TRUE STORY: FINAL! “WE WERE IN LOVE”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHAT’S HAPPENED?: SHE WAS GOING TO RING SEVERAL TIMES. SHE GAVE TRYING TO REMEMBER.

But the same awful silence continued.

SELECTED BY FRANK MORRIS

She said she loved me. I wanted it all to go on forever. And yet all the time there gnawed at my mind something which seemed to warn me that it would end.

I never knew much about Nancy. She worked as a receptionist in a West End Hotel and that her folks were dead. Sometimes I used to think that she might have been hurt by some man, for there was always in her eyes a sort of haunting sorrow.

But she never spoke to me about that ever again. After the first few days she grew palpably fond of me. Then came the time when she said she loved me. That is an experience which millions of other people have had, but to me it seemed unique.

Then came that day when I said: “I’ll see you tomorrow at six outside Romanos”.

But the didn’t turn up. I waited for a hour and a half. I was frantic with worry. The worst part of it all was that I didn’t know where to find her.

WHAT HAPPENED?

My only hope was that she would write to me. I waited a day, a week, a month, a year – but not a line. Meanwhile, I put advertisements in the agony columns, asking her to write. 

But the same awful silence continued.

What happened? Did she have an accident? Did she really love another man? Or was she afraid to share her life with me?

I don’t know. I don’t suppose I shall ever know.

For a brief, crazy moment, while I watched that girl in the Strand, I thought that she might be Nancy’s daughter.

I wanted to go up and speak to her, but something inside held me back. A moment later she had vanished like a dream.

Since that day I have cursed myself for not talking to that girl, for I have a hunch that maybe she was Nancy’s daughter.

Picture: I remarked to Nancy: “Remember, I’ll meet you at Romano.”
<< The Daily Mirror, Britain, August 30, 1940.
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ONE DOWN, ONE TO GO: JOHNNY GILBERT BRACES HIMSELF FOR HIS LAST GUNFIGHT. GILBERT WAS SHOT DEAD BY POLICE AT A PLACE CALLED BINGALONG, NSW, IN 1865.

BUSHRANGERS: PART 4. DEATH OF JOHNNY GILBERT!

The Waverley Hotel, Sydney, said a habitual drinker, was a “bush shanty” and a dangerous abode. Bushranging author, Roy Mendham, comes out with a real secret!

FRANK MORRIS

January 14, 1854, It was Saturday night, the hotel was the site of a murder when publican John Davis was found hacked to death. A newspaper of the time described the crime and said that “it was a bloody mess.”

The newspaper said, “On the left of the head was a terrible gash extending from eye to the ear, the bed and bedding being saturated with blood. Under the bed was found a blood-stained axe which had done the deed.”

What made locals even more fearful was the isolation of Bondi Junction and that the murderer was known to be “on the loose and in their midst.”

The newspaper went on to explain the scene: “This event has struck no small degree of dismay into the residents of the neighbourhood … there being no police protection, the nearest point they could send for a constable being [at] Paddington, a distance of nearly three miles.”

Enter Joseph Roberts.

A veil of suspicion immediately fell upon Joseph Roberts, the nephew of John Davis. Roberts, a “mild looking youth [who was] said to be 17 years of age” and worked for Davis, was now missing.

Several mounted police started a search and 228 km south of Sydney Roberts was found at Collector near Canberra. He told police that he was riding to the goldfields. Local residents said Roberts’ guilt was “purely circumstantial” and “vouched for the boy’s good character.”

NOT GUILTY

The murdered man’s widow, Mrs Davis, later gave evidence that “her unworthy spouse was a habitual drunk.” She had married Davis in September 1853 and stayed with him for three days.

At his trial Roberts showed the court how intelligent he was; he pleaded not guilty to the charge “in a firm and collected manner.” The trial stirs up intense local interest. When the case was heard on April 6, 1854, the court was crowded and the officials had difficulty in maintaining order.

