FOODFROLICO: ‘Bootleg’ liquor makes a good drink for the New Year!

TWO MEN HAD A DREAM!

FRANK MORRIS

GIN MAKERS: WES HEDDLES (LEFT) AND ADAM CARPENTER DUG DEEP INTO THE AMERICAN PAST AND STRUCK THE ‘BOOTLEG’ PERIOD FROM THE 1920s. THE IMAGES OF THE PROHIBITION-ERA ROCKED THEM SO MUCH, THEY MADE PROHIBITION GIN. Below: PROHIBITION GIN AND BEHIND IT A BOOTLEGGER OF THE 1920s.

Having a dream can often bring wonderful thoughts.

A dream that harnesses the spirit of the Prohibition era is a case in point. Two Adelaide men had the world thrust upon them to enter onto the liquor stage. The call was: make a soft, smooth gin as soon as you can.

And the story goes, within three years, Adam Carpenter and Wes Heddles have won 26 international awards for a gin they started to make. Mind you, not unlike bootleggers of the past, in a suburban backyard.

Carpenter and Heddles began producing gin as a passion project. Their pride and joy, Prohibition Liquor, was born.

THE MYSTIQUE OF GIN

Both men loved the mystique of the Prohibition era in the United States. A constitutional ban, which saw bootleggers “do their thing”, prohibited the making and selling alcohol ran from 1920 to 1933.

When people went into speakeasies, barriers broke down. It didn’t matter whether you were black, white, male, female – everyone united by one cause: as simple as drinking. Adelaide Hills spirit maker, Brendan Carter, was briefed, in part, to “create the best martini gin going around”.

With shades of bootlegging past, the bottling and distribution operation began in March 2015, in Carpenter’s garage.

Bottles are shaped like an oversize glass hip flask, with a label that has shadowy images of the Prohibition era. It’s a combo that really works.

INVISIBLE GIN PUNCH

700 ml gin, 450 ml fresh pineapple juice. 240 ml lemon juice. 500-700 ml ginger beer. Pineapple and lemon slices to garnish.

METHOD

Add gin, pineapple and lemon juices to a punchbowl with large blocks of ice. Top up with ginger beer to taste. Garnish with pineapple and lemon slices. Serve in a rocks glass with ice.

<< Frank Morris use the background of the story published in SMH.


AUSSIE POEMS: Always let a birdie say, “See you at the wishing well”!

NEW YEAR GREETINGS

A birdie chirping at my ear,

Said, “I’ll let you see the wishing well,

Then to the well your wishes tell”

I’ve had three wishes, one for you,

So you’ll find joy and gladness too;

And Lady Hope with you shall stay

To bring you sunshine every day.

I hope my friend that you shall find

That elusive peace of mind;

And so I’ve done my best you see,

To bring a year of joys to you.

BERYL THOMPSON

<< A former buyer of Myers. Poetry writing has been with her since she was a small girl.  Picture: Always let a birdie sing.


Great Kiwi First: Mark Twain called New Zealand “Paradise found”!

FRANK MORRIS

PARADISE: NEW ZEALAND IS A LENSMEN’S TREASURE TROVE: WONDEROUS RIVERS, SNOWY GRANDEURS AND MIGHTY GLACIERS. Below: MARK TWAIN’S BOOK, FOLLOWING THE EQUATOR.

In the late 1800s, US author Mark Twain was perhaps the first international literary luminary to visit and publicise New Zealand. Twain found the “land of superb scenery” irresistible.

He wrote about the snowy grandeurs, the mighty glaciers and “beautiful lakes”.

The fiords were, he wrote, “wonderous rivals” to those found in Norway and Alaska. After his historic sojourn, Twain expostulated that “our stay has been too brief; still, we are not unthankful for the glimpse which we have had of it.”

First travel agent to cash in on New Zealand as an “exotic” travel destination was believed to be Thomas Cook and Son. The first government-backed tourism promotion organisation, the Tourist and Publicity Department, was established in 1901.

Through its NZ and international network, the department’s role was to promote New Zealand to the world. Now called Tourism New Zealand, it is reputed to be the oldest bureau of its kind in the world.

As in the case of Mark Twain, the editors of Time magazine were overwhelmed by the visually stunning beauty of New Zealand. In its first cover story on NZ in 1977, Time rhapsodised about the country being “a photographer’s paradise … one of the world’s most beautiful nations.”

