THE GREAT WAR: Winston Churchill was a man of his time!

ON THE RISE: IN 1910, CHURCHILL, THE HOME SECRETARY, ACCOMPANIED THE CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEQUER, LLOYD GEORGE, TO THE HOUSE OF COMMONS. Below: IN 1912, CHURCHILL WATCHED MANOEUVRES AT ALDERSHOT WITH GENERAL SIR JOHN FRENCH WHO COMMANDED THE FIRST BEF TWO YEARS LATER. Below: CHURCHILL WITH POLICE AND TROOPS AT THE FAMOUS ‘SIEGE OF SIDNEY STREET’ IN 1911. PHOTOS: FROM THE NEWSPAPER.

Churchill demanded mobilisation of the British naval fleet (but in the end) he mobilised it on his own responsibility.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

The growth of German sea power threatened the security of France and Britain. Asquith, in 1911, felt it was time for a drive to strengthen British naval preparedness. He moved Churchill to the Admiralty.

In the days of crisis before August 4, 1914, Churchill demanded mobilisation of the Fleet, but the Cabinet refused to allow it. He mobilised it on his own responsibility; when war came all ships were at their appointed stations.

The Navy did not bring off a decisive victory over the main German fleet. Some German ships slipped out of the harbour, shelled two British coastal towns, and got away unscathed. In early 1915, Churchill was losing public support; and then came the tragedy of the Dardanelles.

DETESTED CHURCHILL

Churchill originated the scheme for a land-and-sea assault towards Constantinople. The aim was to effect a junction of the Western Allies with Russia through the Straits, and at the same time cut Turkey off from Germany.

The War Council approved this daring plan. Its execution, however, was a disastrous bungle. In May Admiral “Jacky” Fisher resigned and the Conservatives, who detested Churchill as a renegade, were waiting for a chance to “get” him.

When the first Coalition Government was formed, they insisted that he be shifted.

Asquith made him Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. After a few bored months he resigned and rejoined the Army. In France, as Colonel Churchill, he was given command of the 6th Royal Scots Fusiliers. But in May, 1916, his battalion was amalgamated with another; he was left without a command. He went back to England and took part again in the debates of the Commons.

A CONSTITUTIONALIST

Churchill’s reputation went up in February, 1917. When the Dardanelles Commission published its report the document severely criticised the handling of the affair by Asquith and Kitchener, but found nothing to condemn in Churchill’s conduct, or the plan he had conceived.

Five month after the report Lloyd George, who was the new Prime Minister, made him Minister of Munitions.

After the Armistice, Lloyd George shifted him to the War Office. There he had to tackle the big problem of demobilisation. Three million men were demobilised smoothly in six months.

After the Conservatives won the election in 1922, and Churchill lost his seat, he got back into the House of Commons in 1924 as a Constitutionalist – and independent Conservative. To the astonishment of many, Stanley Baldwin, the Conservative Prime Minister made Churchill the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

<< Winston Churchill Dies, The Sydney Morning Herald, January 25, 1965.


NEXT WEEK: Mitzi’s back with a riveting conclusion to her ‘holiday fun’… Annette Kellerman, long-distance swimmer and movie star … World War 1: Famous War Memorials … Retirement - Taking over a country pub. COMING: Smoking and the health risk.


THE GREAT WAR: Churchill’s words that stirred Britain and the rest of the world!

EXCELLENT: CHURCHILL LOVED THE ENGLISH LAUGUAGE. Below: DASHING YOUNG WINSTON CHURCHILL IN 1899 TAKEN DURING HIS SERVICE IN THE BOER WAR. PHOTO: FROM THE NEWSPAPER.

FRANK MORRIS

Words have a real meaning in a craftsperson’s mind. In the mind of Winston Churchill, “the English language was such that his writing and speeches … were never dull; and he detested dullness in others,” the newspaper said.

He schooled himself in Gibbon and Macaulay when he was a young man. “His power as a writer and speaker matured over the years … But in his greatest speeches during World War II, he combined tremendous strength and force with a piercing simplicity of phrase.”

For any craftsperson with Churchill’s love of the English language they will find full expression in the use of words.

“I don’t know if all the ‘grabs’ are authentic but they have been attributed to Churchill and they certainly hit the mark,” writes a friend of a friend of mine.

Enjoy.

Winston Churchill …

When you’re 20 you care what everyone thinks, when you’re 40 you stop caring what everyone thinks, when you’re 60 you realise no one was thinking about you in the first place. You have some enemies? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.

Diplomacy is the art of telling people to go to hell in such a way that they ask for directions.

Everyone is in favour of free speech. Hardly a day passes without its being extolled, but some people’s idea of it is that they are free to say what they like; but if anyone else says anything back, that is an outrage.

You will never reach your destination if your stop and throw stones at every dog that barks.

FINEST HOUR

Fear is a reaction. Courage is a decision.

To each there comes in their lifetime a special moment when they are figuratively tapped on the shoulder and offered the chance to do a very special thing, unique to them and fitted to their talents. What a tragedy if that moment finds them unprepared and unqualified for that which could have been their finest hour.

A nation that forgets its past had no future.

The POSITIVE THINKER sees the INVISIBLE, feels the INTANGIBLE and achieves the IMPOSSIBLE.

A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth had a chance to get its pants on.

