Great Britain/Great War: Heir to the Austrian throne, and wife, shot dead

FRANK MORRIS

ARCHDUKE FERDINAND, HIS WIFE, AND FAMILY.

ARCHDUKE FERDINAND AND HIS WIFE LIE IN STATE AFTER THE ASSASSINATION. THE DEATH OF FERDINAND SHATTERED ANY HOPE OF A UNITED EUROPE.

ARCHDUKE FERDINAND HEIR PRESUMPTIVE TO THE AUSTRIAN EMPIRE, ONCE THE MOST DANGEROUS SEAT IN POWER POLITICS. IT WAS THE ROAD TO WAR.

When the Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the thrones of Austria and Hungary, and Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were motoring in an open car across the bridge in Sarajevo, Bosnia, people from all sides of the street came out to meet them.

And to top it off, it turned into a fine and bright sunny day.

Gavrilo Princip, who could have been part of the flock of people who gathered to watch the Archduke and the Duchess, stepped out on the road, facing the automobile – and halted.

The car automatically slowed down. Princip fired his pistol twice at Ferdinand’s chest; the first shot missed, and hit the Duchess; the second, well-aimed shot, hit him. He died minutes later.

In all the excitement, the Duchess cried out to the Archduke, “For God’s sake, what has happened to you?” She sank to knees, placing her head in her husband’s lap.

Said an onlooker, “Both assassination attempts and the deaths had taken place within 90 minutes”.

It was June 28, 1914, and the assassination of Fredinand was one of the main causes of World War 1. After a lot of cross-talk between the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Serbia and Bosnia – the Bosnians refused to agree with the contents -- the Empire’s government declared war on July 28.

“Tragically, other countries were drawn into the conflict,” writes Australian historian, Ronald W. Laidlaw, in Mastering Australian History. “The Tsar of Russia and his advisers … mobilised their forces against Austria-Hungary two days later.”

Germany was an ally of Austria-Hungary and France and Britain were allies of Russia. “To attack France,” wrote Laidlaw, “Germany had to march through Belgium.”

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FIGHTING FAMILY …
OF FIVE NIXON BROTHERS WHO WENT TO WAR, FOUR WERE WOUNDED, ONE WAS KILLED. ONE BROTHER WAS A TERRITORIAL, ONE A GUNNER, ANOTHER WAS AN AIRMEN. ONE OF THEM DESERTED. EVERY BROTHER WAS SCARRED.
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Britain had a treaty with Belgium but Germany, nevertheless, invaded Belgium on August 4 and Britain declared war.

When the telegram was received in Melbourne in the early hours of August 5, Australia was also at war. Other countries like New Zealand, Canada and USA, eventually, decided to assist the Allies. The Great War had been percolating for many months.

During the arrest and retribution, many were arrested and the remainder were hanged.

Gavrilo Princip, for instance, in order to protect other fellow conspirators, claimed that he was acting alone.

Princip, aged 19, told the examining judge that he regretted killing the Duchess.

When all the cross-blame had dissipated, Princip was one of the individuals who wasn’t hanged.

SOURCE: From Grand Years. But this time a same ending but rewritten.


Britain’s War Years in vivid, glorious colour!

A FACE IN THE CROWD! HE WALKED THROUGH THE BUSY STREET OUTSIDE BUCKINGHAM PALACE. IT’S EDWARD, PRINCE OF WALES, PASSING THROUGH A CROWD OF ONLOOKERS – UNNOTICED – DURING THE FIRST WORLD WAR IN 1914. THE PRINCE IS WEARING AN INFANTRY OFFICER’S UNIFORM OF THE ELITE GRENADIER GUARDS REGIMENT WHO SERVED ON THE WESTERN FRONT. THIS IMAGE WAS SHOT IN BLACK AND WHITE. COMPUTER SOFTWARE WAS PUT TO THE TEST. AND OUT SPRINGS FORGOTTEN BRITAIN IN SPARKLY GLORIOUS COLOUR. SOURCE: WEEKEND MAGAZINE, ENGLAND.


FAMILY HISTORY: English Wills – the “last will and testament” …

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

TRACING YOUR FAMILY TREE AND YOU’VE HIT A BUMPY ROAD? IN A GLOBALISED WORLD, THERE IS A DESIRE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT OURSELVES, THE INDIVIDUALS AND PLACES WHERE WE COME FROM.

HOW TO TRACE YOUR FAMILY TREE AND FIND RELATIVES IN ENGLAND, IRELAND, SCOTLAND AND WALES BY USING THE INTERNET. GO TO THE RIGHT PLACES JUST LIKE THE ONES WE POINT OUT HERE. NOW, SINCE THE PEACE TREATY HAS BEEN SIGNED BY ALL THE NATIONS IN 1919. IT’S ABOUT TIME YOU RESEARCHED THE WORLD WAR 1 FILES TO SEE IF ANY RELATIVES SURVIVED.

Most people are familiar with the phrase “last will and testament”. It shows the distinction made between land, which cannot be moved, and other goods, which can. The will covers the disposal of estates and property, and the testament deals with movable goods, chattels and money.

A history of wills can be a complex business.

