MEN’S HEALTH: Men ignored doctors’ advice many years ago. It’s a bad decision, say experts!

FRANK MORRIS

MORE MEN THAN WOMEN REFUSE TO GO TO A DOCTOR.

THAT WAS A LONG, LONG TIME AGO. THE POINT IS, IT’S STILL HAPPENING. 

This is what I wrote in 2001:

The first Australian survey by AGB McNair into prostate disease over 10 years ago, showed that one in three men aged over 50 had at least one symptom of the disease.

Hard on the heels of this alarming report, the medical profession issued a stark warning – ignore it at your peril.

The upshot, it seems, the penny didn’t “drop loudly enough”. In 2001, ten thousand of the men will be, nationally, diagnosed with cancer; most of them aged over 50. Twenty-five percent, one in four of this group, will die.

“They had ignored the warning”, experts would say.

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THE GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
WESTERN FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT, WILFRED BURCHETT, IN 1945, WAS THE FIRST NEWSMAN TO ENTER HIROSHIMA AFTER THE ATOMIC BOMB WAS DROPPED. – FM.
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Here is some timely advice from the Men’s Health Week: “In the mental health realm, we encourage men to seek help when something in wrong.”

Men’s Health Week, ACT, recommends that “to improve men’s health is a two-way street involving men, women and their families – and the health services.”

When it comes to mental health problems, research shows men are more likely to die by suicide than women.

With statistics even higher for men living in “rural and remote communities”.

Gerrit Williemse, psychologist at Marathon Health, says “stereotypes that suggest men bottle-up their emotions and handle things alone are completely unrealistic and damaging”.

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THE GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
NATIVE-BORN HORSES WERE SHIPPED TO INDIA FOR USE BY THE BRITISH ARMY IN 1846. THE HORSES, KNOWN AS ‘WALERS’ – A TERM COINED IN CALCUTTA. ORIGINALLY IT MEANT THEY WERE NEW SOUTH WALES BRED, AND WERE CHOSEN BECAUSE OF THEIR STAMINA, PATIENCE AND COURAGE. -- FM.
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He says the real strength “is telling someone you trust that you aren’t doing well; it’s asking your mates if they’re okay.”

“Men aged 18 to 34 with heart problems, are more than twice as likely than their female counterparts to have four or more risk factors of heart disease”.

Tony Stubbs, ACT CEO of the Heart Foundation, says “Over 30 percent of men in Australia have high cholesterol and almost 75 percent are overweight or obese.

”Walking is a great way for men to reduce these risk factors.”

SOURCE: mensheathweek.org.au; prostate Cancer Foundation – prostate.org.au/

Below: Gentleman make an appointment with the receptionist for a check-up.


AUST v. ENGLAND: Star of the past 70 years. They were the nation’s back-stop!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

McCABE AND BRADMAN HEAD OUT IN BRIGHT SUNSHINE FOR THE START OF 1933 TEST SERIES.

Stan McCabe was a genius. McCabe was the brilliant and graceful right-handed batsmen who played three of the most glorious innings in Test cricket.

Without doubt, McCabe was one of Australia’s finest batsman.

In 1932, adventurous by instinct he made a most audacious and classic 187 n.o (25 fours) in Sydney against the blast and fury of Jardine’s English bodyline attack.

Three years later, 1935, in Johannesburg against South Africa, showing his characteristic precision of timing, he made 189 no, in 195 minutes (29 fours); his first 100 in only 91 minutes.

His most enchanting innings displaying skill, power and courage, was in the Nottingham Test in England in 1938.

He saved Australia with an innings of 232, reaching the double century in an amazing 225 minute; his last 127 runs in 80 minutes.

In 39 Tests, Stan scored 2748 runs (6 centuries) at an average of 48.21. He took 36 Test wickets with deceptive medium pacers, and held 42 catches, mainly at second slip.

In 37 Sheffield Shield matches, 24 as Captain of NSW, he made 3031 runs at an average on 55.10. No doubt World War 2 robbed him of more great innings.

