THE GREAT WAR: The “gravest situations” yet faced in war, reported a US newspaper!

FRANK MORRIS

THE END IS NEAR!: THE LUSITANIA, THE FASTEST PASSENGER SHIP IN THE WORLD, ON ITS TRIP TO BRITAIN, LASTED ABOUT 18 MINUTES WAS ONLY 20-MILES FROM PORT WHEN A TORPEDO FROM THE U-20 HIT HER.

THE GREAT WAR. In 1915, the fastest ship in the world for passengers, the Cunard’s Lusitania, was on voyage from New York to Liverpool. A week before its sinking, the “the German Embassy in Washington advertised in the American press a general warning to travellers by ships in British waters,” notes a magazine caption in  The Great War at Sea. Toward the end of their journey, 20 miles from an unscheduled stop in Queenstown, Ireland, the U-20 submarine, commanded by Capitan Lieutenant Walther Schwieger, sent Lusitania to the bottom. Lusitania and the U-20 … NEXT WEEK.

COMING: THE TWO-UP GAME. You could get together a game of two-up in nothing flat. The only person that you need to find is a suitable ringkeeper, the spinner who tosses the coin. Hence the famous expression, “Come in, spinner.” A person could pick up a lot of money or, in the meantime, lose heaps.


COME, ON A JOURNEY OF DISCOVERY: John Oxley’s trek into history!

Commemorate the Bicentenary of Oxley’s 1818 exploration later this year.

FRANK MORRIS

DAYS OF ADVERTURE: JOHN OXLEY’S NAME HAS BEEN COMMENORATED IN MANY PLACES OF NSW. Below: WAUCHOPE IS NOT VERY FAR FROM WHERE OXLEY  DISCOVERED THE HASTINGS RIVER.

John Oxley’s Bicentenary event gets under way in September commemorating Oxley’s historic explorations throughout the Hastings area in 1818 when he discovered the Hastings River which runs through Port Macquarie, NSW.

The great explorer, it is believed, either named the river after the borough in East Sussex, England, from which his wife came; or as a tribute to Warren Hastings, former governor general of India, who died in 1818.

Oxley’s name has been commemorated in many places throughout NSW.

ANY DESCENDANTS

Only a stone’s throw from Port Macquarie is Wauchope, which has the authentic recreation of an entire logging town of the l880s; it is situated
near the Hastings River which was discovered by explorer Oxley in 1818.

Wauchope District Historical Society is searching for any descendants of the men assigned to go with Oxley on his journey of discovery. Only two are reported as marrying and having children: George Simpson married Ann Hayden, Richard Watts married Eleanor Tomlinson.

Contact Jean May at jeanmay@avtiv8.net.au

NEXT: Explorer John Oxley finding new settlements. Coming on June 1.


SALVOS: “When life is absolutely awful, where do you turn. …”?

“MY LIFE WENT INTO A MASSIVE SPIN, I COULDN’T GET OVER IT.”

Selected by FRANK MORRIS

PERSON PLIGHT: ANGELA, MOTHER OF FIVE, SAID EVERYTHING WENT OUT OF CONTROL. WE FOUND OURSELVES HOMELESS. Below: THE FIRST THING I DID I WENT STRAIGHT TO THE SALVOS. THEY HAVE BEEN A GOD-SEND.

When disaster after disaster hit Angela, mother of five, it wasn’t long before long before she and her children were homeless.

“I nursed my ex-husband in hospital and was with him when he died. Then, only a few months later, my son Tom survived a deadly shark attack,” said Angela.

One disaster rapidly lead to another.

“I was burnt out working so many jobs to support my family. I got really sick with a chronic disease called M.E and needed six specialists. I lost my main job.

She said everything “spiralled down and we found ourselves homeless.” Said Angela: “For six months I put my kids with friends, slept under a friend’s house and shared a bunk with my son. My life went into a massive spin and I couldn’t get over the next awful thing that happened after the last one.”

Angela couldn’t believe the ill-fortune which had raised its head. The Salvos came to her rescue.

WAS OUT OF CONTROL

“The Salvos came into my life when everything went out of control. The Salvos helped with food and meals, housing and the bills. They offered counselling, help to get to hospital, and a medic alert bracelet,” she said.

But Angela’s heartache wasn’t over yet. After years of strenuous hardships to get on her feet again, last year’s floods inundated into Angela’s town and she lost everything.

She was babysitting her three grandchildren all under 3 years, when danger struck.

“By the time the police rescue boat pulled up we were standing in deep water,” said Angela. “It was still rising. I went straight to the Salvos, I couldn’t speak.

“We were dripping wet, freezing cold and shaking. They just wrapped us all up like big angels’ wings. They cocooned me and held me and let me cry it out. We were all exhausted and I knew we’d lost absolutely everything.

“Just as well the Salvos are always there,” concluded Angela said. “Whatever I needed would just appear; they have been a God-send.”

<< Please help the Salvos right now.  Your donation could put an end to homelessness, for one person at a time. Phone 13 72 58 or salvos.org.au/spiral


PRINCES OF THE FOURTH ESTATE: Final! Reporters found the pen mightier than the sword!

