GHOST SHIPS: Final! The Mary Celeste and other derelicts

RISE FROM THE DEEP: STARK PICTURES, HERE AND BELOW, ARE TAKEN FROM THE DEPTHS OFF ANZAC COVE. REVEALED ARE LONG-FORGOTTEN REMNANTS OF THE BATTLE THAT BROUGHT A SOBERING REALITY OF THE HUGE LOSS OF AUSTRALIANS AT GALLIPOLI. PHOTO: SUNDAY HERALD SUN, 2011.

The Sapphire’s survivors patch her up as best they could then 800 miles to Gladstone.

ALAN LUCAS      Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Another derelict found was the barque Edward L. Maybury in 1905. She was photographed by a passing ship in the North Atlantic, only two of her masts still stood and the third was missing entirely; while her foremast still flew its course.

She was another reminder that abandoned vessels could drift for ages and be serious navigational hazards for a long time. Australia had her own amazing case of a timber-laden wooden ship that remained afloat long enough to be sailed in an immersed state for a considerable distance.

The story started with the emigrant ship Sapphire in September 1859. The Sapphire was carrying horses to Madras from Gladstone, Queensland. Soon after leaving Gladstone she crashed onto a northern Great Barrier Reef; her crew leaving her in longboats to head north.

When a number of the crew were killed by natives they turned around and headed south, en route they sighted an abandoned ship that proved to be the 529-ton Marina.

NIGHTMARE TO HANDLE

She had been seriously holed and abandoned, but thanks to her wooden hull and cargo of logs she remained marginally buoyant.

The Sapphire survivors patched her up as best they could then, and sailed her 800 miles in a waterlogged stated to Gladstone; and taking three months in a vessel that must have been an unbelievable nightmare to handle.

In Gladstone they met the crew of Marina who’d abandoned her months earlier; they had reached Gladstone in her longboats.

Marina was repaired in Gladstone after which she headed south to Sydney but, inexplicably, she opened up and foundered off Cape Moreton. It must be presumed that this time there were no logs in her hold to keep her afloat.

<< Afloat Magazine, August 2017.

COMING EARLY NEXT YEAR: Two parts. Ghost Ships –amazing wrecks in the Baltic Sea. Dr Stephen Gapps, gives an overview of the sunken ships which he believes is a maritime graveyard packed with remarkably well-preserved shipwrecks. Series start in February.

Illustration: Anzacs sunken treasure. Amazing pictures show a team of Australian divers and marine archaeologists with Turkish counterparts preparing to survey a ghost ship, a hidden remnant of the Gallipoli campaign. Beneath the waters off Anzac Cover lie this barge, one of many, which was found 2.4km off shore in 55m of water.


COMING EARLY NEXT YEAR: Art-beat. The art warriors – George Bush, Dwight Eisenhower and Winton Churchill, apart from being a saviour to the country which they ran, was to flex their untrained muscle at the world of art. Eisenhower referred to his paintings as “daubs – if nothing else”, but one saw deep colour and beauty and, as he said, he “painted for pure enjoyment.” His painting of David Eisenhower, using a set of golf clubs, is one of my favourite works. In the First Lady’s foreword to George Bush’s Portraits of Courage she writes that she would say “no way” if someone had asked whether the former President would be a painter someday. Winston Churchill was 40 before he realised the pleasure of painting.


FROM ON HIGH: HEARD THE BUZZ – THE DRONES ARE COMING. THERE’S A DRONE TO SUIT YOU.

HEARD THE BUZZ: DRONES ARE EVERYWHERE!

FRANK MORRIS

A specialist said that drones are whatever you want them to be. “If you use them for filming, it’s a gadget. Or you can use them as toys. It’s up to you.”

Drones have been around for years. “The origin of drones can be traced to military use and later civilians using drones as a remote-control device,” said the specialist. “For serious hobbyists they are of niche buying.

It’s common for ground-pilots of all ages to be seen using drones to fly them to many places. “We’ve all seen one, and now everybody wants one.

MIND DOES LEAPS

“Today, drones are available at all prices. -- some as low as $20.”

Drones are good for anything -- from military manoeuvres, sending messages, doing photography – yes, anything. And now the technology is improving many new models have one-button take-off and landing and the safety gets better with each new release.

The specialist says that a lot of people want a camera drone. Today, their minds leap with joy at the full-featured models which are available.

<< Frank Morris uses the drone that was advertised in the SMH.

Illustration: Drones galore. The most extensive of drones are available – from drones with cameras, to WiFi drones, rollcage drones and more.


MY MUM: HAZEL AND DAUGHTER/CARER, SUE, WHO WILL CONTINUE HER MOTHER’S WORK IN RAISING AWARENESS OF “THE BIG A” – ALZHEIMER’S.

REFRAMING DEMENTIA: EXPERT DISCUSSES BEST CARE PRACTICES

FRANK MORRIS

Sue Pieters-Hawke, a high-profile advocate for Alzheimer’s disease, is now committed to convey her voice to the issues connected with dementia. Pieters-Hawke has had a long journey associated with the disease when her mother Hazel Hawke was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

She will explore the issues surrounding dementia – suitable for health professionals, carers, family and friends.

