LES MISERABLES: The insurrection and the barricades

FEARS OF WATER POISONING SPREAD THROUGH THE CROWDED QUARTERS.

Adapted by FRANY MORRIS

ACTION!: THE AREA (OPEN STAR) SHOWING LES MISERABLES BARRICADES AT RUE DE LA CHANVRERIE, PARIS.

It was Tuesday, June 5 …

Paris is in a feverish state. The devastating effects on the poor suffering from unemployment, cholera, and rumours of plots and counter-plots from Bonapartists, legitimists, republicans and police provocateurs, it was not a healthy state of affairs.

Royalists, who supported the grandson of Charles X, Henry V, were stirring up rebellion in the west and south. Fears of food and water poisoning sent panic through the crowded quarters.

These condition have … caused thousands of students, workers, soldiers and foreigners to come out to honour the memory of General Lamarque, a strong supporter of the poor, who had been a leader of the opposition to Louis Philippe.

He had described Louis Philippe and his government as a “halt in the mud.”

A horseman carrying a red flag and a cap of liberty, the symbols of 1792, mysteriously appeared at the ceremony. Shots rang out. Troops clashed with the crowd. Barricades, like an electric current, spread through the greater part of the city; and there were many fierce and heroic clashes between the insurgents and the troops.

This was, indeed, a tragedy. Frenchman again Frenchman. Many are wounded, many are dying. The next few hours will affect the future of the nation.

Smashing the printing plates. The newspaper, The Tribune, was seized before it was brought out.

LES MISERABLES: Stop Press – Support failed, absence of leaders

THE WAR ENDED WITH A BLOODY REPRESSION.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

DEATH: THE FALL OF THE BARRICADES GAVE THE INSURGENTS LITTLE CHANCE OF COMING OUT ALIVE. THE OUTCOME WAS INFLUENCED BY ARTILLERY FIRE AT CLOSE RANGE.

The insurgents were eventually defeated by the repeated infantry charges and close range artillery fire. The uprising failed, not for lack of support, but for the absence of leaders.

Neither the young editor of Le National newspaper, Armand Carrel, nor the ailing General Lafayette, both admirers of the American republic, were ready to take the chance and lead the insurrection.

The insurrection is not well-known as a historical revolution. It was an important spontaneous event expressing the feeling of the populace, rather than being well prepared and led by dedicated men.

It ended on June 6 with the bloody repression on the rue St Mery.

RENEWED VIGOUR

Although beseeched by the opposition, the King blamed the troubles on conspirators and refused to alter his policies. There were later 80 attempts on his life. Martial law was declared in four departments.

There were many arrests, but jurors acquitted all but a handful of those brought to trial. Rather than discouraging the republicans, the events filled them with a renewed determination to continue and to educate and organise the people in obtaining better conditions; like, civil liberties and a democratic government.

Repressed again in 1834, they triumphed in the revolution of February, 1848, which inaugurated the Second Republic.

<< Background from Cullen Publications Pty Ltd, Sydney.

Will it hurt? Soldier has a dressing.

LES MISERABLES: Victor Hugo and the common people in Les Miserables

PEOPLE, THINGS: THE MICHELANGELO OF FRENCH LITERATURE, VICTOR HUGO, SAID THE SINGLE, FATEFUL WORD – LES MISERABLES. THEY’RE THE OUTCASTS, THE UNDERDOGS. WHO IS TO BLAME?

The author, wrote the classic, Les Miserables, around the barricades events. The musical production also follows his novel accurately. It contains striking scenes at the barricades. Victor Hugo describes part of the fighting:

VICTOR HUGO

The ground within the barricades was so covered with used cartridge-cases that it might have been a snowstorm. The attackers had the advantage of numbers; the rebels had the advantage of position. They were defending a wall whence they shot down at point-blank range the soldiers staggering amid their dead and wounded; or enmeshed in the barricade itself.

The barricade, constructed as it was and admirably buttressed, did indeed present one of those positions where a handful of men could defy a legion.

Nevertheless, being constantly reinforced and expanding under the hail of bullets, the attacking column inexorably moved forward; with certainly, the army was compressing the barricade like the screw of a winepress.

THE ASSAULTS CONTINUED

There ensued, on that heap of paving-stones in the Rue de la Chanvrerie, a struggle (that would have been) worthy of the ruins of Troy.

That handful of haggard, ragged, and exhausted men, who had not eaten for twenty-four hours, who had not slept, who had only a few shots left to fire, so that they searched their empty pockets for cartridges.

Nearly (all) were wounded, with head or arm swathed in rough, blackening bandages; having holes in their clothing through which the blood flowed; ill armed with sufficient muskets and old, worn sabres, became Titans.

The barricade was ten times assailed and climbed, but still it did not fall. Adapted by FRANK MORRIS.

Next: Victor Hugo -- striking scenes at the barricades.

Defending the barricades. The outcasts and soldiers fight tooth and claw.


