Live and kicking: Protect yourself from lightning when caught in a storm!

LIGHTNING JUMPS FROM THE OBJECT TO THE VICTIM. Below: LIGHTNING STRIKES, SO BE CAREFUL. READ BELOW.

FRANK MORRIS

A news flash on ABC radio reported that a man and woman, who were rescued from lightning near their property, are both in a critical condition in hospital.

According to the National Weather Service, there are 5 ways lightning strikes people.

Direct strike is when a person is struck directly by lightning and becomes a part of the main lightning discharge channel. Most often, the people are in open areas.

Side flash occurs when lightning strikes a taller object near the victim and a portion of the current jumps from a taller object to the victim.

Ground current is when lightning strikes a tree or other object, much of the energy travels outward from the strike in and along the ground surface.

Conduction is when lightning travels long distances in wires or other metal surfaces.

Streamers, while not as common as other types of lightning, people caught in ‘streamers’ are at risk of being killed or injured by lightning.

Other points to be aware of:

IF outdoors, you must try and seek shelter in a hard-top vehicle or some solid building; and never shelter underneath trees. What looks safe is not necessarily true.

IF you are driving, slow down or park away from trees and falling powerlines; don’t touch any mental sections or objects.

IF you find yourself far from shelter, crouch, feet together – preferably in a hollow place.

REMOVE all metal objects from your body, for example, watches, rings, bill change, etc.

DON’T fly kites or model aeroplanes with control wires. STAY AWAY from metal poles and fences.

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SOME OLYMPICS CHATTER …
THE 1968 OLYMPICS WAS “BIG TIME” FOR MAUREEN CAIRD, HURDLER. PAM KILBORN HAD BEEN UNDEFEATED SINCE THE 1964 TOKYO OLYMPICS. BUT AFTER A POOR START, SHE COULD NOT CATCH THE 17 YEAR OLD MAUREEN CAIRD, THE YOUNGEST WOMAN TRACK GOLD MEDALLIST IN HISTORY. PAM KILBORN WON A SILVER MEDAL.
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DON’T ride a bicycle, horses, or travel in open vehicles. IF you are swimming, leave the water immediately.

IF you are boating, go ashore to shelter as soon as possible. Make sure the mast and stays of a sailing boat are adequately ‘grounded’ to the water.

IF you are indoors, disconnect all power leads to TV, computers and radios. Draw the curtains and keep clear of windows, electrical appliances, pipes and other metal fixtures.

DON’T use the bath, shower or sink.

AVOID touching the brick or concrete walls. DON’T stand bare-foot on concrete or tiled floors. AVOID using any fixed-line phone.


TENNIS GREATS: Monica Seles knew more of Monica than we do …

DON’T MESS WITH ME, AS MONICA STRETCHS FOR A FOREHAND RETURN. Below: MONICA, ARCHED AND READY.

FRANK MORRIS and Correspondent

SHE WAS THE WORLD’S BEST FEMALE TENNIS PLAYER UNTIL SHE WAS FELLED BY A KNIFE-WIELDING NUTTER WHO SUSPENDED HER CAREER.

When Monica Seles was 19, she was literally sitting on top of the world. She had won $10 million in prize-money, eight grand slam tennis titles, and then, the bubble burst. Her life was shattered.

Gunter Parche, an unemployed German lathe operator, stuck a kitchen knife “half an inch into my back” as she rested during a changeover of a match in Germany.

She was the youngest number one ranked player in tennis history and she was one of the hardest hitters in the sport. Her fans loved her and her opponents showed their respect.

The stabbing no doubt left the merciless teenager’s career hanging.

Seles career could not have been sweeter with rapid progression -- and making lots of money -- until the stabbing.

Seles kept away from player politics. She did not hug the limelight.

Seles says that Parche’s face still makes her a bit jittery.

“I can see the hate in his face,” said Seles. “He pulled (the knife) out of my back and he was going to do it again.

“When I heard I would have to sit in the courtroom with my back to him, I knew (that not testifying at the trial) was the 100 per cent right decision.

“I mean the man stabbed me.”

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SOME OLYMPICS CHATTER …
WHEN MOSCOW HOSTED THE OLYMPICS GAMES IN 1980, CRITICS SAID IT IS “THE SAGA OF THIS OLYMPICS THAT WILL CONTINUE WITH OUTSTANDING OCCASIONS TO THE SPORT”. CAN IT COMPARE WITH THE LAVISH, WESTERN OPULENCE WE SAW IN THE SEVENTIES? WILL IT RETAIN ITS ORIGINAL PHILOSOPHY THAT TAKING PART IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN WINNING?
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Seles said that “everything, I thought, would be OK was not.” She lives by the philosophy where “I treat every day of my life like it’s the last”.