A spokesperson for the event said, “The discussion will focus on how we can support and care for people living with dementia … how to ensure they are still experiencing life to the full.”

Hazel, the wife of former Prime Minister, Bob Hawke, declared that she had dementia. She talked about the disease publicly and her speech was very moving. She was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2001.

With Jenny Brockie, on Insight, we started to understand Hazel’s condition. Brockie said to Pieters-Hawke “everyone knows your mother, Hazel Hawke … now you live next door. How are you dealing with all this … shift in responsibility being the daughter.”

TOO PATRONISING

Pieters-Hawke replied: “I still make mistakes about being patronising. With the dementia, or some form of progressive mental disability, which is what we’re dealing with … it’s different because you are changing relationship of responsibility.”

After being in Pieters-Hawke care for many years, Hazel was admitted a nursing home in Sydney in 2012.

In 2003, Sue Pieters-Hawke wrote a book called Hazel’s Journey: A personal experience of Alzheimer’s.  It tells of fear and anger and the “gentle happiness” of her life until her death in at 83 in 2013.

FREE – Reframing dementia featuring Sue Pieters-Hawke, Thursday, December 7, at 11 am. Contact 02 9256 5644 or email stpatricks@green.com.au

Illustrations: Complicated. Hazel spoke publicly and movingly about her Alzheimer’s condition. The real Sue Pieters-Hawke. Committed to dealing with dementia.


AT THE PIANO: HAZEL FINISHED WITH AN UP-BEAT MELODY AND BOB “TRIED” TO JOIN IN WITH THE SINGING.

HAZEL HAWKE: “ONE IN A MILLION” SAYS FORMER PM BOB HAWKE

Hazel Hawke, one of Australia’s high-profile figures, has died at age 83. Mrs Hawke spent her last days as she finally succumbs to “complications of dementia,” peacefully, surrounded by family. Here are episodes in Mrs Hawke’s life that brings so much joy and sorrow to the reader.

FRANK MORRIS

When she was told she had contracted dementia Hazel was rather shocked. “It’s a bugger. It’s just bad luck.” But let face it Hazel Hawke “could have easily been your mum, your sister, your aunty or your friend,” the Sydney Morning Herald said.

Hazel became a formidable figure in her own right.

In her last days, Hazel was timid and slightly petulant. According to last night’s program, Australian Story, when Sue Pieters-Hawke handed her a crochet gift, Hazel raised her head and uttered “Thank You.”  

Mrs Hawke had been suffering from advanced dementia for many years and she no longer recognised the family. In 2003, Sue Pieters-Hawke released the book, Hazel’s Journey: A personal experience of Alzheimer’s. Sue Pieters-Hawke has this to say about dementia:

BUGGER IT

“Although mum is naturally reticent about personal difficulties, and also worried that people might see her as a ‘silly old thing, losing her marbles, she was drawn to the idea of going public if it would decrease the stigma of the disease and help others.

“She just wasn’t convinced it really would do any good. It’s that terminal modesty again! We told her we were sure it would be helpful.

“She listened to us, thought about it and finally said, “I think you’ve probably overrating the difference I could make, but if you really think it could be useful than yes, bugger it, I’ll do it.’”

In Diane Langmore’s book the Prime Minster’s Wives, Hazel Hawke, as First Lady, said she hoped that she could become involved in public affairs. That was a job she could do very well. And that exactly is the way it turns out.

In the end Hazel was widely respected in our community. When she was finally diagnosed a few years ago with Alzheimer’s, she threw herself into the fray of speaking publicly about her life with the disease.

TUMOUR FOUND BENIGN

The thing she did was organise the Hazel Hawke Alzheimer’s Research and Care Fund which has proven a great success with the Alzheimer’s Foundation.

Langmore’s book says: “On the February 1992, Hazel entered St Vincent’s Hospital for the removal of a brain tumour. The van-loads of flowers and the stacks of letters and cards that flooded the hospital were testimony to the affection in which she was held by many Australians.

“There was widespread relief when the tumour was found to be benign. Three days later Bob Hawke announced his resignation from parliament, giving as the main reason the needs of his wife and family.

“He said that Hazel was one thousand per cent behind his retirement.”

Frank Morris comments: Bob Hawke was right. Hazel was one in a million. Hazel had a strongly Christian background and she felt for others. She had power and strength within her. Her daughter: “If Hazel could speak for herself.” What would she say? We’ll never know.

<< Repeated from Grand Years 2013.

Illustration: Luck ran out. When she got caught up by dementia, Hazel didn’t even recognise her family. When luck was in. Hazel and Bob enjoy life together.

COFFEE-BREAK CROSSWORD – NO. 4. SOLUTION NEXT WEEK

The last of Coffee-Break Crosswords for this year. They will resume early in 2018.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 30 November 17

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