Despite the fact that he fled on the night of the murder he was arrested and found to have money on him -- $200. His uncle was known to carry large sums of cash, and did so when he was killed.

The jury, alas, found him not guilty of Davis’s murder. He left the place soon afterwards and headed for the Goulburn district. However, Roberts soon fell in with a ‘bad crowd’, or ‘flash gang’, as the local landowners called it. 

Joseph Roberts was born in Canada.

He and his uncle came to Australia in the 1850s and got hooked on the world-wide publicity about the gold discoveries in Victoria. They arrived in Melbourne from New York on board the Revenue in 1852.

MENDHAM: IM RELATED

Roberts is listed on the ship as 10 years old, making him only 12 at the time of his uncle’s murder. This conflicts with contemporary newspaper reports in which they described him as being 17 years old.

In his book The Dictionary of Australian Bushrangers, Roy Mendham claims that after the murder of his uncle Joseph Roberts became ‘Johnny Gilbert’, a bushranger who later rode with the infamous Ben Hall and Frank Gardiner. He was later a key part of their gang.

In the wanted notice for Johnny Gilbert from the Colonial Secretary Office in 1863, he is described as:

“Between 22 and 24 years of age, boyish appearance, 5 feet 7 or 8 inches high, between 9 and 10 stone, light brown straight hair, worn long in native fashion, beardless and whiskerless; has the appearance and manner of a bushman or stockman; and is particulately flippant in his dress and appearance.”

Joseph Roberts/Johnny Gilbert was killed by police at Binalong, 37 km north-west of Yass, on May 13, 1865. His body was taken to Binalong police station where it was put on display. Locks of hair were taken for souvenirs.

He was buried on May 16 in bush near Binalong, where his grave can still be seen today on the outskirts of town.

Pictures: End of the road: Johnny Gilbert, born in Canada, dies as an outlaw. Alone: Johnny Gilbert … guns ready to blaze.

<< Based on the article, A Bushranger at Bondi, in 18??
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ALL THE NEWS:

PSYCHOLOGIST MADE GOING TO THE DENIST LESS PAINFUL

DR EVELYN HOWE, BORN IN 1947, WAS A DENTAL PSYCHOLOGY PIONEER AND THE FIRST WOMAN TO EARN A DENTAL PHD IN SYDNEY.

MARINE ARTIST WAS A TRUE MASTER

OSWALD BRETT, BORN IN 1921, WAS A TRUE MASTER OF PAINTING SHIPS. BRETT MADE A PROFESSIONAL LIVING OUT OF PRIVATE AND CORPORATE COMMISSIONS. HE HAD THE WONDERFUL FACILITY FOR PLACING HIS SHIPS IN HIGH SEAS … AS IF THEY WERE MOVING.
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CLOSE FINISH: BETTY CUTHBERT FINISHES THE 4X100 METRES AHEAD OF HEATHER ARMITAGE (GREAT BRITAIN) AND ISABELLE DANIELS (USA). THE AUSSIE’S SET A NEW WORLD RECORD OF 44.5.

FAMOUS CELEBRITIES: PART 2. BETTY CUTHBERT AND HOW SHE WAS DISCOVERED

She was sent into the Olympic Games as Australia’s No 1.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

The 100 yards championship of Australia was the yardstick for Betty Cuthbert.

However, she was unable to qualify for the final, being third in her heat. But two days later, just 3 weeks before her eighteen birthday, she won the 220 yards in 25 seconds. The time was irrelevant.

The grass track had been soaked by heavy tropical rain that competitors were in part ankle deep in mud; and to avoid two very bad patches, the race was run from end to end of the arena on a curve all the way. The importance of the race was that Cuthbert beat five opponents of international repute.

SHE WAS THE BEST

Marlene Mathews was second, and Norma Croker was third; fourth and fifth were two 1952 Olympic sprinters, Shirley Strickland and Winsome Cripps; sixth was Nancy Boyle, the Victorian Champion, then considered a probable Olympic representative.

