CONNECTION: Family violence – getting rid of the complaint in Victoria

How we rid ourselves of behaviour and discrimination before it becomes overwhelming.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

QUIET MOMENT: ARE HIS FOOTSTEPS GETTING CLOSER? Below: IF YOU RESPOND TO A FAMILY VIOLENCE ISSUE, MAKE SURE YOU ARE SENSITIVE AND TRUSTING. Below: ANY INCIDENCE OF FAMILY VIOLENCE MUST BE REPORTED.

In the Victorian Crime statistics between July 2016 and June 2017 there were 1007 family incidents recorded by Victoria Police. While the recorded incidents of family violence is “relatively low in Glen Eira when compared to many other Victorian Local Government areas, the rate is continuing to increase” the Glen Eira Council said.

For instance, in Glen Eira, a total of 615 family members applied for a Family Violence Intervention Order through the court in 2016-17; breaches were one of the top 10 crimes in the community with 209 recorded by Victorian Police.

While there is no specific local data, Glen Eira knows that the most affected family members are female. Ten per cent are young people aged 17 and under.

PLAY A PART

“We also know that a child is present in nearly 30 per cent of family violence incidents,” a Glen Eira Council spokensperson said. “This can have a long lasting impact on their development and lives.”

Council plans to take action to prevent family violence through leadership and promoting positive values and cultures. Family violence can be stopped if we all “play a part” to be free of it.

“One way is by becoming an active bystander – a person who speak up or seeks out someone to respond when we witness an act of violence, discrimination and offensive behaviour, that’s playing your role,” a Glen Eira spokesperson said.

The Council has listed some ways of being an active bystander:

BLAME THE ‘VICTIM’

REPORT any incident of violence to the police, or appropriate authority.

RESPOND sensitively to an individual who discloses an experience of violence by believing them, and support them to contact an appropriate service.

CHALLENGE a friend’s or peer’s sexist remarks or jokes that normalise or condone violence against women or put the blame on the ‘victim’.

CONFRONT someone you know who has shown violent behaviour; encourage them to seek assistance to change.
If confronted by violence contact the police.

The Glen Eira City Council takes in … Bentleigh, Bentleigh East, Brighton East, Carnegie, Caulfield, Elsternwick, Gardenvale, Glen Huntly, McKinnon, Murrumbeena, Ormond and St Kilda East.

<< Glen Eira News, April, 2018.


AFL: “DALLY” MESSENGER – he was the master of the game

Nobody could deny that this keen player was a born footballer!

FRANK MORRIS

IN THE MAKING: DALLY MESSENGER AT THE START OF AN EARLY FIRST GAME OF RUGBY LEAGUE IN 1907. Below: MESSENGER, IN THE 1950s, AND RAS SHIELD. Below: THE RUGBY LEAGUE NEWS CHRISTEN DALLY MESSENGER AN IMMORTAL TO CELEBRATE HIS BIRTHDAY.

Dally Messenger is a rugby league “high priest”, said the book 200 Years of Australian Sport.

Messenger was credited as being the “father of rugby league” in Australia, and yet he could only manage a spot on the bench in the Rugby League Dream Team. I didn’t query the reason.

Born in April, 1886, Messenger brought many unique gifts into football.

Originally, the stocky-built Messenger was a Rugby Union player. He became “The Master” for his being highly popular with the milling crowds in Sydney. That’s why his swinging over from Union gave Rugby League its greatest impetus.

“League historians have pondered whether Rugby League would have taken its grip in NSW and Queensland if Dally Messenger had not agreed to join the breakaway movement and play the new code in 1907,” sports writer, Alan Clarkson wrote.

DEEP IMPRESSION

In 1907, New Zealand “All Golds”, who were on their way to England, introduced their newly-adopted League game to Sydney. There were so impressed with the genius of Messenger that they took him England. He made a deep impression.

“Dally” toured again as vice-captain of the first Kangaroos of 1908-09. He declined the offer to tour again in 1912-13.

Writes Clarkson, “On the first Australian tour of England, Messenger, in the game against Hull, and with the aid of a strong wind, kicked a goal from about 70 metres out. In an exhibition at Headingly, Messenger, in near force gale winds took the ball a yard out from the try line and close to the corner and kicked 11 goals from 12 attempts.”

Messenger was an unorthodox player, but he had a touch of genius. He was 170cm tall and weighed 76kgs. He died in 1959.

<< Hall of Champions book, 1972.

NEXT: VFL – “Up there Cazaly!” The legend of one of rules highest flyers, Roy Cazaly.


FLASHBACK: Strode paved the way with first country newspaper

He performed miracles with the Hunter River Gazette.

