CONNECTION: Part 1. Case Study: Looking for a country pub … we found it!

IN THE BEGINNING: THE PUB AT THE END OF THE CROSS STREET, FAR LEFT, IS SIMILAR TO WHAT IS KNOWN TODAY AS THE SWAN. DATE IS 1865.

Carol had taken enthusiastically to the pub idea. The search was on in earnest.

FRANK MORRIS

Three years ago, Richard was made redundant. His life as a managing director was finished at the age of 60. He was given certain options but he refused them. He was MD of a rather big firm but didn’t have the patience to, at his age, hunt for a new job; he and his wife would go into business for themselves. He had the money.

Richard’s case was the result of a takeover.

Of course, he’ll miss his salary, and his service contract was left with still had two years to run; the inevitable sometimes has got to happen – and it happened to him. He was reimbursed for the service contract and three years of salary.

He still kept his extensive shares option.

Richard and Anne decided they would search for a business that would maintain their capital and enable them to live off it. Their son, Peter, suggested that they buy a country pub. Not anywhere, mind you, but in a small holiday district which has water views.

SERIOUSLY DEDICATED

Richard felt that they would enjoy country living and running a pub. Carol, surprising herself, had taken enthusiastically to the pub idea. The search was on in earnest. But first, they had to find out how to go about looking a pub and learn all the “ins and outs” of the licensed trade.

He went to hotel authoritarties and they put him in touch with one-week course for managers of local pubs. It was an effective and practical course which provided Richard with a sound potted introduction to the licensed trade – looking after a cellar, legal aspects of licensing, customer service, booking keeping and accounts.

Next stage was the hotel and catering industry. They attended a privately run course, with high reputation, that was divided into three stages. First stage paints a broad picture across the whole industry, highlighting areas of opportunity.

It seeks to demolish any idyllic nonsense about running or owning a business in this country. It dissuades all but the seriously dedicated.

HAVEN OF BUSHRANGERS

After a period of searching, they came across a medium size country town that had everything they would require: It was a waterway wonderland of the utmost perfection. After their solicitor examined the books, they bought the pub.

The pub, the legendary The Captured Arms, was frequently hassled by the last of the bushrangers.

The pub was built in 1890, and became the hangout for memorabilia and antidotes history. It had been rebuilt several times, the last time as the Swan, in 1969.

Meanwhile, Richard had not been wasting his time. He returned to do the final eight weeks of the course which is concerned with the final planning to run a particular business.

Richard was able to get a much clearer understanding of how to about costing and pricing. Although Richard was familiar with financial aspects, he had to change his views quite considerately.

<< Retirement Pack, London. Frank Morris adapted the article.

Photo: With all the legal papers signed we suddenly realised that we were the owners of a country pub.

Next week: Final! The most important items the pair had to face was the many days a year the pub was open.

Coming: 50 years on, recalling the heady years of space … and the building of the 64 metre telescope at Parkes, NSW; Smoking – your health risk; A case of depression: “Carol” speak out!


VALE: AINSLEY GOTTO

Ainsley Gotto, whose alleged love affair shook parliament house, died in Sydney. She was 72. Gotto was age 22 when she was appointed the principal private secretary to Prime Minister John Gorton. Gotto had a distinguished career in international business and media, but she remained loyal to her old boss,” Tony Wright wrote in Sydney Morning Herald. She returned Australia to work for him in his retirement. She assisted his widow, Lady Nancy, with his funeral arrangements after his death in 2002.

VALE: ALAN GILL, JOURNALIST

Journalist and author Alan Gill passed away on February 23. He was aged 80 years. He was well-known as a religious writer for the Sydney Morning Herald. He immigrated to Australia in 1971; and in 1985 was awarded a Walkley Award. And in 1995 was made a member of The Order of Australia for Services to the Media.

VALE: SYLVIA LAWSON, JOURNALIST WHO REINVIGORATED CINEMA

Sylvia Lawson, who assisted in the revival of the Sydney Film Festival, has died in 2017. She was born in Summer Hill, NSW, in 1932. After university she worked as a cadet on the Sydney Morning Herald and left there to work on the Daily Mirror and then the Nation, the independent publication founded by Tom Fitzgerald in 1954. The Nation “provided an opportunity for robust and independent commentary.” She was author of several books, including her first book The Archibald Paradox.

Picture: Ainsley Gotto. She had the town talking.


