FLINDERS: Part 1. The beginning of the end for a person who defined Australia

IMPRESSIVE: MATTHEW FLINDERS’ PERSONALITY … THE PRESSURES HE FACED IN ADVANCING HIS CAREER WHILE STRUGGLING TO MAINTAIN HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH ANN CHARPELLE.

THIS IS MATTHEW FLINDERS BY HIS WIFE ANN CHAPPELLE. IT REVEALS THE PERSONALITY OF FLINDERS AND THE PRESSURE HE FACES ADVANCING HIS CAREER WHILE STRUGGLING TO MAINTAIN HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH ANN. IT WAS A LOVE STORY. TO PUT YOU IN THE PICTURE, WE’VE PUBLISHED THIS SHORT PREFACE WHICH IMPARTS FACTS ABOUT FLINDERS YOU MAY OR MAY NOT HAVE KNOWN.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS    

In 1814, a delicately pale Englishwoman of uncertain health but most certain convictions, sat at her desk and wrote a letter of protest to history about her husband Matthew Flinders.

She wrote, “The disaster of his life has followed him even into death.”

Her presence on his ship had once caused stern rebuke from his patron, Sir Joseph Banks. Flinders had survived shipwreck on two occasions before being imprisoned by the French, causing a separation of nine and a half years from his wife after just three months’ marriage.

Now, on his death, the Lords of the Admiralty had left his widow pensionless.

“He died if ever Man did, a martyr to his zeal for his country’s service,” Ann Flinders Chappelle wrote sadly of her husband.

His life and his disasters, his martyrdom were also her own. A woman in nineteen-century England had few ways to right an injustice. Ann did what little she could. She set down an account of Matthew Flinders’ exploits for future generations – for her child and future grandchild.

During Matthew’s lifetime Sir Joseph Banks, also an important figure in Australian history, saw in Flinders a man of determination and single-minded ambition; a man who would not disappoint his patron.

CONVERSE INTELLIGENTLY

The Lords of the Admiralty, however, saw in him only a brave and somewhat foolhardy adventurer. Flinders’ journals … show him to be a man who loved enduringly and passionately.

Yet Ann wrote of him, “no difficulty could stop his career, no danger dismay him: hunger, thirst, labour, rest. Sickness, shipwreck, imprisonment; Death itself, were equally to him matters of indifference if they interfered with his darling Discovery.”

Flinders was also a man before his time.

Ann was fortunate to have been born into the latter half of the eighteenth century. No longer was she to be a just a decorative accessory to her husband or an efficient housekeeper. Among gentlefolk, a woman was now expected to be able converse intelligently and become a true companion.

The education of young women was therefore look upon quite favourably.

<< Preface to Letters to Ann. The love story of Matthew Flinders and Ann Chapplelle. Shirley Sinclair and Catharine Retter. Angus & Robertson, 1999.

NEXT WEEK: Part 2 Matthew Flinders -- The beginning of the end.


Flinders first circumnavigation of Australia was in his ship Investigator in the years 1801 to 1803.”I call the whole island Australia or Terra Australis,” he wrote. But he was forced to reverse the title of the map for commercial reasons. This was the first time the continent and Tasmania has been named Australia.—FM.


FRANK MORRIS COMING ATTRACTION

NEXT WEEK, WRITER OF RENOWN, PEARL S. BUCK, TALKS ABOUT HER LIFE IN CHINA AND, LATER ON, AMERICA. ACCORDING TO HER, THE GOOD EARTH OF VERMONT MADE HER A WOMAN OF LETTERS, A REGAL LADY, AT 80 YEARS OF AGE, SHE WENT ON TO WIN THE NOBLE PRIZE FOR LITERATURE IN 1938. PEARL S. BUCK WAS ONE OF THE MOST TRANSLATED AUTHORS OF ALL TIME … COMING: FOR 15 YEARS, AUSTRALIA WAS A NEWSPAPERLESS SOCIETY. THE PRESS WITH BATTERED TYPE HAD LAIN DORMANT. CONVICT GEORGE HUGHES, THE FIRST PRINTER OF THE NEW COLONY, STEPS INTO THE BREACH.


SOCIAL JUSTICE: Back to work! This is what women want!

SPARE A THOUGHT: THINK OF THOSE WOMEN WITH LIMITED RETIREMENT SAVINGS? Below: GRAPH SHOWS OLDER WOMEN GOING TO WORK.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

The graph above shows that women from aged 60 to 75 are trying to bridge the shortfall in their superannuation as they approach retirement. “Last year, the super balances for women aged 55 to 64 were on average 37 per cent lower than those for men,” a morning newspaper reported.

“The proportion of working women aged 65 to 74 has almost doubled in a decade,” the newspaper said.

