HISTORY MAZE: Teach your children to love the tales of the past. That’s if you don’t mind dressing up.

FRANK MORRIS

READY TO FIGHT FOR GLORY AT THE JOUSTING TOURNAMENT.

let your imagination do the rest. And wouldn’t that mean that your family would think the world of you!

Have you ever seen a knight joust? In the movies, maybe, but in real life? How would you like to joust with a Tudor knight, or learn to become a gladiator at the Colosseum? Or fight for glory in a jousting tournament?

Luckily, at Hever Castle, England, there are bespoke, interactive programs designed to both entertain and teach kids about ancient warriors and martial arts.

Kids will never be the same after the summer jousting tournament. Did you know that Henry VIII’s favourite sport was jousting? He initially made it popular in Medieval England as a way for knights to show off their cavalry skills.

Hever Castle was Anne Boleyn’s childhood home and features a tiltyard arena where spectators can view the long-forgotten history of theatrical jousting and exploring the castle’s caverns of antiques and Tudor paintings.

The kids will be captivated by exploring the surrounding woodlands and ornamental gardens; as well as the Water Maze, and the over 100 years old Yew Maze.

Before the tournament is staged, the crowd walks in a procession towards the arena behind Anne Boleyn and Henry V111, impersonators, decked out in Tudor costumes.

Many excited kids are dressed in medieval knight costumes or bedecked in thrilling royal gowns.

In the arena, each jouster has their own colours and performs impressive stunts on horseback.

Onlooking kids and adults watch in awe as two jousters ride to unseat one another; a four-metre-long lance is used in the final act.

Check with Medieval Horse Sports Australia com.au to see when they hold their programs for kids.

SOURCE: Jousting Tournament, Five Star Kids magazine, England; fivestarkidsmagaznine.com.au

A tudor knight comes to life. 

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HISTORICAL HIGHLIGHT …
IT’S BEEN 80 YEARS, 1938, SINCE BRITAIN WENT TO WAR ON GERMANY. GERMANY DIDN’T RESPOND TO THE ULTIMATUM ISSUED BY BRITAIN. THEN THE COUNTRIES WERE AT WAR. AUSTRALIAN PRIME MINISTER, MR MENZIES, ALSO SAID WE WERE AT WAR.
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ROAD CCCCRASHED …
FACT: A STUDY BY AN ORGANISATION COMMITTED TO AGED CARE REVEALED THAT PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA WERE UNSAFE TO DRIVE BUT CONTINUED TO DO SO.


Celebrating Australia: The flying 18s are on in your city water-ways!

FRANK MORRIS

AN ‘OLDIE’ GOING THROUGH ITS PACES.

THE RACING SKIFFS ARE OUT AND ABOUT.

The flying 18-foot racing skiffs, arrayed in amazing state of art finery, make a compelling sight.

If Mark Foy, the father of the 18-footer racing, could have witnessed this spectacular homage he would have cried with joy.

Foy regarded Sydney Harbour as the “world’s leading aquatic playground”.

THE FIRST skiff race was in 1891 with six entries sailing three times round a triangular course on Sydney Harbour. The winner, Lottie, won 30 pounds.

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FACT: SOME EFFECTS OF PRESCRIPTION AND OVER-THE-COUNTER DRUGS MAKE IT UNSAFE TO DRIVE.
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THE FATHER of 18-foot racing was Mark Foy who believed racing must be exciting and faster and boats had to colourful and easily identifiable.

QUEENSLAND pioneered interstate competition in 1895, bringing by steamer to Sydney a number of 18-footers and 22-footers for racing.

BEN LEXEN, the man who designed the winged keel on the America’s cup winning Australia II, won the world 18-footer title in 1961.

ONE OF the pioneers of skiff racing was Alf Beashel. His son Ken won the world 18-footer title in 1968 on the Daily Telegraph.

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FACT: ANY DRIVER TRAINING PROGRAM IS NOT THE WHOLE ANSWER, BUT IT CAN BE PART OF THE SOLUTION.

