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Number of blogs returned: 91 to 100 records of 311

FOODFROLICO: ‘Bootleg’ liquor makes a good drink for the New Year!

TWO MEN HAD A DREAM!

FRANK MORRIS

GIN MAKERS: WES HEDDLES (LEFT) AND ADAM CARPENTER DUG DEEP INTO THE AMERICAN PAST AND STRUCK THE ‘BOOTLEG’ PERIOD FROM THE 1920s. THE IMAGES OF THE PROHIBITION-ERA ROCKED THEM SO MUCH, THEY MADE PROHIBITION GIN. Below: PROHIBITION GIN AND BEHIND IT A BOOTLEGGER OF THE 1920s.

Having a dream can often bring wonderful thoughts.

A dream that harnesses the spirit of the Prohibition era is a case in point. Two Adelaide men had the world thrust upon them to enter onto the liquor stage. The call was: make a soft, smooth gin as soon as you can.

And the story goes, within three years, Adam Carpenter and Wes Heddles have won 26 international awards for a gin they started to make. Mind you, not unlike bootleggers of the past, in a suburban backyard.

Carpenter and Heddles began producing gin as a passion project. Their pride and joy, Prohibition Liquor, was born.

THE MYSTIQUE OF GIN

Both men loved the mystique of the Prohibition era in the United States. A constitutional ban, which saw bootleggers “do their thing”, prohibited the making and selling alcohol ran from 1920 to 1933.

When people went into speakeasies, barriers broke down. It didn’t matter whether you were black, white, male, female – everyone united by one cause: as simple as drinking. Adelaide Hills spirit maker, Brendan Carter, was briefed, in part, to “create the best martini gin going around”.

With shades of bootlegging past, the bottling and distribution operation began in March 2015, in Carpenter’s garage.

Bottles are shaped like an oversize glass hip flask, with a label that has shadowy images of the Prohibition era. It’s a combo that really works.

INVISIBLE GIN PUNCH

700 ml gin, 450 ml fresh pineapple juice. 240 ml lemon juice. 500-700 ml ginger beer. Pineapple and lemon slices to garnish.

METHOD

Add gin, pineapple and lemon juices to a punchbowl with large blocks of ice. Top up with ginger beer to taste. Garnish with pineapple and lemon slices. Serve in a rocks glass with ice.

<< Frank Morris use the background of the story published in SMH.


AUSSIE POEMS: Always let a birdie say, “See you at the wishing well”!

NEW YEAR GREETINGS

A birdie chirping at my ear,

Said, “I’ll let you see the wishing well,

Then to the well your wishes tell”

I’ve had three wishes, one for you,

So you’ll find joy and gladness too;

And Lady Hope with you shall stay

To bring you sunshine every day.

I hope my friend that you shall find

That elusive peace of mind;

And so I’ve done my best you see,

To bring a year of joys to you.

BERYL THOMPSON

<< A former buyer of Myers. Poetry writing has been with her since she was a small girl.  Picture: Always let a birdie sing.


Great Kiwi First: Mark Twain called New Zealand “Paradise found”!

FRANK MORRIS

PARADISE: NEW ZEALAND IS A LENSMEN’S TREASURE TROVE: WONDEROUS RIVERS, SNOWY GRANDEURS AND MIGHTY GLACIERS. Below: MARK TWAIN’S BOOK, FOLLOWING THE EQUATOR.

In the late 1800s, US author Mark Twain was perhaps the first international literary luminary to visit and publicise New Zealand. Twain found the “land of superb scenery” irresistible.

He wrote about the snowy grandeurs, the mighty glaciers and “beautiful lakes”.

The fiords were, he wrote, “wonderous rivals” to those found in Norway and Alaska. After his historic sojourn, Twain expostulated that “our stay has been too brief; still, we are not unthankful for the glimpse which we have had of it.”

First travel agent to cash in on New Zealand as an “exotic” travel destination was believed to be Thomas Cook and Son. The first government-backed tourism promotion organisation, the Tourist and Publicity Department, was established in 1901.

Through its NZ and international network, the department’s role was to promote New Zealand to the world. Now called Tourism New Zealand, it is reputed to be the oldest bureau of its kind in the world.

As in the case of Mark Twain, the editors of Time magazine were overwhelmed by the visually stunning beauty of New Zealand. In its first cover story on NZ in 1977, Time rhapsodised about the country being “a photographer’s paradise … one of the world’s most beautiful nations.”

VELEVET HILLS, VALLEYS

Expounds Time: “Until 1973, New Zealand seemed to be a sanctuary … unpolluted, almost undiscovered.” The magazine informed its global readership of the “extravagant” beauty of the country.

“The velvet green hills and valleys; white snow draped peaks; and streams with trout as big as a man’s arm.”

While Twain was scouting around New Zealand, he decided to make Australia his next stop. Twain, then aged 60, visited the Great Southland , in 1895. For three months, he summed up our history wryly.

“It’s almost always picturesque,” he wrote. “Indeed, it is so curious and strange, that it is itself the chiefest novelty the country has to offer; and so it pushes the other novelties into second and third place.

It does not read like history, but like the most beautiful lies. And all of a fresh new sort, no mouldy old stale ones; it is full of surprises and adventures and incongruities, and incredibility’s; but they are all true, they all happened.”

This South Pacific paradise attracts tens of thousands of international visitors each years. Mark Twain happened to be on of first!             

FRANK MORRIS COMMENTS: TO COME ACROSS MARK TWAIN, IT’S HARD TO REALISE THAT HE WAS AT THE FOREFRONT OF FRONTIER WESTERN JOURNALISM -- THE CALIFORNIA TERRITORIAL ENTERPRISE IN 1863. WHEN YOU PUT THAT UP AGAINST THE MARK TWAIN WHO’S ROUGHING IT IN THE THICK OF GOD’S COUNTRY, NEW ZEALAND, IT IS LIKE WE ARE TALKING ABOUT A DIFFERENT FELLOW. BUT, NO, THEY’RE THE SAME: BUSHY AUBURN MOUSTACHE AND THE EYES OF A WOLF. HE WROTE ABOUT IT, WITH SAME INKLING THAT HE WAS A REPORTER COVERING MURDERER’S ROW AND ALL THE EXCITEMENT THAT WENT WITH IT. TWAIN WROTE OVER 25 BOOKS, AND THE ONE ON THE ENTERPRISE WAS ONE OF THEM.

  << Grand Years, 11 years ago.


CARRIGEWORKS: Nick Cave’s special art is immersive in spaces and experiences!

BAUBLES, BAUBLES!: A STUNNING SCENE OF CRYSTAL CLOUDSCAPE.

MUSEUM magazine said Nick Cave’s “gargantuan” solo show, “UNTIL” at the Carrigeworks, Sydney, took four years in the making, and its originates with a question: “is there racism in heaven?” A litany of works explore this and similar ideas. A show stealer of the exhibition will be Crystal Cloudscape. It is a “scintillating” five tonne sculpture suspended from the ceiling, said the magazine.

As far as WHERE NOW magazine is concerned, Cave’s exhibition addresses “race relations, gender politics and

America’s gun violence through a series of immersive spaces and experiences.”

<< From November 23, 2018 until March 3, 2019.


GET TOGETHER: MR TOAD AND THE REST OF HIS GANG. SEE THE KIDS, AS THE ANIMALS, DO THE SAME THING!

WIND IN THE WILLOWS: When Mole decides to go to the river bank one morning rather than do his spring cleaning, it is the beginning of a magical adventure. The Australian Shakespeare Company brings this immortal story to life. You meet Ratty, Mole, Badger, Otter, Portly and the famous Mr Toad. Music, songs and laughs for all the family. Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney. Last day is January 27. Tel: 9011 7704.


TASSIES WINES: Try some fancy drinking for the New Year!

FRANK MORRIS

Josef Chromy OAM is instrumental in the Tasmanian food and wine industry. He’s was the owner /developer of some of Tasmania’s leading wineries.

In 1950, Joe fled his worn-torn Czech village as a penniless 19-year-boy after eleven years of Nazi and Soviet occupation. He escaped across borders, guarded by minefields dogs and soldiers, suffering five months of privation before immigrating to Australia.

Josef Chromy Wines is the culmination of Joe’s experience in the Tamar Valley. His 60Ha vineyard property and its unique location offers one of the memorable food and wine experiences in Tassie.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 11 January 19

JAMES EARL JONES: The Great White Hope makes Jones a “great actor”

YES, 1967 WAS A BIG YEAR FOR JAMES EARL JONES. HE STARRED AS JACK JEFFERSON, THE PRIZE-FIGHTER WHO IS PREPARING FOR A CRACK AT THE TITLE. IT WAS 1908. WHEN THE FIGHT CONCLUDES, JEFFERSON BECOMES THE FIRST NEGRO HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPION OF THE WORLD. THIS REVIEW WAS WRITTEN BY MARTIN GOTTFRIED.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

THE FIRST: JAMES EARL JONES, AS JACK JEFFERSON, WHO BECAME THE “FIRST NEGRO” HEAVYWEIGHT OF THE WORLD. IT WAS A STAGE PART THAT WENT ON TO MAKE HIM THE GREAT MOVIE ACTOR HE TURNED  OUT TO BE. Below: A MATURE ACTOR, JAMES EARL JONES. Below: JEFFERSON WAS BASED ON JACK JOHNSON WHO WAS THE FIRST CHAMPION BACK IN 1908.

WASHINGTON, DC – Howard Sackler had written an extraordinary play. The tremendous production (is) both spectacular and sensitive.

The Great White Hope is probably the most important new American play ever to come out of any resident theatre; and is certainly the most impressive one that I have seen anywhere in a very long time.

It is based … on the career of Jack Johnson, who became the first Negro heavyweight champion of the world on 1908.

Mr Sackler begins the play with Jack Jefferson due to have a crack at the title. The boxing world, the press and the United States are outraged at the likelihood … the retired champion will re-enter the ring to prevent it.

Jefferson is easy-going about the prospective fight. “Been a whole lot of mean talk around here but I’m glad it came down to a plain old scuffle,” Jefferson said.

EPIC WORK

He resents the Negro community’s insistence that a victory will give the race self-respect. “If you ain’t there already, all the boxing in the world ain’t gonna do it for you.” he said.

The play’s episodic structure is as unfortunate as it is necessary. It causes unavoidable moments of blackness, during which momentum is lost. Yet, there are so many scenes – all necessary -- in a long three and a half hour epic work that a director could hardly avoid them.

As for Sackler’s writing, it is regularly magnificent. It ranges from perfect dialects of all kinds of heroism or romance, and is practically always poetry.

A GREAT ACTOR

The humour is high, sometimes giddy, sometimes mocking; and the use of vaudeville techniques … tied the whole thing together with a special sense of high-stepping tragedy.

Sherin handles the enormous cast … with astonishing control and gave James Earl Jones whatever assistance he needed to make Jefferson a figure both heroic and personal -- an awesome task.

In this performance, Jones passed over the line from being a very good actor to being a great one. Though there are no actual boxing scenes, his training ones were powerful.

Shaving his mannerisms as he did his head … he worked with every acting tool under inspired control – vocal technique, physical sense and intellectual understanding.

