THE BOLD, THE BEARDED: Barber certainly notices a change in men’s facial hair

NOW, YOU STEPPED OFF A COBB AND CO COACH YOU COULD BE SURPRISED. JUST LOOK AT THE MEN SPORTING BUSHRANGER BEARDS.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

HMMMM: HOW DO I LOOK? Below: BUSHRANGER BEARD! EVEN NED KELLY WORE ONE.

Unless you have been living under a rock for the past few years, you’ll have noticed that beards are back all across Australia. One of the good-points of men sporting bushranger beards is looking like they’ve stepped of a Cobb and Co coach.

A barber said he’d “certainly noticed a change in men’s attitude to facial hair.” He said, “Thirty years ago, men grew beards and they didn’t bother looking after them.”

These days, based on research he’s done on his own customers he estimates that about 40 per cent of men are using more care products than they were three years ago. For blokes keen to grow their own Ned Kelly beard the barber recommends that they treat it as they would hair on their head.

That means washing it regularly with a good sulphate-free shampoo and condition it afterwards with a spray-on conditioner which will make it easier to comb out.

CHRISTMAS TRIM

“When a bloke’s had a beard for a long time, he gets really dry skin underneath,” the barber said. To prevent skin from drying out, he suggests, using beard oil as well. For the gents out there who prefer a closer cut, an oil-free moisturiser should do the trick.

Close-cropped beards should really be attended to and trimmed weekly, depending on how short you want it. This can done at home or by a professional. But, as the barber says, “beard trims aren’t that dear to get done. So I reckon they should treat themselves, really.”

Longer beards also require regular attention. A manicured look that’s in fashion means it’s about shape and style, not just bushiness. The barber suggests having this done … in conjunction with haircuts. It’s also important that the hair on your head suits the hair on your face.


FOODFOLICO: Christmas Drinks! Get some sparkle in the Henkell Trocken

FRANK MORRIS

SOMETHING ABOUT IT: HENKLELL TROCKEN! IT’S NAME HAS A SPECIAL RING TO IT. Below: DOUGLAS LAMB, WINE WRITER EXTRODINAIRE.

I was having a few drinks with a couple my colleagues. As I poured the sparkling Henkell into their champagne glasses one fellow looked up and said: “How long have you known this bubbly?” I think it was over thirty years ago, I reply.

Before then, I asked a wine expert on the magazine. He said “it was 1980.” When I departed, the chap was still talking about sparkling Henkell.

The wine writer was Douglas Lamb, who penned the Lamb and Wine column. And here is a piece of what he wrote back in 1980 -- “It’s a world of sparkle at Henkell”:

Henkell Trocken has a pleasant sounding ring to it, don’t you think?

ITS OWN WISDOM

Actually, it is the name of the largest sparkling wine company in the world. It produces more than 69 million bottles o year for the international market. Henkell Trocken use the Charmat method, which was perfected in the last twenty years in Germany, in making its sparkling wine.

And by law, the wine must remain on the lees in large tanks for six months. In its own wisdom, the company has extended this period to 15 months. The Henkell Trocken Sekt … is a typical example of a very well made wine which, by anybody’s standard, could only be described as excellent.

Frank Morris comments: Henkell Trocken can be brought at most wine shops and comes in a variety of bottle sizes. Give it a go this Christmas. You be amazed at the price.


WHAT CHRISTMAS IS ALL ABOUT! In the days before I became a wine writer, I used to read the wine columns at Christmas time and marvel about the quality and quantity the wine scribes would put away. Now, I have been at this caper a long time, I can tell you that it ain’t quite like that; Christmas becomes a day off. There is no real reason why Christmas Day should become a marathon of drinking; but there is every reason to pull out some special bottles and share with friends. Since Christmas in Australia is usually hot, I’ve gone for a cold wine selection and I’ve also tried to stick within a budget. Naturally, it would be great to splash the Krug around, but at $145 a bottle, or there about, that’s hardly likely. This year, I’ll be serving chilled sherry as a pre-dinner drink; it simply delicious with turkey and cranberry sauce; and the Christmas Pud, it’s nice and rich. -- Mark Shield, Wine Guide.


THE FESTIVAL IS COMING: There’re places blooming with Jacarandas just like Grafton

FRANK MORRIS

GLORIOUS COLOUR: JACARANDA AVENUE, GRAFTON, FORMS A CANOPY OF MAUVE
IN AUSTRALIA, INCLUDING THE GRAFTON DISTRICT, NSW, OF COURSE, EVERYBODY HAS ADMIRED THE JACARANDA’S 82 YEARS AS PART OF THE GRAFTON FESTIVAL. IN FACT, JACARANDAS WERE PLANTED IN THE 1800S. HENCE, THE BRILLIANT CANOPY OF A MAUVE BACKDROP OF THE FESTIVAL CITY.

There is a long-standing tradition in many Australian towns and cities of celebrating the local harvest or a blossom-time of flowers with organised festivals.

