IN THE PAST: 1903 – Fashion, men-folk and air we breathe!

EVERY LIGHTED GAS-JET IS THE QUALITY OF AIR USED BY THE LUNGS.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

ANYONE FOR TENNIS: THERE IS EXCERISE TO TENNIS SO USE IT TO KEEP FIT. Below: THE MODEL DEMONSTRATES THE PERFECT WAIST.

When we live in the open enforced breathing is not essential. But when wood and stone or brick and plaster form this environment, special measurers must be adopted to ensure constant purity of air. Oxygen is as necessary to life of gas or fire as it is to humans.

Every lighted gas-jet is a powerful rival in the consumption of this element.

One jet will consume as mush oxygen as eight persons. Every inspiration of an individual subtracts oxygen from the air, and every expiration contributes the deadly carbon. This is the carbonic acid gas which collects in the bottom of wells.

It also gathers in mines; it is known as choke-damp. A lighted candle is immediately extinguished in this atmosphere.

So it is the lamp of life.

Breathe through a tube into the bottom of a fruit jar. Then lower into the jar a lighted candle. It will immediately go out. The oxygen of the air is the foods of the lungs.

Be as particular (as you can) regarding the quality of your lung food as of your stomach food. Your palate repudiates vitiated food; so should your nostrils spurn foul air.

PERFECT FIGURE

Look at the diagram. It illustrates what I consider is a woman’s perfect figure. The figure is, as you’ll see, a long one.

The head is small, upon a well-shaped, not too slender, neck. The shoulders are fairly broad. The bust-line is round, well developed. The waist is 21 inches in circumference, and the hips are 37 inches round, well covered, but not, what we call in France, too saillante.

For saillante hips divide the body most ungracefully, and are one of the great difficulties with which the artist in dressmaking has frequently to cope.

The skirt, the measurement from waist to foot, should be 41 inches; and the entire height from neck to foot is 5ft 2 inches. Arms should be 14 inches, from shoulder to the elbow; and 11 inches from the elbow to the wrist. And the wrist should measure just 6 inches round.


IN THE PAST: Flo Russel arrested for wearing an abbreviated skirt

THE JUDGE, OF COURSE, JUMPS AT IT.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

To be arrested on a charge of holding one skirts too high on a rainy day suggests, of course, the United States. In 

Joplin, Missouri, was the precise scene of the incident. And Miss Flo Russel was its victim, or heroine.

It was charged against her, quite in the Addisonian style, the height at which she held them created enough commotion to amount to a disturbance of traffic. Her youth and prettiness, if they did not aggravate the offence, did aggravate the commotion. A policeman arrested her.

ABBREVIATED SKIRT

Miss Russell, in her defence, said that she was wearing a new and particularly handsome silk petticoat and other “thing” equally new and equally handsome. And, she added, held her skirts just high enough to prevent them from being muddied. But, she said, not an inch higher.

To clinch the matter, she had come dressed in identical clothes and was ready if the judge desired to give a demonstration in court.

The judge, of course, jumped at it. A space was cleared and the court became so judicially fascinated with the performance that it took him fifteen minutes to discharge Miss Russell, with apologies.

<< The New Idea, 1903.


IN THE PAST: A lesson in grace – Body twists, upward strength and side stretches!

SHE IS A WOMAN WHO MOVES EASILY – SHE IS THE ‘GRACEFUL’ WOMAN.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

GET READY: ALL THE TWISTS YOU CAN THINK OF -- LET’S GO!

Grace in growing girls is never conscious posing nor lackadaisical drawling and drooping, nor exaggerated nervous intensity, any more that it is a stolid quietness or a rude violence of manner. Grace is much simpler that any of those things.

In fact, grace is often overlooked because it seems so natural and so absolutely what one would like to see.
Grace is literally ease of motion.

Where motion is difficult or awkward or over-intense, there is a great loss of will-powder to provide strength. The horse that runs the swiftest is usually the prize-winner. The horse that steps the lightest and easiest, and is most delightful look at, you back every time.

BREATHE EASILY

The woman who accomplishes the most housework is not the woman who does it with her teeth set, every nerve tense, and stamping about on the heels of her shoes. The woman who is the least tired after a day’s work, or a day’s exercise of any sort, is relaxed.

Whoever the woman, she goes about it with a springy step, breathing easily, with chest held up. This woman is more apt to smile than have a tight look about her mouth. Her muscles are relaxed so far as consistent with accomplishment.

She is a woman who moves easily -- she is the ‘graceful’ woman. The graceful woman is neither too quick nor too slow. She never hurries unless it is necessary. But she is never affectedly slow. Many young ladies have a confused notion that to drawl and to be lazy is to be graceful.

Therefore, the exercises that will benefit these physical deficiencies are the exercises that are going to bring about the condition of grace.

<< From the New I903.


IN THE PAST: 1914/1918. Diggers at Gallipoli over 100 years ago

“THEY RUSH ENEMY TRENCHES … THEIR MAGAZINES WERE NOT CHARGED, SO THEY WENT IN WITH COLD STEEL,” SAID ELLIS ASHMEAD-BARTLETT, WHO WAS DESCRIBING THE SCENE.

FRANK MORRIS

REST TIME: ANZAC MEN GRAB SOME MUCH NEEDED REST AT THE ENTRANCE OF THEIR DUGOUT. Below: AT PEACE: LEAVING GALLIPOLI AFTER A BITTER SWEET STRUGGLE FOR VICTORY.

It happened over 100 year ago. This celebration marks the start of the name Anzac and how it became a symbol of Australian courage and military prowess. It eventually gave the Anzacs the chance of a ‘living hell’ called Gallipoli.

It would also highlight the day when 75,000 Allied soldiers – 10,000 of them Anzacs would lay their lives on the line.
On these bloody shores of Gallipoli was written one of the most memorable chapters in Australian history.

About 1.30am in the inky darkness of April 25, 1915, the troop boat loaded with Anzacs arrives off the Gallipoli peninsula. The eerie stillness of the night produced an uneasy, lonely feeling.

As one war historian wrote: “Even the bravest men among the Anzacs felt fear, but come what may they would acquit themselves in a manner creditable both to themselves and their country.”

Against the shadowy outline of the mountainous coast, the first of the troop boats nosed their bows onto the blackened beach. There was an uneasy silence as they waited for the dug-in Turkish army to open fire.

SHADOWY OUTLINE

The Anzacs leapt out into shallow water, their rifles held above their heads. Suddenly, the tranquillity of the Peninsula’s valleys echoed with the whistling of shells and heavy gunfire. A living hell had erupted. The fight for Gallipoli had begun.

Of the historic day, the Official History of Australia in the War commented: “Never in history was a campaign richer in pure heroism and conscious self-sacrifice.

Now, our Gallipoli heroes have passed on. Their deeds will live forever.

<< From the Grand Years series on Gallipoli.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 08 June 18

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