FRANK MORRIS

AUSSIE GOES TO PRESS: AFTER A LOT OF SETBACKS, STRODE PAVED THE WAY FOR THE COUNTRY PRESS IN AUSTRALIA. Below: AN 1890 ENGRAVING OF THE MAITLAND MERCURY BUILDING. THE MERCURY, STARTED IN 1843, HOLDS THE DISTINCTION OF BEING THE OLDEST COUNTRY NEWSPAPER IN NSW.

Official! Rustic New South Wales goes to press!

The first newspaper published outside Sydney “appeared suddenly” on December 11, 1841 -- that is 177 years ago. It was Thomas Strode’s Hunter River Gazette, priced at one shilling.

Strode, a former chief printer of the Sydney Herald, several years earlier, produced in partnership with George Arden, the Port Phillip Gazette.

Strode performed many miracles with the Gazette, like printing it almost single-handed on an ancient press with defective type.

But it didn’t take long for the partnership founder.

Writes historian Dr R.B.Walker in his book on the NSW press: “Arden’s intemperate pen soon embroiled him in many quarrels and after he attacked an erratic Judge Willis … Strode saw fit to arrange dissolution of the partnership.”

In 1841, not long after parting company with Arden, Strode settled in Maitland, in the Hunter Valley, “a busy centre” for the expanding settlement, where two unsuccessful attempts had been made to establish a newspaper.

The region, with a population of 2768, was far more important than Newcastle, writes Dr Walker.

MOCKING REPLY

When Strode’s four-page paper, Hunter River Gazette, hit the street, it was laid out in a style that was to characterise country newspapers for many years.

Writes Dr Walker: “Strode insisted that he be paid six months in advanced … and his pen spared no one. It wand as his style to print side by side of the letter of a local clergyman and his mocking reply using the same words and phrases in a scathing rebuttal.”

Although Strode had written himself into the historical book, his newspaper had only a short life.

THE PAPER WOULD NOT SURVIVE

He discontinued the Gazette “ungraciously” till June 1842, and headed back to Melbourne where he eventually gained control of the Port Phillip Gazette from his former insolvent partner.

Writes Dr Walker: “But Maitland was too important to be without a newspaper.”

The first issue of the Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser appeared on January 7, 1843.
“The paper would not have able to survive its first year,” writes Dr Walker, “but for the profits derived from advertisements relating to the colony’s first general elections.”

 

<< Grand Years 2012.


FLASHBACK: Strode’s treatment was insight for the country press

FRANK MORRIS

PREMIER IS NO 2: THE LIMITED EDITION COLOUR WALL CHART OF EVERY COUNTRY NEWSPAPER IN NSW WAS PRESENTED TO THE PREMIER, NICK GREINER BY THE COUNTRY PRESS ASSOCIATION OF NSW EXECUTIVES IN 1991. THE CHART WAS DESIGNED AND WRITTEN BY FRANK MORRIS. Below: ONE OF TWO SUPPLEMENTS, THE INFLUENTIAL COMMUNICATOR, THAT WAS RUN IN ALL OF NSW’S COUNTRY PAPERS.

A special symbol was designed to mark the publication of the first country newspaper in NSW in 1841. The logo appeared on the front pages of more than 150 newspapers in NSW to celebrate the historic event.

To top all this, was a limited edition coloured wall chart featuring all the papers in the Country Press Association of NSW in 1991 and the publication of several supplements which detail the recorded history.

Australian newspapers are rich in history, colour and turmoil, and the unforgettable characters who made it so.

Some interesting facts about the ‘first’: The first newspaper to be published in Australia was George Howe’s The Sydney Gazette on March 5, 1803, under the aegis of Governor Phillip Gidley King.

KIAMA INDEPENDENT THE OLDEST

Howe also printed the first Sunday newspaper in Australia and also the first book in the colony,in 1802. In 1841, the first childrens’ book, A Mother’s Offering to Her Children by Lady Bremer, was the last journal issued by the ‘old’ Gazette office.

The oldest surviving country newspaper in NSW published by one family throughout its entire history, before being taken over by Rural Sales, is the Kiama Independent. In was founded in 1863. -- Frank Morris

<< Grand Years 2012.


SHOP WINDOW: Part 2. Heritage Places – A gift to the Nation

The Old Melbourne Gaol, left, is Victoria’s oldest surviving prison complex. Built in 1841, it was the place at which Ned Kelly, who was hanged in 1880, and notorious gangster, Squizzy Taylor. Under the program, there are daily tours, and a comprehensive display and exhibition held within the goal. The Callington Mill in Oatlands, Tasmania, right, is a local landmark. It dates back to 1837 and was once the major flour mill in the region. On the site there is a group of stone buildings which contain a five-level windmill, miller’s cottage, and colonial home. The site was developed as a major attraction for visitors to the region.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 27 April 18

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