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HERE’S A WORLD FIRST …
IN 1968, THE FIRST HUMAN HEART TRANSPLANT WAS PERFORMED IN SOUTH AFRICA. A SECOND TRANSPLANT WAS DONE IN 1974, BOTH PATIENTS DIED. – FM.
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SOURCE: Hall of Champions. Sports House, 157 Gloucester St, Sydney.

BELOW: Stan McCabe. Stood the blast and fury of a Jardine bodyline attack.


Come on? Taste the dried fruits of Australia! Final.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

FEEL LIKE A DRIED APRICOT, OR DRIED PEARS, OR …

IT REQUIRES 6KG OF FRESH TREE FRUITS TO PRODUCE 1KG OF PRUNES, SUN-DRIED APRICOTS, PEACHES AND PEARS.

APRICOT

Although the botanical name suggests Armenia, it is generally agreed that the apricot originated in China … 2205BC.

Apricots were introduced to Europe via the silk route through the Far East, and then through the Mediterranean area by the Arabs.

In early times, the apricot was grown on a considerable scale in Upper Egypt where the fruits were dried for sale throughout Europe.

Dried apricots have the most concentrated dietary fibre of any fruit.

They are also a valuable source of iron and provide potassium, carotene, niacin and important B complex vitamins.

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GREAT KIWI FIRST …
GO NZ! ANYONE FOR PAVLOVA? THIS RICH SWEET DISH OF MERINGUE AND MARSHMELLOW TOPPED WITH WHIPPED CREAM AND FRUIT, AND ORGINATED IN NZ; NAMED AFTER THE CELEBRATED RUSSIAN BALLERINA ANNA PAVLOVA, WHO TWICE TOURED NZ IN THE 1920s.
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PRUNE

During the reign of Henry VIII, it was advised to ‘gather damson plums and dry them in the sun or a hot oven; in this way they could be kept for a year.’

In earlier centuries, plums were dried on racks in small caves.

The Australian prune is a hybrid of the cherry plum and sloe or blackthorn, probably originating in the Caucasus region where forests of wild plum trees existed thousands of years ago.

Many other species of wild plum grew across Britain, Europe and Asia.

Prunes are an important source of dietary fibre, potassium, iron and carotene. They also contain valuable calcium and B complex vitamins.

Prunes, like all dried fruits, contain absolutely no fat or added sugar.

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HEALTH MATTERS …
AUGUST 1 TO 31: NATIONAL TRADIES MONTH – TIPS HELP YOU YOUR JOB WITHOUT ANY PAIN.
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PEACH

As the Romans found the peach growing in present-day Iran, the former country of Persia, they designated it ‘persica’.

In fact, the peach is a native of China -- like the apricot. It travelled the same silk route, it is recorded that peaches were being cultivated in China as early as 2000 BC.

As a compact and highly nutritious food, dried peaches were chosen as the fruit for Neil Armstrong and his team on their expedition to the moon in 1969.

They are a very good source of dietary fibre, potassium, iron, carotene, niacin and other B complex vitamins.

PEAR

The wild pear originally grew in large forests in Europe and Northern Asia.

There’s historical evidence of hybridisation of several Pyrus species and this may have contributed to the development of the cultivated Pyrus communis.

There is little evidence of use by early man, but the pear’s natural flavour and beauty were recognised in Roman times when they were eaten and painted frequently.

Dried pears are excellent source of dietary fibre and potassium; they contain small quantities of iron, calcium, carotene and B complex vitamins.

SOURCE: Australian Studies Magazine.

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IN THE NEWS – 90 YEARS AGO …
DURING THE PAST FEW YEARS, GAY SEABROOK VOICED MINNIE MOUSE SINCE SHE BECAME THE HIT OF THE TOWN. BUT THE FIRST GIRL WHO DID THE VOICE WAS A STAFFER WHEN MINNIE ONLY SAID A FEW WORDS. WHEN MINNIE BECAME MORE INVOLVED, SHE NEEDED LONGER DIALOGUE, AND MORE FEELING. THAT’S WHERE GAY SEABROOK TOOK OVER. MINNIE MOUSE WAS A SUCCESS. – FM.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 16 August 19

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