Vale Alan Garside: His wish did come true!

ALAN GARSIDE: A PROMINEMENT CAREER. Below: IT WAS AN HONOUR TO MEET MARK BOSNICH. Photos by Geoff Jones.

FRANK MORRIS

A TOKEN OF APPRECIATION.

THE SECOND OLDEST LIVING SOCCERO PLAYER ALAN GARSIDE DIED AT THE FERNDALE NURSING HOME LAST WEEK. FAMILY WERE BY HIS SIDE. ALAN WAS 94. HE WAS BURIED AT ROOKWOOD CEMETERY ON FRIDAY (MAY 28).

ALAN WAS IN HIS EIGHTIES WHEN HE INTRODUCED HIMSELF. “ALAN GARSIDE” AND HELD OUT HIS HAND. HE SAID THIS WITH A BROAD SMILE. I DID LIKEWISE; I THEN SMILED BACK.

THAT’S HOW I MET ALAN GARSIDE. IT WAS SIMPLE AND NEAT. I DIDN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT THE FACT THAT ALAN WAS AN EX-SOCCEROO PLAYER. ALL I KNEW WAS THAT HE WAS BLUE-RIBBON FOR A PROMINENT LEAGUE CLUB. I FOUND THIS OUT LATER ON.

HE LIVED IN A VILLA OPPOSITE ME. HIS REGULAR VISITS, AND ONE-LINERS AND OTHER DISCOURSES, WERE SOMETHING TO BEHOLD.

AT ALAN’S 90TH BIRTHDAY PARTY I DID A REPRODUCTION OF A NEWSPAPER POSTER, WHICH SAYS: ‘ALAN GARSIDE – 90 AND NOT OUT!’. ALAN SAID TO ME, “I’LL HAVE TO REACH 100 NEXT TIME”. WE BOTH SMILED.

ALAN, 94, WAS AUSTRALIA’S SECOND-OLDEST LIVING SOCCEROO TO “WEAR AN AUSTRALIAN JERSEY”. HE WAS PRESENTED WITH THE ‘PRIZED’ GIFT AT THE FERNDALE NURSING HOME.

FOR THE LEGENDARY SOCCEROO, IT WAS A WISH THAT HAD COME TRUE. BACK IN THOSE DAYS, ALAN WAS A MILKMAN SERVING THE AREA ON A CART AND HORSE. BUT, AS A 11-YEAR-OLD BOY IN 1937, HE HAD BEEN PLAYING SOCCER AT SCHOOL, WHICH ASSISTED HIM DURING HIS FOOTBALL LIFE.

HE WAS SELECTED IN 1953 AS THE 148TH ‘SOCCEROO’ AGAINST CHINA. HE ALSO REPRESENTED AUSTRALIA AGAINST SOUTH AFRICA IN 1955 BEFORE A LEG INJURY CUT SHORT HIS CAREER.

ALAN SAID IT WAS AN HONOUR TO MEET MARK BOSNICH. BOSNICH PLAYED FOR THE SOCCEROOS AND ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE.

HOWEVER, ALAN ALWAYS “FEARED THAT HE WOULD NEVER WEAR AN AUSTRALIAN JERSEY AGAIN” AFTER SWAPPING THE ORIGINAL JERSEY WITH THE SOUTH AFRICAN TEAM AS “TOKEN OF APPRECIATION”.

IT WAS A DREAM COME TRUE!

<< A MORE DETAILED REPORT AND BACKGROUND FROM THE LEADER, MARCH 22, 2021; FRANK MORRIS.

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Razzle Dazzle Olympic Games: Landy shows he was built for speed!

JOHN LANDY CLIPPED ON THE POST.

John Landy was known for his speed as a mid-distance runner. But he was always the bridesmaid, especially in the 1500m at 1956 Melbourne Olympics.

Bannister won the race in 3m58.8 and Landy was beaten by 0.8, secs. Landy said:

“I must have more speed. I know it’s me, but I have to get it out.”

Landy was holder of two world mile records set in Australia of 3m58. He set a record for 880 yards, 50m.4. –FM. 

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Read all about it: Notorious criminal was brought to task

SQUIZZY TAYLOR (CENTRE) IS ALL EARS WHEN HE RECEIVED A DRESSING DOWN BY A DETECTIVE.

Squizzy Taylor, age 37, a notorious criminal of the Melbourne underworld in the 1920s, was a man with a nasty trait.

Taylor was described as a larrikin, blackmailer, incendiary genius, bootlegger, stool pigeon, standover man and dozens of other villainous nomenclatures.

It hard to imagine another superlative, but a detective came up with one – “a dirty little rat”.

In 1982, the Australian movie drama of Squizzy Taylor and his downfall was based on the life of the Melbourne gangster.

David Atkins, who played Squizzy Taylor, caught every sinew of his character.

Atkins height was apt playing the gangster. He was a not tall chap. He portrait of Squizzy Taylor as a larrikin gangster was brilliant.

Squizzy Taylor was born in 1888. Being caught in a gun duel with a policeman, after an attempt to rob a bank, Taylor was seriously wounded.