What did the stabbing cost you financially? “I had over $10 million US in earnings. My legal bills against Parche alone were unbelievable – hundreds of thousands of dollars. Then there’s the millions I lost in prizemoney, endorsements and exhibitions …”

Seles competed in the Peters International in 1996 and played Lindsay Davenport, also an American, in the final. Seles won. << Sydney Weekly 19-25 December 1995; Frank Morris.

Next: Norman Brookes win is a crowning achievement.

MONICA FEELS THE PAIN. GUNTER PARCHE WHO DID THE DAMAGE.


John Frost, headline hunter: Keep papers away from the sunlight

THE DAILY GUARDIAN WAS STARTED BY JAMES JOYNTON-SMITH, OF SMITH’S WEEKLY FAME, IN THE 1920s. HE  LAUNCHED THE FIRST MISS AUSTRALIA CONTEST. (FM COLLECTION).

FRANK MORRIS

JOHN FROST IS A PERSON WHOSE THIRST FOR NEWS IS NEVER ENDING!

What started as a hobby sixty years ago has become a “proper” business, which is recognised world-wide as “Britain’s only historical newspaper loan service”.  It is managed by John Frost in association with one of his sons, Andrew.

The bulk of the collection is stored in two large sheds at Frost’s semi-detached home in the leafy northern suburb of London; and the remainder is housed in two rented garages.

The oldest and rarer “crown jewels” of the collection are lovingly stored in Frost’s specially fitted ‘conservatory’ in London.

Says John: “We don’t sell or buy newspapers, but exchange.  Most requests for newspapers can be handled in a matter of minutes”.

John Frost’s collection is not stored in any special way.  He says “the basic essential is to keep the newspapers flat and away from strong sunlight and to handle with care at all times”.  A dirty newspaper, he says, can be satisfactorily cleaned by rubbing the surface lightly with a piece of soft white bread.

In 1997, W.C.F. Butler, of London, went to the British Newspaper Library at Colindale, to do some newspaper research. He later reported “on the unfitness of papers in the Library”, especially those of last century.

Mr Butler added, “I was told that damage to those and other newspapers had deteriorated”.

Mr Butler wrote to The Times that “seven out of ten of the south London and other newspapers I wished to consult from 1893 could not be produced”.

Mr Butler went on to say that they were “sitting on the shelf, but in such poor condition that they could not be read without unacceptable risk of damage.”

The staff advised me, said Mr Butler, that the library contains literally thousands of volumes in this condition.

FEB 28: Part 1. John Frost, headline hunter.

THE FIRST ISSUE OF THE WORLD, WHICH CAME IN THE EARLY 1930s, DID NOT HAVE THE CASH TO SURVIVE. (FM COLLECTION).

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SOME OLYMPICS CHATTER …
AT THE 1952 OLYMPICS, AUSTRALIAN SHIRLEY STRICKLAND WON THE 80 METRES HURDLES, BEATING A LEGENDARY FIELD OF HURDLERS, STRICKLAND SET A WORLD RECORD OF 10.9 SECONDS. SHE ALSO WON BRONZE IN THE 100 METRES SPRINTS.
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SOME OLYMPICS CHATTER …
AT THE 1912 STOCKHOLM OLYMPICS, THERE WAS A LEGEND BORN. HER NAME WAS FANNY DURACK. SHE BECAME THE NATION’S FIRST FEMALE GOLD MEDALLIST IN THE 100M FREESTYLE, AND ESTABLISHED HERSELF AT THE HEAD OF AN ARISTOCRATIC PROCESSION WHICH INCLUDES WOMEN LIKE DAWN FRASER, BETTY CUTHBERT, SHIRLEY STRICKLAND, MAJORIE JACKSON, MAUREEN CAIRD AND OTHERS.


PART 1. THIS CARTOON APPEARED IN THE 1968 EDITION OF SURFABOUT MAGAZINE. THE CARTOONIST COMES UP WITH THE PERFECT LOVE-HATE RELATIONSHIP!

CONTINUED.

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SOME OLYMPICS TALK …
WHICH WAS THE NATION WITH A NOUGHT ON THE END? IT WAS WHEN AUSTRALIA’S TEAM OF 255 WAS THE LARGEST THAT EVER LEFT THIS NATION. NOTHING BIGGER WOULD BE ASSEMBLED FOR ANOTHER 20 YEARS. TWO WOMEN WOULD ACHIEVE THE STATUS OF NATIONAL ICONS. NEXT WEEK ANSWER.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 31 January 20

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