Waltzing Matilda: It became a song to remember

FRANK MORRIS

THE OLD TIN SHEARING SHED WHERE CLANCY WAS BORN.

PASTORALISTS BEGAN TO MUSTER THEIR FORCES.

In 1894, the Shearers Strike came to end after four years on the trot.

The bard of Australia, Banjo Patterson, brought to the Australian idiom Waltzing Matilda, which has become our own “unofficial” anthem.

Paterson was a mediator hired to bring the warring sides of the Shearers Strike in Queensland together.
In 1890, the powerful and wealth pastoralists began to muster their forces against the fractious shearers. The pastoralists were abetted by the colonial governments.

The last property to suffer was Dagwood Station in Winton, Queensland.

Out of this vortex came Banjo Paterson’s Waltzing Matilda.

At the Overflow Station, in the outback of NSW, is an old shearing shed where Banjo Paterson partly penned Clancy of the Overflow.

Who was the Clancy that Paterson immortalised in verse?

After much discussion, it turned out to be Glancy McNamara, a well-known drover in the north of the state who lived to the ripe old age of 95.

Glancy had been yarning about the “good old days” and says that the Overflow was a tributary of the Lachlan River.
The ballad was published by the Bulletin in 1889.

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ON ITS WAY …
THE WALTZING MATILDA STORY -- THE EPIC SOJURN THAT FOUNDED A NATION. PLUS – THE FILM STORY, WALTZING MATILDA. NEXT.
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Below: Sarah Riley – she and Banjo were together in Queensland during the strike.

PART 1. Waltzing Matilda – It was coined by Paterson for his famous song, but, nevertheless, it has wide appeal. Next week.


SHAPES & SIZES: How yester-year boats grew to become the giants of today!

It was a simple chore, indeed, for people who wanted to venture afar. Ancient people made dug-out canoes by hollowing out tree trunks. The scraped and chipped the wood out with simple tools. The dug-out canoes were among the first types of boat. Dug-out canoes are still used today.


Flashback 2008: Vale. Michael Pate dies and leaves behind thousands of fans

FRANK MORRIS    Questions by Karen Nixon

MICHAEL PATE AS VITTORIA.

AS FOR MY BEST PART, THE BEST PART WAS DEFINTELY THE ROLE OF VITTORIA, THE INDIAN, IN THE MOVIE HONDO, SAYS PATE.

From 1946, after his return from World War II, he starred in radio plays and serials; he also got a call to do major films and these include Forty Thousand Horsemen, Sons of Matthew and Bitter Springs.

Later, in the 50s, Pate went to Hollywood to do Bonaventure (released as Thunder on the Hill) and over 50 feature films and more than 300 TV shows as guest-star.

In 1970, he starred in Matlock Police and Power without Glory; and produced the films, the Mango Tree and Colleen McCullough’s Tim, which he adapted and directed, winning the Australia Writers Guild award for the Best screenplay.

From 1982 he starred in the film The Return of Captain Invincible and two plays, one with his son Christopher; and the other, The Wild Duck, featuring Liv Ullman.

Pate was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia in 1990.

Actor, writer and director, Michael Pate had died September 1, 2008.  He was 88.

He was working on a film script before he died and it was likely his son would finish off his father’s work.

GREATEST INSPIRATION

You have done some amazing work, which would you say was most memorable?

In radio it would be The Eagle has Two Heads, in theatre, I would say Dark of the Moon and in film Sons of Matthew.  As for the best parts, the best part was definitely the role of Vittoria, the Indian, in the movie Hondo.

Who has been your greatest inspiration?

In acting I was influenced by Spencer Tracy and by Paul Newman’s work.  Cagney was very good but overall I found Olivier with a meticulous approach to his craft my greatest inspiration.

You have had a challenging and exciting life, do you have any regrets?

No, I haven’t regrets about my professional life.  I started fairly early doing things of an amateur sense at school and then got my start professionally with a break during the war, but that time wasn’t wasted when you are defending your country.

