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LEGO MASTER: With Kjeld Kristiansen, it’s what you see is what you get

KJELD KRISTIANSEN LED THE COMPANY ON THE GREATEST GLOBAL EXPANSIONISM IN ITS HISTORY. THE LEGO BOX IN 1957 FEATURING KJELD AND HIS SISTER.

IN 1997, WHEN THIS ARTICLE APPEARED, THE LEGO GROUP WAS ONE OF THE WORLD’S LARGEST TOY MAKERS. TODAY, IT HAS BECOME A LEADER IN THE LEGO INDUSTRY.

ADAPTED BY FRANK MORRIS.

Meeting the president and chief executive of the Lego group, Kjeld Kirk Kristiansen, of the world’s fifth largest toymaker, one is struck by his boyish quality.

Not a big man, his body still has a boy’s slim lines. He has been in charge since 1979; the business was founded by his grandfather Ole Kirk Christiansen.

It was developed into a major enterprise by his father Godtfred Kirk Christiansen. But it was Kjeld who is responsible for the group’s global expansion and its huge growth in product variety.

The Lego group is a big business that has been built out of very small components. This is a major enterprise in Billund, a tiny Jutland town.

There is a certain missionary zeal to the company.

Speaking of his products, Kristiansen says: “There are a lot worse things a child can do to prepare for life than build with Lego components.

“I believe using our products can lead a mind down orderly paths into new areas of thought and imagination. They are tools that unlock the mind”.

Yet, there is a gentle feel to the corporate hegemony. Legoland Hotel is an agreeable inn for visitors, which itself mergers into the group’s corporate headquarters.

The place seems remote from the tense atmosphere of most corporate headquarters.

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ABOUT US IN 1970s …
IN 1972, ‘IT’S TIME’ THEME BEGUN FOR THE ALP. THE ALP ISSUED PHOTOGRAPHS OF FEMALE MODELS WEARING ‘IT’S TIME’ TEE SHIRTS AND THE POLITICAL THEME WAS WELL ON ITS WAY … PMU (PICK ME UP) MARKET THE FIRST CHUNKY SOUPS … WAS IT WYNN’S, PENFOLD’S OR LINDEMAN’S WHO INTRODUCED THE WINE CASK? – A PLASTIC BAG OF WINE IN A CARDBOARD BOX WITH A TAP.
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Part of the serenity stems from another insulator: the group is closely held.

(An) assertion of the financial virtues of yesteryear is accompanied by a winsome grim and few waves of his omnipresent pipe.

Kristansen is such a formidable smoker that once he was elected Denmark’s “pipe smoker of the year”, an honour he takes with considerable amused pride.

The Lego chief executive is, in a way, his own ultimate consumer. He grew up with the product. A Lego box from around 1957 features Kjeld and his sister on the cover. As he recalls: “My father was not a man to throw money away on child models”.

Every four years, there is a … Lego Olympics. A contest which is won by a child who builds the most imaginative and technically “well-constructed” device.

The senior manager of corporate communications said “Kjeld wanders around discussing with the contestants how they did this or why they built that.

“These children know an expert when they see one. This is the Lego builder of Lego builders!”

Frank Morris comment: A British gentlemen, Hilary Fisher Page invented the brick and NOT Ole Kirk Kristiansen, the founder of the Lego Group. Page, who was in born in 1904, died before he could discover Lego has ‘borrowed’ his invention. Ole patented the now famous interlocking Lego blocks in 1949.

NEXT: FINAL. The Lego Masters.

<< The European newspaper, April 24, 1997.


Newspapers close down: The Mercury north-west and The Illawarra Mercury down south

THE MASTHEAD OF THE HUNTER RIVER GAZETTE.

INSIDE A COUNTRY NEWSPAPER. Below: THE FIRST OF THE MAITLAND MERCURY.

THE MAITLAND MERCURY, WHICH WAS THE OLDEST COUNTRY NEWSPAPER IN NSW, AND POSSIBLY AUSTRALIA, AND THE ILLAWARRA MERCURY, BOTH BORN IN 1800, DIED TOGETHER.

FRANK MORRIS

NSW goes to press. It was Thomas Strode who paved the way and a salute goes out to him. He went on to found an integral part of Australian history.

The Hunter River Gazette “appeared suddenly” outside Sydney in 1841 – Strode may be saluted for launching the first country newspaper in NSW.

He continued in the next six months performing miracles with the Gazette until the partnership with the editor embroiled him and the paper in yet another quarrel with the judiciary. Strode arranged for a dissolution to take place.

