The Big Fight: Vic Patrick v Freddy Dawson – Australia’s greatest sporting moments!

FREDDY DAWSON DODGES THE LETHAL RIGHT HAND FROM PATRICK, SIMILAR TO THE ONE WHICH “KNOCKED ME THROUGH THE ROPES”. Below: FREDDY DAWSON – RANKS WITH THE BEST.

THIS TIME, VIC PATRICK ON HIS KNEES TAKING THE FINAL COUNT.

“PATRICK HAD ME DAZED, SAID DAWSON. “THE PUNCH THAT KNOCKED ME THROUGH THE ROPES WAS ONE OF THE HARDEST I’VE EVER TAKEN”. DAILY MIRROR, SEPT 2, 1947.

ADAPTED BY FRANK MORRIS

AUSTRALIAN LIGHTWEIGHT CHAMPION VIC PATRICK’S BOXING CAREER HAS ENDED.

This is the dramatic sequel to Patrick’s sensational knockout in the 12th round by American negro Freddy Dawson at the Sydney Stadium last night.

News of Patrick’s retirement was relayed to the Daily Mirror by Mrs Patrick from the champion’s screened bed at St Vincent’s Hospital today.

“We have decided the Vic will never fight again and he is going away for a long holiday,” Mrs Patrick said.

Patrick was admitted to hospital suffering from concussion and face lacerations after the knockout. The result of an X-ray proved that the skull had not been fractured.

Vic was too ill to be interviewed. But he later spoke to pressmen in the presence of his wife and two daughters, Vicki and Anne.

His face was badly swollen. Both eyes were cut, the left being completely closed.

He denied the story in a morning paper that he was shrieking during the night and that a priest had visited him. A priest also said that the story was not true.

After Dawson had KO’d him in the 12th round, Patrick was “out” for a full minute after referee Joe Wallis completed the count.

PATRICK WAS DAZED

Vic was carried to his dressing room and later ordered to hospital for observation by the Stadium Medical officer.

After the fight, Dawson said he had never lost to a “white boy” … but was close to being out on two occasions last night.

“Patrick had me dazed and I could not see him at all after one of his lefts hit me on the jaw”, said the American.

“The punch which crashed me through the ropes and down for six in the 11th round was one the hardest I have ever taken”.

Dawson said that his grimaces at Patrick late in the contest were not “showing off”, but part of the strategy.

PATRICK WAS HIS KNEES

“I was not taking him cheaply as the crowd thought “, he said. “I wanted him to lead, so that I could slip the punch and counter”.

After a flurry of well-directed counter-punching Patrick fell to his knees.

The epic fight, on September 1, 1947, had Patrick winning on points, when Freddy Dawson fell through the ropes in the round 11. But the tide was beginning to turn for Patrick.

Then it was Patrick’s turn, on his knees, taking the final count against Dawson. Battered, bloodstained but not disgraced, Patrick was assisted from the ring after the sensational fight and removed him to St Vincent’s Hospital for observation.

One of Patrick’s seconds, Billy Smith, stood by to help the beaten champion.

Dawson saw Patrick laying on the stretcher and anxiously inquired how he was. Patrick replied: “I’m OK. I think the people saw a good fight”. Dawson said, “Don’t let it get you down”.

The result of this bout hit the sporting public of Australia like a bombshell. It was just beyond belief that Patrick had been knocked out.

It was more than just the defeat of the Australian Champion. It was Vic Patrick.

Frank Morris comment: I heard the bruising fight in Sydney in 1947. I was eleven. I heard the crowd whistle and cheer as Patrick sent Dawson crashing through the ropes – he was half in, half out. With rapid succession Dawson came back and hit Patrick, and he went down and then got up; but Dawson retaliated, and Patrick went down for the final count. “Dawson counter-punching was purely a gem” said a newspaper at the time. Michael Clarke, a virtual dictionary of boxing facts, who witnessed the fight, said, “Australia was in mourning”.

<< Adapted from Daily Mirror, September 2, 1947.

VIC PATRICK WAS BATTERED BUT NOT DISGRACED. PHOTO: DAILY MIRROR.
COMING:
I received a letter from the parents of a 12-year-old would-be fighter.


THE BIG FIGHT: Razzle Dazzle Olympics -- Carruthers and Madigan – ‘no’ to defeat

CURRUTHERS LACES VIC TOWEEL WITH A LEFT HAND JAB. IT WAS THE BEGINNING OF THE END. Below: THE PROGRAM OF THE BOUT. FROM VIC TOWEEL’S ARCHIVES.

BOTH FIGHTERS CAME UP WITH A ‘SURPRISE’ IN THEIR TIMELY BOUTS!

