REMEMBER WHEN: Aged Care -- Using nostalgia for good means a lot

NOSTALGIA, JUST LIKE SONGS OF LONG AGO, ARE HELPING TO REJIG THE PAST AND GIVE IT A SENSE OF MEANING.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

MEANS TO AN END: NOSTALGIA HAS BEEN FOUND TO CONNECT WITH THE PAST. Below: GET INVOLVED WITH A TASK THAT MAKES YOU HAPPY. YOU WILL LOOK BACK ON IT WITH RICH MEMORIES LATER.

The word is ‘nostalgia’. People know what it is. They know what a disturbance it can cause the mind. Nearly everybody’s got a touch of it.

To explain ‘anticipatory nostalgia’ means later you will be able to look on it with rich memories.

The writer of this interesting article has many fine things to say about this flashback. He points out that nostalgia therapy has done a lot of “good” for aged care.

According to the writer, “nostalgia has been found to connect us to our past. It helps give each of our lives a sense of meaning.”

HANG OUT

Here what the writer says about …
On academics:

“There are things which academics have discovered when studying the concept of nostalgia and its effect on our emotional responses to different forms of memory-triggering stimuli. The feelings that nostalgia creates will also be familiar to you.

“They can be as unique to us personally as people we used to know and places we would hang out; or as universal as the songs and other popular culture … that we lived through.”

On songs:

“In fact, music is one of the powerful memory triggers that we know of. Musical nostalgia is also the reason some radio stations exist.”

“Deliberately thinking of a happy memory, or listening to some songs from your past, is something you can consciously do to give yourself an occasional pick-me-up.

COME TO TERM

On the symptoms.

“Nostalgia has also been found to have a different level of effect on different people. Also, for some – especially through middle age – it can make them more acutely aware of their real age if they haven’t already come to terms with that thought.

“You also need to avoid wallowing in nostalgia … is has a measurable effect on the reward centre of your brain. There is a reward in cutting back when overused.”

On politicians.

That politicians can trigger certain memories to provoke social and cultural anxieties, and thereby use it a tool of persuasion to get your vote. Therefore, be smart enough to realise they are rarely appealing to the intelligence of the public.

They are instead appealing only to your emotional responses. And you shouldn’t let them con you that way.

<< Background for the article can be found in Fairfax Community Newspapers.


MUSICAL: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – It’s inside Roald Dahl’s magical world!

CHARLIE BUCKET IS NOW IN HIS ELEMENT. WHEN HE STEPS INTO THIS CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY THE SONGS AND THE MAGIC ARE STILL THE SAME. THOSE WHO SEE CHARLIE IN ACTION, WILL DELIGHT. LET’S TAKE A PEEK.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Like children everywhere, Charlie Bucket adores chocolate but, sadly, his family is so poor that they can only afford to buy him one bar a year; on his birthday. What make poor Charlie’s longing even worse? He has to walk near the best chocolate factory in the world -- the secretive Willy Wonka’s, every day.

When Charlie’s father loses his job, things go from bad and worse.

One day, Willy Wonka announces that he has hidden golden tickets in five Wonka Bars, with the prize of a tour of the factory for the five lucky winners. The sales of Wonka Bars rockets, Wonka-mania encircles the globe.

WILDEST DREAMS

And one by one the tickets are found: But there is still one golden ticket to find. Charlie’s desperation to be able to buy Wonka Bar and hopefully find the final golden ticket is a feeling that all children (and their parents) know.

The interior of the chocolate factory is magical. It’s themed rooms, amazing chocolates and sweets, the Oompa-Loompas and, of course, Willy Works himself. Oompa-Loompas are like some surreal Greek chorus as they regularly break into verse to comment on the children’s misbehaviour.

Roald Dahl shows a deep understanding of how children feel and think. The moral message is strong; it is beyond any child’s wildest dreams.

<< Adapted from 501 Must-read Books; 2006; Octopus Publication Limited, London.

Frank Morris comments: Don’t miss Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and step inside Roald Dahl’s magical world. Hear songs from the original film, including: Pure Imagination, The Candy Man and I’ve got a Golden Ticket. See Willy Wonka as you never experienced him before! Get ready for the Oompa-Loompas and incredible inventions. From January 8, Capitol Theatre, Campbell Street, Haymarket. Contact: ticketmaster.com.au


FRANK MORRIS’S COMING ATTRACTION

FEBRUARY: It’s our start of the year. There are many features in store for you! The brand new Blackie’s Adventures. Blackie falls into of a lair of 16th century pirates, headed by Captain Flapdoddle of the good ship The Flying Trap. The ‘good ship’ is a bit of a mystery. Next to Flapdoddle, the scariest pirate in the Kingdom, comes a lot new friends we encounter along the way.


FILM GREATS: Jedda was classified as one of the greatest Australian movies ever made!

JUDITH ADAMSON    Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

ONLY THE FEET TELL THE STORY: THE CRINKLING OF SAND AND GRAVEL UNDER HIS FEET TOLD THE OUTCOME OF THIS  LEGENDARY MYTH. THE GIRL REMAINED CALM. Below: GOOD JOB, SAYS ELSA CHAUVEL.

