Aged Care: Woman will make our systems a “one-stop shop”

FRANK MORRIS

ALL-SEEING: JANET ANDERSON WILL MAKE SURE AGED CARE WILL BECOME A “ONE-STOP-SHOP”. Below: A ROLE THAT TAKES IN  ALL THE NOOKS AND CRANNIES OF THE SYSTEM.

An experienced health sector commissioner has been consigned to Australia’s aged care industry to oversee quality and safety. Ms Janet Anderson will manage the commission as it prepares to start the “intensified compliance monitoring” from January 1.

The report says, “The nation’s first commissioner will lead the new and independent aged care quality safety commission.”

OPERATE ON $300M A YEAR

Ms Anderson’s appointment will usher in a new era for aged care.

The report says, “She will oversee the approval, accreditation, assessment, complaints resolution, monitoring and compliance of Commonwealth-funded aged care providers.” The aged care providers will report directly to the Minister for Senior Australians and Aged Care.

The commission will operate a budget of almost $300 million across four years, employing dozens of additional senior compliance offecers. The report says, “Unannounced re-accreditation audits, which have been law since July 1, are set to jump from 263 this year to almost 900 in 2019.”


VALE: Scott Dillon – His amazing ride made surf history!

FRANK MORRIS

THE RIDE OF A LIFETIME: DILLON PADDLED OUT GINGERLY TO MEET THE BOMBORA’S “HEAVY”, AS HE PREPARED TO TAKE OFF ON THE MISSION OF TRIUMPH. Below: THE NEWSPAPER WENT AND SPLASHED THE BOMBORA STORY OVER TWO PAGES. Below: SCOTT DILLON.  Below: AN EARLY ‘KILL’ FOR SCOTT DILLON WAS THIS ‘HEAVY’ FROM PANAMA.

He was a larger-than-life character. He was good at driving stock cars, boxer, traveller, adventurer and inventions.  But he would always be a your mate and best buddy. He was a down-to-earth family man.

Scott Dillon, the man who came across as somebody who cannot be destroyed, died peacefully at 9.15 on Tuesday night (December 11.)

He was one of the pioneers of the Australian surfboard industry in 1960.

One of his closest friends was well-known surf photographer Jack Eden. Eden, together with Scott Dillon and Norm Casey, became partners in the surfing magazine Surfabout.

Eden knew what sort of a big-wave rider he really was. At Bare Island, he captured Dillon on a breaking 18-foot wave in 1963. The wave grew in size at an alarming rate, but it was his moment of triumph.

Dillon was the first surfer to crack a huge “death wave” at the Bombora at Botany Bay.*

THE MECCA

But being an expert photo-leman’s, Eden had positioned himself just above Dillon and followed him all the way. That was one, as it turned out, of the “most amazing” rides in surf history.

In a matter of years, he had established a reputation as a top-ranking custom builder.

His factory was located at Brookvale in 1959, but his reputation spread all over Sydney. With legends like Barry Bennett, Gordon Woods and Bill Wallace, Dillon co-founded the Australia surfboard building fraternity during that time.

Brookvale soon became the mecca of the surfboard industry. Dillon could shape any type of board specified by the customers.

In 2004, Dillon was inducted into the Surfing Hall of Fame.

Dillon was born in 1928. He was 90 when he died.

As Dillon would say, “Surf’s up, have a go,”.

Frank Morris comments: The bombora episode happened when I was editor of Surfabaut magazine in 1963. Surfabout was the only magazine to have the story. It was my first sighting of Scott Dillon. He was definably a brilliant, self-controlled surfer. We did a spread called Bare Island Bares its Teeth, which turned out to be a runaway success. I can still recall what it said: “At last, the spell is broken, as Scott Dillon moves off on the first “heavy” ever ridden at Bare Island.” The Sun newspaper, Sydney, ran the story. I finished working at Surfabout late in 1964. The new publisher had me write the editorial and a brief history of the major surfboard manufacturers in Australia.


REV JOHN FLYNN: Mrs Flynn of the inland prepares for an outback holiday!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

HAVING LUNCH ‘OUTSIDE’: WHAT A DAY? MEMBERS OF THE FLYNN BRIGADE HAVE LUNCH BENEATH A TREE NEAR THE ABODE. AT RIGHT: LOUNGING IN COMFORT, ARE MRS FLYNN AND HER HUSBAND THE REV JOHN FLYNN.  Below: TRYING TO CRANK OUT SOME MESSAGES.

Mrs John Flynn, wife of the Rev John Flynn, said “the Inlanders are cheerful souls … they never complain.” Mrs Flynn prepared to join her husband and umpteen kids back from a city holiday. On her way, she shared the hazards of the natural outback.

“My husband brought a party of children from Trekelano, 40 miles out of Cloncurry, and 1300 miles to Brisbane for a holiday.

“While he was there he suggested to the Education Department that if they would send out a teacher and equipment the people at Trekelano would build a school. I helped him to take the children home. They travelled in the back of the truck.

“We took two weeks over the trip. Rain held us up for three days at Blackall, and two days at Longreach. When we got back the school was built. A surprise for the padre. The children outback are fine specimens, though they never have milk or butter in the summer; and vegetables can only be grown in the winter.

FENCES ARE FEW

“They take so kindly to corned meat that when every few weeks a bullock is killed and they have fresh meat for one day they don’t like it at all. I know the country where our only woman Flying Doctor, Jean White, was lost for some days last year.

“Everything is so flat that the country looks like a faint mist haze from the air. There are no land marks. The Inland is so vast and surprising. I hearda woman outback talk about a ”bit of a holding” that was for sale. I asked how big it was. She said, ‘Three hundred square miles.’

“Fences are few. The cattle are kept together by water bores, but the sheep country does have fences.
“One time up on Cape York Peninsula I saw a man digging post-holes. He said he was helping to fence a paddock. The paddock was 250 square miles.

<< Australian Women’s Weekly, October 21, 1939.

NEXT: After 34 years I’m calling it a day. Sir Sydney Williams talks about what it’s like to live in the outback.


CANBERRA: Australians – look at these facts! Even the national capital will blush!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

HOLY GHOST!: COULD THE NATIONAL FILM AND SOUND ARCHIVE IN CANBERRA BE THE GHOSTLIEST PLACE IN AUSTRALIA? IT’S SPINE-TINGLING, DON’T YOU AGREE.

Haunted Halls: The National Film and Sound Archive, according to a local legend, Tim the Yowie Man, is one of the most haunted buildings in Australia. For spine-tingling explorations, walk the halls and look for the intriguing Picnic at Hanging Rock exhibition or be mesmerised by the case of missing Prime Minister Harold Holt, who vanished without a trace in 1967. Oh, Canada, you shouldn’t have: The famous 39-metre, 7 tonne flagpole … at Regatta Point was a gift from Canada to Australia in 1957. The Australian flag flies year-round, except on Canada Day, July 1, when the Maple Leaf is flown. Meeting Place: Canberra means ‘meeting place’. This is derived from ‘Kamberra’ in the language of the Ngunnawal people. Sister Act: One of Canberra’s sister cities is Nara, Japan, which is famous for its ancient shrines, and also for its brief tenure as that nation’s 8th century capital.

<< Time-Out publication.

IT’S CHRISTMAS TIME! THERE’S A LOT DO … YOU’VE GOT PEOPLE TO HUG AND GREET, HANDS TO SHAKE AND TO WISH EVERYONE A MERRY CHRISTMAS. MERRY CHRISTMAS TO YOU ALL!

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 21 December 18

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