A TO Z HOME CARE: Peace of mind is a two way street for carer and recipient

FRANK MORRIS

A FATHER & CARER: REMEMBER, IT’S TOUGH FOR BOTH PARTIES. Below: A WIFE CHECKED IN WITH HUBBY BEFORE SHE WENT OUT SHOPPING. REMEMBER, A CRISIS CAN HAPPEN  AT ANY MOMENT. THERE IS NO TIMETABLE.

In Australia, last count, there were 2.7 million unpaid carers. Which means 1 person in 8 are carers who provide informal assistance to an individual. It would cost $60.3 billion dollar – or over $1 billon a week-- to replenish this service.

Believe or not, commonsense must prevail at all times. The carer’s role is a responsible and onerous one and especially so if one is holding down a demanding job. It is said that the stress levels can be greater than for workers who dependents are children.

The greatest family conflict arises when our parents become our dependents, says a leading psychologist. “It’s tough for both parties.”

If there is a common thread that’s flagged through every stage of the working carer’s role it is this: be prepared for the unexpected. From the start, the carer must understand that peace of mind is not a one-way street. But the carer MUST make it happen, at all times.

From the outset, the carer must understand that:

THE NEED for care is somewhat unpredictable.

A CRISIS can happen at any time – and it usually does. There is no timetable.

AGAINST A MISHAP

INVARIABLY, a crisis strikes at an awkward, inconvenient, unpropitious moment.

HIGH per cent, aged over 65 years, have a medical problem or disability.

THE condition of an aged person can deteriorate quickly.

There are others. These are the ‘red flags’ if you like that can make life terribly difficult. Knowing what facilities are available and what precautions one can take against a mishap occurring can make all the difference.

Of the people 65 years and over, many tend to ‘age in place’ – that means at home. They want to be as independent as possible. But there will be a time when, if you like, a second fall, or deterioration of the person’s mental faculties will become an overwhelming problem.

That’s why the role of carer is vitally important.

NEXT: A TO Z HOME CARE: The strength of ‘personal’ emergency alarms.


MO STATUE: Mo sits on table in our lounge room doing a lot of thinking

FRANK MORRIS and Barbara Byrne (Bartlett)

Dear Frank

I’d like to tell you a tale about MO. He was, as you said, the undoubted comedy king from the 1930s. MO is a statue, 26 centimetres tall. You probably know him better as Roy ‘MO’ Rene or ‘MO’ McCackie.

My father, Alec Bartlett, bought it for his mother, Harriet. He was 14 years old. Nanna and I grew up seeing MO. Then mum sold our house, Carlton, and gave MO to Yvonne, my sister. Yvonne kept MO in her lounge at faraway Chipping Norton, with a photo of myself and dad standing opposite.

‘LIVE’ REVIEW

Yvonne restored MO. It was early 2000, I think, and was very proud of her work; very proud of the way he looked. He was getting rather shabby, Yvonne thought. Yvonne died 12 years ago in 2006.

MO sits in our lounge room, now. He is dreaming. At the corner of English Street and Railway Parade, Kogarah. It is believed in its day to have has ‘live’ review theatre. It later became known as Carlton stadium.

Did he ever perform at this venue? To our knowledge he did not.

Love Barbara.


Classic Repeat: Mighty Mo -- authentic feel of vaudeville is “uncannily perceptive”`

FRANK MORRIS

MO & GARRY: Mo McCACKIE, ACTOR GARRY MACD0NALD, TAKES ANOTHER APPLAUSE IN THE GRAND FINALE OF THE 12TH ANNUAL MO AWARDS IN 1987. Below: TWO COMEDIANS GET TOGETHER – STAN LAUREL, OF LAUREL AND HARDY FAME, AND ROY RENE,  WHO PLAYS MO McCACKIE.

The greatest of all Australia comedians, Roy ‘Mo’ Rene, made a triumphant return to the vaudeville stage in the high-stepping, and glittery musical Sugar Babies.

But, alas, it’s not the inimitable Mo up there. Instead, it is the highly talented actor Garry McDonald doing his acclaimed impression of the inimitable Mo. McDonald first brought Mo back from the grave at the Nimrod Theatre six years ago. It was great stuff.

In the thirties and forties, Mo was the undoubted King of Comedy. Vaudeville was his domain. And vaudeville thrived on his inexhaustible talents. Well, those clowning and slapstick days were created in Sugar Babies at Her Majesty’s.

MO WAS AWARDED

Although the show has struck out with some critics, the Sydney Morris Herald’s H.G. Kippax awarded McDonald with a B-plus for his efforts. Kippax described his Mo as “uncannily effective” even though “much of his material is very unlike Mo’s. He added: “McDonald can be very funny indeed without gagging at all.”

Kippax also served up some kind words to popular club performer Marty Coffey, rating his juggling act as “brilliant” and one the “best moments” of the show.

“Here is the authentic feel of vaudeville,” wrote Kippax.

<< Mighty Mo was released in newspapers around NSW in 1986.


SOCIAL JUSTICE: The barriers against older people not getting work

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

ON THE HEAP: OVER 50 YEARS OLD AND WITHOUT A JOB. AT ONE TIME HE WAS WORKING AS SECOND IN CHARGE OF A GAS PETROLEUM OUTFIT UNTIL THEY AMALGAMATED. Below: AT 54 YEARS OLD, IT CAME AS A SHOCK. MAVIS WORKED FOR A RETAIL COMPANY IN THE ACCOUNTS DEPARTMENT.

Older Australians have a great contribution to make, but this is dependent on their own capacity: as well as the kind of opportunities provided.

It is important to ensure the older generation have access to flexible workplaces … that will allow them to work or to retire in dignity.

Immediate barriers to the employment of older workers include the lack of workers compensation and restriction on income protection insurance. Age discrimination throws up other barriers, too. Older people are stereotyped as … slow and unproductive.

DOWNSIZING

Older workers may be seen as more expensive and not worth the trouble and cost of training. They are most vulnerable to redundancy where companies are downsizing and restructuring.

A recent national survey found that that 25 per cent of people 50 years and over experienced some form of discrimination -- like being denied employment, promotion or training, or subjected to derogatory treatment.

Many had given up looking for work. As a result, those most affected, included people on lower incomes and single parents. Unemployment among older workers involves huge losses to the economy.

COMBATING AGE

Australia’s Aged Discrimination Commissioner believes the cost of losing mature workers amounts to around $10 billion each year. By comparison, keeping just 3 per cent more people over 55 in work would gain $30 billion annually.

Those are just the economic costs and benefits.

Unemployment has shocking effects on individual self-esteem and family finances. Combating age discrimination in the workforce will require more than raising awareness and appealing to the better nature of employers.

It will need regulation to ensure older workers, particularly the low-paid workers, have a better access to employment that is flexible to their needs.

<< A place at the table: social justice in an ageing society, 2016-2017.

NEXT: After rescuing over 700 people, mainly women and children, from the rapidly-sinking Titanic, the Carpathia, headed for another assignment which she never came back from the 1914-18 war.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 26 October 18

Stay Informed

Receive eNews & Special Offers

Brochure Request Order

Tour Reviews Read

Last 12 months


Tags