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Number of blogs returned: 11 to 20 records of 297

ARNOTT’S: No substitute for biscuits with a distinctive image!

ARNOTT’S DELIVERY VANS: THEY WERE A MOBILE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE COMPANY SINCE THE BEGINNING.

THE START OF ARNOTT’S COMPLEX AT INNER SYDNEY IN 1908. Below: ARNOTT’S WAS ONE OF THE FIRST USERS OF COLOURS.

THE FAMOUS BIRD ON THE BISCUIT TIN BECAME ONE OF AUSTRALIA’S ICONIC SELLING SYMBOLS!

ADAPTED BY FRANK MORRIS

Australia’s most famous trademark, Arnott’s, is appearing on supermarket shelves in the United States.

In 1987, Arnott’s launched a range of products into two US cities – Sacramento and Seattle. The new packs, which the featured the distinctive Arnott’s parrot, were described as the “most ambitious” export project ever by the big company.

The launch took up more the 18 months research and development in association with the Campbell Soup Company.

Australian favourites such as Sao and Tim Tams (‘Cobber’ in the USA) supported with an aggressive advertising and promotional program, feature a fictional Arnott’s salesman called ‘Bluey McCoy’.

‘Bluey’ has been sent to the US to sell a range of Arnott’s biscuits.

The main concern of his Australia customers, as he says farewell to them, was that he should not sell too many Arnott’s biscuits in the US because they would not want to run short in Aussie.

The displays feature the line ‘Australia’s best loved cookies and crackers are here’.

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FIRST FOR AUSTRALIA … IT’S 40 YEARS AGO THAT ROYAL WOMEN’S HOSPITAL IN MELBOURNE, DELIVERED THE FIRST IVF BABY IN 1980. HER NAME CANDICE REED. THE ABC RADIO DID A SPECIAL PROGRAM ON IVF AND SPOKE TO A GROUP OF WOMEN LISTENERS ABOUT THE PROCEDURE. – FM.
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ABOUT US IN 1970s …
IN 1972, AUSTRALIAN AND US TROOPS WITHDRAW FROM VIETNAM … GOUGH WHITLAM, AFTER 23 YEARS, BECOMES LABOR PRIME MINISTER … WINE WRITER KEVON KEMP SAYS IT’S OK TO PUT ICE IN YOUR RED WINE … THE FORTNIGHTLY NATION  WAS TAKEN OVER BY THE MELBOURNE REVIEW TO BECOME THE WEEKLY NATION REVIEW.

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If Arnott’s achieves a fraction of the success in the US that it has attained in Australia since it started in 1865, it will be largely attributable to the company’s exemplary corporate image.

Arnott’s is a big spender and a cautious one.

Through its style of advertising, Arnott’s has aimed to maintain and improve it massive market share.

Arnott’s strength of corporate image stems from its powerful trademark -- the famous parrot on its biscuit tins -- and with in-store displays, packaging and, of course, its highly-polished delivery trucks.

The thought that nostalgia is a permanent pastime for many people and the essence of the entire Arnott’s consumer appeal.

<< Advertising: The Australian Way, 1988.

FOOTNOTE: US Private Equity Firm, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts, bought Arnott’s for $3.1 billion in 2019. KKR is not a long-term owner of companies “and is likely to resell the Arnott’s brand in time”.


LET’S LAUGH …


 


Short Story: The Greedy Thief -- John hit on the idea of burying the container

THE MERCHANTS REST AND GET A NIGHT SLEEPS. Below: JOHN BELIEVED THAT IF HE WAS CAUGHT WITH THE MONEY, SOMETHING SINISTER WOULD HAPPEN TO HIM.

HE SOON DISCOVERED THAT HE WAS A WELL-KNOWN ROGUE!

FRANK MORRIS

A very long time ago in the land of Arabia was a thriving township through which passed long camel trains loaded with silk and jewels and owned by a rich merchant. At this town the merchants rested and, to get a good night’s sleep.

John was a camel watcher. He was well paid and saved his money to provide for his old age. One day he realised that he had so much money that he began to worry in case it might be stolen.

And he hit on the idea of putting it a container and burying it in the garden.

One of the town loafers, a man too lazy to work, spent most of his days watching other people. He saw how well John was paid and got the idea of stealing John’s money. With this in mind he started following John to see where the money was kept.

He saw John come out of his house carefully carrying a container, and he watched with greedily gleaming eyes while John buried the container under a tree in the garden.

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WHERE WE LIVE …
ARMADALE, VICTORIA, IS A SUBURB OF PRAHRAN, IN THE MELBOURNE METROLPOLITAN AREA. IT GETS ITS NAME FROM ARMADALE HOUSE IN KOOYONG ROAD. BUILT IN 1876 BY JAMES MUNRO, A LAND SPECULATOR AND VICTORIAN PREMIER, WHO CALLED HIS HOUSE AFTER A PLACE IN INVERNESS IN SCOTLAND.
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Very soon the thief went into the garden and dug up the container. He knew that if he was caught with it he would be known as a thief. So he cunningly took out the money and reburied the empty container.

Before long John did a particularly good job for a very rich merchant and received a special reward.

“Ha,” said John to himself, “I must bury this with my other money.”

When he went to do so he found, of course, that the container was empty.

At first John was very upset. Then he said to himself, “Whoever did this must have seen me bury the container, and he must have known about my money.” Thinking very hard, he remembered the man who loafed about, who had often watched and followed him.

John struck upon a plan.

He put the empty container back in the ground and went and made enquiries about the man. He soon discovered that he was a well- known rogue.

One day, when he saw the thief near him, John remarked in a loud voice, “I have just been paid some more money. I must bury it tonight.”

The thief heard the remark and began to feel that he had robbed too soon. “If I’d waited”, he said to himself, “I’d have got more.” But he realised that if John found the empty container he would not put any more money into it.

So the cunning thief took the money and put it back in the container. “Now,” he thought, “John won’t know it was ever taken, He’ll put more money in, and I’ll come back and get the lot.”

That is just what John hoped the thief would think. And when John dug up his container again, all the money had been replaced.

So John outwitted the thief and got all his money back.

<< Living World Magazine, 1970.

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ABOUT US IN 1973 …
THE FILM AND TELEVISION SCHOOL IS OPEN FOR BUSINESS … THE ABC’s CONTROVERIAL LATELINE RADIO PROGRAM BEGINS … THE COMMUNIST PARTY OF AUSTRALIA’S NEWSPAPER, THE TRIBUNE, IS FIFTY YEARS OLD … MASSIVE INCREASE IN SPENDING ON ABORIGINALS -- $67 MILLION … QUADRAPHONIC SOUND INTRODUCED COMMERCIALLY … THE TERM ‘GREEN BAN, COMES INTO CURRENCY.


OZ SPOT: Column 8 has something all Australia should read!

CHIPS RAFFERTY GAVE COLUMN 8 GOT ITS COMEUPPANCE!

ACCORDING TO TIM INGALL OF SCOTTSDALE (USA), ASIDE FROM PANDEMICS, THE BEST TIME TO BINGE WATCH ON WAR MOVIES USED TO BE AROUND ANZAC DAY. “COMING INTO WORK AS A RESIDENT AT ROYAL NORTH SHORE HOSPITAL ON ANZAC DAY MANY YEARS AGO, ONE OF THE NIGHT RESIDENTS HAD LEFT A REPORT ON THE NOTICEBOARD IN THE CHANGEOVER ROOM. ‘CHIPS RAFFERTY DIED SIX TIMES OVERNIGHT: TWICE IN TOBRUK, TWICE IN EUROPE, AND TWICE IN THE PACIFIC’.”


VALE: DAME VERA LYNN HAS DIED. LYNN WAS 103. SHE WAS THE ENDEARINGLY POPULAR “SWEETHEART” OF THE BRITISH FORCES WHO SERENADED THEM WITH SENTIMENTAL FAVOURITES SUCH AS WE’LL MEET AGAIN AND THE WHITE CLIFFS OF DOVER.

VALE: FOOTBALLER NOEL ‘NED’ KELLY, NSW, WILL BE A HARD ACT TO FOLLOW, SAID A MORNING NEWSPAPER. KELLY DIED, AGED 84, FROM A HEART ATTACK. HE PLAYED FOR WESTERN SUBURBS, QUEENSLAND AND AUSTRALIA. KELLY WAS AMONG THE BEST FORWARDS TO HAVE PLAYED THE GAME.

GRAND YEARS WILL APPEAR ON JULY 10.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 25 June 20

The Man from Snowy River: Hall was just one of a breed

IN THE FILM, WHEN THE RIDE WAS OVER, CLANCY APPROACHED THE RIDER AND SAID, “THE MAN FROM SNOWY RIVER!”

“HE SENT THE FLINT STONES FLYING … BOTH HIS HORSE AND HE ARE MOUNTAIN BRED”. THIS WAS THE ESSENCE OF HISTORY.

FRANK MORRIS

THE DEATH OF 11 YEAR-OLD EDWARD HALL, OF BINALONG, NSW, SERVED AS A FOUNDATION FOR THE WRITING OF AUSTRALIA’S FAVOURITE POEM, THE MAN FROM SNOWY RIVER IN 1890, SAID RESEARCHER, CLIFF CRANE.