So the result was great theatre despite whatever weaknesses there are in it.

<< Based on the real-life bout between Jack Johnson and Canadian Tommy Burns that took place in Sydney in 1908. James Earl Jones’ opening night in The Great Hope, Washington DC, in December, 1967. It was soon to appear on Broadway, New York. Women’s Wear Daily, December, 1967.


TIMES PAST: Christmas luxuries: The Emperor Antonius speaks out

I ASK YOU?: WHY WAS HE READY TO SPREAD SUCH CULTURE OUT OF OUR KITCHENS?

This is 1908. The Emperor Antonius reckoned a cucumber is no good if it is bitter, a morning newspaper said. He also asserts to avoid that Christmas turkey if it’s too dear.

Many a frugal housewife would be wondering why some stoic philosopher “would spread this culture” to the kitchen? “For it seems the holiday commodities are to be even more expensive than usual, “opined the morning newspaper.

Poultry, we learn, has risen with too great alacrity to the occasion. The trouble is, we’re told, a shortness of supply. – Frank Morris, using subject matters from SMH.


THE PINBALL GAME: Earliest reference made was to Charles Dickens!

COLOUR-SPLASH PINBALLS, INTRODUCED IN 1931, HAVE BEEN A NATIONAL SENSATION.

HERBERT B. JONES          Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

FURORE: THE NEW PINBALL MACHINES CAUSED MODERN DAY PANIC IN SIDE ONE OF THE ARCADE. Below: TWO BEAUTIES TOGETHER. BUT -- YOU CAN PLAY BALLY’S WIZARD ON THE RIGHT.

The origin in of pinball is lost in antiquity. The earliest known reference to a similar amusement device is in Chapter 14 of Pickwick Papers, published by Charles Dickens in 1836. The narrator describes the Peacock Tavern, where members of the Pickwick Club stopped.

“(They) beguiled their time chiefly with such amusement as the Peacock afforded, which were limited to a bagatelle-board on the first floor.”

The game probably resembled the board, illustrated, which is generally regarded as the ancestor of pinball.
In early 1929, John J. Sloan, an advertising solicitor for Billboard – a magazine which caters for vendors, circuses, carnival and coin-operated machines – observed an adaptation of bagatelle in the basement of his apartment.
The device had been built by the janitor for the amusement of his friends.

The unknown, the unsung inventor of modern pinball utilised the traditional scoring objective of bagatelle – holes or cups in a plain surface with the score-value of each hole prominently displayed.

The basement bagatelle was not coin-operated.

Intent on developing a new source of advertising revenue he put his new discovery into a company to market several coin-operated bagatelle or pinball games.

INTO DEPRESSION

Probably it was because the games were too large for the average location, and too expensive, he was part of an economy already drifting into the depression.

His companies were not successful and soon vanished from the amusement scene. But not before other entrepreneurs shrewdly appraised the enormous potential of coin-operated bagatelle.

“On a gloomy day in October of depression-clouded 1931,” writes a veteran coin-machine historian, “a young businessman, Raymond T. Maloney, persuaded his senior partners to join him in a bold venture. This was, admittedly, after hours of stubborn argument.

A nickel’s worth of cheer

“As result of their decision, a simple but fascinating, colour-splashed pinball game was introduced in America in 193l. By the time 1932 had dawned, under clouds of creaking, dark depression, the rain-bow bright game Ballyhoo was a national sensation.

“Just on 50,000 Ballyhoo were sold in seven months.”

GAVES BRIGHTNESS

The historian continues: “In 1932, the lexicon of locations did not include taverns, but barber shops, restaurants, gasoline stations and other miscellaneous stores and – ‘wherever people congregate’, said the Ballyhoo advertisements – it gave brightness to the otherwise sombre scenes.

“It gave Americans a penny’s worth of escape from worry, a nickel’s worth of cheer in a grim world.”

The slot-machine operators constituted the first market for Ballyhoo. But they were joined by throngs of other citizens on the unemployed list who risked their small savings to invest in Ballyhoo. They decided to embark on a new career of self-employment.

Anyone who could scrape together US$16 or US$160 for a10-game Ballyhoo could be in the market.

Indeed, the slot-machine boom was a mild event compared to the pinball boom a quarter of a century later.

<< Coin-Operated Amusement by Herbert B. Jones. Published by Bally Manufacturing Corp Chicago, USA.


VALE: A period of adventures, devotion and a series that stood out from them all!

FINAL: PENNY COOK – FROM A COUNTRY PRACTICE TILL NOW.

BILL THE BASTARD, the horse that is widely considered one of the finest of Australia’s bred equines to be exported to World War 1. This year, he will be enshrined as an Anzac legend with a life-size bronze statue. We dips our lid.

PENNY COOK, who starred as “Vicky the vet” from the series A Country Practice, died at 61 of cancer. She became the sweetheart of the nation. A Country Practice was said to command a weekly audience close to 8 million people. Of the series she has done, ACP “stood out from the pack.”

THE ONLY ONE: REMEMBERING BILL THE BASTARD. COMMENTATORS HAVE TOLD US HE WAS AUSTRALIA’S ”GREATEST WAR” HORSE.


HAPPY NEW YEAR! COME ON EVERYBODY LET’S DANCE!

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 03 January 19

THE OUTBACK AND ALL THAT: Why I loved the inland part of Queensland

FRANK MORRIS

REWARDING: “My association with the Bushies” has always given happiness.” Below: “Without the “Bushies” some of the situations could never have eventuated.”

“After 34 years, I called it a day,” said Sir Sydney Williams. As Chief Executive, of the Queensland-based airline, he’s had the chance to “seek out” some new and exciting destinations. The one that struck him the most was the outback region of the state.

“My association with the ‘Bushies’, the Bush Pilot Airways, has given me happiness of a very rewarding nature! I’ve seen the joys of Outback mums and dads being serviced by a single engine Ausler and Tiger Moth to service 15 cattle stations and Aboriginal Communities in one day.

Homemade airstrips were almost at the front gates, and there was Mrs Hayles of Musgrave Station waiting with tea and scones.

OUTBACK PRIVILEGE

In return, all Mrs Hayles wanted was some link with “the outside world” and “an urgent supply of mail” for the kids who were doing correspondence courses on the popular and easy-to-listen to School of the Air.

“To be associated so closely with people of the Outback is in itself a great privilege. And my love for those people of those vast and open spaces has guided my footsteps for most of my life.”

Sir Sydney William believes that “without the Bushies and its people some situations could never have eventuated.
“Things like these could not be done alone.”

<< Queenslander Magazine of Air Queensland, January 1987.


FILM GREAT: Fatty Finn, comic ‘king’, zooms into film world!

FRANK MORRIS

PIN-UP: POP ORDELL STARRING AS FATTY FINN IN THE KID STAKES. Below: ONE OF THE MANY THEATRES SHOWING THE KID STAKES. Below: FATTY BEING TOLD OFF BY A CRANKY STORE-KEEPER.

“2FC speaking … listen folk! The greatest race of the year is about to start.” It was a billycart derby. An excitable radio announcer was cheering on the goats and riders. This coveted race, critic Judith Adamson says,” earned the film’s racegoers title”.

The first Australian comic strip character to be elevated to film stardom was Fatty Finn. Chief kid-staker Fatty, and his gang of weedy lads, made their debut in Kid Stakes in 1927. “Kid Stakes brings back the Sydney of the 1920s,” said the defunct weekly-pictorial, Pix. “They were all on parade; the ragged urchins, the brawling and the free-fisted characters of the waterfront.” Aside from Fatty, there were Headlight Hogan, Bruiser Murphy, Algie Snoops, and many others, and Hector the goat.

Kid Stakes has been described as “a happy, irreverent piece of suburban Australiana with series of lunatic subplots”.
The film was shot entirely on location at Wooloomooloo, Potts Point and Rockhampton, Queensland, which was a region, at the time, teeming with goats.

Created by Sydney Wentworth Nicholls, Fatty first appeared in the Sunday News in 1923 as Fat and his friends.
Nicholls changed the title to Fatty Finn in 1924.

Kid Stakes, still hailed as “the film that everybody loves”, is today considered somewhat of a classic.
“The director, Tal Ordell, showed unusual skill in translating the new medium of comics into live action film, “writes comic buff and collector John Ryan in his book, Panel by Panel.

NEVER CHANGE STYLE

Nicholls never changed his style of drawing. For fifty years he went on drawing the strip in exactly the same 1920s style, till his untimely death in 1977.

Writes Ryan: “By the late 1920s Fatty Finn had become, perhaps, the most visually pleasing strip in (Australia).
“Nicholls” fine draftsmanship and experimentation with long sweeping panels and tall, column-like frames were complemented by vibrant colouring.”

In the late 1920s, Nicholls published the Fatty Finn Weekly. Containing eight pages and selling for a penny, it is today recognised as the first comic book published in Australia.

Fatty Finn was later published in the Sunday Guardian from 1934. When the Guardian folded the strip re-emerged in 1951 in the Sun-Herald. And there it stayed until May, 1977, when Nicholls died.

The comic was set in the 1930s when times were tough and kids wore hand-me-down clothes.

Monty Wedd, one of Australia’s leading black and white comic artists (Bold Ben Hall, The Making of Australia, Captain Justice), worked with Nicholls in the halcyon days of comic book publishing.

In an interview in 1980, Wedd told me that Nicholls “was a dinky di Australian”.

“He was a real Australian in every way. He just loved his country and everything about it.

“To my mind Nicholls was a legend. And Fatty Finn was the King comic of its day.”

(Fatty Finn was remade in the early 1980s starring Ben Oxenbould as Fatty, Bert Newton, Noni Hazlehurst, Gerard Kennedy and Lorraine Bayly.)

<< Grand Years.


BERNARD LESER: He was the creator of Vogue Australia

FRANK MORRIS

THREESOME: CONDE NAST, CENTRE, WITH DOROTHY PARKER AS HE DISCUSSES SOME OF THE FINER POINTS OF A MAGAZINE FEATURE. Below: THE PERSON WHOSE NAME IS ENGRAVED ON VOGUE AUSTRALIA, BERNARD LESER. Below: FIRST ISSUE OF VOGUE AUSTRALIA PUBLISHED IN 1964.

The CBD column in the Sydney Morning Herald implied that one of the shareholders of a certain media company was the “founder of Vogue, Bernard Leser.”

Really. No -- He was the FOUNDER of Vogue Australia, the magazine that would eventually become the blue-horse of the fashion world.

In 1959, to put the record straight, Leser established Vogue Australia for the US-based Conde Nast organisation.
The title made its inaugural appearance as a supplement inside the British edition of Vogue.

But as a glitzy title of the 1960s, Leser, it is reported, had a battle with the magazine.

UPMARKET BOY

Leser said readers were primed for a high-quality fashion magazine, but advertisers, propagandised by the influential mass-circulation Women's Weekly and New Idea, didn't realise they were paying for people who weren't interested in up-market merchandise.

The Conde Nast organisation in 1971 threatened to close the magazine. Leser formed a consortium and bought the business from Conde Nast.

