SPECIAL: The orphan girls that sailed from Ireland to Australia

ORPHAN GIRL: ONE OF THE YOUNG LADIES CHOSEN TO MAKE THE TRIP TO WESTERN AUSTRALIA MADE A CHART OF HER FEELINGS ON THIS LONG, LONG TRIP.

They travelled over-land to Dublin … and sailed to Plymouth.

SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

After the first successful deployment of the good ship Travencore, another list of passengers was drawn up and the Palestine later set sail from Plymouth on November 26, 1852.

Among the girls chosen to make that fateful journey to Australia was Mary Dooley. Mary and three other girls replaced several girls deemed medically unfit to make the long journey to Australia. The girls that set sail on the Palestine were:

Pat O’Brien, Biddy O’Brien, Mick O’Brien, Catho O’Brien, Mary O’Brien, Catho Cunningham, Mary Geraghty, Mary Flanagan, Mary Flynn, Ms Staunton, Mary Taylor, Ms Egan, Biddy Fitzgerald, Ellen Hansberry, Mary Kilroy, Biddy Tully, Mary Cunningham, Biddy Bodkin, Mary Butler, Mary Neary …

Mary Flynn, Biddy Concannon, Henry Noone, Ms Nilfagle, Cathie Hughes, Georgia Ne, Marie Lorre, Maria Egan, Celia Coldman, Catho Glynn, Mary Cathe, Mary Mannion, Mary Dooley, Esther Tully, Ms Carberry, Mary Carberry, Eliza Trasta, Catho Coleman, and Ms Atkins.

DESCENDANTS OF RELATIVES

They travelled over-land to Dublin and from there sailed to Plymouth, England, prior to their departure for Australia.

The orphan girls arrived in Western Australia on April 28, 1853, after five long and probably terrifying months at sea.

The aim of the project is two-fold: Firstly, to trace the Orphan Girls’ present day descendants, if any, in Australia. Secondly, to research any possible descendants of relatives in Country Galway. Our aim, therefore, is to collate all the descendants and to reconnect them with their ancestors here in the community.

Anyone wishing to contact the coordinators of this project or make comment can do so through Facebook at: -https://www.facebook.com/Mountbellew-Workhouse-Cemetery-Restoration-814745548596059/


YOU BEAUT!: PERCEPTION OF HEALTHIER FOOD BEING SERVED IN SANDWICH SHOPS IS GOOD FOR BUSINESS. BUT FISH ‘N CHIP ARE DEFINETELY NOT OUT.

BITS & PIECES: FISH AND CHIP SHOPS ADRIFT FROM HEALTHIER MARKETS

Fish and chips are OUT and good wholesome sandwiches are IN!

The perception of rising health has encouraged healthier eating habits that are negatively affecting fast food operators that have struggled to project a healthy image to consumers. In this case, fish and chip shops are the ones to watch out for.

In Australia, consumer awareness has led to healthier eating habits over the past 5 years. The growing popularity of healthy food has influenced the performance and product make-up of the fast food industry.

FISH & CHIP SHOPS DRIFTING

The more traditional types of fast food – burgers, pizza and fish and chips – have declined as a share of industry revenue; while sandwiches, salads and juices are conducive to good food and have increased their share of the revenue.

The lesson to come out of this: Overall, fast food industries who offer good wholesome sandwiches are promoting the rising statistics of good health.

<< Information from IBIS/WORLD. Rewritten by Frank Morris.

Illustration: No go. Tasty fish and chips is one meal which is not conducive to healthy food.


VALE: AUSTRALIAN ACTOR JUDITH MCGRATH DIES AGED 70

Actor Judith McGrath won the plaudits of the public at large for her role as “Po Face” in the television drama Prisoner. McGrath, born in Brisbane, appeared in 253 episodes, between 1979 and 1984, of the show. Her part as the prison officer Collen Powell was voted as one of the “most loved” in the drama. She earned the nickname of “Po Face” because of her dry wit. McGrath also appeared in Neighbours, A Country Practice, Winner and Losers and All Saints.  – FM. SMALL SCREEN SUCCESS – FEATURING JUDITH MCGRATH – LAST ITEM.


WHAT A LAUGH: WAIT AND SEE WHAT HAPPENS?