CRANE SPENT 28 YEARS TRYING TO SOLVE THE PROBLEM.

THE SPECTACULAR IMAGERY WAS WRITTEN BY BANJO PATERSON 15 YEARS AFTER HIS “FAMOUS SCHOOL MATE” WAS KILLED.

PATERSON, A 9 YEAR-OLD, OFTEN CALLED BARTY, AND HIS SCHOOLMATES, WERE CLOSE-UP WITNESSES WHEN EDWARD FELL TO HIS DEATH.

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BANJO PATERSON IN 1993 …
PATERSON’S WORDS. A LETTER BY BANJO PATERSON, WHERE HE DESCRIBES THE COMPOSITION OF WALTZING MATILDA, SOLD FOR A RECORD $27,000 IN MELBOURNE. THE LETTER, RECEIVED FROM A CHILDREN’S BOOK CLUB IN CANBERRA, PATERSON, WROTE THAT HE COMPOSED THE VERSES IN QUEENSLAND AND THAT THE MUSIC WAS BASED ON A SCOTTISH FOLK SONG. HE PUT THE WORDS TO THE SONG.
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HERE IS WHAT HAPPENED: EDWARD WAS RIDING A YOUNG AND BRAZEN COLT, BAREBACK, WHICH HAD BOLTED “HEADLONG DOWN A LONG HILLSIDE COVERED WITH FALLEN TIMBER”. EDWARD WAS THROWN VIOLENTLY TO THE GROUND.

“HE WAS DEAD BEFORE WE GOT UP TO HIM”, PATERSON LATER RECOUNTED. THE PARENTS OF EDWARD HALL WERE HENRY AND ELLEN (HACKNEY).

HENRY SNR WAS A LONG TIME LOCK-UP KEEPER AT BINALONG FROM ABOUT 1860. HE WAS PRESENT WHEN A BUSHRANGER, JOHN GILBERT, WAS KILLED AT BINALONG IN 1865.

COMING: Historic Hotels – how about a hotel with a zoo. The owner boasted “the only one with a zoo in the colony!”

SIGRID THORNTON AND TOM BURLINSON IN THE FILM THE MAN FROM SNOWY RIVER.


William Arnott: King of the biscuit trade was a ball of muscle

ONE OF THE FAMOUS HORSE TEAMS FROM THE 1865. Below: WILLIAM ARNOTT: HAD A THRIVING BUSINESS.

PART OF THE ORIGINAL ALBION FLEET.

ARNOTT WORKED, SCRIMPED AND SAVED. “I STARTED ALL OVER AGAIN”.

FRANK MORRIS

William Arnott, born in Scotland in 1827, was apprenticed as a young lad and earned half a crown a week (25c). In Australia, the name Arnott is synonymous with biscuits.

Like all factories he opened, every one of them would bear his name. Unbeknownst to him, that was the platform that lead his company to its most famous trademark – Arnott’s.

When the young 20 years Arnott migrated to Australia he baked loaves and pastries for the goldminers until he had enough money to set up shop in West Maitland, NSW, and Newcastle.

Soon he had a thriving business among the coal miners. But disaster struck and his business was ruined in a flood. A few months later his wife died. In seems like enough to stop many men, but not William Arnott.

He worked and scrimped and saved. “I’ll start all over again,” Arnott said.

In 1865, he opened his business in the heart of Newcastle. He married again, and his five sons learnt the baking trade, and later became partners in the business.

By 1870, William’s biscuits were in such demand that he had to build a new factory. But time waits for no man. Now, he was at stage where he could make his plant all-driven by mechanical power.

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HOME-CARE MEANS COMMONSENSE …
THESE SOLUTIONS ARE MEMORY JOGGERS – PURELY AND SIMPLY. COMMONSENSE MUST PREVAIL AT ALL TIMES. FROM THE OUTSET, THE WORKING CARER MUST UNDERSTAND THAT: THE NEED FOR CARE IS UNPREDICTABLE – AND IT USUALLY HAPPENS AT ANYTIME; THERE IS NO TIMETABLE. LET’S FACE IT, A CRISIS DOES STRIKE AT AN AWKWARD, INCONVENIENT, UNPROPITIOUS TIME IN THE CARERS WORKING ROUTINE. CONTINUED.
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When the Newcastle to Sydney railway line opened in 1889, Arnott opened a depot in Sydney. Within five years, with his sons were now business partners; a Sydney factory was opened.

William Arnott died, age 74, in 1901

In 1908, the Homebush biscuit plant, the largest the Southern Hemisphere, was up and running. All his factories would bear his name and Homebush was no exception. It’s was the biggest in the southern hemisphere.

The company, Arnott Biscuits, was so successful as an Australian firm, that it was taken over by the American soup company, Campbell’s, in 1997.

While many varieties of biscuits have been developed over the years, one of William Arnott’s best-selling favourite was Milk Arrowroot.

It still popular in Australia today -- over 100 years since it was first baked.

NEXT: Arnott’s, no substitute for its distinctive image!

COMING: The “agony aunts” speak to the girls about their problems!

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HOME-CARE MEANS COMMONSENSE …
“THE GREATEST FAMILY CONFICT ARISES WHEN OUR PARENTS BECOME OUR DEPENDENTS”, SAYS A LEADING PSYCHOLOIGIST. “IT’S TOUGH FOR BOTH PARTIES”. IF THERE’S A COMMON THREAD THAT’S FLAGGED THROUGH EVERY STAGE OF THE CARER’S WORKING ROLE, IT IS THIS: BE PREPARED FOR THE UNEXPECTED. AND THIS: ABOUT 50 PER CENT OF PEOPLE AGED 65 YEARS AND OVER HAVE A MEDICAL PROBLEM OR DISABILITY. THE CONDITION OF  AGED PERSONS CAN DETERIORATE QUICKLY. THESE ARE THE ‘RED FLAGS’. – FM.
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SURF’S UP! DANNY KEYO -- The 60s board builders and their fancy nameplates!

FRANK MORRIS

DANNY KEYO IS ONE OF AUSTRALIA’S TOP CUSTOM BOARD MANUFACTURERS. BY NO MEANS A NEWCOMER, HE HAS BEEN AN ACTIVE EXPONENT OF THE INDUSTRY FOR MANY YEARS. ONE OF HIS TOP SHAPERS IS MIDGET FARRELLY, THE INTERNATIONAL SURFING TITLE-HOLDER. DANNY BELIEVES THAT HIS BRAND IS ONE OF THE FINEST ON THE MARKET. DANNY HAS MADE IT A POLICY TO ONLY TURN OUT CUSTOM BOARDS. HE FAVOURS TREVARNO GLASS AND THE AMERICAN POLYTRON WATER-BASE FOAM. EACH BOARD HAS DOUBLE-LAPPED SIDES. (THIS PROFILE WAS WRITEN WAS BY FRANK MORRIS 1965.)


RUGBY LEAGUE: 100 years on! Fans will meet and greet old timers as they reminisce the game!

CENTURY-OLD! THE FRONT COVER OF THE FIRST RUGBY LEAGUE NEWS. Below: NORM PROVAN 1976 FRONT COVER OF BIG LEAGUE THE MAGAZINE WHICH REPLACED IT.

FRANK MORRIS

“Rugby league stars come and go like the roar of a crowd. But the golden names live on forever”. They’re the words I wrote to an introduction of the book, Golden Players from the Golden Years, in 1975.

It’s a book that dealt with the ‘golden names’ of league: Dave Brown, Roy Bull, Clive Churchill, Dally Messenger, Reg Gasnier and a dozen or so more players that brought a roar to the crowd every time they stepped on to the field.

The century old magazine, The Rugby League News, stretching back until 1920, is now the “digitised resource that allows you read every issue of the journal right through to 1973 grand final”.

The News, being the official magazine of the NSWRL, was published every week of the season.
Apart from having the official team line-up for each match, the News is packed with team photos, news and gossip.

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HOME-CARE MEANS COMMONSENSE …
EVEN IN MODERATION, THE CIGARETTE HABIT REDUCES THE CHANCES OF ENJOYING A HEALTHY LIFE. EVEN IF YOU’VE BEEN SMOKING CIGARETTES FOR YEARS, IT IS STILL WORTH STOPPING AT ONCE. YOU’LL REDUCE THE RISK OF GETTING LUNG CANCER OR HEART DISEASE. CALL QUITLINE 137848 AND THEY PROVIDE ADVICE AND ASSISTANCE TO SMOKERS WHO REALLY WANT TO KICK THE HABIT.
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In 1935, the News magazine commented on the St George Club, remarking that it was “new club that has made good”.

“Although the first grade premiership had yet to be won by St George, the club has been runner-up in the premiership three times – 1927, 1930 and 1933”.

Every issue features profiles of star players, cartoons and artwork by cricketer Arthur Mailey; as well as ads for pony races and boxing contest featuring Digger Evans.

Tom Brock, the well-known league historian, found notes about the matches he attended, including weather, the quality of the playing surface and the scores. 

Through Trove more 4.5 million pages of historical newspapers, including The Rugby League News, are now fully searchable as part of its digital Excellence Program, an initiative of the NSW government.