SPECTACULAR OR A SEEDY FAILURE? WHO WAS THE GRAND SUCCESS – MARK TWAIN OR DAN De QUILLE?

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

GUN WAS LAW – ALMOST: C.C. (JOE) GOODWIN, WHO TOOK OVER THE ENTERPRISE IN 1861, SAID DE QUILLE WAS AS GOOD A REPORTER AS MARK TWAIN. Below: ROLLIN M. DAGGETT WAS ASSOCIATED EDITOR AND CELEBRATED WRITER. Below: ALF DOTEN, ONE-TIME EDITOR OF THE ENTERPRISE, DAN DeQUILLE’S CAREER JUST EVAPORATED.

An entry from Alf Doten’s journal would read: “On board the passenger train this afternoon I found Dan De Quille – William Wright – with wife and daughter Lou. I had a talk with De Quille during the ten minutes stop. He was going to West Liberty, Iowa, their old home.

He never expects to come back because he is terribly broken down with rheumatism. He cannot live long anyway. Doten, in his journal said, “(He is) racked with it from shoulder to knees, back humped up double and is merely animated skin and bone, almost helpless.

“Can only walk about the house a little, grasping his cane with both hands. Has not been able to walk down from his residence … and back for nearly … or quite two years. He looks 90 years-old, yet was 68 on May 9 last – two months and 10 days older than I am.

“Promised to write to me when he gets home. Poor old dear boy, Dan, my most genial companion in our early Comstock reportorial days. Goodbye and I think forever personally on this earth …”

TWAIN THE FOUR-FLUSHER

Dan De Quille died on March 16, 1898.

Comparisons with his old partner, Mark Twain, are irresistible. They called Twain spectacular in the grand success compared with quiet De Quille the seedy failure.

But that was not the way they were remembered in Virginia City. Joe Farnsworth, the former State Printer, gave his youth to the Enterprise back shop in the 1890s. He learned about Twain from the old timers who had known him in the early days.

“From them I gathered the impression that Clemens (Twain) was regarded as the prime s.o.b of Virginia City while he was here.” Farnsworth heard Twain damned as a foul-minded, dirty-talking four flusher.

“One old fellow used a phrase I remember: ‘Mark Twain had no ear-muffs on when somebody else was buying. He could hear a live one order a round three doors from where he was standing. But he was deaf as a post when it was his turn to shout.’

LOVED AND RESPECTED

“I never heard admiration expressed for him personally by men who know him personally,” Farnsworth said. “Everybody on the staff hated Mark Twain and everybody really loved Dan De Quille. I think he was the most wonderful old man I ever knew.

“He couldn’t say three words to you before you were friends for life and wanted to put your arms around him. The time I speak of, he was poor as a church mouse. I don’t know what he did with his money. But in his old age I know he didn’t drink at all then.

“He was the grand old man of Virginia City and everybody in Nevada knew him by sight. I never knew a man more loved and respected.”

Judge C.C Goodwin wrote the obituary of Dan that took more than a column on the front page of the Enterprise. In it he coined the phrase that ought to be carved on Dan’s tombstone: “He was the most efficient and valuable man that even wore out his life in a newspaper office.”

<< Adapted from the Modern Monthly, 19??


FOODFROLICO: 1940s. We’re back again! This week … cabbage

THIS NO-WASTE-IN-THE-KITCHEN BECOMES SERIOUS EVERY DAY. COME ON NOW, HOW ABOUT COOKING THE MEALS AND GET A TRUE IDEA OF HOW THEY TASTED IN THE LAST CENTURY!

OUTER LEAVES OF GABBAGE

Wash the leaves under running water. Parboil them in the saucepan with boiling saltwater, about 1/2in high. Remove the leaves, spread on a board or a clean table. Thicken the juice in which they were cooked with flour and spice with any extract cube; or gravy powder. Taste for salt and pepper.

Heap on to each leaf a small portion of one of the stuffings below, and roll into a parcel.

Pack these cabbage parcels tightly into a saucepan with the gravy, and stew on the lowest flame until done. (The gravy improves considerably if you add a little sour milk to it.)

STUFFING FOR CABBAGE

FOR two cups of minced-meat, heat one cup of water in a saucepan. When it boils add the meat, stir immediately, and cook gently while stirring for about three minutes.

ADD enough breadcrumbs to thicken this meat stew. (Breadcrumbs thicken in liquid after a short time.) Taste for salt and pepper.

AN economical stuffing with sausage mince-meat can be obtained by mixing the meat with lentil puree. – Selected by FRANK MORRIS.

NEXT: HOW TO ADD THE “HEARTY” TASTE OF STALE BREAD WHEN YOU COOK ANY TYPE OF STEW -- IN THE TRUE 1940s STYLE.


THIS IDEA FROM THE 1940s WILL ADD RELISH TO YOUR MEAL: Serve mixed pickles with mince and hamburger steak, and pickled red cabbage or beetroot with lamb stew and pork dishes.

 

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 25 May 18

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