By 1989, Leser sold the company back to Nast. The consortium “did well,” Leser said.

Arthur Baldwin Turnure, a New York socialite, founded Vogue in December 1892, as a fashion weekly for “the cultivated and money class.” In other words, the social elite.

The magazine's first editor, Josephine Redding, is credited with choosing Vogue as the title, with the assistance of the Century Dictionary (“the word “vogue” fitted her fledging to a T.”)

CONDE NAST

The entrepreneurial whiz kid Cone Nast (who in 1907, was business manager of Collier's at a salary of $40,000!) became a publisher in 1909 when he bought Vogue, three years after Turnure's untimely death, and turned it into “a synonym for elegance and style.”

When Nast took control Vogue had been published consecutively for 14 years, had a circulation of 14,000 copies and advertising revenue of $100,000 a year.

According to magazine historian, Theodore Peterson, Nast saw in Vogue “a chance to test his theory…that money could be made from a medium which efficiently brought together the buyers and sellers of luxury goods.

When the high-flying New York newspaper publisher Samuel Nowhouse bought 66 percent of Conde Nast publications in 1959 (as a thirty-fifth wedding anniversary present for his wife Mitzi) Vogue's circulation had grown to about 500,000 and its advertising revenues were $8.4 million.

British Vogue started in 1916 when the submarine menace prevented the import of the US edition; and French Vogue started in 1922.

<< Grand Years.


VALE OF TIMES PAST: The King is dead, long live the Queen

SPLASH: KING GEORGE DIED.

The year is 1952. “The King died peacefully in his sleep early this morning.” Before he retired last night, he appeared to be in his usual health. Princes Elizabeth, his eldest daughter, now becomes Queen Elizabeth 11. The Queen is in Kenya and will leave by air for London and is expected to cancel her planned tour. Before the King died, she was expected to sail from Mombasa to Australia and New Zealand. Adapted by Frank Morris.

HAPPY NEW YEAR! I HAD ANOTHER AMAZING TWELVE MONTHS. I HOPE YOU DO, TOO?

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 27 December 18

Aged Care: Woman will make our systems a “one-stop shop”

FRANK MORRIS

ALL-SEEING: JANET ANDERSON WILL MAKE SURE AGED CARE WILL BECOME A “ONE-STOP-SHOP”. Below: A ROLE THAT TAKES IN  ALL THE NOOKS AND CRANNIES OF THE SYSTEM.

An experienced health sector commissioner has been consigned to Australia’s aged care industry to oversee quality and safety. Ms Janet Anderson will manage the commission as it prepares to start the “intensified compliance monitoring” from January 1.

The report says, “The nation’s first commissioner will lead the new and independent aged care quality safety commission.”

OPERATE ON $300M A YEAR

Ms Anderson’s appointment will usher in a new era for aged care.

The report says, “She will oversee the approval, accreditation, assessment, complaints resolution, monitoring and compliance of Commonwealth-funded aged care providers.” The aged care providers will report directly to the Minister for Senior Australians and Aged Care.

The commission will operate a budget of almost $300 million across four years, employing dozens of additional senior compliance offecers. The report says, “Unannounced re-accreditation audits, which have been law since July 1, are set to jump from 263 this year to almost 900 in 2019.”


VALE: Scott Dillon – His amazing ride made surf history!

FRANK MORRIS

THE RIDE OF A LIFETIME: DILLON PADDLED OUT GINGERLY TO MEET THE BOMBORA’S “HEAVY”, AS HE PREPARED TO TAKE OFF ON THE MISSION OF TRIUMPH. Below: THE NEWSPAPER WENT AND SPLASHED THE BOMBORA STORY OVER TWO PAGES. Below: SCOTT DILLON.  Below: AN EARLY ‘KILL’ FOR SCOTT DILLON WAS THIS ‘HEAVY’ FROM PANAMA.

He was a larger-than-life character. He was good at driving stock cars, boxer, traveller, adventurer and inventions.  But he would always be a your mate and best buddy. He was a down-to-earth family man.

Scott Dillon, the man who came across as somebody who cannot be destroyed, died peacefully at 9.15 on Tuesday night (December 11.)

He was one of the pioneers of the Australian surfboard industry in 1960.

One of his closest friends was well-known surf photographer Jack Eden. Eden, together with Scott Dillon and Norm Casey, became partners in the surfing magazine Surfabout.

Eden knew what sort of a big-wave rider he really was. At Bare Island, he captured Dillon on a breaking 18-foot wave in 1963. The wave grew in size at an alarming rate, but it was his moment of triumph.

Dillon was the first surfer to crack a huge “death wave” at the Bombora at Botany Bay.*

THE MECCA

But being an expert photo-leman’s, Eden had positioned himself just above Dillon and followed him all the way. That was one, as it turned out, of the “most amazing” rides in surf history.

In a matter of years, he had established a reputation as a top-ranking custom builder.

His factory was located at Brookvale in 1959, but his reputation spread all over Sydney. With legends like Barry Bennett, Gordon Woods and Bill Wallace, Dillon co-founded the Australia surfboard building fraternity during that time.

Brookvale soon became the mecca of the surfboard industry. Dillon could shape any type of board specified by the customers.

In 2004, Dillon was inducted into the Surfing Hall of Fame.

Dillon was born in 1928. He was 90 when he died.

As Dillon would say, “Surf’s up, have a go,”.

Frank Morris comments: The bombora episode happened when I was editor of Surfabaut magazine in 1963. Surfabout was the only magazine to have the story. It was my first sighting of Scott Dillon. He was definably a brilliant, self-controlled surfer. We did a spread called Bare Island Bares its Teeth, which turned out to be a runaway success. I can still recall what it said: “At last, the spell is broken, as Scott Dillon moves off on the first “heavy” ever ridden at Bare Island.” The Sun newspaper, Sydney, ran the story. I finished working at Surfabout late in 1964. The new publisher had me write the editorial and a brief history of the major surfboard manufacturers in Australia.


REV JOHN FLYNN: Mrs Flynn of the inland prepares for an outback holiday!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

HAVING LUNCH ‘OUTSIDE’: WHAT A DAY? MEMBERS OF THE FLYNN BRIGADE HAVE LUNCH BENEATH A TREE NEAR THE ABODE. AT RIGHT: LOUNGING IN COMFORT, ARE MRS FLYNN AND HER HUSBAND THE REV JOHN FLYNN.  Below: TRYING TO CRANK OUT SOME MESSAGES.

Mrs John Flynn, wife of the Rev John Flynn, said “the Inlanders are cheerful souls … they never complain.” Mrs Flynn prepared to join her husband and umpteen kids back from a city holiday. On her way, she shared the hazards of the natural outback.

“My husband brought a party of children from Trekelano, 40 miles out of Cloncurry, and 1300 miles to Brisbane for a holiday.

“While he was there he suggested to the Education Department that if they would send out a teacher and equipment the people at Trekelano would build a school. I helped him to take the children home. They travelled in the back of the truck.

“We took two weeks over the trip. Rain held us up for three days at Blackall, and two days at Longreach. When we got back the school was built. A surprise for the padre. The children outback are fine specimens, though they never have milk or butter in the summer; and vegetables can only be grown in the winter.

FENCES ARE FEW

“They take so kindly to corned meat that when every few weeks a bullock is killed and they have fresh meat for one day they don’t like it at all. I know the country where our only woman Flying Doctor, Jean White, was lost for some days last year.

“Everything is so flat that the country looks like a faint mist haze from the air. There are no land marks. The Inland is so vast and surprising. I hearda woman outback talk about a ”bit of a holding” that was for sale. I asked how big it was. She said, ‘Three hundred square miles.’

“Fences are few. The cattle are kept together by water bores, but the sheep country does have fences.
“One time up on Cape York Peninsula I saw a man digging post-holes. He said he was helping to fence a paddock. The paddock was 250 square miles.

<< Australian Women’s Weekly, October 21, 1939.

NEXT: After 34 years I’m calling it a day. Sir Sydney Williams talks about what it’s like to live in the outback.


CANBERRA: Australians – look at these facts! Even the national capital will blush!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

HOLY GHOST!: COULD THE NATIONAL FILM AND SOUND ARCHIVE IN CANBERRA BE THE GHOSTLIEST PLACE IN AUSTRALIA? IT’S SPINE-TINGLING, DON’T YOU AGREE.

Haunted Halls: The National Film and Sound Archive, according to a local legend, Tim the Yowie Man, is one of the most haunted buildings in Australia. For spine-tingling explorations, walk the halls and look for the intriguing Picnic at Hanging Rock exhibition or be mesmerised by the case of missing Prime Minister Harold Holt, who vanished without a trace in 1967. Oh, Canada, you shouldn’t have: The famous 39-metre, 7 tonne flagpole … at Regatta Point was a gift from Canada to Australia in 1957. The Australian flag flies year-round, except on Canada Day, July 1, when the Maple Leaf is flown. Meeting Place: Canberra means ‘meeting place’. This is derived from ‘Kamberra’ in the language of the Ngunnawal people. Sister Act: One of Canberra’s sister cities is Nara, Japan, which is famous for its ancient shrines, and also for its brief tenure as that nation’s 8th century capital.

<< Time-Out publication.

IT’S CHRISTMAS TIME! THERE’S A LOT DO … YOU’VE GOT PEOPLE TO HUG AND GREET, HANDS TO SHAKE AND TO WISH EVERYONE A MERRY CHRISTMAS. MERRY CHRISTMAS TO YOU ALL!

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 21 December 18

GAMBLERS: Are you a risk taker? I can’t lose, trust me!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

WATCH OUT!: REMEMBER, IT TAKES ALL THE LUCK IN THE WORLD TO BECOME A TRUE GAMBLER. SO, HOW DO YOU RATE YOURSELF. Below: IF GAMBLING IS A PROBLEM, SEE YOUR GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS CONSULANT. Below: A BANK OF POKIES CAN BE A PERSON’S WORST ENEMY.

Why do you gamble? If you have to ask, you wouldn’t understand. Nothing can compare with the thrill of the big score, or the excitement as you set your mind against your opponent’s.

Both of you trying to bluff, or double bluff; while searching for a clue to what other person is thinking. It’s better than any sport or game because you’re in control – maybe. That sense of chaotic control is really what makes you a gambler!

Just like the games you play, your interest revolves around two concepts: fun and profit. Depending on personal preference – one may dominate your particular style. But there is a daredevil in every gambler.

Gamblers, as a group, lack structure. In fact, most of you are skilful and individualistic. You win respect through skill and style. That means, if you lose it, lose with flash. Unfortunately, if a style is copied, it loses its flair, hence the streak of individuality.

PROBLEM GAMBLERS

Getting into gambling is incredibly easy. At least, that’s what most people would think. In reality, they’re nowhere close to being a true gambler. The second problem is, which few realise, is that you have to win to be a true gambler. This takes SKILL and LUCK.

If you prove that you are of a certain quality, this will allow you entrance into the special room. This is where the true gaming gets under way. It was when your standard bluff and strategies were inadequate that you knew you were finally dealing with opponents of fine calibre. That’s when you knew they had accepted you.