Frank Morris: From the 1973 issue, it was a different ball game magazine-wise. It needed change to give a new and exciting look. I joined the magazine in 1976 and introduced some new features to its pages, one which was the Miss Football pin-up. I was told the crowd would not like it. They did.

COMING: Skateboarding – the new Olympic sport. When did the sport get its wings?

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HOME-CARE MEANS COMMONSENSE …
A CRISIS CAN HAPPEN AT ANYTIME. AND IT USUALLY DOES. INVARIABLY IT HAPPENS AT THE WORST POSSIBLE JUCTURE. THIS IS ONE OF THE WARNINGS THAT WILL CROP UP SEVERAL TIMES IN THESE ASSESSMENTS. THE CONDITION OF A PERSON CAN DETERIORATE QUICKLY AFTER A FALL, A ‘MINI’ STROKE OR EVEN A MINOR MISHAP. ARTHRITIS AFFLICTS MANY OF AUSTRALIA’S POPULATION OVER 65. – FM.
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OZ SPOT: Smurf creator, Peyo, dies 1992 and leaves thousands of tiny blue characters behind

PEYO, THE BELGIAN CARTOONIST WHO ENCHANTED CHILDREN WITH HIS TINY BLUE CHARACTERS KNOWN AS SMURFS, DIED IN BRUSSELS ON CHRISTMAS EVE IN 1992. HE WAS 64. JUST OVER A MONTH BEFORE PEYO DIED, (WHOSE REAL NAME WAS PIERRE CULLIFORD), HE LAUNCHED A FEATURE-LENGTH ALBUM ENTITLED THE MONEY SMURFS. PEYO’S BEST-KNOWN COMIC STRIPS ARE THE SMURFS AND JOHAN AND PEEWIT, IN WHICH THE SMURFS FIRST APPEARED IN OCTOBER 1958. IN 1959, THE SMURFS GOT THEIR OWN TELEVISION SERIES. THE MERCHANDISING BEGAN TO ROLL OUT THE SAME YEAR. PVC FIGURINES AS THE MOST IMPORTANT PART UNTIL THE LATE 1970S. THEY WERE OUT TO CAPTURE THE INTERNATIONAL MARKET, SO ITS NOT LONG BEFORE THE SMURFS WERE AWAY. THE SMURFS WON SPECIAL HONOURS AND AWARDS FOR THEIR ROLL IN THE MARKETPLACE. – Adapted by Frank Morris.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 11 June 20

FLASHBACK TO 1930: Airship R101 bursts into flames over France

THE GIANT RIOI ON ITS FLIGHT TO INDIA. Below: THE DAILY SKETCH WAS JUST ONE OF WORLD NEWSPAPERS THAT CARRIED THE TRAGIC TRIP. 

A SECTION SHOWS THE PASSENGERS WERE RELAXED AND CONVERSING. ONLY A FEW SURVIVORS WERE LEFT TO TELL THEIR VIVID STORIES.

R101’s BLOWS UP AND THE GIANT CRASHED IN FLAMES.

DIRIGIBLE BLOWS UP. 42 PEOPLE LOST. TRAGIC END TO BRITISH AIRSHIPS AND THE END OF A GLORIOUS ADVENTURE TO INDIA.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

LONDON, Sunday: The giant airship R101, which was making a flight to India, blew up and burst into flames over the French town of Beauvais.

The Sunday papers had long gone to press and all England was enjoying an hour’s extra sleep owing to the length of the summer time, when there was a startling flash from the tape machines.

They stated that there was an explosion on the R101 and this message was followed immediately by the Paris announcement that an explosion occurred at 2.30am while the dirigible was a few miles from Beauvais.

This was obviously the route of the R101, which Londoners, a few hours previously, were trying to see through rain clouds.

The next message said that alarm was caused in Paris by an unconfirmed report that the airship had blown up but there were no details.

An anxious hour was passed before a Paris news agency reported from Beauvais tersely explaining that R101 had exploded. Another hour had passed. At 5 am came the terrible news that the R101 had crashed in a blaze of flames.
Only seven of the 53 aboard were saved and the rest were burnt to death.

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MILESTONES TO FREEDOM …
IN APRIL, 1963, WAS THE OZ TRIAL, IN WHICH RICHARD WALSH IS SENTENCED TO SIX MONTHS’ JAIL FOR PUBLISHING AN OBSCENE CARTOON IN OZ MAGAZINE. OZ WAS A SATIRICAL JOURNAL WHICH LAMBASTED THE VALUES OF THE MENZIES ERA. THE SENTENCE CAUSED PUBLIC OUTCRY AND WAS OVERTURNED IN 1966.
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The R101 was the biggest airship in the world. It left Cardington with floodlights gleaming on the silver of her massive frame. The flight was recognised as the most momentous in the development of the airship in the history of aviation.

Confidence was indicated among the passessgers as well as by Lord Thomson and Sir Sefton Branckner, both experts on aviation. They both lost their lives.

The flight was regarded as the forerunner of a regular airship service between Britain and India.

Although the flight from Britain to India was not as spectacular as the trans-atlantic voyage of the R101 … but interest in it was greater than any previous airship venture.

R100 and R101 were constructed on an entirely different principle. This trip used heavy fuel in the engine, which was as important moment in an aviation, was considered not only an advantage in eliminating carburettors but more economical than petrol.

The speed of the R101 was 75 miles an hour, with five motors in operation.

Whether the privilege of being allowed to smoke on board was conducive to the disaster, will not be established until a full investigation.

The airship crashed and burnt immediately.

<< Adapted from The Northern Daily Leader, October 6, 1930, Tamworth, NSW.


The big fight: Tommy Burns – top drawcard brought excitement to the ring!

FRANK MORRIS

Tommy Burns, regarded as one of Australia’s greatest drawcards, would pack out the stadium whenever he appeared.

Burns, known as “a glamour boy who drew a crowd”, passed away in February, 2011. 

He was 88.

Burns fought many famous fights at the Sydney Stadium, two of which were for Australian Welterweight Titles -- against Vic Patrick, 1946, and Hockey Bennell -- in early 1947.

“In his time Burns had 77 fights, won 61 and drew seven,” said Ron Murphy, a boxing writer. “He was inducted into the Australian National Boxing Hall of Fame in 2004.”

Burns met Vic Patrick for the Australian Welterweight Title. Patrick retained the title by winning with a knockout in the ninth round.

Said Murphy: “Burns offered no excuses. ‘I never wore a hat but I will buy one so that I can raise it to Vic Patrick.’” Burns learnt a lot is his fight with Patrick.

In 1947, Burns pounded Hockey Bennell to the floor in their contest for the vacant Welterweight Championship.
Burns won by a TKO in round four.

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MILESTONES FOR FREEDOM …
IN JANUARY, 1964, THE BEATLES RELEASED, I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND, WHICH SOUNDS ‘INNOCENT’ ENOUGH. BY NOVEMBER 1968, THE ‘INNOCENT’ LYRIC HAD BEEN SUPPLANTED BY THEIR WHY DON’T WE DO IT IN THE ROAD.
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Some pundits predicted that his next fight was “probably his greatest” ever. American O’Neill Bell, showed what a capable gloveman he was, ducked under several long rights from Burns.

If they had connected it would have been good night Bell. Burns won by a knockout in the eleventh round. It was Burns finest moment. “I could have beaten any boxer in the world,” said Tommy Burns.

Burns took off six months from boxing and with his film-star look and sight on for acting in the Sons of Matthew for Charles Chauvel.

He lost his title in 1949 to Kevin Delaney, and then he retired. He took several jobs and then he came back to boxing. 

He retired again for the last time and spent his time travelling the club circuit showing fights and answering questions.

Burns was christened Geoffrey Murphy; this was changed to Reg Burns; then Tommy Burns, after the heavyweight who fought in Sydney in 1908.

PICTURE: And effective operator, a young Tommy Burns show what he’s made of.

COMING: Vic Patrick was Australia’s greatest-ever lightweight, having won the Championship of Australia from 1941 to 1948, and the national Welterweight Title from 1942 to 1946. He met Freddy Dawson who, later, turned in an epic fight, easily ranks as the best imported boxer to visit this country. The fight was in 1947. The defeated, Vic Patrick, was on his knees when he took the final count.


THE GOLDEN YEARS OF LEAGUE …

NORM PROVAN AND ARTHUR SUMMONS IN THEIR ‘WORKING CLOTHES’ EMBRACE FOR THE PICTURE OF A LIFETIME WHICH HAS BECOME AN ENBLEM OF THE NFL.

ADAPTED BY FRANK MORRIS

ARTHUR SUMMONS, ‘THE GLADIATOR’, WAS THE DIMINUTIVE FORMER AUSTRALIAN CAPTAIN, COACH AND DUAL INTERNATIONAL, DIED AT 84 AFTER A BATTLE WITH CANCER IN MAY. HE WAS IMMORTALISED AND A CENTREPIECE ON THE NRL PREMIERSHIP TROPHY ALONGSIDE NORM PROVAN. IT EPITOMISED ALL THINGS LEAGUE STANDS FOR. THE PICTURE WAS TAKEN BY JOHN O’GREADY AFTER THE 1963 GRAND FINAL MUDBATH AT THE SCG.


FLASHBACK: That INCREDIBLE Weekly is a real goer!