ADAPTED BY FRANK MORRIS

BOXER JIMMY CARRUTHERS WAS UNBEATEN AT THE 1948 LONDON OLYMPICS. BUT ONE THING STOPPED HIM GAINING A MEDAL: HE HAD SUFFERED A SERIOUS AND PAINFUL CUT ABOVE THE RIGHT EYE.

But Carruthers was a dyed in the wool boxing champion.

He became Australia’s first official world boxing champion with a shock one-round knock-out of South Africa’s Vic Towel in Johannesburg on November 15, 1952.

In only his 19th professional fight he took the world bantamweight crown, giving Toweel no chance to recover from a pre-determined onslaught in the opening round.

The 23-year-old Sydney southpaw defended his title successfully four times before announcing his retirement in 1954. He was the first world champion in any division to quit the ring without a defeat, or even a draw – a perfect record in 19 fights.

DECISION HOTLY DISPUTED

He made a brief and unsuccessful comeback seven years later, winning two of his four fights. Carruthers (centre) in his successful Australian Bantamweight Title fight with Ellery Bennett in 1951.

He was born 1929 and died in 1990.

On the other hand, Tony Madigan had been flying the boxing kite higher and higher.

Madigan won two Empire Games gold medals as a light heavyweight in Cardiff in 1958 and Perth in 1962. He scored an Olympic Bronze medal in the same division in Rome in 1960.

In his semi-final in Rome, he dropped a hotly-disputed points decisions to the young American called Cassius Clay, the eventual gold medal winner.

TOUGH ENCOUNTER

Clay was to become better known as Muhammad Ali.

The year before, in 1959, Madigan, after winning the New York V Eastern States Golden Gloves Championship, had also lost on points to Clay in the final of the International Golden Gloves in America.

Madigan’s efforts against Clay were all the more impressive when you consider he was already turned 30 and was the elder of his opponent by 12 years when they fought in Rome. He won the light-heavyweight International Diamond Belt, virtually the world amateur championship in 1958 and 1959.

In 1954 he was the Amateur Boxing Association Light-Heavyweight Champion of Britain.

He represented in three Olympics in 1952, 1956 and 1960 the three Empire Games in 1954, 1958 and 1962. 
Madigan also played first grade Rugby with Randwick Club in 1950 and 1951. He was born in 1930.

<< Hall of Champions Publication; Frank Morris.

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COMING:  FORGOTTEN AUSTRALIA AND BRITAIN … THEY WILL CONTINUE ON APRIL 9.
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SURF’S UP: The 1960s board-builders and their fancy nameplates!

Below: JOE LARKIN. HE MADE EVERYBODY LAUGH.

FRANK MORRIS

JOE LARKIN HAD THE DISTINCTION IN 1964 OF BEING THE ONLY RECOGNISED CUSTOM BOARD-BUILDER IN QUEENSLAND.

IN A 1964 ISSUE OF SURFABOUT, WELL-KNOWN AND RESPECTED AT HIS JOB, JOE LARKIN, RAN AN ADVERTISEMENT IN WHICH HE SAID, “THE DISCRIMINATING SURFER LIKES A BOARD THAT IS TRULY CUSTOM BUILT AND PERFORMS WELL”.

BEFORE MOVING TO QUEENSLAND 2 ½ YEARS AGO IN THE 1960s, JOE LEARNT HIS TRADE MAKING HOLLOW – PLYWOOD TYPE – PADDLE BOARDS AND THEN GRADUATED TO SHAPING MALIBU BOARDS.

IN FACT, JOE INFORMS US THAT HE ACQUIRED HIS FIRST BOARD AT NINE AND SHAPED HIS OWN BOARD AT 15. “AND I’VE BEEN BUILDING SURFBOARDS EVER SINCE.

LARKIN WAS ONE THE LEADING SURFING IDENTITIES IN AUSTRALIA. HE WAS A THINKER. HE KNEW HIS STUFF. HE HAD A POLISHED SENSE OF HUMOUR.

HERE’S SURFER ANDREW McKINNON ON THE LARRIKIN LEGEND: “JOE HAS PLAYED A MAJOR ROLE IN THE AUSTRALIAN SURFING INDUSTRY.

“HE PUT QUEENSLAND ON THE SURFING MAP. AS IT TURNED OUT, HE HELPED TO BREED WORLD SURFING CHAMPIONS. HE’S A CLASSIC JOKER WITH A HEART OF GOLD. HE STILL MAKES ME LAUGH”.

JOE WAS INFLUENTIAL AND MODEST. HE PASSED AWAY IN 2017.


Skippy The Bush Kangaroo …

CONTINUED......

GRAND YEARS WILL BE PUBLISHED ON APRIL 9.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 25 March 21

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