He discontinued the Gazette “ungraciously” in June 1842.

Strode and his newspaper were written into the history books, although his newspaper had only a short life. But Maitland was too important to be without a newspaper, a scribe once remarked.

The first issue of the Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser was soon manifest on January 7, 1843.
But for the profits that came from advertisements relating to the colony’s first general elections it would have sunk without trace.

Less than six months or so after the closure of The Gazette the Mercury was printed on the same equipment formerly used for the ceased newspaper.

An 1890 engraving of The Maitland Mercury shows the whole building but now only the left-hand section of the building remains as a paper store. The Mercury was not a “direct” descendant of The Gazette.

The Mercury still holds the distinction of being the oldest continuing country newspaper in NSW. It is true that The Hunter River Gazette lasted only six months, which was not long compared with its successor, The Mercury.

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ABOUT US IN 1970s …
IN 1972, WOMEN JOURNALISTS GET EQUAL RIGHTS WITH MEN AT THE JOURNALISTS CLUB IN SYDNEY AFTER A SIT-IN AT THE CLUB … PAUL HOGAN, A RIGGER FOR THE SYDNEY HARBOUR BRIDGE, DOES A WINFIELD CIGARETTE ADVERTISEMENT WHICH STARTS THE IDEA OF OCKER-IMAGE APPEAL.
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Even after 167 years of publishing, The Maitland Mercury carries the imprimatur of being the oldest country newspaper in the State.

In the south, there is the Illawarra Mercury, which was established by Thomas Garrett and a partner in 1855. The first issue was 8 large pages in that October.

It was, initially, published as a weekly, then increased to twice weekly in 1929. Then the Depression struck, forcing the newspaper to revert to a weekly.

In 1950, it was published as a daily; this led to a change-of-name to the Illawarra Daily Mercury until 1954. In 1979, the newspaper dropped “Daily” from its masthead and it joined the class of the other ‘metropolitan’ daily papers.
It amalgamated with the Bulli Times and Port Kembla Pilot in 1949; and the South Coast Times in 1968.

In 1981, the paper invested in a new off-set press that allowed it to bring life to you in full colour; and other implements that enhance its newspaper production.  It was also the first newspaper in Australia to install the state-of-the-art Itex 210K scanner.   

Fairfax, a major shareholder in 2012, relocated reproduction and other strands of sub-editing and page layouts of the paper to New Zealand.

FLASHBACK: A COLLECTOR HOLDS UP THE ‘MOON DAY’ SOUVENIER EDITION OF THE 1963 ILLAWARRA MERCURY.

<< Airlines Magazine, November, 1991; and The Influential Communicator for background.


OZ SPOT: Ali “has Parkinson’s disease”

ALI: “I AM THE GREATEST”.

IN 1984, A NEWSPAPER REPORT SAID THE FORMER WORLD HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPION MUHAMMAD ALI HAS “MINOR SYMPTOMS” OF PARKINSON’S DISEASE. RESULTS OF THESE TESTS LAST WEEK IN NEW YORK WERE SHOWN TO A DOCTOR TRAVELLING WITH THE BOXER IN EUROPE HAVE BEEN REVEALED. BIRGITT WOLFF, WHO INTERVIEWED DR MARTIN ECKER AND ALI QUOTED ALI AS SAYING “I ALWAYS FEEL TIRED BUT DON’T FEEL PAIN AT ALL. I DON’T KNOW EXACTLY WHAT IT IS”. – FM.

GRAND YEARS WILL BE PUBLISHED ON MAY 15.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 29 April 20

THE OVERLANDERS. RAVE UK REVIEWS. SEE OZ SPOT.

 


From The Papers: Keeping up with the headlines in The Labor Daily of the 1930s

BOLT FROM THE TRUE BLUE. Below: THE AUSTRALIAN NEWSPAPERS ARE AWAYS LOOKING OUT FOR STORIES.

LITTLE THINGS THAT COUNT SAVE LIVES.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS.

“If you take care in small ways, you will avoid big accidents” was the advice given last night by Mr Alan Davis in a broadcast address from 2KY (Sydney radio station) arranged by the Safety League of NSW.

“Very rarely can your recall an accident caused through the neglect of important safety rules as nearly always they are caused through neglect of seemingly small precautions”, said Mr Davis.

He instanced the fact that although a workman would not put his hand deliberately near the teeth of a circular saw; accidents occurred where men and women were drawn into rapidly moving machinery through a flapping sleeve or other loose clothing.