GEORGE WARNECKE, WHO HELP FOUND THE JOURNAL, LOOKING FOR NEW FEATURES FOR AUSTRALIAN WOMEN. Below: VIGILS 1939 COVER SHOWING THREE SERVICEMEN READY FOR ACTION.

FRANK MORRIS

THE WEEKLY CHEERS UP A LOT OF AUSTRALIANS!

Despite a tenuous beginning during the worst of times, The Australian Women’s Weekly has survived since 1933.  The man behind the journal was George Warneck, part founder and first editor-in-chief.

When its first edition rolled off the presses 93 years ago, the Weekly magazine seemed to radiate confidence. It became another symbol of hope during the depths of the Great Depression.

Another indication that better times could be the ahead was the recently opened Sydney Harbour Bridge – “the graceful arch”. Both events happened when Australians needed a lot of cheering up.

The Depression worsened from the start of 1931 to become the bitterest and bleakest period of deprivation in Australian’s history; the greatest economic disaster the nation has seen, a time of severe social turmoil and stagnation.

The Weekly was the greatest show in town. The women, after all, were like bees to a honey jar.
Within three years the magazine soared from 92,000 copies to 360,000, and it continued to climb at a rocketing rate.

Women found The Weekly is an extremely interesting journal to pursue and often (to puts it mildly) more so than most Australian similar magazine.

In the early days, readers used to become ‘hooked’ on famous Mandrake. Created by Lee Falk and Phil Davis, the full-page step was introduced to the Weekly on December 1, 1934, seven months after it was launched.

The first glossy square-back quarto issue with its pages perfect-bound was released on December 1, 1979.

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MILESTONES TO FREEDOM …
IN MARCH 1964, MARY McCARTHY’S THE GROUP WAS BANNED IN VICTORIA BUT THE OBJECTIONABLE PASSAGES ARE READ INTO VICTORIA’S HANSARD, ON SALE FOR 4d … IN JULY 1965, LADY CHATTERLEY’S LOVER AND LOLITA ARE RELEASED BY THE COMMONWEALTH CENSOR. IN MELBOURNE, LADY CHATTERLEY, INITIALLY, SOLD AT THE RATE OF ONE EVERY TWO MINUTES.


FAMOUS WOMEN: Part 1. The brilliant career of Miles Franklin

FRANK MORRIS

AT AGE 20, MILES FRANKLIN WROTE WHAT WAS DESCRIBED AS “THE FIRST AUSTRALIAN NOVEL”, MY BRILLIANT CAREER, PUBLISHED IN 1901. HENRY LAWSON, ANOTHER ICON, ENTHUSIASTICALLY HERALDED THE BOOK AS BEING “BORN OF THE BUSH”. LAWSON WROTE, “THE BOOK IS TRUE TO AUSTRALIA”. A.G. STEPHENS, THE EMINENT CRITIC, SAID “SHE LOOKS AT THINGS, ABSOLUTELY, FROM AN AUSTRALIAN POINT OF VIEW”. IT WAS CRITICAL ACUMEN AT ITS MOST INCISIVE. FRANKLIN’S STAUNCH NATIONALISM STAYED WITH HER ALL HER LIFE. SHE WAS WRITING ABOUT IT WITH UNBRIDLED FERVOUR A MONTH BEFORE HER DEATH. HER PRIZE-WINNING CHRONICLE ABOUT AUSTRALIAN LIFE, ALL THAT SWAGGER, HAS BEEN ACCLAIMED AS HER “BEST BOOK”. SHE ESPOUSED AUSTRALIAN LITERATURE WITH A PASSION. IN RADIO BROADCASTS, UNIVERSITY LECTURES, OVER THE LAST 20-ODD YEARS OF HER LIFE, SHE EXPOSTULATED “WITH BURNING CERTAINLY”. IT’S A PASSION THAT LIVES BEYOND THE GRAVE. MILES FRANKLIN WAS BORN IN 1879 AND DIED IN 1954.

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VALE: REMEMBER LEAVE IT TO BEAVER ON AUSTRALIAN TELEVISION BACK IN THE 50s AND 60s? ACTOR KEN OSMOND, WHO PLAYED EDDIE HASKELL, HAS DIED. HE WAS 76.

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GRAND YEARS WILL BE PUBLISHED ON JUNE 12.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 28 May 20

ROAD CCCCRASH: Behaviour on the road has a lot to do with death toll

DAUGHTER IS PLEASED THAT HER MUM PASSED THE TEST. Below: YOUNG-OLD AS COMPARED TO 75-YEARS-OLD.

COMPLACENCY AND DRIVER DISTRACTION ARE DEFINITELY A COCKTAIL FOR ANY ROAD CRISIS. FRANK MORRIS REPORTS.

OK. Let’s face it, you can’t lay the full blame on the vehicle in a crash. So, it must be you -- the driver.

More the 1200 lost their lives in car crashes in 2019. In 2018, it was 1135; and 1225 in 2017.

A crash is more likely to be reported if it involves a truck and a 4WD, but what factors caused the crash? They are less likely to rate a mention.

However, once optimism comes in to play: people just don’t believe it will happen to them.

Another dangerous pitfall is driver distraction.

Text messaging when you’re driving is illegal, stupid and dangerous with a capital D. 

Learning skills is one of the objects in a safe driving course. Developing and applying appropriate driving behaviour is the end goal.

Make some enquires about having a post-licence training course, developed on the principles of low-risk driving.

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WHERE YOU LIVE …
ADAVALE, QUEENSLAND, ORGINALLY CALLED ADA’S VEIL, WAS BECAUSE IN 1879 A WOMAN WAS TRAVELLING WITH HER HUSBAND TO TINTINCHELLA LOST HER VEIL DURING THE CROSSING OF BACKWATER CREEK. IT WAS CHANGED TO ADAVALE WHEN THE RAILWAY REACHED THE TOWNSHIP.
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Truck traffic is still at the crux of many of our road accidents. However, it appears that the volume of trucks on our roads is not the problem but it’s driver behaviour.

Large trucks were only involved in only 10 per cent of road fatalities, according to a 2003 survey. 0f those, 67 per cent were not the fault of the truck driver.

Motorists were up in arms over the way, they believe, a truckie will force them into “dangerous situations”.

Here’s what you can do. Every time you hit the road follow this checklist and help to save lives.

Always wear your seatbelt.

Reduce blind spots by checking the position of your mirrors, head restraint and seat before starting the engine.

Concentrate! It sounds obvious but it’s easy to forget you’re using a potentially lethal weapon. Limit distractions by keeping your mobile out of reach so you’re nor tempted to answer it.

The road is there to share – watch out for cyclists, motorcyclists and pedestrians.

If you’re feeling tired, don’t fight it. Stop and take a break.

Remember: there’s no such thing as safe speeding.

If you’re buying a car, it pays to get the safest one you can afford.

<< NRMA Open Road, 2006.

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WHERE YOU LIVE …
ALBION PARK, NSW, IS PART OF SAMUEL TERRY’S GRANT LOCATED ALONGSIDE THE MACQUARIE RIVULET. IN 1838, AFTER TERRY’S DEATH, THE PROPERTY WAS TAKEN OVER BY JOHN TERRY HUGHES WHO OWNED THE ALBION BREWERY. THIS LATER BECAME TOOHYEY’S BREWERY. ALBION IS AN OLD NAME FOR BRITAIN AND WAS ORIGINALLY SUGGESTED AS THE NAME FOR SYDNEY. –FM. BACKGROUND: AUSTRALIAN PLACE NAMES.


Some old favourite Aussie movie stars of the silent era!

JESSICA HARCOURT (RIGHT) AND EVA NOVAK STAR IN FOR THE TERM OF HIS NATURAL LIFE. Below: EVA NOVAK GETTING THE EYE FROM AN ERRANT SEA DRIFTER.

Australian leading film star of the silent days, Jessica Harcourt, dies in Sydney in 1988.  Frank Morris

Harcourt, who was 84, was always billed as “the beautiful Jessica Harcourt” on posters publicising her films.

She played Sarah Purfoy in the 1927 film of For the Term of His Natural Life, the third version of Marcus Clarke’s classic novel.

Produced by American Norman Dawn at a cost of $120,000, the film broke box-office records Australia-wide for a local production.

The film was further distinguished for two other reasons: it starred Hollywood actress Eva Novak in the leading role; and the author’s daughter, Marion Marcus Clarke, who played the hero’s mother.

This powerful production of Dawn’s For the Term of His Natural Life is just one of the more than 40,000 film and television productions preserved by the National Film and Sound Archive, Canberra.

When For the Term of His Natural Life was trotted out for the movies, it gave particular praise for George Fisher who played Rufus Dawes and Arthur McLaglen’s role as Gabbett.

“The film, preached The Argus, “marked a new enterprise in the production of motion pictures in Australia”.

As far as the McLaglen role was concerned, “he played Gabbett, an escaped prisoner who killed his four companions, with disconcerting starkness”.

COMING: Leading Hollywood actress Eva Novak almost stole the show.


Lego Master: Final. With Kjeld Kristiansen, what you see is what you get!

KRISTIANSEN, ALWAYS LOOKING FOR SOMETHING TO BUILD IN LEGO. Below: FOUR BRIGHT SPARKS BUILD OWN PROJECT WHILE KRISTIANSEN LOOKS ON.