He died that same day. It was in 1927.

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Coming: Ace Reporter, Mason Knight, is back!

YES, HE’S BACK. THE MAN WHO’S THIN AS A RAKE AND KNOWS HOW TO CUT CORNERS. HE IS HOT ON THE TRAIL OF THE “GORGEOUS” ANGEL LOOVE CASE -- AND THERE’S NO WAY OF STOPPING HIM.

THIS BLOKE HAS MORE TRICKS UP HIS SLEEVE THAN A WILY MAGICIAN. I AM CONVINCED THAT THE “IMAGINARY” MASON KNIGHT WILL STOP AT NOTHING TO GET THE STORY STRAIGHT.

ONLY MASON KNIGHT CAN DO THAT. THE WAY HE GOES ABOUT IT MAKES A GRIPPING READ. KEEP WATCHING THIS SPACE.

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Ruth’s Reminiscences, Part 2: Rents fail, and the dawn of the First World War draws near

BOER WAR: RUTH’S FIRST RECOLLECTION OF A CONFLICT.

FIRST WORLD WAR: THE BRITISH AND GERMANS JUST WANTED TO BE FRIENDS, WRITES RUTH.

TWO NATIONS WANTED TO DESTROY EUROPEAN LIFE FOR EVER.

FRANK MORRIS

RUTH PHILPOT EXPRESSES WITH PASSION, VIGOUR, GRACE AND OPTIMISM -- EVERYTHING THAT WAS INCANDESCENT.

I was immediately mindful of those words and images in Australia that were captured so poignantly in a book Weevils in the Flour published a few years ago.

Ruth continued:

Newcastle, where I was born, was truly an industrial town – mainly shipbuilding and coal mines. The river was given the name “Coaly Tyne’ because it had shipyards on both banks.

As far back as I can recall the miners seemed to be striving for better conditions and wages. In the early 1900s -- circa 1909 -- there was big miners’ strike and families were living in poverty.

At the same time dinner tickets were handed out at school to the needy children so they were assured of one good hot meal each school day.

I was fortunate in having parents who were aware of the struggle between the “have” and the “have nots”, [and they] were supporting the miners in their rightful demands; seeing the children stay behind for their free dinner left an indelible impression on the other families, which remains today.

Why should many be destitute while the mine owners and other bosses are so wealthy?                                   

We lived in a house which was one of several in the street owned by the same man. Apparently, landlords were proposing to increase the rents. Dad came home from his Union meeting and reported [that] the decision was not to pay the increase.

So, mum called the six houses in the row and told them [that] she was not paying and advised them not to do so. All but one refused. The others were surprisingly happy, as no pressure was brought to bear upon them.

They thought mother was wonderful!

One of the neighbour’s daughters was so gratefully surprised at mother’s successful action, she said, “if that’s being a socialist than I’m one too.”

Ruth’s “first recollection” of war was when a neighbour, who had served in the Boer War, told her he had shot a man because he wanted the pipe and tobacco the African civilian was smoking.

As a little girl, Ruth “did not think [the neighbour] was bragging; I believed he was ashamed.” However, the war that was to impact with tragic circumstances on Ruth, her family and her friends, waiting in the wings.

In July, 1914, the Daily Mail reported that the British fleet had put to sea “as a precautionary measure.” Prime Minister Asquith told the House of Commons that the situation “at this moment is one of extreme gravity.” On August 1, 1914, Germany declared war on Russia.

IT WAS OFFICIALLY REPORTED BY THE NEWSPAPERS THAT GREAT BRITAIN AND GERMANY HAD DECLARED WAR. THE GRAVE ANNOUCEMENT RECEIVED A LOUD CHEER.

A few days later, on August 5, the Daily News & Leader reported: “It was officially announced … that war was declared between Great Britain and Germany last night.” The paper went on to state that “the grave announcement was received with loud cheers.”

The First World War, or The Great War, as it was called, was under way. The rivalry between the two nations was to destroy European life had as it had been.

Ruth continued:

We lived between two families, of which the matriarchs were sisters. One had nine sons and the other had nine sons and a daughter. The boys from the first family were older, of working age, mostly miners.

Some went to the war. One was a POW in Turkey. As with some of his brothers he did not return.

During the war … my teacher asked us to write a composition. I wrote about a conversation between a British and a German soldier. The gist of it was that neither wanted to kill the other -- they just wanted to be friends.

My teacher’s comment stunned me.

“Most improbable,” she snapped.

The war raged on.

NEXT: RUTH PHILPOT MAKES THE JOURNEY AFTER THE WAR.

<< FRANK MORRIS, THE BOOK COLLECTOR, 2000; GRAND YEARS.

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SKIPPY the bush kangaroo! …

THE VET WAS RIGHT.  BUT SOME TENDER-LOVING BY THE VET HAD MICAH LOOKING AS GOOD AS NEW.

THE END.

GRAND YEARS NEXT APPEARANCE WILL BE ON JUNE 18.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 03 June 21

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