LOOKING BACK: ENOLA GAY’s papers auctioned in New York: more than they estimated

“ENOLA GAY LOG IS A UNIQUELY IMPORTANT DOCUMENT,” SAID A SPOKESPERSON.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

CONQUEROR: THE ENOLA GAY DROPPED THE FIRST ATOMIC BOMB IN THE WORLD CALLED “LITTLE BOY” ON HIROSHIMA. Below: COLONEL PAUL TIBBETS AND ENOLA GAY JUST BEFORE TAKE OFF.

New York (Reuters): “My God, what have we done?”

The Enola Gay co-pilot’s log book, which recorded the horror of having just dropped the first atomic bomb in war, was the most chilling item on auction in the sale of US historical documents that fetched record prices. The auction was held on March 28, 2002.

Winning bid for Capt. Robert Lewis’s log chronicling the “Little Boy” mission that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945 was $350,000 – more than the estimated range of $200,000 and $300,000.

“It is a uniquely important document,” said dealer Seth Kaller about the Enola Gay log. “It’s one of the greatest moments, but one of the most terrible, of the century. It’s a terribly sad record. I think that affects the desire to own it.”

Lewis’s minute-by-minute account of the mission, written in pen and pencil during the flight, was full of details of the bombing run aimed at bringing a fast end to the Second World War. It also was filled with awe after the 9000 pound bomb, dubbed “Little Boy,” was dropped over Hiroshima.

HOW MANY KILLED

It is believed that more the 140,000 people died by the end of the year as a result of the bomb. The total number of people who died due to the bomb has been estimated at 200,000.

“Fifteen seconds after the flash there were two very distinct slaps (air turbulence) that was all the physical effects we felt,” wrote Lewis. “There in front of our eyes was without a doubt the greatest explosion man has ever witnessed.

“The city was nine-tenths covered with smoke. A column of white cloud, which in less than three minutes, reached 30,000 feet and then went up to 50,000.

“I am certain the entire crew felt this experience was more that anyone human had ever thought possible. Just how many did we kill? We’re groping for words to explain. My God, what have we done.

“If I live a hundred years I’ll never quite get those few minutes out my mind …”

<< From Reuters; Larry Fine; 2002.


IT’S CHRISTMAS TIME. MERRY CHIRSTMAS, MERRY CHRISTMAS TO YOU ALL!


HOME-CARE: Large-print novels are for people with impaired vision

“I COULDN’T READ ANY OF THE BOOKS I’D BORROWED BECAUSE OF POOR EYESIGHT.”

FRANK MORRIS

ONE- UPMANSHIP: LARGE-PRINT EDITIONS WERE AN IMMEDIATE SUCCESS. Below: BRITISH CRIME WRITER AGATHA CHRISTIE’S RECENTLY FINISHED NOVEL CONTRIBUTED TO THE WORLD-WIDE FAME OF PROJECT.

Large-print novels have been available from your local library for years.

The pioneer of large-print books, Frederick Thorpe, formerly a publisher of childrens’ classics, was the founder of Ulverscroft Books in 1964. His idea “met with resistance from publishers reluctant to have their popular authors associated with what they considered to be a gimmick.”

The catalyst for what was eventually to became worldwide the bestselling “Ulverscroft large-print series” was initiated by a group of women volunteers who delivered books to the elderly. Though grateful for the service, Thorpe was informed, many of the service’s clients “couldn’t read the books they borrowed because of poor eyesight.”

CHRISTIE WAS THE LIGHT

To get the project off the ground, Thorpe realised that he had to have the support of at least a few high profile authors.

He approached Agatha Christie, who was published by Collins. When she heard what Thorpe had in mind, Christie embraced the scheme wholeheartedly. The author’s A Pocketful of Rye was one of first titles published in the new quarto sized, hard-cased format.

Thorpe’s large-print editions were an immediate success with libraries throughout the English-speaking world. He opened the floodgates for other publishers. By the mid-1970s, the edition had become an international market.
Thorpe dies in England at 85 in 1999.

COMING: HOME-CARE RESUMES IN FEBRUARY.


FOODFROLICO: Christmas time – try Bacardi rum daiquiri with your favourite fruit

FRANK MORRIS

“It’s the easiest drink to concoct. It sounds complicated. But anyone can do it. It’s not an idle boast. Not at all.

“What you’re trying is a Bacardi rum daiquiri – its simplicity itself. But there is a trick to it! You must become a theatrical entrepreneur of showmanship, you must now demonstrate the flamboyance of the mixing performance.

“So pay close attention. My guests, take a step forward.

“To 45ml of light, dry Bacardi rum. Add a dash of lemon juice, a teaspoon of sugar, ice … crushed usually … and strawberries. Into the blender. And then, I said, switching my voice into a loud vibratory sound.