KRISTIANSEN BUILT HIS WALL OF LEGO.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

The company began as a wooden toymaker, then drifted into plastics, and settled firmly into building bricks. The end result was the familiar famous Lego.

Its bricks have eight studs which fit into endless numbers of their counterparts, in what seems an infinite number of ways. The key invention, which is attributed to Kjeld’s father, happed in 1958.

The ways the studs and tube coupling systems work make it easy to track down any Lego configuration possible. The name derives from an abbreviation of the Danish phrase LEg GOtd, which means “play well”.

As competition has grown the organisation has fought hard to maintain its rights to the basic Lego building notion. A legal department oversees a variety of infringement suits brought by the group in various countries around the world.

The best protection, however, stems from the fast-developing product lines. The systems have been increasingly combined with mechanical and electronic devices.

Over the past 40 years, from the day Lego was available, 300 million children have played with the bricks. In

January, 1997, the group launched Lego Scala aimed at “big girls”, meaning those five years old and above.

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WHERE YOU LIVE …
NOT FAR FROM APOLLO BAY, VICTORIA, A HOLIDAY RESORT SOUTH-WEST OF GEELONG, TAKES ITS NAME FROM THE BAY WHICH CAPTAIN LOUTIT NAMED AFTER HIS SCHOONER.  APOLLO BAY, IN THE DAYS OF SETTLEMENT, WAS CALLED MIDDLETON; THEN IN 1874 WAS CHANGED TO KAMBRUK, AN ABORIGINAL WORD FOR “SANDY PLACE”. BY 1952, IT WAS CALLED APOLLO BAY. – FM.
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In addition to the core business, the enterprise has opened Legoland parks, of which there are two: at home in Billund and in Windsor, close to the British royal family’s castle.

A third park was slated to open in Carlsbad, California, in 1999.

Kristiansen says that the parks work because “in general they are based on skills, not thrills, and on participation more than diversion.

“There are no white-knuckle rides, and we want everyone who goes to learn something”.

Other diversifications include a licensed line of Lego children’s wear, Lego books, watches, bed linen and computer games.

Kristiansen continues to be a local boy: straight, honest and true.

After you have talked to him you realises that want you see is what you get.

<< Master builder … by Hale Richards, The European, April 24, 1997.

Frank Morris comment: There are several more Legoland Parks in 2020. Florida, Malaysia, Dubai, Japan and Germany.  Global revenue 5.16 billion euros in 2019.


OZ SPOT: Doctor Livingstone I presume!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

In 1889, the explorer Henry Stanley, famous for finding Dr David Livingstone in Africa, received praise for his latest successful expedition, to relieve Mehmed Emin Pasha, a governor in the Egyptian Sudan. The expedition greatly increased Western knowledge of the “Dark Continent”. The Herald said it would be good for the locals too. “The ignorant savage soon awakes to the knowledge … the white people from far-off lands will take a keen interest in his material and religious welfare”. – FM.

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VALE FOR MAN WHO SAVED OUR HERITAGE
The word ‘greenies’ was once used to describe conservationists. And then a strange thing happened. The NSW Builders Laborers Union, under the leadership of Jack Mundey, steps in. Jack Mundey died in May aged 92. He introduced bans on building work which threatened the national heritage. This was a first in industrial action. Some sites saved thanks to Jack Mundey and his green bans: Kelly’s Bush, Eastlakes, The Rocks, The Botanic Gardens, Centennial Park/Moore Park, Woolloomooloo, Victoria Street, Surry Hills. And there were others.

Next Grand Years will be published on 29 May 2020.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 14 May 20

LEGO MASTER: With Kjeld Kristiansen, it’s what you see is what you get

KJELD KRISTIANSEN LED THE COMPANY ON THE GREATEST GLOBAL EXPANSIONISM IN ITS HISTORY. THE LEGO BOX IN 1957 FEATURING KJELD AND HIS SISTER.

IN 1997, WHEN THIS ARTICLE APPEARED, THE LEGO GROUP WAS ONE OF THE WORLD’S LARGEST TOY MAKERS. TODAY, IT HAS BECOME A LEADER IN THE LEGO INDUSTRY.

ADAPTED BY FRANK MORRIS.

Meeting the president and chief executive of the Lego group, Kjeld Kirk Kristiansen, of the world’s fifth largest toymaker, one is struck by his boyish quality.

Not a big man, his body still has a boy’s slim lines. He has been in charge since 1979; the business was founded by his grandfather Ole Kirk Christiansen.

It was developed into a major enterprise by his father Godtfred Kirk Christiansen. But it was Kjeld who is responsible for the group’s global expansion and its huge growth in product variety.

The Lego group is a big business that has been built out of very small components. This is a major enterprise in Billund, a tiny Jutland town.

There is a certain missionary zeal to the company.

Speaking of his products, Kristiansen says: “There are a lot worse things a child can do to prepare for life than build with Lego components.

“I believe using our products can lead a mind down orderly paths into new areas of thought and imagination. They are tools that unlock the mind”.

Yet, there is a gentle feel to the corporate hegemony. Legoland Hotel is an agreeable inn for visitors, which itself mergers into the group’s corporate headquarters.

The place seems remote from the tense atmosphere of most corporate headquarters.

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ABOUT US IN 1970s …
IN 1972, ‘IT’S TIME’ THEME BEGUN FOR THE ALP. THE ALP ISSUED PHOTOGRAPHS OF FEMALE MODELS WEARING ‘IT’S TIME’ TEE SHIRTS AND THE POLITICAL THEME WAS WELL ON ITS WAY … PMU (PICK ME UP) MARKET THE FIRST CHUNKY SOUPS … WAS IT WYNN’S, PENFOLD’S OR LINDEMAN’S WHO INTRODUCED THE WINE CASK? – A PLASTIC BAG OF WINE IN A CARDBOARD BOX WITH A TAP.
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Part of the serenity stems from another insulator: the group is closely held.

(An) assertion of the financial virtues of yesteryear is accompanied by a winsome grim and few waves of his omnipresent pipe.

Kristansen is such a formidable smoker that once he was elected Denmark’s “pipe smoker of the year”, an honour he takes with considerable amused pride.

The Lego chief executive is, in a way, his own ultimate consumer. He grew up with the product. A Lego box from around 1957 features Kjeld and his sister on the cover. As he recalls: “My father was not a man to throw money away on child models”.

Every four years, there is a … Lego Olympics. A contest which is won by a child who builds the most imaginative and technically “well-constructed” device.

The senior manager of corporate communications said “Kjeld wanders around discussing with the contestants how they did this or why they built that.

“These children know an expert when they see one. This is the Lego builder of Lego builders!”

Frank Morris comment: A British gentlemen, Hilary Fisher Page invented the brick and NOT Ole Kirk Kristiansen, the founder of the Lego Group. Page, who was in born in 1904, died before he could discover Lego has ‘borrowed’ his invention. Ole patented the now famous interlocking Lego blocks in 1949.

NEXT: FINAL. The Lego Masters.

<< The European newspaper, April 24, 1997.


Newspapers close down: The Mercury north-west and The Illawarra Mercury down south

THE MASTHEAD OF THE HUNTER RIVER GAZETTE.

INSIDE A COUNTRY NEWSPAPER. Below: THE FIRST OF THE MAITLAND MERCURY.

THE MAITLAND MERCURY, WHICH WAS THE OLDEST COUNTRY NEWSPAPER IN NSW, AND POSSIBLY AUSTRALIA, AND THE ILLAWARRA MERCURY, BOTH BORN IN 1800, DIED TOGETHER.

FRANK MORRIS

NSW goes to press. It was Thomas Strode who paved the way and a salute goes out to him. He went on to found an integral part of Australian history.

The Hunter River Gazette “appeared suddenly” outside Sydney in 1841 – Strode may be saluted for launching the first country newspaper in NSW.

He continued in the next six months performing miracles with the Gazette until the partnership with the editor embroiled him and the paper in yet another quarrel with the judiciary. Strode arranged for a dissolution to take place.

He discontinued the Gazette “ungraciously” in June 1842.

Strode and his newspaper were written into the history books, although his newspaper had only a short life. But Maitland was too important to be without a newspaper, a scribe once remarked.

The first issue of the Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser was soon manifest on January 7, 1843.
But for the profits that came from advertisements relating to the colony’s first general elections it would have sunk without trace.

Less than six months or so after the closure of The Gazette the Mercury was printed on the same equipment formerly used for the ceased newspaper.

An 1890 engraving of The Maitland Mercury shows the whole building but now only the left-hand section of the building remains as a paper store. The Mercury was not a “direct” descendant of The Gazette.

The Mercury still holds the distinction of being the oldest continuing country newspaper in NSW. It is true that The Hunter River Gazette lasted only six months, which was not long compared with its successor, The Mercury.

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ABOUT US IN 1970s …
IN 1972, WOMEN JOURNALISTS GET EQUAL RIGHTS WITH MEN AT THE JOURNALISTS CLUB IN SYDNEY AFTER A SIT-IN AT THE CLUB … PAUL HOGAN, A RIGGER FOR THE SYDNEY HARBOUR BRIDGE, DOES A WINFIELD CIGARETTE ADVERTISEMENT WHICH STARTS THE IDEA OF OCKER-IMAGE APPEAL.
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Even after 167 years of publishing, The Maitland Mercury carries the imprimatur of being the oldest country newspaper in the State.