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ON ITS WAY …
FANTASTIC VOYAGE: IN 1973, LAS BALAS CHARTS ITS LONG VOYAGE FROM ECUADOR TO BRISBANE, IS NOW AT THE BALLINA NAVAL MUSEUM. JUNE/JULY.
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The only thing I would say is a shame, is that older people are ignored not adored.  The problem is that there aren’t many acting roles for older folk and I honestly feel that the older actors could be utilised to master classes in our craft.

I think that it would be wonderful to be able to share the great experiences and skills.  That way they are not lost and the community and industry could all benefit.  That would be my only regret, a personal regret only.

What made you decide to live here on the Central Coast?

In the later stages of my career, I was starting to do more narration and documentary roles.  We were living in Bellevue Hill and thought we could get an apartment in the city from the sale of Bellevue Hill, even a small place on the Central Coast – and Id just live between the two places.

My wife and I both enjoy fishing and we both like the ocean.  Basically I’ve always visited the Central Coast, even as a boy I would visit Woy Woy to fish and prawn with my uncle.

SOURCE: From Grand Years, 2008.


SHARK ATTACK! Final. The dangers lurking in Australian waters!

ALAN LUCAS             Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

LEGALLY KILLED, THESE BULL SHARKS ARE ONLY PUPS OF AROUND 0NE METRE LONG. SEE PANEL.

A TEN-FOOT SHARK ATTACKED A GIRL WHO WAS WAIST-DEEP IN WATER AND ONLY METRES OFF A MACKAY BEACH.

In 1962, the pearling lugger Sari Ritzah, owned by Bert Cummings and skippered by travel writer Peter Pinney, won the Mackay district contract for shark meshing.

Statistics showed that 38 people had died from shark attacks in Queensland waters during the previous 60 years.
Conviction that meshing was necessary may have finally come after a ten-foot shark snatched the girl in waist-deep water five metres of a Mackay beach in 1961.

The shark tore off both her arms and savaged her right thigh, then bit off her companion’s hand as he fought to drive the shark away from his fatally wounded girlfriend.

During the same year that Peter Pinney started shark meshing with Sari Ritzah, I anchored outside the Lockhart River, far north Queensland, and rowed upstream close to the mangroves trailing a line for an evening meal.

On the way back, while crossing the shallow entrance, I saw a huge mud crab standing like an angry praying mantis on the sandy bottom.

Reaching under water to pick up the crab without losing a finger was a heck of a gamble.

While pondering this dilemma I became aware of an express train coming out of nowhere. It knocked the oar out from under me before zooming off with most of my crab.

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THE BULL SHARK, ONCE THEY LATCH ONTO A VICTIM THEY DON’T LET GO, RANKING THEM AMONG THE WORLD’S FOUR MOST DEADLY SHARKS. MORE THAN ANY OTHER SPECIES, BULL SHARKS TEND TO TURN PINK AS THEY DIE.

Source: Bulls Shark illustration from Shark Attack by Mike Edmonds; Five Miles Press, Victoria.
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The train was, of course, a shark, probably around two metres long. The abrasion of its rough skin leaving me with bloodied shins.

My immediate horror was not that the shark might circle back to attack me, but that I was now lying face down in shallow water looking point-blank at a still-articulating giant crab claw.

Since that day outside the Lockhart River I have dived (but never swum) … hundreds of times despite never really feeling comfortable in the water; the anticipation of suddenly being torn apart by a shark dulling its pleasure.

SOURCE:  Shark Attack by Alan Lucas, AFLOAT January 2019. This article was edited. Please read fuller version in the magazine.

Below: A dangerous way to test your metal is by swimming in open water.


ON ITS WAY …
HISTORIC HOTELS: BUILT IN 1918, ADELAIDE CAN REALLY BOAST A HOTEL IN 1976 THAT’S REALLY INTERNATIONAL IN CHARACTER. JUNE/JULY.
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ON ITS WAY …
ARTBEAT: MRS MAMIE EISENHOWER SAID THE BEGINNING OF IKE’S PAINTING AS A HOBBY MAKES QUITE A STORY. NEXT.
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Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 07 June 19

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