old I’ll be! And don’t forget, Chrissy, you will one year older”, he whispers in my ear.

My owner is a big-wig journalist on a newspaper. He’s knows all. He’s invited everyone who crossed his path in the last month. He often tells me that he knows all “the people who matter”.

“On with the show,” he jumped for joy, smiling voraciously. He was getting the pool all spruced up. My owner is divorced. He knows what he was up too!

All I can tell you, there was usually were more unattached women than I expected.

I can still recall the day, six years ago. Uncle Ralph was busy talking to this man and they were coming towards the kennel. I was walking all over my mum in a playful way and not taking any notice.

The other gentleman was my potential owner. Personally, I liked him.

He lent on the wooden fence. “How old is she now, Uncle Ralph,” he asked. “She turned nine months today,” Uncle replied.

Uncle Ralph pushed the gate open and strolled towards me. His big hands – Uncle was a coal miner – and picked me up. Hey, that’s me they were chattering about. I hope mum’s coming too.

But mum didn’t come. I never saw her again.

“There you are, Chrissy, meet your new owner,” Uncle said, with tears in his eyes. That was that. We have come a long way since those days.

When my owner showed his wife what a little bundle of fluff he had secured for her, she said, “Don’t bring that mutt anywhere near me. You know I hate them!”

That was six years ago. And the divorce? Well, it followed shortly after that. Things got a bit out of hand. It was painful.

People started to arrive at the party, pushing and shoving, screaming and yelling. Most of the souls who rolled up were either important people or famous people all tarted up in vivid colours of the rainbow.

I’d heard a growl at the side gate. It was my mate Roughie. He had a sign around his neck with “Happy Birthday” – meaning me.

So, now we’ll have a good time too. We drank and ate our way like there was no tomorrow. Roughie was busy eating some leftover dessert. I looked at him. He looked at me.

Wearing my scarlet tiara, I asked, are you happy. You betcha, replied Roughie.

………………………………………………………………………………………………........................................................
SOME OLYMPICS CHATTER …
FANNY BLANKERS-KOEN, OF THE NETHERLANDS, WAS THE “STAR” OF THE 1948 OLYMPICS. BLANKERS-KOEN WAS A REMARKABLE ATHLETE. SHE COMPETED IN THE HIGH JUMP AT THE BERLIN OLYMPICS. AT THE AGE OF 30, THERE WERE PEOPLE WHO SAID “SHE WAS TOO OLD TO WIN THE OLYMPIC SPRINTS”. BUT COMPETE SHE DID. SHE WON GOLD MEDALS FOR 100 AND 200 METRES, THE 80 METRES HURDLES AND THE 4 X 100 METRES RELAY. BLANKERS-KOEN FINISHED HER CAREER AS HOLDER OF SIX WORLD RECORDS.
……………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................


TENNIS CHAMPS: Norman Brookes – the man and the player

NORMAN BROOKES SHOWED THE CONCENTRATION NECESSARY WHEN YOU PLAY AN OPPONENT WHO IS PRONE TO DASHING AROUND THE COURT. Below: NORMAN BROOKES, OUTSTANDING SPORTMAN.

FRANK MORRIS

HIS CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT WAS THE 1914 WIMBLEDON CHAMPIONSHIP WHEN HE WAS PITTED AGAINST A PLAYER WHO WAS A 4 TIMES WINNER OF THE TITLE.

Tennis critics summed up the 1914 Wimbledon Championship as the “triumph of the tactician over the athlete”.

Brookes’ Wimbledon tussle was just like an act of war had landed on his doormat. It was his first in seven years.

Anthony Wilding, of New Zealand, has been the Wimbledon champion the last four times. The final time was 1913.

During the match, Wilding relied principally on the strength of his drives and his dashing ability around the court.

Whereas Brookes played with splendid judgement. He used his drop-volley angle shot magnificently and, overall, showed a vast superiority in tactics.

On the scores, the German player, O. Froitzheim, who Brookes defeated with some difficulty in the semi-final (five sets), was a much different proposition to Wilding. Brookes won the final 6-4, 6-4, 7-5.

The Sydney Mail cable report said that “the last game was the most thrilling ever seen on the centre court at Wimbledon”.

“Twice Brookes came within a point of winning the set, Wilding saves on each occasion. Brookes won the match with an untakeable drop volley off a fast drive”.

Born in Melbourne in 1877, Brookes received a top-flight education and joined his father’s business, Melbourne Paper Mills.

He played interstate tennis from 1896. At Wimbledon, in 1905, he won the Allcomers’ singles title.

In 1907, Brookes and Wilding won the Davis Cup in great style. Brookes in singles, and with Wilding won the doubles and mixed doubles – a historic first Davis Cup for Australasia.

Brookes captained six winning teams for Australasia in the Davis Cup until 1921.

He was the first president of the Lawn Tennis Association from (1926-1955), and was responsible for raising the tennis standards throughout Australia. Much of the eventual revival of the Davis Cup was influenced by Brookes.
He was a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour and knighted in 1939. He died in 1968.

<< Sydney Mail newspaper.

Next: Margaret Court was named Australia’s greatest woman tennis player.

……………………………………………………………………………………………….......................................................
IT’S THE OLYMPICS …
IN 1952, FINLAND, DENIED THE GAMES IN 1940, PLAYS HOST TO A RECORD NATIONS ATTENDANCE IN HELSINKI. RUSSIA SHOWS UP AFTER IGNORING THE CONTEST FOR 40 YEARS. AUSTRALIA’S MARJORIE JACKSON POCKETED TWO GOLDS – 100M AND 200M SPRINT. WHILE SHIRLEY STRICKLAND TOOK OUT HER FIRST MEDAL IN THE 80M HURDLES. AUSTRALIA WON GOLD FOR THE 200M BREASTSTROKE; RUSSEL MOCKRIDGE WON TWO GOLDS IN THE 1000M TIME TRIAL, AND THE 2000M TANDEM.
……………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................


THE SHOW-OFF!

CONTINUED.

<< From the 1968 Surfabout Magazine.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 07 February 20

Stay Informed

Receive eNews & Special Offers

Brochure Request Order

Tour Reviews Read

Last 12 months


Tags