The various festivals usually have exhibitions, street displays, processions and social and sporting events which  attract thousands of tourists from all over Australia. And, of course, the crowning of a “festival queen” is also an integral part of the festivities.

Eighty-two years ago, the first Grafton Jacaranda Festivals was held on October 30, 1935.

“Grafton has that awesome looking Clarence River bisecting the city,” wrote a colleague. “Thousands of Jacarandas and other trees lining its streets and filling its national parks.

“Scores of lovely historic homes, public buildings and numerous old pubs. The ‘capital’ of the Clarence Valley has a beauty and charm that’s worth stopping to sample.”

The event has not only become one of national renown but it is today recognised as Australia’s foremost floral festival.*

CANOPY OF MAUVE

Needless to say, the city is gearing up to celebrate this historic event in grand style. In the early 1800s, Jacarandsa were planted in the Grafton district. In the 1900s, a citizen names Volkers, in the cause of civic pride, planted an avenue of jacaranda trees which is now referred to as Jacaranda Avenue.

“As these trees grew to their full height – up to 15 metres – they embowered the avenue in the spring time with a canopy of mauve and carpeted the roadway with blossoms,” said a spokesperson for the Council.

“At festival time the jacarandas contrast with the colour and greenery of flame, white cedar, fig, pine and flowering gum trees.”

The festival was inaugurated by Mr E.H.Chataway, and it received “whole-hearted support from the community,” said the spokesperson.

Grafton, the birthplace of champion sculler, Harry Searle and sometime Prime Minister, Sir Earle Page, has become a popular tourist centre – especially at Festival time. The jacaranda, of which there are about 50 species, hails from the West Indies to Brazil.

It is described as “one the finest ornamental flowering trees” for subtropical regions. The jacaranda can be found in the gardens and streets plantations of eastern Australia, particularly around Brisbane; and also as far south as Melbourne.

“There are many beautiful examples of jacaranda in Melbourne, and they recover their beauty quickly if cut by severe frost,” said a leading flora expert.

A CHART OF NSW’S FESTIVALS AND WHERE ARE THEY FROM

Dahlia, Mittagong; Lasiendra, Wauchope; Orchid’s, Ballina; Wattle Time, Cootamundra; Tuplip, Bowral; Apple Blossom, Batlow; Spring Flowers, Katoomba/Leura; Cherry Blossom, Young; and the Rhododendron, Blackheath.

Illustration: The original jacaranda tree, in Grafton, in the early 1800s, acts as a shading device on a hot day.


FOODFOLICO: Special from 1940! Something different for Christmas

WORLD OF DIFFERENCE: 1940s RAISED PIE, A SAVOURY ALTERNATIVE. Below: SPECIALTY SHOPS ALL OVER THE WORLD COOK FAMOUS BRITISH PIES, JUST LIKE THE SAVOURY RAISED PIE! Below: HANGOVER, HANGOVER, HANGOVER! PLEASE – DRINK A LITTLE LESS.

For hot food lovers! A perfect Christmas raised pie – this should make a world of difference at YOUR family mealtime!

Here is what you do: use the same ingredients as the 1940s cook does but cook it your way. The family cook says: “This is a 1940s wartime raised pie prepared exactly the way the cook does in the 40s -- BUT cooked in my own oven.”

RAISED PIE. A savoury alternative to the more usual Raised Pie. Enough for 4 people.

INGREDIENTS. PASTE: 8 oz flour, 1 level teaspoon salt, 2 oz lard, quarter pint water.

FILLING. 8 oz sausage meat, 4 oz fat bacon, minced, 1 onion, minced, 2 level teaspoons mixed herbs, 1 level teaspoon salt, ½ level teaspoon pepper.

METHOD. Mix flour and salt. Boil lard (or equivalent) in water and add to the flour. Knead well and line a bread or cake tin with the pastry keep back a little for the lid. Mix the remaining ingredients thoroughly, place in bread tin and cover with remaining pastry. Brush over with reconstituted egg and bake in a moderate oven for 1 hour. Serve hot from tin; or turn out when cold.

<< The Daily Mirror, April 19, 1945.

PAYING THE PRICE FOR HANGOVERS

Christmas is a celebration time. Over-indulgence is costing Australia dearly, according to the latest research. Hangovers are causing 11.5 million “sick days” a year at a cost of $3 billion to the economy.

A university study found the more alcohol one consumes, the more time they are likely to take off work. They estimated that the cost of lost productivity ay $3 billion a year, up from $1.2 billion in an alcohol-related absenteeism in 2001.

Researchers looked at data from the 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey, which asked more the 12,000 people about their habits.

HANGOVER?

While most, (56 per cent) drank alcohol at low-risk levels (four or fewer drinks on one occasion), 27 per cent drank at risky levels (five to 10 in a session) and 9 per cent drank at high-risk – more than 11 drinks in one stint.

“Hands up all those who have never suffered a hangover?” said Mark Shield, wine writer. “Too much of a good thing can make for a very uncomfortable aftermath.”

NEXT: HOME CARE: Large-print novels. For people who suffer with impaired vision.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 23 November 18

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