In the south, there is the Illawarra Mercury, which was established by Thomas Garrett and a partner in 1855. The first issue was 8 large pages in that October.

It was, initially, published as a weekly, then increased to twice weekly in 1929. Then the Depression struck, forcing the newspaper to revert to a weekly.

In 1950, it was published as a daily; this led to a change-of-name to the Illawarra Daily Mercury until 1954. In 1979, the newspaper dropped “Daily” from its masthead and it joined the class of the other ‘metropolitan’ daily papers.
It amalgamated with the Bulli Times and Port Kembla Pilot in 1949; and the South Coast Times in 1968.

In 1981, the paper invested in a new off-set press that allowed it to bring life to you in full colour; and other implements that enhance its newspaper production.  It was also the first newspaper in Australia to install the state-of-the-art Itex 210K scanner.   

Fairfax, a major shareholder in 2012, relocated reproduction and other strands of sub-editing and page layouts of the paper to New Zealand.

FLASHBACK: A COLLECTOR HOLDS UP THE ‘MOON DAY’ SOUVENIER EDITION OF THE 1963 ILLAWARRA MERCURY.

<< Airlines Magazine, November, 1991; and The Influential Communicator for background.


OZ SPOT: Ali “has Parkinson’s disease”

ALI: “I AM THE GREATEST”.

IN 1984, A NEWSPAPER REPORT SAID THE FORMER WORLD HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPION MUHAMMAD ALI HAS “MINOR SYMPTOMS” OF PARKINSON’S DISEASE. RESULTS OF THESE TESTS LAST WEEK IN NEW YORK WERE SHOWN TO A DOCTOR TRAVELLING WITH THE BOXER IN EUROPE HAVE BEEN REVEALED. BIRGITT WOLFF, WHO INTERVIEWED DR MARTIN ECKER AND ALI QUOTED ALI AS SAYING “I ALWAYS FEEL TIRED BUT DON’T FEEL PAIN AT ALL. I DON’T KNOW EXACTLY WHAT IT IS”. – FM.

GRAND YEARS WILL BE PUBLISHED ON MAY 15.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 29 April 20

THE OVERLANDERS. RAVE UK REVIEWS. SEE OZ SPOT.

 


From The Papers: Keeping up with the headlines in The Labor Daily of the 1930s

BOLT FROM THE TRUE BLUE. Below: THE AUSTRALIAN NEWSPAPERS ARE AWAYS LOOKING OUT FOR STORIES.

LITTLE THINGS THAT COUNT SAVE LIVES.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS.

“If you take care in small ways, you will avoid big accidents” was the advice given last night by Mr Alan Davis in a broadcast address from 2KY (Sydney radio station) arranged by the Safety League of NSW.

“Very rarely can your recall an accident caused through the neglect of important safety rules as nearly always they are caused through neglect of seemingly small precautions”, said Mr Davis.

He instanced the fact that although a workman would not put his hand deliberately near the teeth of a circular saw; accidents occurred where men and women were drawn into rapidly moving machinery through a flapping sleeve or other loose clothing.

“A board left lying around with a nail stuck in it seems a very trivial matter, and you may observe it a hundred times and avoid standing on it.

“Then some unfortunate fellow steps on it and get a badly punctured foot, develops lockjaw and dies,” said Mr Davis.

The moral, he declared, was to remove nails from any boards or other material lying around for both the workman’s own sake as well as for his comrades.

“It behoves every one of us to take precautions in small ways to conserve the lives of our fellow workers as well as ourselves” said Mr Davis.

The Safety League will continue this series of talks from 2KY at 7.40 tonight.

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VALE OF A RESPECTED MINER …

THE DEATH HAS OCCURRED AT MOUNT KEMBLA OF MR JOHN LENARD, 67, A HIGHLY RESPECTED MINER, WHO HAS RESIDED ON THE MOUNTAIN FOR OVER 15 YEARS. MOUNT KEMBLA MINERS PRECEDED THE HEARSE TO THE KEMBLA HEIGHTS CEMETRY, AND THE MANY FLORAL TRIBUTES INCLUDED ONE FROM THE LOCAL MINERS’ LODGE. DECEASED IS SURVIVED BY ONE SON, JOHN.


From The Papers: Boxing -- “Sawn offs” of the ring game!

AUSTRALIAN HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPION, AMBROSE PALMER, WHO BOXES AMERICAN LEO KELLY AT THE SYDNEY STADIUM ON MONDAY WEEK.

BABE MARINO’S DEBUT BUT HE DOES NOT CONSIDER HIS SHORTNESS A DISADVANTAGE.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS.

The short stature of Babe Marino, the Pacific Coast middleweight champion, who makes his Sydney Stadium debut against Tommy Jones on Monday night.

Marino recalls that several of the world’s leading middleweights and heavyweights of the past were “sawn offs”.
Australia’s own Les Darcy, Mickey Walker, the “Toy Bulldog” Stanley Ketchell and Joe Wallcott, who knocked out heavyweights with ease; they were all under 5ft 7in.

Tommy Burns was the shortest man to hold the world’s heavyweight championship. Sam Langford, the “Boston Tar Baby”, who defeated all that cared to meet him; Myer Grace, who, with Fred Henneberry, shares the distinction of being the only man to have knocked out Jack Carroll.

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ABOUT US IN 1890 …
THE SPORTING LIFE, USA, RECEIVED THIS SPECIAL CABLE FROM LONDON. IT READ: JACK BURKE, THE IRISH LAD WHO RECENTLY ARRIVED FROM AUSTRALIA, CALLED AT THE SPORTING LIFE OFFICE TODAY AND ISSUED A CHALLENGE TO FIGHT JACK DEMPSEY, THE MIDDLEWEIGHT CHAMPION OF AMERCIA, FOR FIVE HUNDRED POUNDS A-SIDE.
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Lou Brouilliard, ex-world’s welter and middleweight champion … and one of the finest-built men in the fighting game today, are all under 5ft 6in.

Marino does not consider his shortness a disadvantage. He weaves into the attack to get close enough to hammer away at the body of his opponent.

Trading punches is his speciality. If Jones cares to mix it, a fine battle will be witnessed.

Jones is in the field with challenges to any boxer at a weight limit of 11st. 9lb. Having defeated most of the welterweights, he has turned his attention to the middles.

With the exception of Jack Carroll and Ron Richards, Jones has scored a knockout on every opponent he has met in Australia.

<< The three stories are from The Labor Daily, March 27, 1936. NEXT:  Lego Master: He built his own wall of Lego.


SURF’S UP: The 60s board-builders and their fancy nameplate!

FRANK MORRIS
DEWEY WEBER, HOBIE AND OTHER FAMOUS USA NAMES HIT THE AUSTRALIAN MARKET IN THE 1960s. WEBER WAS A DEFINITE LEGEND OF THE AMERICAN SURF. WEBER, WHO WAS KNOWN FOR HIS RIDING PROWESS, MADE HIS INTRICATE WALK UP AND DOWN THE BOARD, THUS GIVING HIM THE NAME “LITTLE MAN ON WHEELS.” HE STARRED IN A NUMBER OF BUD BROWNE SURF MOVIES. WEBER BACAME THE SYMBOL OF THE UNITED STATES SURFING ASSOCIATION. HE LATER BECAME A MOVIE ACTOR. WEBER BOARDS, WITH THE FAMOUS LABEL, WERE AVAILABLE IN AUSTRALIA FROM 1965.


The Great War: Who was the oldest recruit in the Anzac’s?

WILLIAM SCHMUTTER IS POSITIONED AT THE RIGHT PLACE – OUTSIDE THE RECRUITMENT OFFICE. Below: IN A CROWDED GATHERING OF RECRUITS, HE WOULD BE HARD TO FIND.                                                                                                                                                                               

SHE FOUND IT A BIT CONFUSING. WILLIAM WAS BORN IN 1859, AND THAT WOULD MAKE HIM OLDER THAN HE SHOULD BE.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Like many brave Australians during WW1 William Schmutter was eager to do his part for his country. He lied about his age in order to be eligible to enlist.

However, unlike many young Aussie’s, William did not change his date of birth to make himself older, he did the opposite.

Kate Mills, an avid family researcher, was not aware her family had any military history, until she accidentally stumbled upon on an old photograph through her research.

Kath uncovered a large family photo showing her great-great grandfather, William, sitting at the centre of a group of family members wearing a military uniform.

This snap-shot was taken just before he went off to war in 1916.

She found this a bit confusing. William was born in 1859, which meant he was almost 60 years old. She was aware that the Army did not accept recruits of that age; Kate was faced with a new family mystery.

Armed with photographic evidence, she focused on searching for military records about her great-great grandfather. She probed for William Schmutter in the military records, but uncovered nothing.

She became more dedicated to unravelling the truth. She searched high and low for variations of names. Eventually, his appeared under the name William Smutter.

Jackpot!