RETIREMENT INCOME

Think of women with limited retirement savings? Nonetheless, they are at a perilous disadvantage. Many have spent long periods outside the labour force when raising and caring for family members. They are more likely to have employment that offers little chance for promotion; and is low-paid, casual or part-time.

These factors combine to have a serious impact on retirement income.

Before the introduction of compulsory superannuation, women’s retirement savings were very low. Even now, the typical balance for women is around half that for men.

Women can face real difficulty if they have experienced family poverty or marriage breakdown.


SOCIAL JUSTICE: Back to work – men workers shouldn’t stop looking

LISTEN WISELY: YOUNG PEOPLE SHOULD BE ALL EARS TO THEIR FATHER OR NEXT OF KIN. THEY WILL HEAR SOME AMAZING THINGS!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Unemployed older workers, who are part of a traditional industrial section, have been pummelled hard by global competition and restructuring. They continue to be the most vulnerable to radical changes, particularly when the economy and technological changes are in progress.

It is predicted that over the next 15 years, 40 per cent of Australian jobs are likely to be computerised or automated. Routine manual and service jobs are at high risk.

WITHOUT WORK

This is, cards on the table, where older people often experience long-term unemployment; in the job market 60-64-years-olds remain without work … for over two years.

Many draw down on retirement savings; or spend the years before retirement on the Newstart  Allowance or Disability Support Pension. Increased investment in training and employer incentives for people over 50 is particularly important.

<< Social Justice, 2016-2017.


Inside Newspapers: The Labor Daily, 1936 -- Footlights and Films’ great line-up of shows!

AS TIME GOES ON: MODERN TIMES, IN 1936, STARRING CHARLES CHAPLIN AND PAULETTE GODDARD. Below: SWORDMAN PERSONIFIED, CAPTAIN BLOOD.

EASTER IS ALMOST WITH US, WROTE FILM REVIEWER, IAN SMITH, IT USHERS IN A PERIOD OF ENTERTAINMENT OF SUCH OUTSTANDING VARIETY AND QUANTITY THAT IT’S PROBABLY UNRIVALLED.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION

It is easy to recollect many previous occasions on which various theatres had claimed the presentation of their “most colossal, stupendous production ever.” I think this Easter’s attractions leave little to be desired – personally.
It is the most enticing line-up put forward by the cinemas for some time.

Magnificent Obsession, at the Regent, has been put on as a special Easter Treat, and it stars Irene Dunne, Robert Taylor, Charles Butterworth and Betty Furness. It is interesting to record that it’s handled by director Carl Laemmle Snr, under whose supervision have been made some of the outstanding motion pictures of all time.

Laemmle regards Magnificent Obsession as the pinnacle of all his achievements. Great praise indeed from the director who gave you Seed, Back Street and All Quiet on the Western Front, and many others. They were all equally outstanding successes!

CAPTAIN BLOOD

From the adventure-dipped pen of Rafael Sabatini comes Captain Blood now showing at the State. And what an offering it is too!

Errol Flynn, who will be remembered for his role in the Australian-made Charles Chauvel production of In the Wake of the Bounty. Flynn plays the central role. It is a distinct credit to this young actor that his performance has earned world-wide attention and praise.

There seems little need to stress the entertainment value of this story. The name Sabatini stands for the best there is in adventure and romance. And in Captain Blood, the producers have one of his best works.

With Flynn, the producers have assembled an unusually talented cast. There’s Olivia de Havilland, Guy Kibbee, Ross Alexander, Lionel Atwill and Basil Rathbone. Incidentally, the sword-fight scene will go down in screen history as one of the most stirring occasions … for the last 25 years.

MODERN TIMES

Perhaps the most momentous production at the Plaza this Easter is Modern Times, Charles Chaplin’s new picture. With him is Paulette Goddard, who engagement to the comedian was head-lines in the newspapers recently.

If the gigantic success attending this picture in London and New York is any criterion, then the Plaza should have the biggest attraction of all times.

<< The Labor Daily, 1936, and feature Footlights and Films.


Father & Daughter: How to fish?  A father and daughter give it a try out!

LOOK: A DAUGHTER ASKS HER FATHER EVERYTHING ABOUT FISHING!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

A father is teaching his daughter to fish. They are standing up to their shins in a big Estuary and the expanse of water in front of them is glassed out, taking up more than its fair share of the horizon.

Floating on the surface nearby is a polystyrene box filled with salt-water and live bait fish. The sky is the strange colour that distant bushfires and sometimes give to summer haze. But the most striking thing about the scene is how still the pair are.

The entire view seems to be holding its breath; a Mexican stand-off between the lake, the sky, the family and a handful of birds perched on a couple of semi-submerged posts.

The spell is broken from beneath when a mullet, as long your forearm, burst through the surface.

<< Adapted from the Sun-Herald, 199(?).

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 08 March 19

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