To leave gambling is not easy to do. Gamblers exist on a continuum and most us will fall somewhere on the pathway to: non-gamblers, social gamblers, heavy gamblers, problem gamblers and pathological gamblers.

So – how do you rate yourself?

If you’re a problem gambler, for instance, then this is usually when an individual’s gambling is out of control and it begins to cause personal, social and occupational reasons to become a problem. Deal with the problem and then comes the solution. This will, of course, take time.

ADDICTED TO GAMBLING

If the answer is “yes” to any of these question, you may have a serious problem:

Have you ever tried to cut back or even stop gambling? Have you ever borrowed (or stolen) money; or had a financial predicament as a result of your gambling? Do you feel high when gambling; depressed after losing; anxious or irritable when not able to gamble? Have you felt guilty about your gambling? Has anyone ever told you that you that are addicted to gambling?

The advice you should have been given is: go to your doctor; or go and see a Gamblers Anonymous consultant in your area.

<< Problem Gambling, Griffith University, NSW.


SPECIAL HOME-CARE: Christmas, not Xmas, should be the joyful celebration of the day!

FRANK MORRIS

STOP IT! LET US ABOLISH ‘XMAS’.

Xmas, as a would-be abbreviation for Christmas, does not conjure up in any way the period when Christ was born in Bethlehem. There’s nothing joyful at all about the word. It doesn’t, by any stretch of the imagination, reflect the spirit, the custom, the celebration, the tradition, or, sadly, the Gospels at Christmas.

Only an insipid (but creative) mind could have been responsible for dreaming up an implausible word. Everything in our power must be done to have it expunged from the English language.

STAMP IT OUT

Let us have a word that symbolises the ‘great light’ that people witness as they walked toward it in darkness on that special day.

And the word is … “Christmas”.

<< Abbreviated version from the A-Z Health Guide for adoutsenior.com.au


AUTHORS: 100 years ago -- The Magic Pudding book first went on sale

FRANK MORRIS

CHARACTERS ALL: THEY’RE CENTENARIANS GOING FOR A WALK IN THE PARK. ALBERT, THE MAGIC PUDDING, IS HAVING TROUBLE KEEPING UP. Below: THE FIRST MAGIC PUDDING BOOK – OLD BUT YOUNG. Below: THE MAGIC PUDDING – RELEASED WITH THE ANIMATED FILM IN 2000.

Norman Lindsay’s offbeat children’s story about the picaresque adventures of Albert the cantankerous Puddin’, and his friends, has been in print since it was first published by A & R in 1918.

The book took Lindsay nine months to write.

As the author moved towards its completion, he wrote to George Robertson in mid 1917: “I have finished the last slab of “Pudding” and thank God for it, for I’ve had a bellyful.

There is quite as much effort and invention needed to write nonsense as to create more pretentious works, and the stimulus is apt to flag.”

The Magic Pudding is highly valued and much sought after world wide by collectors’ et al.

In the 1990s, a first edition belonging to noted war historian C.E.W. Bean fetched $2100 at auction.

CANTANKEROUS PUDDIN'

Norman Lindsay is the most collected person in Australia, according to the late bibliophile, Walter Stone.  Stone once remarked that one “acquires” rather than “collects” Lindsayana.

A Commemorative Edition was issued in 1987; the Australian Children’s Classic edition in 1990; and a miniature edition, containing one section of the original text, in 1982. This 1924 edition varied slightly from the first edition.

In 2008, another version was published, more like The Magic Pudding of old.  This time the illustrations were rescanned and the page size was much like the original, in 1918.

An animated version of Norman Lindsay’s 1918 children’s classic The Magic Pudding, with an all-star cast, came to life on the big screen in December 2000, with the English actor John Cleese voicing the part of the cantankerous puddin’, Albert.

The film was produced by Energee Entertainment, a local film and television production house.  The animated characters were largely based on the Norman Lindsay drawings from the book.  The book of the film is signed by the actor who voiced ‘Bill Barnacle’, Hugo Weaving.

The story was described by the filmmakers as much “like the Magic Pudding – a resource that never runs out.”


CANBERRA: Visit one the youngest capital cities in the world

FRANK MORRIS

UP, UP AND AWAY: CANBERRA SUMMERS ARE FILLED WITH CRISP MORNINGS AND ARE JUST PERFECT FOR HOT AIR BALLOON RIDES. THE BALLOON SPECTACULAR FILLS THE CITY SKIES AS MORE THAN 30 HOT-AIR BALLOONS, FEATURING SOME STUNNING PATTERNS AND BIZZARE SHAPES, COME FROM ALL CORNERS OF THE CITY. Below: FOUR STIMULATED FOLKS REACH THE TOP OF A MOUNTAIN. Below: THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF CANBERRA, THE NEW CAPITAL, IN 1913.

Lonely Planet has rated Canberra third on its Best in Travel 2018 list of cities.

“This is the highest ranking an Australian city has ever achieved on the Lonely Planet list since its inception,” the team said. “It reveals just how unfairly overlooked the city has been. Canberra now boasts exciting boutique precincts with gastronomic highlights and cultural most-does.

“As one of the world’s young capital cites you might think Canberra has some catching up to do. It now a repository for national treasures, and a place where nature intrudes elegantly into urban spaces,” the Lonely Planet said.

Much of the charm and appeal of Canberra lies in its natural beauty. There’s dozens of picnic spots set in verdant, open spaces; while trees litter parks and line streets. Canberra is no longer a place for imposing buildings full of politicians and bureaucrats. Far from it. The Canberra of today has a vibrancy all of its own.

When you came to Canberra, do yourself a favour: leave time to explore some of a city’s many attractions. Canberra is a place for seasons, and reasons.

Here are some things you didn’t know about Canberra. Others will be published next week.

Marion Mahony Griffin: While her husband Walter Burley Griffin takes all of the credit for creating the designs for Canberra, it was Marion Mahony Griffin, artist and architect, who drew and presented the winning plans to the panel of assessors.

Phar Lap’s BIG heart: Phar Lap’s unusually large heart is on display at the National Museum of Australia. It weighs a whopping 6.35kg – that’s 1.5 times the weight of an average thoroughbred racehorse heart.

Gone-broke: When the government invited the people of Australia to nominate suitable names for their new capital in 1913, the public responded in good humour. And names like Kangaremu, Sydmelperadbrisho, Swindleville, Gone-broke and Caucus City getting a run for their money.

Einstein angles: At Questacon, there’s an impressive 3D sculpture of Albert Einstein on view. But look at it from a different angle and you’ll discover a completely different image.

Run it up the flagpole: The Australian flag that flies over Parliament House 24 hours a day is a big one. It’s roughly the same size as a double-decker bus and it weighs 22kg. It takes three people to change over, and this happens once a month.

Next: Five more things you must know about Canberra.

<< The Lonely Plant; Time Out; Frank Morris.


NOW OPEN: It’s on at David Jones, for kids only!

DIFFERENT SHAPES: SOME OF THESE MARVEL-ITES ARE KIDS BEST FRIENDS!

Disney, Star Wars and the Marvel characters are right in the heart of Sydney. That’s right!  All kids have the awe-inspiring chance to explore, learn and create. It’s also a world of storytelling for the young and the young at heart. All you have to do is this: Go to a magical one-of-a-kind destination. You’ll be taken to Level 9 Elizabeth Street – David Jones. For kids only.

 

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 13 December 18

SHORTS: This is one of the most famous names in British aviation

THE GOLDEN AGE OF FLYING.

FRANCIS ROLLEY

MEN OF HISTORY: THIS HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH WAS TAKEN NEAR LEYSDOWN, ON THE ISLE OF SHEPPEY, IN 1909. IT WAS THE YEAR IN WHICH THE WRIGHT BROTHERS PLACED A CONTRACT WITH SHORTS FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF SIX BIPLANES. DESCRIPTION OF THE PHOTO AT THE BOTTOM OF THE STORY. Below: SHORTS’ OWN DESIGN WINNER OF ONE THOUSAND POUNDS. Below: A SIMILAR DESIGN TO THE WINNER BUT RELEASED 12 MONTHS LATER.

This article was written in 1988 just after Shorts was being considered by a major Australian airline. Back in 1938, the high-powered Qantas-Sutherland flying boats were to undertake the nine and a half days day trip from Southampton to Sydney, landing at Rose Bay, the site of the Sydney’s first international airport. As a promotional brochure advertising the Sydney service said, “it was an era when travel was new, exciting and glamorous.” – Frank Morris.

The headquarters of the  Shorts organisation is now located at Belfast, in Northern Ireland, where the company operates a design and production complex which is one of the best equipped of its kind in Europe.

A broad-based  work program is concentrated in three main areas: aircraft, aerostructures,  and missile systems.
Aircraft activity covers the whole area of design, development and manufacture of  the company’s own aircraft projects.

These include the highly successful 360 36-seat and 330-seat wide-bodied regional airliners and the Skyvan STOL (Short TakeOff and Landing) light transport, as well as the new C-23 Sherpa multi-role freighter and the Shorts Tucano  turbo-prop military trainer, all of which are in world-wide service.

In recent years Shorts has greatly extended its international commitments by undertaking the manufacture of major aircraft components for other producers in Europe and America.  They have specialised particularly in the business of jet engine nacelle production.

Major companies with which Shorts have collaborated include Boeing, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Pratt & Whitney and Rohr in the United States, while teaming up with British Aerospace, Fokker and Rolls-Royce in Europe.

GUIDED WEAPONS

In the missile field, Shorts has for many years been acknowledged for its expertise in close-up guided weaponry.  The company’s current range includes the Javelin and Blowpipe man-portable shoulder-launched systems and the Seacat ship-to-air/surface missiles.

The company also claims the distinction of having supplied guided weapon systems to more countries than any other British manufacturer.

The history of the Shorts oganisation dates from April 1901 when brothers Oswald and Eustace Short first set up business at Hove in Sussex as manufacturers of aerial balloons.

Within  two years they had moved to a larger workshop in London, and in 1906 they transferred to still larger premises at Battersea.

FIRST PILOTS LICENSES

In 1908 they were joined by the eldest Short brother, Horace, and the following year began construction of their first heavier-than-air machine.

In the same year the brothers were awarded the contract by Orville and Wilbur Wright for the manufacture of six biplanes under licence.  These were constructed in a new factory at Shellbeach on the isle of Sheppey, and in them members of the Aero Club gained the first pilot’s licences to be issued in the United Kingdom.

In October 1909 a biplane built to Shorts’ own design gained a prize of 1,000 pounds for the first British aircraft to fly a circular mile,

The brothers had now moved decisively into a new era of powered flight and within  five years their rapidly increasing workload had twice necessitated transfer to larger premises.

From these beginnings the company has risen to become one of the most famous in British aviation, pioneering designs and production techniques which have been adopted throughout the industry, producing a long line of famous aircraft and forging an unbroken link between the first ‘stick-and-string’ pioneers and the supersonic world of the 1980s.

PHOTOGRAPH: Group included Oswald, Horace and Eustace Short (second, third and fourth, back row); in the front row (from left) are J.T.C. Moore-Brabazon (later Lord Brabazon of Tara), Wilbur and Orville Wright and C.S. Rolls, co-founder of Rolls Royce.