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ABOUT US IN 1914 …
WHEN WW1 BROKE OUT WILLIAM BIRDWOOD, IST BARON BIRDWOOD OF ANZAC AND TOTNES, WAS MADE COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF OF AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND FORCES IN EUROPE. AS SECOND-IN-COMMAND OF THE GALLOPOLI LANDING AT ANZAC, BIRDWOOD NAMED THE COVE, HIS COURAGROUS LEADERSHIP EARNED HIM UNIVERSAL RESPECT AMONG AUSTRALIAN SOLDIERS. EVEN MONASH ADMIRED HIS ABILITY. – FM.

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The reason for dropping the ‘ch’ in Schmutter was possibly to anglicise his name.

Here’s another puzzling discovery?  William was, she soon discovered, had listed his age at 44 years and 4 months at the time of his enlistment.

Why would someone make themselves younger to enlist?

A number of theories have been floated around. Yet, ultimately, the secret of why he lied about his age to enlist is buried with him?

There is no doubt that he was a brave soldier who served overseas as a driver for two years. He was injured and transferred to a hospital in France, then England.

William Smutter was eventually discharged on April 8, 1918.

In the end, for whatever reason, William chose to lie about his age and be able to join his fellow countrymen overseas. He is an ANZAC of which we can all be proud.

<< Kath Mills supplied the story. Ancestry.com.au


OZ SPOT: Local film a hit overseas!

IN 1946, THE LONDON PRESS HAVE HAILED THE AUSTRALIAN FILM, THE OVERLANDERS, AS A SUPERB PRODUCTION, WHICH HAS GIVEN AUSTRLIA A PLACE IN THE FILM WORLD. NEARLY ALL THE MORNING NEWSPAPERS DEVOTED THE BULK OF THEIR WEEKLY FILM REVIEW SPACE TO THE MOVIE WITH NO ADVERSE CRITICISM … CRITICS USED THE PHRASES SUCH AS “SUPERLATIVELY GOOD”, “TOPNOTCHER” AND “THRILLING INTEREST” ARE TYPICAL. PRIME MINISTER, MR BEN CHIFLEY, SAID, “I FEEL THAT THE OVERLANDER WILL HELP PUBLICISE AUSTRALIA THROUGHOUT THE WORLD”. – FM.

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GRAND YEARS WILL APPEAR ON MAY 1.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 16 April 20

FROM THE PAPERS: Rediscovering Australia’s past through the pages of our newspapers

The Australian Labor Daily 1936. NEXT issue.


SHORT STORY: The Black Rabbit discovered a Mulberry Tree – the only one in La La Land!

A MULBERRY TREE: ITS THE ONLY ONE IN LA LA LAND.  Below: I FEEL LIKE DANCING AROUND IT, BLACKIE SAID.

FRANK MORRIS

JOLLY IS A HAPPY WORD. HE FEELS IT IN HIS BONES.

The Black Rabbit was feeling marvellous. Jolly marvellous.

“Absolutely, stupendously jolly marvellous!” he yelled. “That is a jolly happy word,” he said.

He could feel it in his bones.

What he could see of La-La-Land, it looked perfectly fine, too.

As he looked over La-La-Land, from his front porch, he saw that every animal was leaping around.

They must be caught up in a kind of merriment.

I wonder whether it’s something in the grass.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!,” he said, with a modicum of goodly mirth. "How ex-tra-ordinaaaary.”

The Black Rabbit felt like leaping too.

He tried it. He leapt very high.

He tried it again. He leapt even higher.

He thought he might try it again. He did. He leapt so high he thought he would never come down.

He plummeted down to earth and rolled all the way to the river.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he said.

“Those animals must be in peak form”, he muttered to himself.

With all that leaping around the Black Rabbit began to feel tired himself.

Fatigued, in fact.

He looked at the other animals and they were still leaping.

All of a sudden he stopped walking and yelled out, “Where am I, where am I. I know La-La-Land like the back of my hand, but this is ridiculous.”

He looked up-the-hill, down-the-hill and to the left and right

He sighted the Mulberry Bush. Only one. Oh, and four rabbits popped out.

The rabbits were bright-eyed and full of smiling. Each rabbit was standing around the bush holding a piece of multi-coloured tape.

And then they were off … singing and dancing.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he said, in a rather high voice.

Next, the rabbits were singing in front of a wash tub, with a new verse to the same song.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he said, in a higher voice than last time.

The four rabbits were busy hanging their clothes on the line to dry.

And all were singing a verse of the same song.

When they finished, the four rabbits darted into their house.

They emerged minutes later with a pile of school books, some wrap and string. And off to school went the four rabbits. All were singing, quite happily, “going to school on a cold and frosty morning.”

Next moment, he was alone. “I wonder how long they’ll be,” he thought.

…………………………………………………………………………………………..............................................................
ABOUT US IN 1953 …
THE AVERAGE LIFE EXPECTANCY FOR MEN IN AUSTRALIA HAS RISEN FROM 50 TO 70 SINCE 1903, SAID THE MINISTER FOR HEALTH, SIR EARLE PAGE. FOR WOMEN IT INCREASED FROM 52 TO 72. HE SAID INFANT MORTALITY HAD DROPPED FROM ONE IN 8 BIRTHS TO ONE IN 40. IN 1903, THE PRINCIPAL CAUSES OF DEATH WERE DISEASES OF DIGESTIVE ORGANS, TUBERCULOSIS AND HEART DISEASE. TODAY, 2020, IT’S MAINLY IS HEART DISEASE, DEMENTIA AND CANCER. – FM.
……………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................

I hopped back to the Mulberry Bush and tried to emulate the rabbits singing and dancing.

I tried singing.

I tried skipping and hopping to the same tune.

The next thing I knew I was doing it. I was doing it … singing and dancing.

“How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” he said in a voice that would have drowned out all of La-La-Land.

At last, just over the hill I heard the four rabbits heading for home.

They were singing and dancing.

“This is the way we come out of school on a cold a frosty morning,” all four rabbits sang.

I ran to meet them. And I joined in.

They laugh at me. I laugh back.

All five of us were singing and dancing. “Here we go round the mulberry bush, the mulberry bush, the mulberry bush early in the morning …”

They were out of sight.

“I got my wish”. “How ex-tra-ordinaaaary! How ex-tra-ordinaaaary!” was the familiar tone that I heard echoing from on high.

<< Grand Years.

 


AUSSIE OLD TIME FILM STARS: Let’s peek in the larder and see what we shall find!

LOTTIE LYELL WAS AUSTRALIA’S FIRST SILENT SCREEN STAR. HER LARGE, EXPRESSIVE EYES BECAME HER TRADEMARK.

THE ROMANTIC STORY OF MARGARET CATCHPOLE, MADE IN 1911, IS ONE OF THE OLDEST AUSTRALIAN FEATURE FILMS. DIRECTED BY RAYMOND LONGFORD, AND STARRING LOTTIE LYELL AS THE GIRL TRANSPORTED TO NSW FOR HORSE THEFT, EXPLAINS AUTHOR AND FILM CRITIC JUDITH ADAMSON. THE LONGFORD AND LYELL DUO WAS TO BE A FORMIDBLE COMBINATION. HE WAS AN ACTOR IN ALFRED ROLFE’S FILMS OF STAGEPLAYS THROUGHOUT 1910, THEN WENT ON TO BECOME AUSTRALIA’S MOST FAMOUS SILENT DIRECTOR. LEADING LADY WAS, OF COURSE, LOTTIE LYELL, HIS PRODUCTION PARTNER. A NEWSPAPER SAID “THIS EXCELLENT AUSTRALIAN PRODUCTION CONTAINED EXCITEMENT AND ROMANCE. -- FM.

<< Australian Film Posters, 1906-1960, Judith Adamson, 1978.

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ABOUT US IN 1923 …
DIABETES SUPPLIES OF INSULIN WOULD BECOME MORE PLENTIFUL AND CHEAPER, A STATEMENT THAT MADE THE WORLD STAND UP AND CHEER. IT WAS WELCOME NEWS! DR FREDERICK BANTING, WORKING IN MacLEOD’S LABORATORY, MADE CERTAIN DISCOVERIES AND TOOK THEM TO MacLEOD. THE RESULT WAS INSULIN TREATMENT. MacLEOD TOLD AN AUDIENCE IN BRITAIN … THAT THE PRICE WOULD DROP TO 25 SHILLINGS A WEEK. – FM.


John Frost Newspaper Collection: Final. Headlines you’ll never forget!

POSSE KILLS BONNIE AND CLYDE. THE ELUSIVE DUO WERE SHOT DEAD AS DESPERADOES. Below: THE DEATH OF MADAME CURIE.

FROST IS A MAN WHO LOOKED FORWARD TO THE PAST.

ELAINE WILLIAM        Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

John Frost’s love of his newspaper collection had continued even throughout a seven year spell in the army that spread from 1939 to 1946.

While on active duty in Normandy, Frost says he “had a rifle in one hand and an eye on collecting newspapers.” Any local papers he found were sent home.

On one occasion he had … no leave from the army for more than 12 months; his mother wrote to her son complaining about the growing pile of foreign newspapers.

When Frost left the army, it took 18 months for him to sort out the publications.

He has many types of newspapers that have become war-time treasures. The local German paper called the Lubecker Zeitung, published on May 1, 1945, reported Hitler’s suicide with the words “Unser Fuhrer Gefallen” (Our leader has fallen).