“A board left lying around with a nail stuck in it seems a very trivial matter, and you may observe it a hundred times and avoid standing on it.

“Then some unfortunate fellow steps on it and get a badly punctured foot, develops lockjaw and dies,” said Mr Davis.

The moral, he declared, was to remove nails from any boards or other material lying around for both the workman’s own sake as well as for his comrades.

“It behoves every one of us to take precautions in small ways to conserve the lives of our fellow workers as well as ourselves” said Mr Davis.

The Safety League will continue this series of talks from 2KY at 7.40 tonight.

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VALE OF A RESPECTED MINER …

THE DEATH HAS OCCURRED AT MOUNT KEMBLA OF MR JOHN LENARD, 67, A HIGHLY RESPECTED MINER, WHO HAS RESIDED ON THE MOUNTAIN FOR OVER 15 YEARS. MOUNT KEMBLA MINERS PRECEDED THE HEARSE TO THE KEMBLA HEIGHTS CEMETRY, AND THE MANY FLORAL TRIBUTES INCLUDED ONE FROM THE LOCAL MINERS’ LODGE. DECEASED IS SURVIVED BY ONE SON, JOHN.


From The Papers: Boxing -- “Sawn offs” of the ring game!

AUSTRALIAN HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPION, AMBROSE PALMER, WHO BOXES AMERICAN LEO KELLY AT THE SYDNEY STADIUM ON MONDAY WEEK.

BABE MARINO’S DEBUT BUT HE DOES NOT CONSIDER HIS SHORTNESS A DISADVANTAGE.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS.

The short stature of Babe Marino, the Pacific Coast middleweight champion, who makes his Sydney Stadium debut against Tommy Jones on Monday night.

Marino recalls that several of the world’s leading middleweights and heavyweights of the past were “sawn offs”.
Australia’s own Les Darcy, Mickey Walker, the “Toy Bulldog” Stanley Ketchell and Joe Wallcott, who knocked out heavyweights with ease; they were all under 5ft 7in.

Tommy Burns was the shortest man to hold the world’s heavyweight championship. Sam Langford, the “Boston Tar Baby”, who defeated all that cared to meet him; Myer Grace, who, with Fred Henneberry, shares the distinction of being the only man to have knocked out Jack Carroll.

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ABOUT US IN 1890 …
THE SPORTING LIFE, USA, RECEIVED THIS SPECIAL CABLE FROM LONDON. IT READ: JACK BURKE, THE IRISH LAD WHO RECENTLY ARRIVED FROM AUSTRALIA, CALLED AT THE SPORTING LIFE OFFICE TODAY AND ISSUED A CHALLENGE TO FIGHT JACK DEMPSEY, THE MIDDLEWEIGHT CHAMPION OF AMERCIA, FOR FIVE HUNDRED POUNDS A-SIDE.
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Lou Brouilliard, ex-world’s welter and middleweight champion … and one of the finest-built men in the fighting game today, are all under 5ft 6in.

Marino does not consider his shortness a disadvantage. He weaves into the attack to get close enough to hammer away at the body of his opponent.

Trading punches is his speciality. If Jones cares to mix it, a fine battle will be witnessed.

Jones is in the field with challenges to any boxer at a weight limit of 11st. 9lb. Having defeated most of the welterweights, he has turned his attention to the middles.

With the exception of Jack Carroll and Ron Richards, Jones has scored a knockout on every opponent he has met in Australia.

<< The three stories are from The Labor Daily, March 27, 1936. NEXT:  Lego Master: He built his own wall of Lego.


SURF’S UP: The 60s board-builders and their fancy nameplate!

FRANK MORRIS
DEWEY WEBER, HOBIE AND OTHER FAMOUS USA NAMES HIT THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET IN THE 1960s. WEBER WAS A DEFINITE LEGEND OF THE AMERICAN SURF. WEBER, WHO WAS KNOWN FOR HIS RIDING PROWESS, MADE HIS INTRICATE WALK UP AND DOWN THE BOARD, THUS GIVING HIM THE NAME “LITTLE MAN ON WHEELS.” HE STARRED IN A NUMBER OF BUD BROWNE SURF MOVIES. WEBER BACAME THE SYMBOL OF THE UNITED STATES SURFING ASSOCIATION. HE LATER BECAME A MOVIE ACTOR. WEBER BOARDS, WITH THE FAMOUS LABEL, WERE AVAILABLE IN AUSTRALIA FROM 1965.


The Great War: Who was the oldest recruit in the Anzac’s?