This was the first time the sporting public, outside of NSW, had heard of Betty Cuthbert.

But consistently good times in Sydney during the Australian winter climaxed with a world record 200 metres of 23.2 in September. This culminating in a double victory in the Australian Olympic trials sent her into the Games as Australia’s No. 1.

<< Olympic Saga: The Track and Field story Melbourne 1956; by Keith Donald and Don Selth; Futurian Press, Sydney; 1957.

Next month: The similarity in the careers of Betty Cuthbert and Marjorie Jackson.

Picture: Like a breeze: Betty Cuthbert flashes home in the Olympic 200 metres. Then came Stubnick, second, and Mathews, third.………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

HOLMES AND MORIARTY: IS IT THE END?

SPECIAL: FINAL. SHERLOCK HOLMES AND FRIENDS – THE VARYING DEGREE OF PERSONIFYING!

He donned tweeds or the oppressively respectable Victorian frock-coat!

FRANK MORRIS

These appurtenances “are stereotypical symbols of Sherlock Holmes … all, alas, are apocryphal … part of Sherlockian lore,” writes Jack Tracy in The Encyclopedia of Sherlockiana.

“Sidney Paget, the famous illustrator of the stories for Strand magazine, was fond of wearing the deerstalker … and the Inverness cape, which is essentially a travelling cloak, to protect one from railway soot and road mud.”

This “traditional” apparel was not worn by Holmes in London. Rather, he “donned tweeds or the oppressively respectable Victorian frock-coat” asserts Tracy.

The American actor William Gillette, who originated Holmes on stage in 1899, is attributed to supplying the detective with a meerschaum pipe. When he illustrated the stories for Collier’s magazine, the American artist Frederic Dorr Steele based his representations of Holmes on Gillette’s character.

PAGET ILLUSTRATIONS OKAY!

Doyle complained that Paget had made Holmes more handsome than he intended. But the author considered Paget essential to the success of his stories, and especially asked for him as illustrator of The Hound of the Baskervilles.

Paget work from his studio, at Holland Park Road, Kensington. From the time he illustrated A Scandal in Bohemia, Paget produced a total of 357 drawings, ending with The Adventures of the Second Stain in December 1906.

Some of the earlier drawing were imperfect. But Frederic Dorr Steele defended Paget, saying that any defect in the engraving was partly because of the crudity of the reproduction. Those who have seen the originals say the illustrations lost much in the publishing.

James Montgomery, in a Study in Pictures, wrote: “It would be impossible to overestimate the influence that he (Paget) exerted on the hearts and minds of countless thousands who based their conceptions then, as they continue to do after sixty years, on his interpretation (of Holmes).”

HOLMES DIDN’T CHANGED

Montgomery found that Paget was more accurate in his illustrations than was Steele.

In 1953, the Sherlock Holmes Society of London used a portrait of the great detective as a Christmas card; however, the portrait, though first published in the Cornhill magazine in 1951, was done by Paget and found in waste-paper basket by his wife who rescued it.

Montgomery thought it possibly the most satisfactory portrait of Holmes; a wonderful character study of the Master in a contemplative mood. In Peter Haining’s The Art of Mystery and Detective, it was said the “first appearance of Holmes no doubt helped The Strand circulation.

Haining added: “Particularly the earlier ones by Sidney Paget played a significant part in the success story by giving the world a physical likeness of Holmes which has changed little to this day.”

Paget married Edith Hounsfield in 1893 and had five children; one son and four daughters.

Sidney Edward Paget died on January 29, 1908.

<< Sherlock Holmes and Friends came about when Frank G. Greenop wrote the storyline, I think it was in 1974. Frank Morris wrote the story in 2002. It was never published until it appeared in Grand Years.

Pictures: Honest man: Frederic Dorr Steele defended Sidney Paget for his engravings. Holmes hadn’t changed. Paget’s likeness of Holmes has changed little to this day.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 20 October 17

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