FAITHFUL SERVICE: Shorts company served Australia for 70 years!

A SPARTAN LOOK: THIS BUILDING SERVES AS THE FIRST AIRPORT FOR FLYING BOATS IN 1938 FOR INTERNATIONAL FLIGHTS.

In Australia the company became well known in 1938 when Qantas, in conjunction with Imperial Airways, the predecessor of British Airways, opened up the Southampton-Sydney air route.

Flying the famous Shorts Empire flying boats, the journey took 9 ½  days.

The final stages from Singapore, for which Qantas had responsibility, were via Surabaya in Indonesia, Darwin, Karumba, Townsville, Brisbane and finally Sydney.

After the war, during which the Shorts Sunderland was operated by the RAAF, Shorts flying boats were again operated by Qantas and others, including Ansett.

<< Airlines Magazine, November 1988.


FOODFROLICO: From Boxing Day to New Years Day – let cool cocktails do the work!

FRANK MORRIS

CENTRE OF THE WORLD: SAN FRANCISO SERVES A MIGHTY COCKTAIL CALLED … SAN FRANCISO. Below: CHAMPAGNE PUNCH … IT HAS A HABIT OF LAYING A PUNCH. Below: SAY HELLO TO JACK … YOU’LL LIKE HIS COCKTAIL.

After the Christmas dinner meltdown, Wine Guide said, you’ll be needing some cool cocktails to tide you over the limbo. Said the Wine Guide, “the emphasis in on long drinks so any spirit base is eligible.

CHAMPAGNE PUNCH

250 ml brandy, 2 bottles of reasonable bubbly, 600 ml soda, 30 ml maraschino cherries, juice of 6 lemons, castor sugar.

Stir the lemon juice with ice, sweeten with sugar to taste, then add the rest of the ingredients. Garnish with cherries and serve in punch cups.

Mocktails – not all cocktails have to be lethal. Here are two suggestions for those who have to drive home afterward.

SAN FRANCISCO

50 ml orange juice, 50 ml pineapple juice, 1 egg white. Dash of grenadine, dash of orange bitters, soda water.                                                                                         
Shake all ingredients. To up with soda water and garnish with orange.

JACK THOMPSON

45 ml Clayton’s dry tonic, 40 ml ginger ale, 50 ml lemonade.

Combine in a long glass and garnish with a slice of lemon.

COCKTAILS: DID YOU KNOW?

Here are a few cocktail party conversation starters:

The archetypal  cocktail, the classic Martini, dates back to about the 1850s … Gin is used in at least 150 different cocktails … A US expert says a cocktail can be strong, seductive, shattering, sensual, swinging and even sentimental … When professional barmen pour ingredients, they “use the eye” so to speak … A State Tourism Minister’s favourite cocktail is a Pina Colada … “Candy is dandy, but liquor is quicker,” observed poet Ogden Nash, reflecting on how liquor, in some form or another, has been employed to breach maidenly defences … Madame de Pompadour said that, “Champagne is the only wine that leaves a woman beautiful after drinking it.” – Frank Morris.

<< Wine Guide; Frank Morris.


Snugglepot and Cuddlepie by May Gibbs have been together for 100 years!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

100 YEAR OF RAISING: NOT BAD FOR SNUGGLEPOT AND CUDDLEPIE. Below: MAY GIBBS … INNOCENCE WAS ALWAYS TRIUMPHANT.

Snugglepot and Cuddlepie, laconic Mr Lizard, the Big Bad Banksia men, Little Ragged Blossom, Mr John Dory, Miss Anne Chovey are names that roll out of memory and off the tongue like an invocation of Australian childhood.

Where every blossom holds a bush baby, newspapers are written in scribblybark, evil banksia men connive, wicked Mrs Snake lurks and innocence is always triumphant.

The wonderful world of May Gibbs.

FLANNEL FLOWER

Gibbs, artist and author, peopled the Australian bush with beings of her imagination instantly recognizable to all adults who as children were captivated by her books. Plump bare-bottomed gumnut babies in gumnut caps and gumleaf briefs with long blossom eyelashes, gnarled thick-lipped stubbly banksia men and wide-eyed flannel flower babies peering out of blossom cups.

Gibbs’ real world was Nutcote, the home she commissioned in 1923 from architect Bertrand Waterhouse in Sydney’s Neutral Bay.

She lived there until her death at 93 in 1969. She bequeathed the property to UNICEF, which sold it in 1970 for $80,000. (Today it is valued at millions of dollars.)

The May Gibbs’ Foundation opened Nutcote in 1994. Check website.

<< Adapted from Kate Halley’s longer version in Time, May 7, 1990.


TARONGA ZOO: When the modern animals meet up with the dinosaurs return

FRANK MORRIS

The rise of the Tarongasaurs. The dinosaurs will visit Taronga Zoo this summer. Make boredom extinct. Come face to face with the fearsome T-Rex. Kids, climb atop the Pachyrhinosaurus Dino. Keep cool with the spitting Dilophosaurus. Remember, kids, you’ll encounter 20 life-size, roaring and moving dinosaurs of all types and sizes.

Rise of the Tarongasaurs is FREE with Zoo entry. Check: taronga.org.au/dinosaurs

IT’S CHRISTMAS TIME! DRINK MODERATELY, EAT SLOWLY – IT WILL MAKE YOUR CHRISTMAS A VERY MERRY ONE INDEED.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 07 December 18

LOOKING BACK: ENOLA GAY’s papers auctioned in New York: more than they estimated

“ENOLA GAY LOG IS A UNIQUELY IMPORTANT DOCUMENT,” SAID A SPOKESPERSON.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

CONQUEROR: THE ENOLA GAY DROPPED THE FIRST ATOMIC BOMB IN THE WORLD CALLED “LITTLE BOY” ON HIROSHIMA. Below: COLONEL PAUL TIBBETS AND ENOLA GAY JUST BEFORE TAKE OFF.

New York (Reuters): “My God, what have we done?”

The Enola Gay co-pilot’s log book, which recorded the horror of having just dropped the first atomic bomb in war, was the most chilling item on auction in the sale of US historical documents that fetched record prices. The auction was held on March 28, 2002.

Winning bid for Capt. Robert Lewis’s log chronicling the “Little Boy” mission that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945 was $350,000 – more than the estimated range of $200,000 and $300,000.

“It is a uniquely important document,” said dealer Seth Kaller about the Enola Gay log. “It’s one of the greatest moments, but one of the most terrible, of the century. It’s a terribly sad record. I think that affects the desire to own it.”

Lewis’s minute-by-minute account of the mission, written in pen and pencil during the flight, was full of details of the bombing run aimed at bringing a fast end to the Second World War. It also was filled with awe after the 9000 pound bomb, dubbed “Little Boy,” was dropped over Hiroshima.

HOW MANY KILLED

It is believed that more the 140,000 people died by the end of the year as a result of the bomb. The total number of people who died due to the bomb has been estimated at 200,000.

“Fifteen seconds after the flash there were two very distinct slaps (air turbulence) that was all the physical effects we felt,” wrote Lewis. “There in front of our eyes was without a doubt the greatest explosion man has ever witnessed.

“The city was nine-tenths covered with smoke. A column of white cloud, which in less than three minutes, reached 30,000 feet and then went up to 50,000.

“I am certain the entire crew felt this experience was more that anyone human had ever thought possible. Just how many did we kill? We’re groping for words to explain. My God, what have we done.

“If I live a hundred years I’ll never quite get those few minutes out my mind …”

<< From Reuters; Larry Fine; 2002.


IT’S CHRISTMAS TIME. MERRY CHIRSTMAS, MERRY CHRISTMAS TO YOU ALL!


HOME-CARE: Large-print novels are for people with impaired vision

“I COULDN’T READ ANY OF THE BOOKS I’D BORROWED BECAUSE OF POOR EYESIGHT.”

FRANK MORRIS

ONE- UPMANSHIP: LARGE-PRINT EDITIONS WERE AN IMMEDIATE SUCCESS. Below: BRITISH CRIME WRITER AGATHA CHRISTIE’S RECENTLY FINISHED NOVEL CONTRIBUTED TO THE WORLD-WIDE FAME OF PROJECT.

Large-print novels have been available from your local library for years.

The pioneer of large-print books, Frederick Thorpe, formerly a publisher of childrens’ classics, was the founder of Ulverscroft Books in 1964. His idea “met with resistance from publishers reluctant to have their popular authors associated with what they considered to be a gimmick.”

The catalyst for what was eventually to became worldwide the bestselling “Ulverscroft large-print series” was initiated by a group of women volunteers who delivered books to the elderly. Though grateful for the service, Thorpe was informed, many of the service’s clients “couldn’t read the books they borrowed because of poor eyesight.”

CHRISTIE WAS THE LIGHT

To get the project off the ground, Thorpe realised that he had to have the support of at least a few high profile authors.

He approached Agatha Christie, who was published by Collins. When she heard what Thorpe had in mind, Christie embraced the scheme wholeheartedly. The author’s A Pocketful of Rye was one of first titles published in the new quarto sized, hard-cased format.

Thorpe’s large-print editions were an immediate success with libraries throughout the English-speaking world. He opened the floodgates for other publishers. By the mid-1970s, the edition had become an international market.
Thorpe dies in England at 85 in 1999.

COMING: HOME-CARE RESUMES IN FEBRUARY.


FOODFROLICO: Christmas time – try Bacardi rum daiquiri with your favourite fruit

FRANK MORRIS

“It’s the easiest drink to concoct. It sounds complicated. But anyone can do it. It’s not an idle boast. Not at all.

“What you’re trying is a Bacardi rum daiquiri – its simplicity itself. But there is a trick to it! You must become a theatrical entrepreneur of showmanship, you must now demonstrate the flamboyance of the mixing performance.

“So pay close attention. My guests, take a step forward.

“To 45ml of light, dry Bacardi rum. Add a dash of lemon juice, a teaspoon of sugar, ice … crushed usually … and strawberries. Into the blender. And then, I said, switching my voice into a loud vibratory sound.

“Mesdames and geeentlemen”, the guests broke out in cheesy smiles, “the 18 second Bacardi rum, and strawberry daiquiri!”

A sip of the foaming, pink, magical daiquiri makes you feel like you had dreamed and gone to La La Land.

The guests gathered around me. “I raised my glass. The guests cried ‘Encore!’” Try your favourite fruit – bananas, peaches, limes or strawberries.

<< Ogilvy MBA Advertising; 1988.


FAMOUS PIECART: Stopover for generations of Sydneysiders since it started

“FREE WHEELER”

TINO DEES, A MASTER BUTCHER, WHO HAS WON MORE 170 AWARDS FOR HIS SAUSAGES, HAMS AND BACON, IS THE NEW OWNER OF THE 73-YEAR-OLD INSTITUTION, HARRY’S CAFÉ DE WHEELS. ‘WE’RE CALLED HARRY’S CAFÉ DE WHEELS, BUT HAVE YOU TRIED OUR COFFEE? WE WANT TO OPEN MORE THAN 100 “HARRY’S” LOCATIONS AROUND AUSTRALIA. ACCORDING TO A NEWSPAPER REPORT, FANS OF HARRY’S FAMOUS TIGER – A MEAT PIE TOPPED WITH MUSHY PEAS, MASHED POTATO AND GRAVY – CAN TAKE COMFORT. IT WILL STAY ON THE MENU AND REMAIN UNCHANGED. I’VE NEVER ‘DINED’ AT HARRY’S. HERE IS A WRITER WHO HAS VISITED THERE MANY TIMES OVER THE YEARS. – Frank Morris.