WILLIAM SCHMUTTER IS POSITIONED AT THE RIGHT PLACE – OUTSIDE THE RECRUITMENT OFFICE. Below: IN A CROWDED GATHERING OF RECRUITS, HE WOULD BE HARD TO FIND.                                                                                                                                                                               

SHE FOUND IT A BIT CONFUSING. WILLIAM WAS BORN IN 1859, AND THAT WOULD MAKE HIM OLDER THAN HE SHOULD BE.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Like many brave Australians during WW1 William Schmutter was eager to do his part for his country. He lied about his age in order to be eligible to enlist.

However, unlike many young Aussie’s, William did not change his date of birth to make himself older, he did the opposite.

Kate Mills, an avid family researcher, was not aware her family had any military history, until she accidentally stumbled upon on an old photograph through her research.

Kath uncovered a large family photo showing her great-great grandfather, William, sitting at the centre of a group of family members wearing a military uniform.

This snap-shot was taken just before he went off to war in 1916.

She found this a bit confusing. William was born in 1859, which meant he was almost 60 years old. She was aware that the Army did not accept recruits of that age; Kate was faced with a new family mystery.

Armed with photographic evidence, she focused on searching for military records about her great-great grandfather. She probed for William Schmutter in the military records, but uncovered nothing.

She became more dedicated to unravelling the truth. She searched high and low for variations of names. Eventually, his appeared under the name William Smutter.

Jackpot!

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ABOUT US IN 1914 …
WHEN WW1 BROKE OUT WILLIAM BIRDWOOD, IST BARON BIRDWOOD OF ANZAC AND TOTNES, WAS MADE COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF OF AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND FORCES IN EUROPE. AS SECOND-IN-COMMAND OF THE GALLOPOLI LANDING AT ANZAC, BIRDWOOD NAMED THE COVE, HIS COURAGROUS LEADERSHIP EARNED HIM UNIVERSAL RESPECT AMONG AUSTRALIAN SOLDIERS. EVEN MONASH ADMIRED HIS ABILITY. – FM.

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The reason for dropping the ‘ch’ in Schmutter was possibly to anglicise his name.

Here’s another puzzling discovery?  William was, she soon discovered, had listed his age at 44 years and 4 months at the time of his enlistment.

Why would someone make themselves younger to enlist?

A number of theories have been floated around. Yet, ultimately, the secret of why he lied about his age to enlist is buried with him?

There is no doubt that he was a brave soldier who served overseas as a driver for two years. He was injured and transferred to a hospital in France, then England.

William Smutter was eventually discharged on April 8, 1918.

In the end, for whatever reason, William chose to lie about his age and be able to join his fellow countrymen overseas. He is an ANZAC of which we can all be proud.

<< Kath Mills supplied the story. Ancestry.com.au


OZ SPOT: Local film a hit overseas!

IN 1946, THE LONDON PRESS HAVE HAILED THE AUSTRALIAN FILM, THE OVERLANDERS, AS A SUPERB PRODUCTION, WHICH HAS GIVEN AUSTRLIA A PLACE IN THE FILM WORLD. NEARLY ALL THE MORNING NEWSPAPERS DEVOTED THE BULK OF THEIR WEEKLY FILM REVIEW SPACE TO THE MOVIE WITH NO ADVERSE CRITICISM … CRITICS USED THE PHRASES SUCH AS “SUPERLATIVELY GOOD”, “TOPNOTCHER” AND “THRILLING INTEREST” ARE TYPICAL. PRIME MINISTER, MR BEN CHIFLEY, SAID, “I FEEL THAT THE OVERLANDER WILL HELP PUBLICISE AUSTRALIA THROUGHOUT THE WORLD”. – FM.

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GRAND YEARS WILL APPEAR ON MAY 1.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 16 April 20

FROM THE PAPERS: Rediscovering Australia’s past through the pages of our newspapers

The Australian Labor Daily 1936. NEXT issue.


SHORT STORY: The Black Rabbit discovered a Mulberry Tree – the only one in La La Land!

A MULBERRY TREE: ITS THE ONLY ONE IN LA LA LAND.  Below: I FEEL LIKE DANCING AROUND IT, BLACKIE SAID.

FRANK MORRIS

JOLLY IS A HAPPY WORD. HE FEELS IT IN HIS BONES.

The Black Rabbit was feeling marvellous. Jolly marvellous.

“Absolutely, stupendously jolly marvellous!” he yelled. “That is a jolly happy word,” he said.

He could feel it in his bones.

