FM’s CONNECTION: Smoking – others stop why can’t you!

I THINK I’LL QUIT: DON’T JOIN THE THOUSANDS OF AUSTRALIANS WHO HAVE DIED FROM SMOKING. Below: LOOK AT THIS SIGN CAREFULLY: IT SAYS QUIT NOW. Below: READ THE MESSAGES ON THE PACKAGES.

Thousands of Australians have died from smoking and related diseases every year.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Quitting at any age will give you immediate benefits and reduce your chance of developing any type of smoking related illnesses. With planning and determination a person can quit and never smoke again.

Tobacco smoke is toxic and contains more than 7000 chemicals. At least 70 of these are known to cause cancer.
Many chemicals from tobacco smoke pass through your lungs and pass into your bloodstream and are carried around in your body. Carbon monoxide replaces some of the oxygen carried in a person’s blood, robbing their muscles, heart and brain of oxygen.

Other toxic gases damage the tiny hairs that help clean a person’s lungs, allowing mucus and toxins to build up and increase the risk of lung disease. It make no difference if they smoke “light” or regular cigarettes: they will inhale a similar amount of toxic chemicals.

Nicotine is the addictive drug in tobacco smoke that can make quitting difficult – but not impossible.

SMOKING – STOP IT!

A person’s health can be affected by smoking, it:

INCREASES the risk of developing heart disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease.

DAMAGE a person’s lungs, causing respiratory diseases such as emphysema, asthma and bronchitis.

INCREASE the risk not only of lung cancer but also many other types of cancer – including cancer of the mouth, throat, bladder, stomach and pancreas.

REDUCES fertility in women and men.

WEAKENS your immune system, making you more susceptible to infections.

CAN cause or contribute to many other health problems – blindness, osteoporosis, etc.

LIVE LONGER

Tobacco smoke in the air comes from both the burning end of a cigarette and from the smoke breathed out by a smoker over family members, friends, co-workers, etc.

This exposure to second-hand (SHS) can cause heart disease, lung cancer and increase breathing problems in non-smokers living or working with smokers. Children, too, exposed to SHS are more likely to suffer from health problems.

Why stop smoking?

It’s important to be clear about your reasons for smoking and for quitting. Good reasons to quit are simple: the condition of your heart, lungs, circulation and immune system, will improve. Breathing will improve within weeks; and food will smell and taste better.

And the person live will longer!

Contact the Quitline on www.quit.org.au

<< Pharmaceutical Society of Australia; ABS.

COMING: The Heide Gallery, in Heidelberg, Victoria. In the same area, which was the beginning of a strong tradition of Australian modern art, stands the famous Heidelberg School of the 1880s. Enter the movers and shakers of the new venture in the 1930s.


ART GALLERY: Making History – Nolan at the newsagent

CAR AND FLOWERS: HONEY, WHERE IS THE FORD?

This exhibition recreates the 1942 experimental display at a local newsagency at Heidelberg.

FRANK MORRIS

Sidney Nolan would try anything as long as he sold some of his work. This is why in 1942 the young Nolan held a “ground-breaking” display of his work in the window of a local newsagent in Heidelberg, Melbourne.

“It was the idea of Nolan’s benefactors, John and Sunday Reed, to ‘take art to the people’ rather than to an exclusive audience in an art gallery,” the curator said. “The works were mostly experimental landscapes … the prices were low but nothing sold.

“Many of the paintings subsequently languished in obscurity. The exhibition re-creates this remarkable but little-known venture. It brings together the surviving compositions which have been identified through photographs … taken at the time.”

At Heide Museum of Modern Art until May 20, 2018.

Picture: One of the paintings. Sidney Nolan’s Golden Landscape, 1942.


COVERS: Final farewell to magazine after 44 years!

FAREWELL: MODEL JESINTA CAMPBELL CAME FACE TO FACE WITH CLEO TWICE. WHEN IT WAS STARTING, AND 44 YEARS LATER FOR ITS FINAL ISSUE. “I FELT HONOURED”, SAYS CAMPBELL.

Gone are days of sass, bachelors, sex and centrefold.

FRANK MORRIS

In March 2016, a mighty explosion took place in Australian magazine-land! The controversial magazine Cleo was shutting up shop. The magazine, which for 44 years, had hunted down everything related with bachelors, sex and centrefolds to become one of the best read journal’s in Australia by women.

At Cleo, they described the magazine as “Australia’s paper giant.”

When Cleo arrived in 1972, it created excitement and pizazz in Australia. I remember the issue that contained the ‘seductive’ Jack Thompson centrefold was truly a knockout. Of all the centrefolds published over the years, none have ‘caused a stir’ like Jack’s.