Until 1858, when a national system was introduced, probate was mainly administrated by church courts. But “peculiars” and some manors also had the right to prove wills. During the Commonwealth period, 1653 to 1660, a government court handled them.

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REMEMBER …
THE FILM, THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, WITH YUL BRYNNER, IS SUPPORTED BY A TRIBE OF LEGENDARY NAMES, AND DIRECTED BY JOHN STURGES. HE IS A MASTER AT OVERSEEING THE WESTERN AND MAKING THEM A HIT OF ALL TIME. REMEMBER GUNFIGHT AT THE OK CORRAL AND LAST TRAIN FROM GUN HILL? BOTH WERE STURGES’ FILMS. WITH THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, THERE ARE NOT MANY STORIES THAT COULD BE ADAPTED TO A WESTERN. RELEASED IN 1962.
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Before 1838, when nuncupative wills became illegal, a statement of how a person wanted to dispose of his or her possessions could be accepted. They were usually dictated when the person was dying and there wasn't enough time to call in a lawyer or someone experienced in writing a proper will.

Although it was witnessed, it was not signed.

Such wills usually start with “Memorandum”, rather than stating that this is the last will and testament, are to be found with the other wills of the court in which they were proved.

What happened to wills before 1858?

The proving of wills was done by a church court, which charged for this service. It’s been estimated that in the 19th century only 5 per cent of people’s estates went through probate, so the family historian must be prepared not find a will.

When they do exist, however, they can supply a great deal of information.

What happened after 1858?

The authenticity and validity of wills were proved by the state system on a national basis. The will was taken to the local probate office, which made its own copy, and then sent another to the Principal Probate Registry in London, now called the Probate Service.

In addition to being the probate office for the south-east of Britain, it also deals with wills that present problems from everywhere in the country and the national scene as well.

The original will was given back to the executor(s) after a note that probate had been granted and was added to it. This conferred on the executor(s) the power to administer the estate.

SOURCE: Family History Made Easy; Kathy Charter; Southwater, an imprint of Anness Publishing Ltd 2004.


MELBOURNE CUP: 1919 – packed crowds returned to the Cup after years of shallow memories!

MAURICE CAVANOUGH       Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

ARTILLERYMAN, STANDS MEAN AND LEAN, KNOWS WHAT TO DO AND WHEN TO DO IT, PARTICULARLY ON THE TRACK. CANCER DIDN’T STOP HIM WINNING THE MELBOURNE CUP.

MANY COMPETENT JUDGES SAID ARTILLERYMAN WAS THE BEST-LOOKING HORSE EVER SEEN ON AN AUSTRALIAN RACE-TRACK!

Racing, in common with most forms of amusement, entered into a boom period in 1919. In a reaction from the austere years of the war, the people spent freely on all forms of diversions.

And the Melbourne Argus put it rather primly, “The desire for pleasure is more noticeable than the will to work”.
On Melbourne Cup day, there was a good deal of argument as to whether Artilleryman or Richmond Main was the colt of the year.

There was a tremendous crowd at Flemington on Cup Day. Officials estimated the figure at more than 105,000 spectators.

The Cup running settled any doubt – Artilleryman scored the easiest victory -- as to which was the better colt.

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RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS ...
THE AUSTRALIAN OLYMPIC TEAM IS A NEVER-ENDING STREAM OF FACES AND MOMENTS THAT STRETCH … FORWARD INTO HISTORY, SHAPING US AS WE HAVE SHAPED THEM. THEY ARE THE AUSTRALIAN OLYMPIC TEAM … THEY ARE THE STARS OF THE SOUTHERN CROSS. TEXT: PART OF A HOMILY PRODUCED BY THE DAILY & SUNDAY TELEGRAPH.
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With Bobby Lewis, the great rider in the saddle, Artilleryman did as was told in the Cup. Lewis has him going kindly about sixth or seventh all the way to the straight entrance; then he gave him his head.

The colt bounded away and scored with ridiculous ease.

Artilleryman was first, an official six lengths, to Richmond Main second and Two Blues, who cut Lucknow out for a place, finished third.

Bobby Lewis scored his third Cup by his win on Artilleryman; and a fourth Cup on Trivalve in 1927.

Lewis learned to ride horses on the common at the Clunes, a small town Ballarat. He was born there in 1878.

He was 10 year old when he rode his firse winner at Clunes. It was 50 years later, in July 1938, that Lewis handed his jockey’s licence.

SOURCE: Melbourne Cup, 1861-1982; the end-piece came from 200 Years of Australian Sport, by Heads and Lester.


RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS …
WOMEN PLAYED A BIG PART IN THE 1956 OLYMPIC GAMES. NOT ONLY AS COMPETITORS BEHIND THE SCENES AS WELL. ONE OF THESE WOMEN WAS LILLIAN NEVILLE. LILLIAN HAD BEEN CONNECTED WITH WOMEN’S ATHLETICS FOR OVER 25 YEARS. SHE WAS A SELECTOR SINCE 1948. SHE FEELS THAT HAVING THE GAMES IN OUR COUNTRY IS A WONDERFUL INCENTIVE. TWO-PART FEATURE COMING IN 2020.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 08 November 19

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