What he could see of La-La-Land, it looked perfectly fine, too.

As he looked over La-La-Land, from his front porch, he saw that every animal was leaping around.

They must be caught up in a kind of merriment.

I wonder whether it’s something in the grass.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!,” he said, with a modicum of goodly mirth. "How ex-tra-ordinaaaary.”

The Black Rabbit felt like leaping too.

He tried it. He leapt very high.

He tried it again. He leapt even higher.

He thought he might try it again. He did. He leapt so high he thought he would never come down.

He plummeted down to earth and rolled all the way to the river.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he said.

“Those animals must be in peak form”, he muttered to himself.

With all that leaping around the Black Rabbit began to feel tired himself.

Fatigued, in fact.

He looked at the other animals and they were still leaping.

All of a sudden he stopped walking and yelled out, “Where am I, where am I. I know La-La-Land like the back of my hand, but this is ridiculous.”

He looked up-the-hill, down-the-hill and to the left and right

He sighted the Mulberry Bush. Only one. Oh, and four rabbits popped out.

The rabbits were bright-eyed and full of smiling. Each rabbit was standing around the bush holding a piece of multi-coloured tape.

And then they were off … singing and dancing.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he said, in a rather high voice.

Next, the rabbits were singing in front of a wash tub, with a new verse to the same song.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he said, in a higher voice than last time.

The four rabbits were busy hanging their clothes on the line to dry.

And all were singing a verse of the same song.

When they finished, the four rabbits darted into their house.

They emerged minutes later with a pile of school books, some wrap and string. And off to school went the four rabbits. All were singing, quite happily, “going to school on a cold and frosty morning.”

Next moment, he was alone. “I wonder how long they’ll be,” he thought.

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ABOUT US IN 1953 …
THE AVERAGE LIFE EXPECTANCY FOR MEN IN AUSTRALIA HAS RISEN FROM 50 TO 70 SINCE 1903, SAID THE MINISTER FOR HEALTH, SIR EARLE PAGE. FOR WOMEN IT INCREASED FROM 52 TO 72. HE SAID INFANT MORTALITY HAD DROPPED FROM ONE IN 8 BIRTHS TO ONE IN 40. IN 1903, THE PRINCIPAL CAUSES OF DEATH WERE DISEASES OF DIGESTIVE ORGANS, TUBERCULOSIS AND HEART DISEASE. TODAY, 2020, IT’S MAINLY IS HEART DISEASE, DEMENTIA AND CANCER. – FM.
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I hopped back to the Mulberry Bush and tried to emulate the rabbits singing and dancing.

I tried singing.

I tried skipping and hopping to the same tune.

The next thing I knew I was doing it. I was doing it … singing and dancing.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he said in a voice that would have drowned out all of La-La-Land.

At last, just over the hill I heard the four rabbits heading for home.

They were singing and dancing.

“This is the way we come out of school on a cold a frosty morning,” all four rabbits sang.

I ran to meet them. And I joined in.

They laugh at me. I laugh back.

All five of us were singing and dancing. “Here we go round the mulberry bush, the mulberry bush, the mulberry bush early in the morning …”

They were out of sight.

“I got my wish”. “How ex-tra-ordinaaaary! How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” was the familiar tone that I heard echoing from on high.

<< Grand Years.

 


AUSSIE OLD TIME FILM STARS: Let’s peek in the larder and see what we shall find!

LOTTIE LYELL WAS AUSTRALIA’S FIRST SILENT SCREEN STAR. HER LARGE, EXPRESSIVE EYES BECAME HER TRADEMARK.

THE ROMANTIC STORY OF MARGARET CATCHPOLE, MADE IN 1911, IS ONE OF THE OLDEST AUSTRALIAN FEATURE FILMS. DIRECTED BY RAYMOND LONGFORD, AND STARRING LOTTIE LYELL AS THE GIRL TRANSPORTED TO NSW FOR HORSE THEFT, EXPLAINS AUTHOR AND FILM CRITIC JUDITH ADAMSON. THE LONGFORD AND LYELL DUO WAS TO BE A FORMIDBLE COMBINATION. HE WAS AN ACTOR IN ALFRED ROLFE’S FILMS OF STAGEPLAYS THROUGHOUT 1910, THEN WENT ON TO BECOME AUSTRALIA’S MOST FAMOUS SILENT DIRECTOR. LEADING LADY WAS, OF COURSE, LOTTIE LYELL, HIS PRODUCTION PARTNER. A NEWSPAPER SAID “THIS EXCELLENT AUSTRALIAN PRODUCTION CONTAINED EXCITEMENT AND ROMANCE. -- FM.