“My centrefold was part of the liberating of women and I’m happy to be a part of that sense of freedom,” said Jack.

BRAVEST DECISION

On its arrival, Cleo was caught up in Helen Reddy’s emphatic declaration “I am woman, hear me roar”, a statement the Australian women responded to “in droves”.

“By the early 90s, Cleo was the highest selling women’s lifestyle magazine, per capita, in the world,” the magazine said.

As a young mother, Ita Buttrose was never considered “the most of likely of people to head up a controversial new women’s magazine” like Cleo. But she was. There were thousands upon thousands of young women who had a yearning for the “new sexual revolution.”

In her editor’s letter, she completed by saying, “Like us, certain aspects of women’s lib appeal to you but you’re not aggressive about it.”

The model, Jesinta Campbell, met Cleo when it was starting – “It was the first cover I ever shot for any publication in Australia” – and again – “To then shoot the final issue was an absolute honour.”

Launch in 1972: 200,000 copies. Final issue: Over 54,000 copies.

Creating Cleo was one of the bravest decisions ever made.


THE MO STORY: Final! His son, Sam, tells it all

VISIT FROM HOLLYWOOD: CAROL LANDIS AND JACK BENNY GO BACK-STAGE AT THE TIVOLI TO MEET ROY ‘MO’ RENE IN 1943. Below: SADIE GALE AND ROY RENE IN 1929. Below: ROY RENE. JUST CALL ME MO!

Sam talk about his famous mum, Sadie Gale.

SAM VAN DER SLUICE      Adapted by FRANK MORRIS   

My mother’s name was quite famous in show business.

Her name was Sadie Gale and she had been on the stage since she was three years old. She even beat my father. She was a star in her own right.

She retired when my sister, Milo, and I started high school and she thought that it was the right thing to do. She decided to be our mum. Up to then she played soubrette roles and principal boys, and she was a very beautiful woman.

In fact, I think she is a very beautiful at eighty years old.

Come this March, she will be eighty-one and I don’t think she would mind if I still call her beautiful.

She and my father would never encourage my sister or me to go into showbusiness. Dad was always aware, however, that it is probably one if the hardest businesses in the world.

Friends and parents … would come home and see mum and dad studying scripts for a new show. They would think that it was all fun and games.

Show business is a very tough business. As far as father and mother were concerned, there is not a better business.

The audience are zany, lovely, wonderful human beings.

LOT’S OF MONEY

Dad was pretty well liked. He knew everybody. In fact, I would go so far as to say that everybody loved my dad. He was a soft touch, though. In those days he was being paid fairly well, and even though he made lots of money whilehe was working, he certainly did not die a wealthy man.

He must have given a lot on money away; we certainly didn’t get it! People used to go up to him in the street and tell him a sad story and he’s give them a few quid. Yes, he definitely was a soft touch!

Dad knew a lot of the “underworld”. People like Tilly DeVine thought he was a wonderful person. Then at the other end of the scale he had judges and people of the legal fraternity who were his friends.

He had that rare gift of making everyone feel that they were his closest friends.

(On reflection), it was really a funny combination of people who would come to sit in the audience and listen to my father.

The Macquarie Theatre, at 2GB, was not far from the Police Station. Opposite, on the corner of Hunter and Phillip Streets, there was a hotel. Dad would spend his time between the Saloon Bar with the police and the Public Bar with the “underworld”.

Dad would happily flit from the Law back to the cut-throats and thieves without any problem. He was one of their mob and they were one of his mob!

WE WERE PALS

The funny part about it, though, Dad was very unsure of himself. He had to be constantly reassured by his colleagues and by my mother. He’d come off stage and say, “Was that any good’, “Did I get any laughs”. You know that sort of thing.

He really was very unsure of himself and always wanted to do better. He was a professional through and through.

Before he went on stage he would check his props … then he’d take a cigarette out of his mouth and hand it to somebody else … without fumbling. Dad was a complete professional in every way.

I was twenty-two years old when he died. I was just getting to know him as a man. Dad would discuss contracts or a show … and it was nice relationship to have. We were pals.

That was so sad, because he died before I had a chance to really spend a lot of time with him as an adult – man to man. We were a very, very close family.

I think my father was the best, no, the greatest comedian that Australia has ever produced. I say that with all sincerity. God bless you dad!

<< From Grand Years. Adapted from the 8th Annual Mo Awards, 1983.


Last Laugh! Sorry! I’ve got bad news for you chief. It's about the noise!

Next week: Shop Window -- when we gave away properties to the nation.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 20 April 18

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