Sydney is famous for its landmarks. But there’s none more colourful than Harry the Wheels piecart on Cowper Wharf Drive, Wooloomooloo, near Garden Island naval base.

To Sydneysiders and overseas vistors, Harry the Wheels has become an institution. Harry’s legendary piecart has been a stopover for generations of sailors and taxi drivers.

Although the original Harry has long since departed for that great Piecart in the Sky, his successor, Alex, has carried on the tradition for many years. Harry the Wheels and Alex have been popularised in several documentaries shown on American and European television networks.

DAMN SHAME!

As a result, Harry the Wheels has gained international fame. Over the years many well-known personalities have made a point of paying Harry’s a visit. The walls of the piecart are festooned with photographs of some of the notables.

Colonel Sanders, of Kentucky Fried Chicken fame, is shown munching one of Harry’s pies – and enjoying every mouthful.

But sadly, Alex and Harry’s are an endangered species. Even though Harry’s has been shifted to various locations in recent years, there is a move to bring the curtain down on Alex for good.

And that would be a dammed shame. [This article was written in July, 1984. The author was a correspondent of Cab Talk, a weekly newspaper. A lot has happened since then. Started in 1945, Harry’s is now operated under a franchise system and has branches all over Sydney and Newcastle.]


S.O.B: Save our brumby … that’s the call to Australia!

FRANK MORRIS

HE COULD BE TRAPPED: PALEFACE IS CAPTURED IN HIS ELEMENT BY PHOTOGRAPHER MICHELLE BROWN. Below: A BRUMBY IS OFF AND RUNNING IN FULL FLIGHT.

It’s been a hard year for the brumbies. Like every other year. This year, the brumby situation is way out of control.

“Originally, the plan called for the culling of most of the estimated 6000 wild horses in the park,” reported The Land newspaper, “with the intention to leave a remaining population of 600. One of the potential captures is a famous grey or silver brumby known as Paleface.”

Photographer Michelle Brown has spotted Paleface many times.

“About four years ago I saw Paleface … for the first time … and it’s an experience I’ll never forget,” she told the newspaper. “Paleface is a ten-year-old white stallion who roams the Mount Selwyn, Kiandra and Three Mile Dam Area.

“Each year, I have noticed that he graces us with one or two new foals and the closeness he has with his mares is a bond I have never witnessed before in my life around horses.”

“CULL THE BRUMBIES”

The Land newspaper reports the “current wild horse trapping near Kiandra was foreshadowed in the 2016 Wild Horse Management plan to ‘minimise impacts in the northern and southern regions by reducing the horse population in these areas.”

In 1991, wild horses caused trouble for a NSW Environment Minister when word got out of the plans to cull the brumbies in Kosciusko National Park. They were horses immortalised in Banjo Paterson’s The Man from Snowy River.

Premier Bob Carr stepped in and said “Not on.”

If you want an easy way to do it, said a guest on the ABC’s Back Roads, then get a community to pay the horseman to secure the horses. Once you’ve got them, they will be broken-in and sold to the public. It may take time but it will be worth it.

That’s one way, at least.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 30 November 18

THE BOLD, THE BEARDED: Barber certainly notices a change in men’s facial hair

NOW, YOU STEPPED OFF A COBB AND CO COACH YOU COULD BE SURPRISED. JUST LOOK AT THE MEN SPORTING BUSHRANGER BEARDS.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

HMMMM: HOW DO I LOOK? Below: BUSHRANGER BEARD! EVEN NED KELLY WORE ONE.

Unless you have been living under a rock for the past few years, you’ll have noticed that beards are back all across Australia. One of the good-points of men sporting bushranger beards is looking like they’ve stepped of a Cobb and Co coach.

A barber said he’d “certainly noticed a change in men’s attitude to facial hair.” He said, “Thirty years ago, men grew beards and they didn’t bother looking after them.”

These days, based on research he’s done on his own customers he estimates that about 40 per cent of men are using more care products than they were three years ago. For blokes keen to grow their own Ned Kelly beard the barber recommends that they treat it as they would hair on their head.

That means washing it regularly with a good sulphate-free shampoo and condition it afterwards with a spray-on conditioner which will make it easier to comb out.

CHRISTMAS TRIM

“When a bloke’s had a beard for a long time, he gets really dry skin underneath,” the barber said. To prevent skin from drying out, he suggests, using beard oil as well. For the gents out there who prefer a closer cut, an oil-free moisturiser should do the trick.

Close-cropped beards should really be attended to and trimmed weekly, depending on how short you want it. This can done at home or by a professional. But, as the barber says, “beard trims aren’t that dear to get done. So I reckon they should treat themselves, really.”

Longer beards also require regular attention. A manicured look that’s in fashion means it’s about shape and style, not just bushiness. The barber suggests having this done … in conjunction with haircuts. It’s also important that the hair on your head suits the hair on your face.


FOODFOLICO: Christmas Drinks! Get some sparkle in the Henkell Trocken

FRANK MORRIS

SOMETHING ABOUT IT: HENKLELL TROCKEN! IT’S NAME HAS A SPECIAL RING TO IT. Below: DOUGLAS LAMB, WINE WRITER EXTRODINAIRE.

I was having a few drinks with a couple my colleagues. As I poured the sparkling Henkell into their champagne glasses one fellow looked up and said: “How long have you known this bubbly?” I think it was over thirty years ago, I reply.

Before then, I asked a wine expert on the magazine. He said “it was 1980.” When I departed, the chap was still talking about sparkling Henkell.

The wine writer was Douglas Lamb, who penned the Lamb and Wine column. And here is a piece of what he wrote back in 1980 -- “It’s a world of sparkle at Henkell”:

Henkell Trocken has a pleasant sounding ring to it, don’t you think?

ITS OWN WISDOM

Actually, it is the name of the largest sparkling wine company in the world. It produces more than 69 million bottles o year for the international market. Henkell Trocken use the Charmat method, which was perfected in the last twenty years in Germany, in making its sparkling wine.

And by law, the wine must remain on the lees in large tanks for six months. In its own wisdom, the company has extended this period to 15 months. The Henkell Trocken Sekt … is a typical example of a very well made wine which, by anybody’s standard, could only be described as excellent.

Frank Morris comments: Henkell Trocken can be brought at most wine shops and comes in a variety of bottle sizes. Give it a go this Christmas. You be amazed at the price.


WHAT CHRISTMAS IS ALL ABOUT! In the days before I became a wine writer, I used to read the wine columns at Christmas time and marvel about the quality and quantity the wine scribes would put away. Now, I have been at this caper a long time, I can tell you that it ain’t quite like that; Christmas becomes a day off. There is no real reason why Christmas Day should become a marathon of drinking; but there is every reason to pull out some special bottles and share with friends. Since Christmas in Australia is usually hot, I’ve gone for a cold wine selection and I’ve also tried to stick within a budget. Naturally, it would be great to splash the Krug around, but at $145 a bottle, or there about, that’s hardly likely. This year, I’ll be serving chilled sherry as a pre-dinner drink; it simply delicious with turkey and cranberry sauce; and the Christmas Pud, it’s nice and rich. -- Mark Shield, Wine Guide.


THE FESTIVAL IS COMING: There’re places blooming with Jacarandas just like Grafton

FRANK MORRIS

GLORIOUS COLOUR: JACARANDA AVENUE, GRAFTON, FORMS A CANOPY OF MAUVE
IN AUSTRALIA, INCLUDING THE GRAFTON DISTRICT, NSW, OF COURSE, EVERYBODY HAS ADMIRED THE JACARANDA’S 82 YEARS AS PART OF THE GRAFTON FESTIVAL. IN FACT, JACARANDAS WERE PLANTED IN THE 1800S. HENCE, THE BRILLIANT CANOPY OF A MAUVE BACKDROP OF THE FESTIVAL CITY.

There is a long-standing tradition in many Australian towns and cities of celebrating the local harvest or a blossom-time of flowers with organised festivals.

The various festivals usually have exhibitions, street displays, processions and social and sporting events which  attract thousands of tourists from all over Australia. And, of course, the crowning of a “festival queen” is also an integral part of the festivities.

Eighty-two years ago, the first Grafton Jacaranda Festivals was held on October 30, 1935.

“Grafton has that awesome looking Clarence River bisecting the city,” wrote a colleague. “Thousands of Jacarandas and other trees lining its streets and filling its national parks.

“Scores of lovely historic homes, public buildings and numerous old pubs. The ‘capital’ of the Clarence Valley has a beauty and charm that’s worth stopping to sample.”

The event has not only become one of national renown but it is today recognised as Australia’s foremost floral festival.*

CANOPY OF MAUVE

Needless to say, the city is gearing up to celebrate this historic event in grand style. In the early 1800s, Jacarandsa were planted in the Grafton district. In the 1900s, a citizen names Volkers, in the cause of civic pride, planted an avenue of jacaranda trees which is now referred to as Jacaranda Avenue.

“As these trees grew to their full height – up to 15 metres – they embowered the avenue in the spring time with a canopy of mauve and carpeted the roadway with blossoms,” said a spokesperson for the Council.

“At festival time the jacarandas contrast with the colour and greenery of flame, white cedar, fig, pine and flowering gum trees.”

The festival was inaugurated by Mr E.H.Chataway, and it received “whole-hearted support from the community,” said the spokesperson.

Grafton, the birthplace of champion sculler, Harry Searle and sometime Prime Minister, Sir Earle Page, has become a popular tourist centre – especially at Festival time. The jacaranda, of which there are about 50 species, hails from the West Indies to Brazil.

It is described as “one the finest ornamental flowering trees” for subtropical regions. The jacaranda can be found in the gardens and streets plantations of eastern Australia, particularly around Brisbane; and also as far south as Melbourne.

“There are many beautiful examples of jacaranda in Melbourne, and they recover their beauty quickly if cut by severe frost,” said a leading flora expert.

A CHART OF NSW’S FESTIVALS AND WHERE ARE THEY FROM

Dahlia, Mittagong; Lasiendra, Wauchope; Orchid’s, Ballina; Wattle Time, Cootamundra; Tuplip, Bowral; Apple Blossom, Batlow; Spring Flowers, Katoomba/Leura; Cherry Blossom, Young; and the Rhododendron, Blackheath.

Illustration: The original jacaranda tree, in Grafton, in the early 1800s, acts as a shading device on a hot day.


FOODFOLICO: Special from 1940! Something different for Christmas

WORLD OF DIFFERENCE: 1940s RAISED PIE, A SAVOURY ALTERNATIVE. Below: SPECIALTY SHOPS ALL OVER THE WORLD COOK FAMOUS BRITISH PIES, JUST LIKE THE SAVOURY RAISED PIE! Below: HANGOVER, HANGOVER, HANGOVER! PLEASE – DRINK A LITTLE LESS.

