It’s Christmas: Marilyn Monroe’s tree was simply a token of love!

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THIS IS THE FINAL GRAND YEARS FOR THE YEAR. IT WILL RESUME PUBLICATION FROM JANUARY 18. 2020.
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A PAINTING OF MARILYN (TOP) AND PART OF THE CHRISTMAS TREE DECORATIONS. THE PAINTING IS JUST AS HER FAN-BASE KNEW HER IN MANY OF ‘MM’ PUBLICITY PHOTOS SURROUNDING THE ESCAPADES OF HER LIFE OFF-SCREEN; LIKE MM IN SONG AT THE CELEBRATION OF PRESIDENT KENNEDY’S BIG NIGHT.

AS A TOKEN OF HIS LOVE, JOE DiMAGGIO GAVE THIS SPECIAL TREE OF GILDED PINECONES TO MARILYN MONROE SHORTLY BEFORE THE TWO WERE WED. THE TREE WAS PURCHASED AT AUCTION FOR $10,000. IN THE FORGROUND ARE THE SHOES MARILYN WORE IN HER LAST FILM, THE MISFITS.

MARILYN BROUGHT THE ATMOSPHERE OF HOLLYWOOD IN TO ANY PLACE SHE VISITED. SHE POSED ESPECIALLY FOR THIS COLOUR PHOTOGRAPH IN APRIL 8, 1959 EDITION OF THE WOMEN’S WEEKLY, CLAD IN A BLACK SATIN SPARLING FROCK AND LOOKING VERY SAUCY. MARILYN’S MARRIGE BREAK-UP WITH DiMAGGIO HAPPENED LONG BEFORE THIS.


DIGGERS: Louise Mack – She was in the front-line of reporters in World War 1

THE EARLIEST AUSTRALIAN WOMAN WAR CORRESPONDENT SINCE THE FIRST WORLD WAR.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Australian women have been involved in journalism since the late nineteenth century.

The first Australian female foreign correspondent also originates from this period, with Jessie Couvreur, “Tasma”, reporting from Brussels for the British newspaper The Times in the 1890s.

The earliest Australian woman war correspondent dates from The First World War. Louise Mack despite the British Government’s prohibition against women leaving for the front line set off for Belgium from London in September 1914 as a journalist for Alfred Harmsworth’s Daily Mail and Evening News.

She stubbornly remained there for several months while all other correspondents fled, and only avoided arrest by the Germans in Antwerp through disguising herself as a maid.

In contrast, the actions of Second World War female correspondents were much more tightly controlled, but by this time there was an increased number of women involved in the occupation.

There has, however, been little written about these Australian women war correspondents – a lack of information which essentially ignores their contribution to reporting.

SOURCE: The MSS, Confined to a Mainland? By Kathie Bird.

 


FLASHBACK: As if by magic, a new Blyton novel discovered

THE CLASSIC MANUSCRIPT WAS IN THE BOTTON DRAWER. I DON’T THINK ANYBODY FULLY UNDERSTOOD WHAT IT WAS.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

A manuscript of a previously unknown Enid Blyton novel has been discovered in a children’s book centre in London.

Mr Tempy’s Caravan is a 180-page fantasy about caravan with a mind of its own.

The story features a princess in a foreign land, a dog-headed dragon and a pet called Bun-Darg. It was included in a collection of manuscripts auction by the Blyton family and bought by the Seven Stories centre in Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

Initially, staff believed it to be a version of a comic strip collection entitled Mr Tempy and His Caravan, which was published in 1949. The address on the typescript – “Old Thatch, Bourne End, Buckinghamshire” – dates it to early in Blyton’s writing career, as she left there in 1938.

The Enid Blyton Society said: “The story has been sitting unnoticed in a bottom drawer, and I don’t think anybody fully understood what it was. It was sent to a publisher in the early 1930s and rejected.”

Seven Stories paid $65,000 for the archive, which includes draft copies of the Famous Five, Secret Seven, Noddy and Malory Towers stories. Blyton’s younger daughter, Imogene Smallwood, told the BBC: “There’s always excitement when an unknown typescript is found …”

Blyton died in 1968 at the age of 71.

SOURCE: Telegraph, London.


“My sister’s a writer!” says Bibby Moriarty. That was the start of a fruitful friendship

SHE LOVED TO TALK. SHE TALKED INCESSANTLY.

FRANK MORRIS

“There is a friendship that is like a torch we meet in a dark street; it quickly leaves us a flash of compliment for the time.”

I don’t know who said those words but he/she was spot on. My first encounter with Biddy is a receding memory and all that remains are a few flickering, shadowy images of that day.

Some of the fragments show a diminutive, school-marish, silver-haired woman sporting a neatly plaited pigtail; it is tightly rolled and fixed firmly to the back of her head.

She had attracted my attention from the other side of the room and promptly headed in my direction.

In a matter of seconds I was face-to-face with this primly dressed woman in her early to mid sixties.

She held out her hand: “I’m Biddy Moriarty.” The year was 1963. Biddy and I were employed by the same company, a once venerable retailing organisation.

She was responsible for cataloguing documents and relevant publications for the firm’s ‘historical files’. She loved to talk. She talked incessantly. Biddy was well-read, well- spoken and extremely articulate and she came across as a worldly, well-travelled person.

But as I was later to discover Biddy had not journeyed beyond Mosman, where she lived for decades. The office was per private sanctum, to which Biddy retreated three days a week.

Then Biddy said: “My sister’s a writer. She went to live in England in the thirties. Changed her name and she’s been very successful. Her name is P.L. Travers – Pamela Lyndon Travers.”


They say that Christmas is for children and the child in each one of us!

IT IS LONG PAST BEDTIME, AND LITTLE HEADS DREAM.

NOT HERE THE HOLLY AND THE MISTLETOE. BUT NATIVE FLOWERS AND GUM-TREES GROW. THE SUN AND THE SURF AND THE BUSHLAND, AND THE WELCOMING WARMTH OF SUMMER SMILES. – AUSTRALIAN WOMEN’S WEEKLY MORE TREASURES.


THIS IS THE FINAL GRAND YEARS FOR THE YEAR. IT WILL RESUME PUBLICATION ON JANUARY 18, 2020.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 19 December 19

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