Men's Shed: Are you missing a yarn with the lads? Do you want to test your skills? Or both?

THE SHED IS A FAVORITE PLACE TO BE FOR MEN WHO NEED A YARN AND TO TEST THEIR SKILLS! STORY BELOW

Some are content to use the traditional Men’s Shed to continue their hobby and learn new skills or pop in for a cuppa and a chat.

FRANK MORRIS

The bloke who came up with the idea of a ‘men’s shed’ should come and have a drink with the tens of thousands of lads throughout Australia who have also reaped some benefits.

The Men’s Shed, is in every nook and cranny of the nation. The role of the Men’s Shed is to play an important part in providing men with a unique meeting place for men to “stay connected” within the community.

“You find that a lot of men retire and they are at a loose end and that’s something that leads to depression,” says a coordinator. “A lot of wives encourage the men to join up. They say it’s a godsend.

“For others, that are alone, it’s a great way to get out of their abode and keep busy.”

It’s vital that a man’s physical and mental wellbeing is being taken care of. “As a consequence, some are looking to spend time in a constructive environment or simply share time with other men who have similar interests,” says News for Seniors.

“A major issue for many men is they don’t take an active interest in their own health and wellbeing. According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, men make fewer GP visits that women. Only 40 per cent discuss health issues with professionals and 16 per cent don’t use any medical services at all.

“Men’s Sheds often play a significant role in reducing these problems … by connecting the men with health professionals.

“Most sheds also undertake community work and so there’s an opportunity for men to be involved in something meaningful and be a positive contributor to the cause.”

Take Bill and Carol (not their real names) for instance. They move intrastate to a small country town and were living quite happily. One day, Bill, who was retired, was deep in conversation at the local pub with several guys about his own age; and then one of them mentioned a place he was reading about called “a men’s shed.”

He went on to say that “this place” is used to build food trolleys destined for local aged care facilities, dog kennels, coffee tables, cubby houses and “all that sort of thing”.

“The men would build these things for the community” said the local guy. “And men came from all over the place who were interested and would join in and take part.”

In the end, Bill was wrapped in “the shed idea” and was keenly interested in the whole concept. All the lads at the pub were “in” and the only problem was: we’re would the Men’s Shed be located.

That was a minor concern. The word is, that everything worked out according to “Hoyle”.

“The group are a mixture of age and cultural backgrounds from the late 50s to 80s.” the coordinator said.
One gentleman said, “This is the best thing I’ve done in years.”

Currently, there are about 1000 sheds of various sizes offering men a place to socialise and share skills, reported News for Seniors.

[The Australian Men’s Shed Association gets financial assistance across Australia. To find a Men’s Shed near you call the Association on 1300 550 009; or email amsa@mensshed.net ]

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TOP PHOTO: MEN LOVE THE SHED. THE SHED IS OPERATED VOLUNTARILY BY MEMBERS OF THE COMMUNITY. IT GOOD FOR MEN WHO HAVE MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES OR LIVING UNDER STRESS TO SHARE A YARN OR TWO WITH THEIR COBBERS AT THE SHED.

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FRANK MORRIS IS ON HOLIDAYS. THE MAIN STORIES HERE ARE REPEATS. THEY’RE FROM A BACK-LOG OF ARTICLES WE HAVE PUBLISHED SINCE GRAND YEARS WAS BORN 8 YEARS AGO. IT COULD BE THE FIRST TIME YOU’LL READ THEM.

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STRIPES CAN BE A HEADACHE! WE MUST ALWAYS ASK THE QUESTION – WHY?

FRANK MORRIS

When you look at these stripes, similar to those on the tread of an escalator, you may have illusions of colour, shape and, in fact, a slight motion sickness. Do not look at the pattern for too long: it might make you feel dizzy or bring on a headache.

According to a theory put forward by a senior doctor at the Medical Research Council’s Applied Psychology Unit in the UK, people who see many illusions tend to have frequent headaches; and, on days when they have one, they see more illusions.

If the headache is only one side of the head, the illusions tend to be asymmetric.

Such stripes are similar to those that induce seizures in people suffering from epilepsy who are sensitive to flickering light. Certain forms of visual stimulation trigger large number of cells in the visual cortex of the brain in a time-related pattern that may bring about a spreading excitation.

Stress may arise through watching television, the doctor says. “There may be a link between the illusions and control of eye movements.”

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TIT-BITS: TV Trivia of the 1950s and 1960s. How clever are you? Name Beaver Cleaver’s brother and tell who played him … What was Barney’s specialty on Mission Impossible? … What was the main character’s name on Wanted – Dead or Alive and who played him? … What was Zorro’s real name? 

Answers: Wally/Tony Dow, Electronics, Josh Randall/Steve McQueen, Don Diego de la Vega

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 25 September 15

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