MARILYN MONROE: Milton H. Greene’s superb portraits of an era!

THE ARRIVAL: TAKEN ON THE SET OF BUS STOP IN 1956 IS BASED ON WILLIAM INGE’S PLAY AND OFFERS A MIXTURE OF SENSITIVE DRAMA AND COMIC MOMENTS. IT WAS ONE OF MARILYN’S BEST FILMS.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

PEASANT: MARILYN TAKEN IN THE FRENCH VILLAGE ON THE SET THAT WAS USED FOR WHAT PRICE IS GLORY? IN SEVERAL SCENES MAYILYN COMFIRMED HER DRAMATIC SIDE. Below: MARILYN SITTING PLACIDLY IN THE FILM, BUS STOP.

Milton H. Greene had become an award winning photographer for Life and Look magazines in the 1950s.

Greene had created a collection exceeding 250,000 images, including those of movie star favourites: Marilyn Monroe, Frank Sinatra, Judy Garland, Cary Grant, Grace Kelly, Sophia Loren, Sammy Davis Jr and many more.

Milton Greene Archives was created by Milton’s son Joshua in 1993 to preserve, restore and present these timeless works of photography.

Milton died in 1985. Joshua believed much of his father’s work to have been lost in time. He spent the proceeding nine years digitally restoring the photographs to full glory.

INTERNATIONAL ACCLAIM

A worldwide 61-image exhibition titled Portraits of an Era, which featured roughly 33 of Greene’s images of Marilyn Monroe and 28 images of other celebrities. The exhibition toured throughout Australia in 2002.

Milton was born 1922. His work is known throughout the world. Apart from Life and Look magazines, he photographed for Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Town and Country and other high-fashion magazines, earning him international acclaim, along with Richard Avedon, Cecil Beaton and Irving Penn.

They brought fashion photography into the realm of fine art.

<< Design Graphics Number 89 2002.

 


SHORT STORY (For Adults): Final. Blackie Rabbit was strung up by a vengeful pirate!

‘HOW DID HE ESCAPE FROM MY CHAINS,” SAID CAPTAIN FLAPNODDLE.

EFFECTIVE: “WELL, WELL, MY LITTLE HEARRRTIES” SAID ONE OF THE DEADLIEST PIRATES FOR SEVERAL CENTURIES. Below: OOMPH! BLACKIE LANDED ON HIS BACK AND TUMBLED OVER. Below: I FOUGHT THIS LAGGARD TO THE DEATH. HE WAS A GONNA, MY HEARRRTIES, SAID FLAPDODDLE.

Blackie hopped on The Bird’s back and hung on for grim mercy. Suddenly, the hundreds of kilometres became a flash in pan, and there was it the gates of Never-Never Land spiring up to the open sky. 

The Bird touched down in the speck of green just inside. Bumph! Whack! Bummmp! Blackie tumbled over the side and landed on his back.

The Bird and Blackie gazed at the mammoth looking figure standing over them.

“This is ex-tra-ordinarrrrary,” sang out Blackie. The Bird was screeching loudly.

“Well, well, my little hearrrty,” said Captain Flapnoddle, one of the deadliest pirates of several centuries ago. “I’ve seen you before,” he said, pointing at The Bird. “But this little hearrrty,” pointing at Blackie. “How did you escape from my chains – all four of them.”

But before Blackie could reply, The Bird jumped in: “I did it. And all it took was five seconds. No fuss or bother, either.”

LOOKED SURPRISE

Captain Flapnoddle nearly fainted. “Only five seconds. It me took half a day and the little hearrrty was still asleep. If only you came by when I was stealing from the rich and pocketing all the dough.”

Both the Bird and Blackie looked, mesmerised.

Every sailor used to shake in his boots when they saw my ship – the Flying Flap. They used to call it the “flying hangover”. It be driven high in the sky or sail in the mighty sea. Take your pick.

He thought for a moment. The two looked surprised.

“I’m impressed with you two hearrrties, I’m going to give you the gift of a lifetime. And that is … THE TREASURE of all time is something I’ve been chasing for almost 300 odd years …”

HE WAS A GONNA

Blackie blinked three times and thought yes. The Bird was laughing -- yes, yes, yes!

“… THE TREASURE that my first mate stole from the ship with all those laggards who turned against me! I fought him to the last. When the slimy beast was on top of the ship’s steps, I legged him, so he fell to the bottom on the hard, crinkle boards. He was a gonna, my little hearrrties!

“When I built Never Never Land he was a skeleton by then. So I used him to become the ‘nasty pirate’. “Are you in my hearrrties?”