BITS & PIECES: CHIMPS MAY BE STRUCK DOWN WITH ALZHEIMER’S, TOO!

Holy Tarzan! And now, it’s the chimps.

The human being may not be alone in its struggle against Alzheimer’s disease, according to the Metro, London.

“For the first time,” the paper said, “the sticky plaques that characterise the condition have been found in the brains of older chimpanzees.”

MORE ADVANCED AGE

It added: “A team at Northeast Ohio Medical University studied 20 brains from chimps ages from 37 to 62. They discovered beta-amyloid plaques in 12, and increasingly larger volumes in the brains of those of a more advanced age.

“However, it is unclear if they cause dementia in the animals.” said the Metro.

<< Metro, London, August 2017.

Illustration: Chimps have Alzheimer’s Disease. It is NOT clear what caused it.


BITS & PIECES: GET ME WEIS ICE CREAM, SAYS UNILEVER?

They did. And Unilever loved the taste for Weis.

“Global food giant Unilever has snapped up the Australian ice cream company Weis, “said the SMH. The Dutch-British consumer goods company said it had entered into a definitive agreement to acquire the Queensland company.

Already, Unilever own the Streets ice cream company and more than 400 other consumer brands from around the around the world like Lipton, Bushells and Dove.

<< From SMH, 2017.


MANAGED TO HANG ON: WESTCOURT WENT STRIDE FOR STRIDE WITH LINGLE AND IT PAID OFF.

MELBOURNE CUP: 1917 AND FOR WESTCOURT THE TIDE TURNS

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

There has never been a dead-heat for first or second in the Melbourne Cup. On one occasion, in 1933, there has been a tie for third; but the judge must have been sorely tempted to call it even when Westcourt and Lingle went across the line almost on terms in the 1917 Cup.

Both W.H McLachlan on Westcourt and P. Brown on Lingle thought they had won. As far as the crowd was concerned a decision for a dead-heat would have been acceptable. But the judge, the only man in the right place to see, said that Westcourt had won by a short half-head.

It would have been bad luck for Westcourt if the verdict in the 1917 Cup had gone against the horse. Two years previously, Westcourt had lost the Melbourne Cup to Patrobas by a mere half-neck as a three-year old.

That year, Westcourt had an exasperating run of minor placings in important races. He did not win a race as a three-year-old, but his placings were high on the list.

ELEVENTH HOUR

Westcourt suffered an injury to his near foreleg and a veterinary surgeon declared the horse would never race again. With patient care, the effect of the injury was minimised but the possibility of a complete breakdown was never far from the thoughts of his connections.

Set for the Australian Cup in the autumn of 1917, Westcourt was forced to withdraw from work. His Melbourne Cup trial was the Melbourne Stakes on Derby Day but he ran third to Cetigne. It was only then, did Westcourt reach his eleventh hour.

From 10th position in the Cup field, Westcourt was able to improve his position to the point of taking the lead after turning for home. Westcourt, under heavy punishment from McLachlan, went stride for stride with Lingle, hanging on for a game win. Wallace Isinglass was two lengths further back, third.

It was McLachlan’s third winning ride in the Melbourne Cup.

<< The Melbourne Cup from 1861, Maurice Cavanough; 1960; Lloyd O’Neil Pty Ltd, Melbourne, Victoria.

Illustration: Who was responsible, says The Strike newspaper. Because of the sudden-death Great Railway Strike in NSW, who was to blame? How many people would have been game enough to take the train to Melbourne?                                                                                                         


THE WHISPER: ELSPETH BALLANTYNE (LEFT) AND JUDY MCGRATH IN A SCENE FROM THE HIT DRAMA PRISONER.

SMALL SCREEN SUCCESS: PRISIONER ALMOST TURNED THE WHOLE TV WORLD CRAZY

FRANK MORRIS

Australian drama Prisoner was the only show to take wayward women down the path to a correctional facility called Wentworth Detention Centre. For the time it was made, just about everybody got a good going over -- some of it quite bizarre.

The series was produced by Reg Grundy Organisation and aired through Network Ten from February 27, 1979 to December 11, 1986, a total of 692 episodes.

It was released in the United States and United Kingdom but with copyright injunction, it was retitled Prisoner – Cell Block H. The series was released in Sweden, and various other countries, with a cult following.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 27 October 17

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