For hot food lovers! A perfect Christmas raised pie – this should make a world of difference at YOUR family mealtime!

Here is what you do: use the same ingredients as the 1940s cook does but cook it your way. The family cook says: “This is a 1940s wartime raised pie prepared exactly the way the cook does in the 40s -- BUT cooked in my own oven.”

RAISED PIE. A savoury alternative to the more usual Raised Pie. Enough for 4 people.

INGREDIENTS. PASTE: 8 oz flour, 1 level teaspoon salt, 2 oz lard, quarter pint water.

FILLING. 8 oz sausage meat, 4 oz fat bacon, minced, 1 onion, minced, 2 level teaspoons mixed herbs, 1 level teaspoon salt, ½ level teaspoon pepper.

METHOD. Mix flour and salt. Boil lard (or equivalent) in water and add to the flour. Knead well and line a bread or cake tin with the pastry keep back a little for the lid. Mix the remaining ingredients thoroughly, place in bread tin and cover with remaining pastry. Brush over with reconstituted egg and bake in a moderate oven for 1 hour. Serve hot from tin; or turn out when cold.

<< The Daily Mirror, April 19, 1945.

PAYING THE PRICE FOR HANGOVERS

Christmas is a celebration time. Over-indulgence is costing Australia dearly, according to the latest research. Hangovers are causing 11.5 million “sick days” a year at a cost of $3 billion to the economy.

A university study found the more alcohol one consumes, the more time they are likely to take off work. They estimated that the cost of lost productivity ay $3 billion a year, up from $1.2 billion in an alcohol-related absenteeism in 2001.

Researchers looked at data from the 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey, which asked more the 12,000 people about their habits.

HANGOVER?

While most, (56 per cent) drank alcohol at low-risk levels (four or fewer drinks on one occasion), 27 per cent drank at risky levels (five to 10 in a session) and 9 per cent drank at high-risk – more than 11 drinks in one stint.

“Hands up all those who have never suffered a hangover?” said Mark Shield, wine writer. “Too much of a good thing can make for a very uncomfortable aftermath.”

NEXT: HOME CARE: Large-print novels. For people who suffer with impaired vision.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 23 November 18

CARPATHIA: From a rescue ship to a ship of war

GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN; THE 1918 WAR.

FRANK MORRIS

GOODBYE: THE CARPATHIA, WITH ALL HOPE ABANDONED, ON ITS WAY TO THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA. Below: IN ANOTHER LIFE, CARPATHIA WAS THE FIRST SHIP ON THE SCENE DURING THE TITANIC CRISIS. Below: BOAT 14 TOWING ONE OF THE LIFEBOATS AS IT NEARS THE RESCURE POINT.

Wireless messages were soon received from the various ships relaying the disaster of the Titanic in 1912. Titanic had hit an iceberg estimated to be 30 metres high above the water and 120 metres long when the boats were ordered out at 11.45am.

There was no panic or rush to join the boats. By 12.05, there was mass hysteria.

Up on the top deck of Titanic, a lady claimed the attention of a passing steward.

“What ship is that?” she asked. “It is the Cunarder Carpathia, ma’am.”

“The Carpathia?”

Yes, ma’am.”

********

The rescue was underway. It was rowdy, uncontrolled bedlam.

When all the boats, containing mothers and children, a few men, finally were off-loaded down from the rapidly-sinking Titanic, they broke out in song and drifted away easily.

On boat 14, one of the survivors, Lawrence Beesely* wrote, it was now 1 o’clock in the morning. It was an ideal night, except for the bitter cold. In the distance, the Titanic looked enormous. At about 2 o’clock, we observed her settling rapidly, with the bow and the bridge completely under water.

She slowly sank. Titanic was heading for the bottom of the sea. She was gone.

********

What happened to the extraordinary Carpathia after the rescue?

In July 1918, while Thia waits patiently at Huskisson Dock, in the Port of Liverpool, for the naval escort that will see her convoy of merchant ships – some bound for the Mediterranean, others the Americas – through the Southwest Approaches, Captain William Prothero visits his wife and children at their home in town.

A proud Welshman, he nonetheless moved his wife … to the city on the Mersey, soon after they wed and he began working for Cunard.

He misses singing sea shanties while crewing on a big, three-skysail yarder in the China trade, whole-sail set on a moonlit night. And now … he captains steamers. He’s Thia’s longest-serving captain, in fact.

Though these days she’s more of an armed merchant cruiser than ocean liner, courtesy of Cunard’s agreement with the British admiralty that allows them to requisition ships during wartime. Her funnel has long since shed its red and black livery … for battle grey.

It’s been that way since … he had been forced to paint her funnel in the rain. A wild rumour had washed across her decks that she was about to fall prey to a pack of German warship. But that voyage was blessedly uneventful.

She’s spent most of the war as a pack mule, hauling horses for the cavalry, aeroplanes for the air force and oil in her double bottom. She’s carried $25 million in securities from the Bank of England … Canadian troops by the thousands … Americans when they finally joined the cause …

Somewhere during these years, she acquired armament … a 4.7 inch gun that weighs as much as an elephant. The eighteen-foot rapid-fire barrel can hit a target at 16,500 yards and it has a 210-degree arc of fire.

The gun caused a furore in New York … (it was) the largest, at the time, ever brought to the city aboard a merchantman.

********

“Hard-a-starboard,” William orders. “Port engine full astern.” But it’s too late. The torpedo hits Thia’s side and detonates. A plume of water shoots up towards the bridge and she shudders hard from the impact, bleeding black smoke.

It’s long and bruising encounter with the U-55 submarine, five of the crew were missing, but none of the passengers.
The U-55 had won it day. Carpathia was never to return.

<< Carpathia, Jay Ludowyke, 2017.

*Lawrence Beesley’s account was given to The Times three days after the sinking.


HOME-CARE: Personal emergency alarms can be yours … and save your life

FRANK MORRIS

SAVIOUR: NURSE TO CLIENT – “NOW YOU ARE SAFE.” Below: THE PREFERRED MODEL.

Don’t let another day pass without checking out the personal alarm for yourself! Remember, it could save your life. Choice magazine described the devices as “the ultimate” product for carers and dependents alike.

Says Choice: “These alarms are the modern cry for help. Emergency alarms effectively give people more independence. They’re only a button press away from help if they need it.”

When you’re not these it is reassuring to know that there is a ‘safety net’ of a 24-hour emergency service are in place for your dependent/s, which operates 365 days a year.

PREFERRED SYSTEM

Falls and all sorts of problems, which would not be a problem in times past, can now become a dire emergency.

The Vital Call system was launched in Australia in 1976. It is the preferred brand for retirement villages, hostels and for personal use at home; and certain areas of the home. Its technology is second to none. It is recognised throughout the world for the quality of the equipment and the services that come with it.

Vital Call’s switchboard operators are a dedicated response team that know the ins and outs of the service.

If a person at home is in trouble and cannot speak, Vital Call can identify the user and react appropriately by using confidential details to summon the necessary service to that person’s house.

<< Retirement Villages: MAKING THE RIGHT CHOICE; Frank Morris, PRP Graphics Pty Ltd, Queensland; Best Years No 1, Vol 2.

NEXT: Large Print novels. For people who suffer with impaired vision.


MARBLE BAR: A drinking den of unique finery celebrates 125 years!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

GLEAMING: THE MARBLE BAR HAS CELEBRATED 125 YEARS SINCE IT WAS BUILT. Below: MR GEORGE ADAMS, OF ADAMS HOTEL, CONSTRUCTED THIS HIGH VICTORIANA STYLE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DECORATION IN AUSTRALIA – THE MARBLE BAR.

Where else in Australia could one enjoy a beer in best Aussie tradition in such an improbable and extravagant setting?

Come on, have a guess? The Marble Bar, of course.

The Adams Hotel was the favourite drinking place of Sydneysiders since the 1870s. It was demolished in the 1960s. It was to make way for a new building development. Unusual steps were taken to save its lavishly ornate Marble Bar from a similar fate.

The Marble Bar rescue mission was overwhelmed by a tide of sentimental attachment rather than for historical reasons. The Bar, itself, had been constructed by the self-made swashbuckling entrepreneur George Adams and perhaps represented one of the finest examples of the High Victoriana style of architecture and decoration in Australia.

A well-known Sydney architect said the Bar had become semi derelict and “the cost of preserving it was estimated at $250,000.”

WAS REPRIEVED

However, the problem was unexpectedly resolved when the Hilton organisation expressed an interest in the old Adams site, which ran from Pitt Street through to George Street, provided that the Marble Bar could be incorporated into the proposed new Hilton Hotel.

With the site secured by the hotel chain, the Marble Bar was reprieved. This year is the fourteenth in its new location under the Sydney Hilton complex.

From the 30s, the Marble Bar declined in popularity and appearance. It became increasingly shabby and patronage waned to the extent that by the 1960s, according to a spokesperson, “you could shoot a gun through the place and not hit anyone.”

The official opening of the Marble Bar was at the Hilton Hotel in April 1973. It was culmination of the most complex and, with costs of $250,000, the most expensive architectural restoration in Australia.

<< Historic Australia, 1987, for a much fuller version of the Andrea Loder article; Frank Morris.


It’s 1963, and Pearl Turton does a bit of twisting and turning at Palm Cove

IAN LORDING            Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

HAPPY THREESOME: PEARL TURTON, CENTRE, LAPS UP ALL THE ATTENTION. PHOTOGRAPH JACK EDEN, RIGHT, SEEMS TO BE HAVING A GOOD TIME. Below: YOUNG PEARL TURTON.

The Surfer Detective, Ian Lording, has dug up from the musty bowls of the British Pathe Reuters Historical Collection a super sleuth’s dream. Six minutes of gold. But for the life of us we can’t get the sound board to work.

Nevertheless, it has everything from the local milkman to Pearl Turton and her mates (and brother, Ron) cruising the dirt road of Sydney’s Palm Beach in the Morris Major for a bit of surfing. Just a shame the producers couldn’t have waited for a better day, and catch up with Pearl at work.

And it’s all topped off with a jaunt way up north to the Barrier Reef for a spot of diving and shell collecting.

And with a newsreel for British cinema and TV, they had a pretty good budget by the looks of it. The Poms were rather enamoured with Oz beach culture – and that’s fair enough!

Here’s a short summary of the British Pathe event:

A THINKING GIRL

The young Australian, Pearl Turton is typical of the Sydneysiders who start every day really early. Pearl has been surfboarding for two years and, at sixteen, is already a champion.

Some 62,000 boards, it is estimated, are used on the Australians beaches. And Pearl Turton “owns” her own --- Palm Beach.  She talks about the quality of waves, their size, their potential and how they can be mastered. This is the thinking of the Australian outdoor girl.

The boards are light and easily manoeuvred, and cost about 40 pounds each. The Australian Surfing Association hopes that Sydney might the venue for a World Championships next year – 1964.

Then comes Pearl’s working day – as a cosmetician in a Sydney pharmacy.