“This is ex-tra-ordinarrrrary!” shouted Blackie and The Bird.

They were in. The three shook hands. The three were partners. But two of them had worried looks on their faces.  And they had to fly -- in a ship. Or … whatever!

COMING: Adventurer Blackie is back with The Bird, Captain Flagnoddle and a stranger.

IIustration: The Captain. Flagnoddle’s the name and I’ve been around for about 400 years. Could you believe it? Blackie thought the news was all gobble talk.


VIETNAM WAR. Death of a young warrior who was the first victim killed in action

COMING: THE DILEMMA OF THE WAR WAS BEGINNING TO BITE.

FRANK MORRIS

TASTE OF WAR: VIETNAM .. THE WAR WAS BEGINNING TO BITE. Below: PRIVATE ERROL NOVACK --- FIRST VICTIM KILLED.

The war in Vietnam has claimed its first Australian victim in June 1965. And Private Bill Carroll was the first combat battalion soldier to die in battle.

Private Errol Noack, 21, of South Australia, was the first National Serviceman killed in action in 1966.

His uncle Mr J.G. Noack, said Errol was “a good Christian”.

Reporting his death, one newspaper said: “Besides the immediate pangs of loss, Errol Wayne Noack’s family also suffer the fear that people may make political capital out of his death”.

The dilemma of Vietnam was beginning to bite hard.

There was no subject “more pervasive” among US college students as they began packing up at the end of the academic year, reported Time magazine.

ENLARGED TASK FORCE

In April 1965, the Fiftieth Anniversary of Gallipoli, the Federal Government decided to send an Australian infantry battalion to Vietnam.

Prime Minister Robert Menzies told the House that the Government “has no desire to have Australian forces in Vietnam any longer than necessary”.

As the US escalated its involvement in Vietnam so did Australia’s commitment increase.

Australia decided to “treble its commitment to include military conscripts in the enlarged task force”.

Prophetically, the Sydney Morning Herald warned Prime Minister Harold Holt “to inform himself as closely as possible about the tangled political situation in South Vietnam which necessarily affects the whole Allied policy”.

When he became Labor’s first Prime Minister in 23 years, Gough Whitlam abolished the military draft, established diplomatic relations with China and North Vietnam and ordered the remaining Australian servicemen home from Vietnam. From 1965 to 1972, 40,200 Australians fought in Vietnam, with 424 being killed and 2369 wounded.

COMING: The Vietnam War – a short series on the war we did not want.


HISTORIC HOTEL: Go west, where there’s a king-size thirst!

FRANK MORRIS

IT’S HOT: THE CROWD ENJOYS A COLD, HARD BEER – OUTSIDE. Below: THE CLUB HOUSE HOTEL … THE BEAUTY OF AN HISTORIC PUB IN 1824.

Ironclad Hotel, in 1976, one of the hottest properties in Australia. And as the only hotel in the region, went on the market for $100,000. It is in Marble Bar, Western Australia, established 1893. 

Situated at Marble Bar, a town that boasts the highest temperatures in Australia, the hotel’s beer consumption is staggering.

More than 1350 litres and 140 dozen bottes were consumed every week.

HISTORY GETS A FACFLIFT

In 1976, while still retaining the charm and beauty of an historical building, the Club House Hotel in Singleton modernised to give added comfort to its guests.

Installation of the bar, with wood panelled walls and new carpeting, with a drive-in bottle department were completed at a cost $250,000.

The original owner of the hotel was Benjamin Singleton, after whom the town was named. The hotel remained in the family for many years. The town of Singleton was established in the 1820s. In the early years, it was called Patrick Plains.

Frank Morris comments: Marble Bar was given the royal treatment recently on Back Roads, ABC TV, featuring a leafier region than what it was like 100 years ago. All the trees and shrubs that shade some of the important parts of the town was the work of one fellow who started planting 36 years ago. He told Back Roads that he hasn’t finished yet. When the show comes up again as a repeat you’ll see all the characters who have decided to stay there.


Prawn raises war: The epic battle continues!

SIZE: PRAWN MAY BE BIGGER, BUT …

The final sentence regarding Ballina’s, NSW, Big Prawn is very unnecessary, write Bob Paskins, via email. He adds: “Although this prawn may be bigger that the Big Prawn in Exmouth, Western Australia, it’s certainly not as realistic. The Exmouth Prawn has my vote and is by the same artist who made the Big Whale Shark in Exmouth, Western Australia.

<< Open Road magazine, NSW.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 08 February 19

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