THE DC-3 REVISITED: FINAL! The undercarriage failed as the plane was landing

FLYING CAREER: MITZI REVISITED THE DC-3 SHE WAS ON WHICH HAS PRIDE OF PLACE IN THE MACKAY AIR MUSEUM. Below: THE FLIGHT WE WERE ON HAD ACCIDENTLY RETRACTED THE UNDERCARRIAGE AS  THE PLANE TOUCHED DOWN. IT NEVER FLEW AGAIN.

“I never found out whether we were legally married,” Mitzi says.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

The pilot of the DC-3, Captain Marian Kozuba Kozubski, a Polish World War II Victoria Cross recipient, was one of the best. But his flying skills were not enough to prevent the frequent minor mechanical problems and a breakdown in out-of-the-way places.

The crew of four would then pool their ideas and, with a sense of humour, ingenuity and sometimes a little rascality, come up with a solution. On one occasion the DC-3 burst a tyre on landing at the wadi in the Sahara -- Kozubski and the engineer set off into the darkness and returned several hours later pushing a DC-3 wheel.

“We thought it best not to ask questions,” says Mitzi. “We can only surmise the wheels came off another DC-3; but where they found a DC-3 in the middle of the desert was another matter!”

Ingenuity and hard work were the trade-marks of an air hostess in the early 1950s. It was her job to shop for all the supplies needed for the trip, to ensure there was sufficient water on board, and to make sure that the passengers were looked after with meals and entertainment.

On one long and tedious flight, Mitzi married the flight engineer-navigator. The ‘wedding’ ceremony was united by Captain Kozubski in mid-flight, with the team as witnesses.

AIR CRASH

“I never did find out whether we were legally married,” she says, “but the passengers thought it was wonderful.”
There were no heating facilities on the DC-3s: if a stopover could not be organised to coincide with meal times, it meant cold meats prepared as creatively as possible. But, says Mitzi, the team “were very understanding.”

In the post-war years, items like whisky and cigarettes were expensive. So the crew used to stock up in Malta with enough for their stay in England. They became more and more daring until the day they got caught smuggling in the stuff.

Mitzi’s flying career came to an end in an air crash at Livingstone in 1953. This is not long after the DC-3 had been phased out and replaced by two Avro Tudors which had a greater payload.

She had already burst an ear drum during a flight on a DC-3, and spent three months in hospital after this crash. The undercarriage was apparently and accidentally retracted as the plane touched down. It never flew again.

<< The Queensland In-flight Magazine, l986.


Part 2. THE GREAT WAR: War memorials – make a visit this year!

Selected by FRANK MORRIS

SOLDIERS’ MEMORIAL HALL, BIDGEE WIDGEE, SA: After the Great War there was much argument about what to do for World War 1 soldiers. Some of it was acrimonious, whether to settle for a conventional stone monument or a “useful” monument, such as a hospital, a library or a hall.

Those who had raised the funds, and those who had endured the rigours of organising functions in such unsuitable premises as the School or the old woolshed usually voted for a Memorial Hall. And if they got it, what a boon and blessing it would it be!

No more Jumble Sales in the church under the eye of a somewhat cranky parson; no more whist drives in the cramped little desks of the school. Freedom from everything – from a Monster Baby Show to a Grand Football Dance.

SEMAPHORE, SA: A clock-tower with an angel on top. The angel is manufactured out Carrara marble from Italy; but the rest of the work is wholly designed and executed by Mr J. E. Topham of Norwood.

On May 24, 1925, the President of Semaphore RSL, Lt. Col. L.O. Betts, unveiled the monument. It is a great service to the people who go fishing without their watches!

<< Sprod’s War Memorials, Ouadrant, October, 1975.


House Proud: Part 2. A quick overview!

Remember, if it’s for sale, don’t spend too much money. In other words, do not get carried away. Here’s a tip: If it really needs a painting, do so, but stick to safe neutral or fashion colours – but none to brash – and not a colour that shrieks loud and clear. Prospective buyers may thank you for saving them cost of repainting.

Here’s another tip: If you haven’t time to cook before potential buyers arrive, try putting a bought cake or a loaf a fresh bread in a low oven with a pan of hot water underneath. The kitchen will smell of fresh baking.

Next week: If it’s for sale, clear out all the junk you have hoarded.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 02 March 18

Stay Informed

Receive eNews & Special Offers

Brochure Request Order

Tour Reviews Read

Last 12 months


Tags