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AMERICA’S CUP skipper Iain Murray, Bob Holmes and Trevor Barnabas are the most prolific winners of the world 18-footer titles, winning five each.

ANOTHER PIONEER was rugby league player James J. Giltinan; he was also a major player in 18-footer racing

SINCE the inception of the world titles for the JJ Giltinan Trophy, Australian sailors have won all but eight crowns. These eight were won by seven New Zealand crews and one UK team.

IN the early1900s to 1930s the average speed of an 18-footer (wooden, with 10-15 crewman) over 9nm course 6.45 knots. IN the year 2000, with high, state of the art, carbon fibre, an 18-footer can reach speeds in excess on 30 knots downwind and costs $350,000-$400,000.


Film Great: Gay Seabrook was the first official voice of Minnie Mouse!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

GETTING THE VOICE OF MINNIE SHE HAD TO SPEAK LOUDER.

GAY SEABROOK’S VOICE WAS HER FORTUNE IN THE 1930s. IT IS A LIGHT, YOUNG VOICE WHICH SHE PITCHES A FEW TONES HIGHER FOR MINNIE MOUSE.

Walt Disney, four years ago, heard her in a radio act in a baby-talk part, and invited her to take the part of Minnie in a radio act which was being planned then as a highlight of American programmes.

A grand orchestra was engaged for the act, and everything was in train to make it one of the biggest items being offered to American listeners, but it was never put on.

Without the antics of the little black and white figures Minnie and Mickey just somehow didn’t exist, so instead the radio act was split up and became two Mickey Mouse pictures, one of which was called “The Dentist’s Office.”

Miss Seabrook says she is not the original Minnie. A girl in the studio, one of the staff known as “an inker,” who inks-in the figures in the cartoons, was Minnie in the early pictures when Minnie only said a few words.

She is not an actress, so when Minnie began to play longer parts with more dialogue it was necessary to call in someone with stage training, and so Miss Seabrook took over some of the work.

Walt Disney is, of course, Mickey, and will remain so, and his strongest rival is the man who plays Donald the Duck, whose strange nasal “yap” (for want of a more expressive word) has made him famous.

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ROAD CCCCRASHES …
FACT: PRINCESS DIANA AND DODI FAYED COULD HAVE LIVED IF EACH HAD BEEN WEARING A SEAT BEAT, ACCORDING TO THE UK TRANSPORT ROAD RESEARCH LABORATORY.
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Donald’s leading lady is an engaging chicken, a part which Miss Seabrook has played. “Oh, he’s lovely,” is what Miss Seabrook says when you ask about Walt Disney. He is, she claims, the most generous and genuine of people.

This story bears out her statement.

“When we were signing up a twelve-page contract for the first proposed radio programmes,” she said, “Walt Disney’s lawyer had to turn round to him at last and tell him he was being unfair to himself. He kept saying, ‘Now, this point’s not fair to these kids,’ and so on." He is a grand person.

In the making of the cartoons the timing is of the utmost importance, and each little speech has to be made to the beat of a metronome in a gadget fastened to the orchestra leader’s ears, so that the speech will fit to a certain number of feet of film.

There are several months between the making of the dialogue and the release of the film, but at the beginning the cast is gathered round a table and the plot and the characters are explained to them.

The idea-men and writers and artists who work this out are tremendously keen,” said Miss Seabrook. “The little creatures are all absolutely real people to them, and they go to endless trouble to make their ideas absolutely real to us, too.

“It is most fascinating and delightful work, though it is more or less anonymous and therefore does not offer any promise of a glamorous personal career.”

SOURCE: from Sydney Post, 1930.

NEXT: The Walt Disney story. “I don’t have depressed moods – and I don’t want to have any.

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ROAD CCCCRASHED …
HOT TIP: HEADACHES, FIDGETING, TENSION, NERVOUSNESS, YAWNING OR POOR CONCENTRATION ARE SIGNS OF FATIGUE. DON’T FIGHT IT. LET FRESH AIR CIRCULATE IN THE CAR, SHARE THE DRIVING AND EAT LIGHT FOOD.

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Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 06 September 19

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