<< Pacific Longboarder magazine; Pacific Longboarder.com

NEXT YEAR: Pearl Turton story. In over four hours of surfing she has ridden some top waves.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 16 November 18

THE GREAT WAR HAS ENDED: At last the dawn breaks and the whole country comes alive

THE WORD ‘VICTORY’, IN GREAT ELECTRIC LETTERS, WAS FLASHED ACROSS THE FRONT OF THE HERALD 0FFICE. THE NEWS HAD SPREAD RAPIDLY. THEN, BY MID-MORNING, THE WHOLE COUNTRY HAD BURST ALIVE TO CELEBRATE.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

CHEERS!: MARTIN PLACE WAS THE STARTING POINT FOR THE GREAT CELEBRATIONS. Below: THE ARMISTICE IS SIGNED. BELOW: BILLY HUGHES CONSCRIPTIONS WERE BEATEN.

On November 11, 1918, the war has ended.

The news reached our shore early last evening. Germany had submitted to the Allies’ terms and signed the armistice. The war was over.

The information, transmitted through the State Department in Washington, reached the offices of the Herald at seven o’clock. A few minutes later an extraordinary edition was being sold in the streets and the word ‘Victory’ in great electric letters was flashed into being across the front of the Herald office.

(Nearly all newspapers in Australia, Britain and America, for example, would have done something similar. At the end of five years of war, it’s amazing what brings on these super-human tasks. –FM.)

By 7.30 the news was spreading rapidly. By 7.45 steam whistles on ferries and locomotives were in full blast; the whole city began to stir. Even in the smallest and most distant suburbs, people commenced to gather in little knots and discuss the news.

Then, suddenly, from cottage and mansion, flat and lodging, everyone who could walk turned an eager face towards the city. Never in the history of Sydney did a greater flood of passengers flow over the evening service of trams, trains and ferries.

WILD, UNRESTRANED JOY

Every-man, woman and child came into the city to “celebrate”, but they came in such numbers ... At nine o’clock, in Martin Place and Moore Street, and in Pitt and George Streets adjoining, the crowds were so dense that no one could move. They could only stand and cheer.

But in the surrounding streets, where it was possible to move, old and young let themselves go, and there were witnessed scenes of wild and unrestrained joy.

The crowds armed themselves with two varieties of articles considered indispensable – flags and noise-makers. The former added to the picturesqueness of the scene, the latter made existence nearly unendurable.

But nobody cared.

SHOWERED WITH CONFETTI

The realisation that the most terrible war of all history was over, that the Allies were completely triumphant, that the menace of Prussianism was swept away, that peace was once more to come to the earth after four years of horror – this did not come to every mind.

Perhaps, but on every face, there was gladness, relief, satisfaction. Perhaps, no incidents were more striking than the enthusiasm that men in khaki, and those wearing returned soldiers badges, were greeted. All were hailed with expressions of gratitude and showered with confetti.

“I know of no words adequate for such an occasion,” said the Premier, Mr Watt. “The long night of suffering and anguish has ended. There will go up from the hearts of the people of Australia a great sigh of relief that dawn has come.

“”The first impulse of a Christian nation … is to thank God for the triumph of right against the demoniac designs of the enemy.”

<< Sydney Morning Herald, November 12, 1918; Frank Morris.

CHRISTCHURCH CHEERS ON: THERE’S NOTHING THAT SOUNDS MORE CHEERFUL THAN 100,000 CITIZENS JOINING IN WITH EVERY TOWN AND VILLAGE OF NEW ZEALAND.


THE GREAT WAR HAS ENDED: Troops praised for their braveness and courage to annihilate Turkish armies

THEIR GALLANTRY AND DETERMINATION MEANT TOTAL DESTUCTION OF THOSE WHO OPPOSED US.

FRANK MORRIS

IMAGE IN GLASS: A SPECIAL MEMO WAS SENT TO OUT TO ALL TROOPS FOR THEIR GALLANTRY AND THEIR DEFEAT OF THE VIIth and VIIIth TURKISH ARMIES. THIS COPY, AN ORINGALS, IS OWNED BY FRANK MORRIS.

On September 26, 1918, General Allenby sent his gallant forces a specially signed memo which amplified his “total thanks” for the role they played in the defeat of the Turkish Armies.

It reads:

“I desire to convey to all ranks and all arms of the Force under my command, my admiration and thanks for their great deeds of the past week, and my appreciation of their gallantry and determination, which have resulted in the total destruction of the V11th and V111th Turkish Armies opposed to us.

“Such a complete victory has seldom been known in all the history of war.”

General Allenby

26TH September, 1918.


THE GREAT WAR HAS ENDED: Brothers in arms and a war of words…

BRASS HAT, STANDING: “THINGS PRETTY QUIET TODAY, EH? THE CANDID DIGGER: “YAIR, WHAT WITH THE BIRDS SINGIN’ AND YOU BLOKES STROLLIN’ AROUND, A MAN’D HARDLY KNOW THERE WUS A WAR GOING ON!” Frank Dunne, Smith’s Weekly.

THE SERIOUS SIDE …

ON NOVEMBER 11, 1918 WAR ENDS, LEAVING A COUNTRY IN MOURNING. GUNS OF WAR WERE FINALLY SILENT. EUPHORIC SCENES IN AUSTRALIA CELEBRATED THE ARMISTICE – BUT FOR TENTERFIELD’S CAPTAIN WOODWARD. NOVEMBER 11 WAS MORE SOBERING. HE WROTE: “THE OUTWARD MANIFESTATION OF JOY WHICH COULD BE EXPECTED … WAS ABSENT. WE WERE AS MEN WHO HAD COMPLETED A TASK WHICH WAS ABHORRENT TO US. THE OCCASION CALLED FOR THANKSGIVING. IT WAS … TOO GREAT FOR WORDS.”

AUSTRALIA’S FIRST SHOT FIRED

A GERMAN STEAMER, AFTER DISCHARGING CARGO AT MELBOURNE, ATTEMPTED TO PASS OUT THROUGH THE HEADS TO SYDNEY. SHE HAD HER CLEARANCES, BUT THOSE ON BOARD DID NOT KNOW THAT WAR HAD BEEN DECLARED BEWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND GERMANY. A SHOT WAS FIRED FROM THE CLIFF FACE. THE VESSEL WAS IMMEDIATELY STOPPED AND RETURNED TO WILLIAMSTOWN.    .


THE GREAT WAR HAS ENDED: Milestones shows some of the battles fought in WW1

CAR RIDE: THE ARCHDUKE FERDINAND AND HIS WIFE WERE SHOT DEAD BY A SERBIAN NATIONALIST. Below: WORLD WAR IS OVER, SHOUTED THE AMERICAN DAILY TELEGRAPH. Below: THE WAR ISSUE OF THE SYDNEY MAIL.

1914

Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to throne of Austria-Hungary, shot dead by a Serbian nationionalist in Sarajevo.

A series of ultimatums leads to declarations of war between Europe’s great powers.

Australian make a pledge to Britain.

Australia quickly pledges its support for Britain and enters the war. Labor leader Andrew Fisher utters his famous promise to defend Britain “to our last men and our last shilling.” By the end of 1914, 52,561 volunteers have passed medicals to serve overseas.

First Australians die.

A skirmish in the German colony of New Guinea, Bitapaka, with Melanesian and German troops results in six Australians killed – the first of over 60,000 Australian soldiers to fall in WW1.

1915

Aussie sub sunk.

The only surviving Australian submarine, AE-2, was scuttled by her crew on April 30. The sub received severe damage incurred in her forcing of the Dardanelles.

Gallipoli begins.

Australian and New Zealand troops land at Anzac Cove near the Gallipoli Peninsula. The craggy terrain was easily defended by the Turks. Nevertheless, the Anzacs gained a toehold; but made little progress over the next eight months.

Lone Pine versus the Turks.

The 1st Division launches an attack on the Turkish positions. So fierce was the fighting that 1st and 3rd brigades suffer 2277 casualties between them.

A futile charge.

On foot, Australian Light Horsemen charge the Turkish trenches against machine guns and rifle fire. Over 230 of the 8th and 10th Light Horse regiment are killed and 140 wounded.

Evacuation of Gallipoli.

Gallipoli’s evacuation proved to be the most successful operation of the campaign. The Anzac Cove campaign led to 26,000 Australian casualties, including 8000 killed in action or dying of wounds or disease.

1916

Travelling Australians.

During the year, Australian troops took part in operations in Egypt, Palestine and Syria. Four infantry divisions were also sent to France to the Somme.

Battle of Fromelles.

Australian troops took part in their first big Western Front engagement at Fromelles on July 19. Seven days later, they went into battle at Pozieres.

Gov’ment twice beaten.

The war had deeply divided Australia. Prime Minister Billy Hughes had attempted to win a referendum on conscription. Twice he was defeated. On October 28, the first proposal for conscription was defeated 1,087, 557 votes to 1,160,033.

1917

Australia gets Flying Corp.

The Australian Flying Corp began operations in France and Palestine. On October 31, Beersheba was attacked, this triggering the third battle of Gaza. On December 20, the conscription referendum was again defeated.

1918

Monash takes it to them.

Five Australian divisions in France were formed into an army on January 1 under the command of Sir John Monash. On July 4, Hamel, an enemy stronghold in France, was captured by Australian troops. On September 18, the Hinderburg Line on the Western Front was captured. On September 30, more than 4000 Turkish troops were captured in action near Damascus, ending the war in Palestine.

War is over.

Germany surrenders on November 11 and the war was officially over. By the war’s end, 61,512 Australians have been killed or die from wounds or disease. Another 152,000 are wounded.

<< The Sun-Herald, The Land, Frank Morris.


MELBOURNE CUP 1918: Night Watch was to strengthen speed for the run home

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

SPECIAL DAY: ON THAT AFTERNOON, THE WEATHER WAS SUPERB.

On November 5, the 1918 Melbourne Cup was run less than a week before the war had ended. The newspapers said it to be the biggest and most light-hearted gathering at Flemington for more the four years. The crowd needed to be in good humour.

The Derby Day nor Cup Day, without a single favourite being mentioned, meant a disaster all around.

Although the favourite for the big one was King Offa, trainer Dick Bradfield had a ‘saver’ -- his name was Night Watch.

This was mainly because he had finished second in the Hotham Handicap on Derby Day. Night Watch was down at the end of the scale. He was handicapped the minimum of 6.7 and carrying two pounds overweight. In the hands of Billy Duncan, the jockey, took Night Watch to the lead six furlongs from home.               

MISSED HIS CHANCE

On the turn Daius moved up to join him at the half-mile … and the imported horse, Gadabout, snatched the lead from both of them. At this point, Night Watch was interfered with and seemed to have missed his chance.

Metropolitan winner, Kennaquhair, who got in front a furlong out, was called the winner. But the steely Night Watch came again, and with his light-weight was able to outstay his rival to win by half a length from Kennaquhair with Gadabout sticking on well for third.

Night Watch put up a new Cup record by running the two miles in 3.25 3/4.

<< The Melbourne Cup 1861-1982; Maurice Cavanough; Currey O”Neil, 1960.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 09 November 18

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