<< Australian Film Posters, 1906-1960, Judith Adamson, 1978.

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ABOUT US IN 1923 …
DIABETES SUPPLIES OF INSULIN WOULD BECOME MORE PLENTIFUL AND CHEAPER, A STATEMENT THAT MADE THE WORLD STAND UP AND CHEER. IT WAS WELCOME NEWS! DR FREDERICK BANTING, WORKING IN MacLEOD’S LABORATORY, MADE CERTAIN DISCOVERIES AND TOOK THEM TO MacLEOD. THE RESULT WAS INSULIN TREATMENT. MacLEOD TOLD AN AUDIENCE IN BRITAIN … THAT THE PRICE WOULD DROP TO 25 SHILLINGS A WEEK. – FM.


John Frost Newspaper Collection: Final. Headlines you’ll never forget!

POSSE KILLS BONNIE AND CLYDE. THE ELUSIVE DUO WERE SHOT DEAD AS DESPERADOES. Below: THE DEATH OF MADAME CURIE.

FROST IS A MAN WHO LOOKED FORWARD TO THE PAST.

ELAINE WILLIAM        Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

John Frost’s love of his newspaper collection had continued even throughout a seven year spell in the army that spread from 1939 to 1946.

While on active duty in Normandy, Frost says he “had a rifle in one hand and an eye on collecting newspapers.” Any local papers he found were sent home.

On one occasion he had … no leave from the army for more than 12 months; his mother wrote to her son complaining about the growing pile of foreign newspapers.

When Frost left the army, it took 18 months for him to sort out the publications.

He has many types of newspapers that have become war-time treasures. The local German paper called the Lubecker Zeitung, published on May 1, 1945, reported Hitler’s suicide with the words “Unser Fuhrer Gefallen” (Our leader has fallen).

The report of the assassination in Sarajevo, of the Crown Prince of Austria, in the Neues Wiener Tagblatt, of Sunday, June 28, 1914, is another example of this world-respected collection of newspapers.

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ABOUT US IN 1971 …
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT ESTABLISHES THE AUTRALIAN FILM COMMISSION TO ENCOURAGE AN AUSTRALIAN FILM INDUSTRY … JEANS DESIGNED EXCLUSIVELY FOR WOMEN COME ONTO THE MARKET … ACUPUNCTURE TREATMENT INTRODUCED TO AUSTRALIA FROM CHINA … PHOTOGRAPHS OF GOUGH WHITLAM SHOW THAT HE IS NO LONGER USING HAIR OIL AND IS, PERHAPS, BLOW-DRYING HIS HAIR.
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One of Frost’s personal heroes is Winston Churchill. Frost has every major political event in Churchill’s life.

Newspapers of the war time, are an extra-special category of papers because of Frost’s own experience as a Normandy veteran.

Still, events such as the deaths of film stars Marilyn Monroe and Rudolph Valentino also have their place among the extra-famous personalities.

Along with more light-hearted moments with articles of the famous and not-so-famous, like the one of Freddie Starr. One tabloid front page headline records the dubious behaviour of British comedian, Starr, who was accused of eating a pet hamster.

Frost has been described as the man who looks forward to the past. He enjoys this graphic summary.
Also, he looks forward to the future and the news of important events. I had been with Frost a few minutes when the news came through of the sudden and tragic death an hour earlier of a man who was tipped to become Britain’s next prime minister.

The future is never far away!

<< Adapted from an article, Headlines we never forget! Elaine William; Frank Morris also supplied some extra words.

FROM A HIGH PEAK, SHERLOCK HOLMES AND PROFESSOR MORIARTY WRESTLE AND STUMBLE TO THEIR DEATH.

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ABOUT US IN 1972 …
MacDONALD’S BURGERS COME TO AUSTRALIA TO OPEN ITS FIRST OUTLET AT THE SUBURB OF YAGOONA, NSW. (KENTUCKY ARRIVED IN 1968) … THE LONDON ECONOMIST SURVEY LISTS THAT AUSTRALIA IS THE FOURTH-BEST PLACE TO LIVE AFTER US, CANADA AND SWEDEN.


ANNOUNCEMENT FROM MANAGEMENT …

BECAUSE OF THE CURRENT VIRUS PROBLEMS, GRAND YEARS WILL PUBLISHED EVERY TWO WEEKS. NEXT ISSUE: APRIL 17.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 02 April 20

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