Jedda was Charles Chauval’s last film. After Jedda, Chauvel made thirteen episodes of an outback series called Australian Walkabout for the BBC. He died in Sydney in 1959. He was 88. There are other film-makers which operate in his territory but none can take his place.

When it was released, Jedda was the first feature to be made in colour; and it was a highly interesting film indeed.

Jedda, an Aboriginal girl, is played by Ngarla Kunoth. She is brought up as the daughter of a highly-strung, strictly conventional wife of a Northern Territory station owner. Jedda leaves her cosy place of safe existence and heads for the comfortable arms of her stockman boyfriend.

Unfortunately, Jedda never arrives. She is kidnapped by an older stranger passing through the station, Robert Tudawali. The story on one level is a simple adventure where the main characters are Aborigines.

On another level, from the moment the screen explodes in fire and shouting and galloping horses, that the girl is hurried away. It becomes ominous that the patternb is shifting.

SENSATIONAL

The circumscribed “respectable” life she was leading was indeed being presented critically; that all the magnificent settings and colour and action, and Tudawali’s stunning personality, are adding up to a film about living fully and taking the consequences.

Probably, there is none of his other films that shows quite clearly Chauvel’s sheer film-making ability; the quality which informed the bare outlines of a plot with a meaning that the audience instinctively responds to.

Jedda was released in 1955.

<< Adapted from Judith Adamson’s Australian Film Poster 1906-1960.

Frank Morris comments: Film historian, Judy Adamson, passed away on August 2. 2013. Ms Adamson was 80 years old. Ms Adamson won several distinctive awards, including the Ken G. Hall Preservation Awards in 2002. Ms Adamson was a unique, uncompromising woman whose dry humour and passionate commitment made people instantly warm to her.


Street photography: Walking or standing still you’ll probably come to a street snapper!

A FLASHBACK TO 1930-1950 – PHOTO SNAPPERS WERE ON EVERY STREET CORNER. THEY CREATED A VAST ARCHIVE OF BLACK-AND-WHITE CANDID, POSTCARD-SIZE IMAGES. THE MUSEUM OF SYDNEY PRESENTS “STREET PHOTOGRAPHY” AS AN EXHIBITION EXPLORING THE HEYDAY OF THIS ONCE POPULAR GENRE OF PHOTOGRAPHY.

FRANK MORRIS

STREET SNAPPERS: THE POPULARITY OF STREET PHOTOGRAPERS AT THEIR HEIGHT PRODUCED OVER 10,000  PEOPLE WHO BOUGHT THEIR SNAPS. 

This day, as I remember, I am perched up in bed reading a Biggles book. The door suddenly burst open and Aunty Leah rolled in. I jump to attention by surprise, not by fear.

“Right oh, Frankie! (Gee, I can’t stand that name!) Out of bed and into the shower. Nana, you and I are tripping off to city and we’ll have lunch at David Jones.”

“Can I have my photo taken by one of the blokes,” I butted in. “Of course. We’ll all have a picture taken,” said Aunty Leah. At 10.30 that day, we found a bloke who had new camera around his neck. He said OK, “pick your position.”

GLIMPSE OF A CITY

“There are you, happy!” said Aunty Leah. “I’ll pick up the picture next week.” She did just that. The pictures were beautiful to look at.” I did, just looked.

That was the third time I had a ‘picture’ taken by ‘a street photographer’; the other occasion was when I saw a show at Mark Foys department store.

There were people from all walks of life -- the Depression, WW11 and the postwar years. More the 1500 images have been contributed.

“A total of 250 images from people’s family albums form the basis of the exhibition,” said the curator. “Armed with small portable cameras and positioned in key places around the city, the photographers caught pedestrians unaware.

“They were going mid-stride, talking or deep in thought as they went about their day. The public loved it.”

The street photographers gave a fleeting moment of what it was like to spend a day in the city.

<< Museum of Sydney, cnr Phillip and Bridge Street. Open daily 10am-5pm.


SHIP AHOY: HMS ENDEAVOUR TO TAKE PART IN AN A EPIC VOYGE OF THE PACIFIC.

BITS & PIECES … EPIC VOYAGE: HM Bark Endeavour, a replica of James Cook’s ship in which he found New Holland (Australia), will circumnavigate Australia to mark 250 years since that famous voyage of the Pacific will be under way in 2020. The Bark Endeavour was started in 1988 and launched in 1993. She has been 25 years at sea. MATESHIP: A US Embassy-type letterhead, one of the many it has, is called MATESHIP, has been sent by a friend. It constitutes friendship, loyalty, solidarity -- Mateship


TIMES PAST: Darcy Dugan in hospital “morose and silent”

 

This year is 1952. Darcy Dugan was brought from Grafton Gaol to Long Bay and lodged in that gaol hospital. Dugan has made more escapes from gaol and lock-ups than any NSW prisoner.

He has been on a hunger strike since last November. He is serving a life sentence for an armed hold-up. Should officials find that his life is endangered then a doctor would have him fed forcibly?

<< Background from the SMH.

HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOU ALL. KEEP SMILING. KEEP HOPING. YOU MAY BE SURPRISED!

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 24 January 19

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