NEXT WEEK: Queen Elizabeth ll at 95 – the winds of change. Meanwhile …

AT AGE 90, THE QUEEN REMEMBER THE POMP AND PAGENTRY OF HER MARRIGE.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

WEDDING DAY: NOVEMBER 20, 1947 WAS THE GRANDEST DAY IN THE QUEEN’S 90 GLORIOUS YEARS WHEN SHE WAS TO MARRY PHILIP, THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH. ON THE MORNING OF HER WEDDING DAY, SHE TOLD CRAWFIE HER GOVENESS. “I CAN’T REALLY BELIEVE IT IS HAPPENING.”

A fairy-tale wedding. On July 9, 1947, three months after Princess Elizabeth’s 21st birthday, the world learned her very thrilling secret: she was officially engaged to dashing Philip Mountbatten who was the love of her life.

In accordance with royal protocol, he was created His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh shortly before the wedding.

The wedding reception was at Buckingham Palace and in honour of the happy couple the dinner included Fillets de Sole Mountbatten to start and Bombe Glace Princess Elizabeth as dessert. They honeymooned in the UK at Broadlands, the home of Philip’s uncle, Lord Louis Mountbatten.

Perhaps not surprisingly, the bride close to take her favourite corgi Susan with them.

END OF A LIFE

The young naval couple lived first at Windlesham Moor near Windsor Castle and then in Clarence House in London. But Philip was still a serving naval officer, the second in command of the destroyer HMS Chequers, which was based at Malta.

She spent her stays there at Villa Guardamangia, another home owned by Lord Mountbatten.

Almost a year to the day after her wedding, the Queen gave birth to Charles on November 14, 1948, at Buckingham Palace. Princess Anne was born on August 15, 1950, at Clarence House.

Life was cut short for George VI. He was becoming frailer so Elizabeth was increasingly involved as a stand-in at royal events. In 1952, she and Prince Philip were on their way to Australia and New Zealand … when news was received on February 6 that lung cancer had ended the King’s life.

His health undoubtedly suffering from the strain of being a dutiful king through the difficult war years.

<< 90 Glorious years, a YOURS Souvenir Edition; Bauer Media Pty Limited, Sydney.

lIIustration: The King and I: George VI and Princess Elizabeth share a few words.

COMING: Bushranger – Ned Kelly meets his doom; Historic Pubs – A farmer builds a pub.


QUEEN VICTORIA BUILDING: 120 glorious years for this icon of Sydney!

THE POPULATION HAS WITNESSED SOME ENORMOUS CHANGES TO THE FACE OF ITS CAPITAL CITY.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

PICTURE: THE DOMED SHAPES OF THE QUEEN VICTORIA BUILDING FILLS THE SKY WITH WONDERMENT THAT PEOPLE HAVE NEVER SEEN BEFORE. 

The Queen Victoria Building, built 120 years ago, first captured the public’s imagination in 1898. The building, in all this time, has remained an edifice unparalleled in Australia. For its scale and architectural air of distinction, the level of detail and craftsmanship, was second to none.

Over the past century, this majestic Romanesque arcade has become a symbol of a flourishing city and one true constant in a world moving at a modern pace.

Described as “this iconic jewel” in the heart of Sydney, it has been witness to enormous change, and, at one time, faced a real threat of being torn down. Yet it seemed that survival was always in her sights and it continues to thrive. Is it rare that a Victorian-era building so resiliently stands the test of time as our beloved QVB?

It will inspire generations with her enduring beauty and grace.

MYSTERY, INTRIGUE

A touch of local heritage is also part and parcel of the grand, ‘young’ building. By unlocking the secrets, for instance, you’ll discover the little-known details of Australia’s largest and grandest Victorian arcade. As befits this building, which has amassed a 120 year-old history, wants to share her mystery and intrigue.

For instance, the ghost of a former tenant wandering thought the arcades at night; and the extraordinary tale of how the long-abandoned Queen Victoria statue found its way to Sydney. There’s more to this majestic building that you might think.

Question: In the building’s inaugural years, a Chinese-merchant opened the Elite Hall tea house, which went on to be one of the most popular restaurants of the Victorian era. His spectre was reportedly seen walking the arcades at night?

Who was it?

<< Background to this story from Celebrating an Icon; to mark its 120 years of history.

TO EXPERIENCE THE GRANDEUR OF THE QUEEN VICTORIA BUILDING, BOOK A GUIDED TOUR WITH THE CONCIERGE OR CALL 02 9264 9209.


SHOP WINDOW: Heritage Places -- A gift of a nation 

FRANK MORRIS

Collingrove in the Barossa Valley, SA. In a magnificent section of the Barossa Valley, complete with English country garden, is a homestead called Collingrove. The Angus family, which built it 1856, Collingrove stands as a rare specimen of how our pioneers attempted to recreate the ‘Old Country’ atmosphere of their origins. The homestead is the perfect place to step back in time. It’s ideal for accommodation, homestead tours and weddings.

The first school in Alice Springs. The school was established in temporary accommodation on the Old Hartley Street site. This took place shortly after the railway reached the township in 1929. The school underwent some restoration since 1980; and it was opened for the Bicentennial program in l988.

<< Backgrounds for the two articles came from a Gift to the Nation, Historic Australia, No 4. 1987.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 17 August 18

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