There is nothing government can give you that it hasn’t taken from you in the first place.

A good speech should be like a woman’s skirt: long enough to cover the subject and short enough to create interest.

<< AZ Quotes, England.


THE GREAT WAR: Diggers tale of epic gallantry is a highlight of the film

DETERMINED: THE 800 STRONG BRIGADE OF THE LIGHTHORSEMEN CAME AT THE TURKS LIKE AN EXPRESS TRAIN. Below: HORSE AND MASTER – THE HORSE DRINKING WATER FROM HIS MASTER’S HAT.

The film deals with the last cavalry charge in history.

FRANK MORRIS

The multi-million dollar Australian film The Lighthorsemen is a story of courage and comradeship during the First World War.  The film was released in 1987.

Described as “an epic film in the classic tradition,” The Lighthorsemen focuses on a little known incident involving a band of ordinary Australians who rode against overwhelming odds in the charge at Beersheba and became heroes.

The Lighthorsemen achieved the impossible and their action became one of the great military triumphs of modern warfare.

“Australian and British military history often celebrates failures,” says co-producer and director Simon Wincer. “The Lighthorsemen celebrates a magnificent victory.

In essence, the film deals with the last great cavalry charge in history.

TURKISH DEFENCES STORM

The time is 1917 and the British campaign in Palestine is stalemated. Beersheba, an ancient water-rich stronghold of the Turkish desert flank, becomes the lynch-pin of the British strike at Jerusalem

In an all-or-nothing move 800 Australian Lighthorsemen obey the seemingly impossible order to gallop their horses across two miles of open desert against Turkish troops who are formidably supported by machine guns, artillery and aircraft.

The storming of the Turkish defences to win the precious water wells of Beersheba changed the history of the Middle East.

“Lighthorsemen is rich in colour and spectacle,” says the film’s writer, Ian Jones. “For young audiences, the film’s teenage hero is a potent link to the remarkable events of a known war.

“For an older generation, the film brings to life the Light Horse legend.”

<< The Lighthorsemen is available on video.

 


THE GREAT WAR: Diggers epic bring life to the legend!

THE TRUE STUFF: THE WORD ‘EPIC’ IS A MUCH ABUSED EXPRESSION, BUT FOR THE FILM, THE LIGHTHORSEMEN, IT WAS SPOT ON. Below: IAN JONES SAID: “YOUNGS CHAPS ON BOTH SIDES TASTED THE DRAMA THAT ONE HAD TO GO THROUGH.”

IAN JONES and selected by FRANK MORRIS

“Epic” is a much-abused word in the vocabulary of film.

But, to me, this is a true epic – and one that has great rightness about it for an Australian audience.

Its heroes are ordinary men who are called on to achieve the impossible, against overwhelming odds.

And they win. After ten years of research on the charge at Beersheba, during which I formed friendships with several men who rode in the remarkable action, I was tempted to tell their story on film.

TEENAGE HERO

But I couldn’t let personal and emotional ties outweigh the cold realities of such an ambitious production. I had to believe that the film’s potential audience would justify the large budget needed to realise this huge story: and I do.

For the young audience, the film’s teenage hero is a potent link to the remarkable events of an unknown war. To the audience at large, it offers a unique and uncontrived combination of war film and western, with a powerful emotional core operating on both personal and national levels.

For an older generation, the film brings to life the Lighthorse Legend.

For a world audience ready to accept exciting horse action from Australia, we offer a totally new genre, rich in colour, texture, and spectacle.

<< Ian Jones was a film producer/writer. Jones wrote the above article for Prospectus, April 1986.


THE GREAT WAR: Here mate, There's a war going on here!

TRUE BLUE: THE “MILLION DOLLAR” MERMAID, ANNETTE KELLERMAN, WHOSE WATER FEATS WON WORLD WIDE PRESS COVERAGE. KELLERMAN DID WEAR A ONE PIECE COSTUME. Below: UP CLOSE, THE LEG SECTION OF A FORM-REVEALING ONE PIECE, COTTON SWIMSUIT.

How people lived? MILESTONES from our history.

1905.

Horse-drawn transport was gradually being replaced by the car.

Widespread use of concrete as a building material.

The “million dollar mermaid”, Annette Kellerman, Australian distance swimmer, appeared in a one-piece bathing costume. Kellerman’s water feats made a splash world-wide. A polio-crippled child, she turned into The Perfect Woman” of America. She starred in Neptune’s Daughter and A Daughter of the Gods.

1906

“The most thrilling and interesting Living Pictures Ever Taken – that’s how The Story of the Kelly Gang was introduced to its enthusiastic audience. It later emerged as perhaps the world’s first full-length film. The Kelly gang was made in 1906; and screened in Melbourne on December 26, 1906.

The first surf lifesaving club in the world was established at Bondi, NSW. The Surf, which was also started by the club, is credited as the world’s first surfing magazine. It began in December, and lasted until April, 1918.

1907

The opening of the Canning stock route, the longest in Australia, from the Kimberleys to Perth. The telephone linked Sydney and Melbourne. The Harvester Judgement initiated the “Basic Wage” – 7 shillings a day.                                                                                                                                                             

Norman Brookes became the first Australian to win the men’s singles at Wimbledon. Brookes and his partner Anthony Wilding won the 1907 Davis Cup for Australia.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 23 February 18

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