VELEVET HILLS, VALLEYS

Expounds Time: “Until 1973, New Zealand seemed to be a sanctuary … unpolluted, almost undiscovered.” The magazine informed its global readership of the “extravagant” beauty of the country.

“The velvet green hills and valleys; white snow draped peaks; and streams with trout as big as a man’s arm.”

While Twain was scouting around New Zealand, he decided to make Australia his next stop. Twain, then aged 60, visited the Great Southland , in 1895. For three months, he summed up our history wryly.

“It’s almost always picturesque,” he wrote. “Indeed, it is so curious and strange, that it is itself the chiefest novelty the country has to offer; and so it pushes the other novelties into second and third place.

It does not read like history, but like the most beautiful lies. And all of a fresh new sort, no mouldy old stale ones; it is full of surprises and adventures and incongruities, and incredibility’s; but they are all true, they all happened.”

This South Pacific paradise attracts tens of thousands of international visitors each years. Mark Twain happened to be on of first!             

FRANK MORRIS COMMENTS: TO COME ACROSS MARK TWAIN, IT’S HARD TO REALISE THAT HE WAS AT THE FOREFRONT OF FRONTIER WESTERN JOURNALISM -- THE CALIFORNIA TERRITORIAL ENTERPRISE IN 1863. WHEN YOU PUT THAT UP AGAINST THE MARK TWAIN WHO’S ROUGHING IT IN THE THICK OF GOD’S COUNTRY, NEW ZEALAND, IT IS LIKE WE ARE TALKING ABOUT A DIFFERENT FELLOW. BUT, NO, THEY’RE THE SAME: BUSHY AUBURN MOUSTACHE AND THE EYES OF A WOLF. HE WROTE ABOUT IT, WITH SAME INKLING THAT HE WAS A REPORTER COVERING MURDERER’S ROW AND ALL THE EXCITEMENT THAT WENT WITH IT. TWAIN WROTE OVER 25 BOOKS, AND THE ONE ON THE ENTERPRISE WAS ONE OF THEM.

  << Grand Years, 11 years ago.


CARRIGEWORKS: Nick Cave’s special art is immersive in spaces and experiences!

BAUBLES, BAUBLES!: A STUNNING SCENE OF CRYSTAL CLOUDSCAPE.

MUSEUM magazine said Nick Cave’s “gargantuan” solo show, “UNTIL” at the Carrigeworks, Sydney, took four years in the making, and its originates with a question: “is there racism in heaven?” A litany of works explore this and similar ideas. A show stealer of the exhibition will be Crystal Cloudscape. It is a “scintillating” five tonne sculpture suspended from the ceiling, said the magazine.

As far as WHERE NOW magazine is concerned, Cave’s exhibition addresses “race relations, gender politics and

America’s gun violence through a series of immersive spaces and experiences.”

<< From November 23, 2018 until March 3, 2019.


GET TOGETHER: MR TOAD AND THE REST OF HIS GANG. SEE THE KIDS, AS THE ANIMALS, DO THE SAME THING!

WIND IN THE WILLOWS: When Mole decides to go to the river bank one morning rather than do his spring cleaning, it is the beginning of a magical adventure. The Australian Shakespeare Company brings this immortal story to life. You meet Ratty, Mole, Badger, Otter, Portly and the famous Mr Toad. Music, songs and laughs for all the family. Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney. Last day is January 27. Tel: 9011 7704.


TASSIES WINES: Try some fancy drinking for the New Year!

FRANK MORRIS

Josef Chromy OAM is instrumental in the Tasmanian food and wine industry. He’s was the owner /developer of some of Tasmania’s leading wineries.

In 1950, Joe fled his worn-torn Czech village as a penniless 19-year-boy after eleven years of Nazi and Soviet occupation. He escaped across borders, guarded by minefields dogs and soldiers, suffering five months of privation before immigrating to Australia.

Josef Chromy Wines is the culmination of Joe’s experience in the Tamar Valley. His 60Ha vineyard property and its unique location offers one of the memorable food and wine experiences in Tassie.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 11 January 19

Stay Informed

Receive eNews & Special Offers

Brochure Request Order

Tour Reviews Read

Last 12 months


Tags