“Mesdames and geeentlemen”, the guests broke out in cheesy smiles, “the 18 second Bacardi rum, and strawberry daiquiri!”

A sip of the foaming, pink, magical daiquiri makes you feel like you had dreamed and gone to La La Land.

The guests gathered around me. “I raised my glass. The guests cried ‘Encore!’” Try your favourite fruit – bananas, peaches, limes or strawberries.

<< Ogilvy MBA Advertising; 1988.


FAMOUS PIECART: Stopover for generations of Sydneysiders since it started

“FREE WHEELER”

TINO DEES, A MASTER BUTCHER, WHO HAS WON MORE 170 AWARDS FOR HIS SAUSAGES, HAMS AND BACON, IS THE NEW OWNER OF THE 73-YEAR-OLD INSTITUTION, HARRY’S CAFÉ DE WHEELS. ‘WE’RE CALLED HARRY’S CAFÉ DE WHEELS, BUT HAVE YOU TRIED OUR COFFEE? WE WANT TO OPEN MORE THAN 100 “HARRY’S” LOCATIONS AROUND AUSTRALIA. ACCORDING TO A NEWSPAPER REPORT, FANS OF HARRY’S FAMOUS TIGER – A MEAT PIE TOPPED WITH MUSHY PEAS, MASHED POTATO AND GRAVY – CAN TAKE COMFORT. IT WILL STAY ON THE MENU AND REMAIN UNCHANGED. I’VE NEVER ‘DINED’ AT HARRY’S. HERE IS A WRITER WHO HAS VISITED THERE MANY TIMES OVER THE YEARS. – Frank Morris.

Sydney is famous for its landmarks. But there’s none more colourful than Harry the Wheels piecart on Cowper Wharf Drive, Wooloomooloo, near Garden Island naval base.

To Sydneysiders and overseas vistors, Harry the Wheels has become an institution. Harry’s legendary piecart has been a stopover for generations of sailors and taxi drivers.

Although the original Harry has long since departed for that great Piecart in the Sky, his successor, Alex, has carried on the tradition for many years. Harry the Wheels and Alex have been popularised in several documentaries shown on American and European television networks.

DAMN SHAME!

As a result, Harry the Wheels has gained international fame. Over the years many well-known personalities have made a point of paying Harry’s a visit. The walls of the piecart are festooned with photographs of some of the notables.

Colonel Sanders, of Kentucky Fried Chicken fame, is shown munching one of Harry’s pies – and enjoying every mouthful.

But sadly, Alex and Harry’s are an endangered species. Even though Harry’s has been shifted to various locations in recent years, there is a move to bring the curtain down on Alex for good.

And that would be a dammed shame. [This article was written in July, 1984. The author was a correspondent of Cab Talk, a weekly newspaper. A lot has happened since then. Started in 1945, Harry’s is now operated under a franchise system and has branches all over Sydney and Newcastle.]


S.O.B: Save our brumby … that’s the call to Australia!

FRANK MORRIS

HE COULD BE TRAPPED: PALEFACE IS CAPTURED IN HIS ELEMENT BY PHOTOGRAPHER MICHELLE BROWN. Below: A BRUMBY IS OFF AND RUNNING IN FULL FLIGHT.

It’s been a hard year for the brumbies. Like every other year. This year, the brumby situation is way out of control.

“Originally, the plan called for the culling of most of the estimated 6000 wild horses in the park,” reported The Land newspaper, “with the intention to leave a remaining population of 600. One of the potential captures is a famous grey or silver brumby known as Paleface.”

Photographer Michelle Brown has spotted Paleface many times.

“About four years ago I saw Paleface … for the first time … and it’s an experience I’ll never forget,” she told the newspaper. “Paleface is a ten-year-old white stallion who roams the Mount Selwyn, Kiandra and Three Mile Dam Area.

“Each year, I have noticed that he graces us with one or two new foals and the closeness he has with his mares is a bond I have never witnessed before in my life around horses.”

“CULL THE BRUMBIES”

The Land newspaper reports the “current wild horse trapping near Kiandra was foreshadowed in the 2016 Wild Horse Management plan to ‘minimise impacts in the northern and southern regions by reducing the horse population in these areas.”

In 1991, wild horses caused trouble for a NSW Environment Minister when word got out of the plans to cull the brumbies in Kosciusko National Park. They were horses immortalised in Banjo Paterson’s The Man from Snowy River.

Premier Bob Carr stepped in and said “Not on.”

If you want an easy way to do it, said a guest on the ABC’s Back Roads, then get a community to pay the horseman to secure the horses. Once you’ve got them, they will be broken-in and sold to the public. It may take time but it will be worth it.

That’s one way, at least.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 30 November 18

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