The report of the assassination in Sarajevo, of the Crown Prince of Austria, in the Neues Wiener Tagblatt, of Sunday, June 28, 1914, is another example of this world-respected collection of newspapers.

……………………………………………………………………………………………….......................................................
ABOUT US IN 1971 …
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT ESTABLISHES THE AUTRALIAN FILM COMMISSION TO ENCOURAGE AN AUSTRALIAN FILM INDUSTRY … JEANS DESIGNED EXCLUSIVELY FOR WOMEN COME ONTO THE MARKET … ACUPUNCTURE TREATMENT INTRODUCED TO AUSTRALIA FROM CHINA … PHOTOGRAPHS OF GOUGH WHITLAM SHOW THAT HE IS NO LONGER USING HAIR OIL AND IS, PERHAPS, BLOW-DRYING HIS HAIR.
……………………………………………………………………………………………….......................................................

One of Frost’s personal heroes is Winston Churchill. Frost has every major political event in Churchill’s life.

Newspapers of the war time, are an extra-special category of papers because of Frost’s own experience as a Normandy veteran.

Still, events such as the deaths of film stars Marilyn Monroe and Rudolph Valentino also have their place among the extra-famous personalities.

Along with more light-hearted moments with articles of the famous and not-so-famous, like the one of Freddie Starr. One tabloid front page headline records the dubious behaviour of British comedian, Starr, who was accused of eating a pet hamster.

Frost has been described as the man who looks forward to the past. He enjoys this graphic summary.
Also, he looks forward to the future and the news of important events. I had been with Frost a few minutes when the news came through of the sudden and tragic death an hour earlier of a man who was tipped to become Britain’s next prime minister.

The future is never far away!

<< Adapted from an article, Headlines we never forget! Elaine William; Frank Morris also supplied some extra words.

FROM A HIGH PEAK, SHERLOCK HOLMES AND PROFESSOR MORIARTY WRESTLE AND STUMBLE TO THEIR DEATH.

……………………………………………………………………………………………….......................................................
ABOUT US IN 1972 …
MacDONALD’S BURGERS COME TO AUSTRALIA TO OPEN ITS FIRST OUTLET AT THE SUBURB OF YAGOONA, NSW. (KENTUCKY ARRIVED IN 1968) … THE LONDON ECONOMIST SURVEY LISTS THAT AUSTRALIA IS THE FOURTH-BEST PLACE TO LIVE AFTER US, CANADA AND SWEDEN.


ANNOUNCEMENT FROM MANAGEMENT …

BECAUSE OF THE CURRENT VIRUS PROBLEMS, GRAND YEARS WILL PUBLISHED EVERY TWO WEEKS. NEXT ISSUE: APRIL 17.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 02 April 20

John Frost. Newspaper collector: Part 2. Headlines we never forget!

THE UNSINKABLE TITANIC SINKS ON FIRST VOYAGE. THE TRAGEDY MADE HEADLINES ALL OVER THE WORLD. Below: THE MAN THE NAZIS MOST HATE, WINSTON CHURCHILL, INSPECTING A BOMBED LONDON AREA AND CHECKING ON THE DAMAGE.

HIS ORGANISATION COLLECTS EVENTS WHICH WILL BECOME HISTORY. NEWSPAPERS RECORD EVERYTHING. FROM THE DAY A COMEDIAN WAS ACCUSED OF EATING A HAMSTER TO THE CORONATIONS AND DEATHS OF KINGS AND QUEENS.

ELAINE WILLIAM       Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

In the leafy northern suburbs of London is a modest semi-detached dwelling which houses Britain’s only historical newspaper loan service.

It controls one of the most remarkable collection of newspapers in the world, over 60,000 British and overseas newspapers and periodicals plus more than 100,000 press cuttings of events dating from 1640.

The newspapers cover the death and coronation of every British monarch since 1751 and the election of every American president since 1832.

…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…
JOHN, HOLD THE FRONT PAGE …
LINDA MOONEY, UK, REPORTS: FROST REMEMBERED THE CRASH OF THE R101 AIRSHIP. IT WAS ITS MAIDEN VOYAGE TO INDIA AND CRASHED WITH THE LOSS OF 48 LIVES, INCLUDING THAT OF THE AIR MINISTER. MY MOTHER GAVE ME A PENNY. A FEW MOMENTS LATER I WAS BACK FOR A SUNDAY EXPRESS, WHICH COST 2d. FROM THAT DAY, I WAS HOOKED ON NEWSPAPERS THAT COVERED A MAJOR CRITICAL EVENT. CONTINUED.
……………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................

There are thousands of papers which covered the Second World War, and reports of other major conflicts – American Civil War, Boer War, Korea, Vietnam, the Falklands and Middle East Wars.

That’s just the tip of the iceberg.

Major disasters like the Titanic sinking in 1912 and the Waco cult siege of 1993 are represented, together with a rare colour newspaper of 1909.

This rarity contains news of French aviator Bleriot’s historical flight over the English Channel.

Frost collects not only British national papers but also local papers that can give a different appeal; oftentimes, it’s a more personal viewpoint on worldwide events.

“We like to get the newspapers from where it happened”, he once said.

In l969, major American newspapers had the day that Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. The Daily Express and the majors carry the story, and other newspapers from Armstrong’s home town.

What started as a hobby for Frost, is now gradually being taken over as a “proper” business by his son Andrew. As a child, Frost was fascinated by headlines.

As a ten-years-old kid, his first newspaper covered the crash of the R101 airship in 1930. This crash led to the UK abandoning the development of airships for decades.

<< Adapted from an article Headlines we never forget! Elaine William, 1994. Frank Morris some extra words. John Frost died in 20??.

Next: Final. Headlines you never forget!

JOHN’S PILE. AMONG THESE IS THE PRIDE OF THE COLLECTION. IN THE RIGHT-HAND CORNER IS A COPY OF THE LUBECKER ZEITUNG WHICH REPORTED HITLER’S SUICIDE A SHORT TIME AFTER IT HAPPENED.

……………………………………………………………………………………………….......................................................
JOHN, HOLD THE FRONT PAGE …
LINDA MOONEY, UK, REPORTS: IN HOLLAND AND BELGIUM, WHEN HIS DIVISON CAPTURED LUBECK JUST TWO DAYS AFTER HITLER’S SUICIDE, JOHN MANAGED TO BAG THE BLACK-BOARDED, ONE-PAGE EDITION OF THE LUBECKEN ZEITUNG. THE PAPER REPORTED THE DEATH OF THE FUHRER.  JOHN SAID IT WAS THE “PRIDE” OF HIS COLLECTION.


THE POKIES: My father is a gambler. What’s the next step?

WARNING: NEARLY NINETY PER CENT OF AUSTRALIANS PLAYED THE POKER MACHINES OVER THE LAST THREE MONTHS. MANY OF THEM ARE SERIOUS GAMBLERS. Below: THE CASH YOU LOST ON THE POKER MACHINES WAS A SECRET UNTIL YOUR PARTNER FOUND OUT.

THERE’S AN ADAGE ABOUT THE POKIES: THE MORE YOU SPEND, THE MORE YOU LOSE. YOU CAN’T WIN! YOU CAN’T WIN!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

Ms X is concerned that her recently widowed father is spending his time and money playing the pokies which, one day, “will be the ruin of him,”

“My mum and dad were always close,”.  “They did everything together. Sadly, she passed away quite  suddenly six months ago.”

Ms X continues: “For awhile I thought my dad was coping pretty well, still getting out and keeping quite busy. He lives about an hour away.

“Recently, when I visited, he’d been out and I let myself in and waited for him to return. Just last week I noticed there was a pile of red bills stuffed at the back of a drawer. When I asked him he became defensive, angry and quite hurtful.

“He said I know nothing about what he is going through. Later, I called one his friends; he told me dad was spending hours on end at the local club playing the poker machines.

I'm very concerned about his gambling habit.  But after his uncharacteristic outburst, I don't know what to say to him.  Can you advise me where I should start?

The Carers Aid said many people spend a few dollars on the pokies - and that's harmless.

As it appears your father's joining the 160,000-200,000 other Australians who have become addicted to the promise of a big win.

But, quite simply, you lose more than you win. Sadly, no one can rein him in. The back-log of bills worries him. What started out as fun with the pokies has gone too far.


AUSSIE OLD TIME FILM STARS: Let’s peek into the larder and see what we’ll find!

FRANK MORRIS

BEATRICE EINSIEDEL WAS A VERY SPRIGHTLY 80-YEAR-OLD WHEN SHE WAS INTERVIEWED BY AUTHOR ERIC READE IN THE SEVENTIES. SHE USED THE NAME OF BEATRICE DAY. SHE REMEMBERED PORTRAYING NERO’S WIFE IN THE FILM, SOLDIERS OF THE CROSS. THE FILM WAS MADE IN 19OO, CLAIMING TO BE THE WORLD’S FIRST FULL-LENGTH FILM. MOST THE FILM WAS SHOT ON THE TENNIS COURT, NEAR A SALVATION ARMY HOME FOR GIRLS, AT MURRUMBEENA, MELBOURNE, CLOSE TO WHAT IS NOW KNOWN AS CHADSTONE SHOPPING CENTRE. THE FILM WAS DIRECTED BY JOSEPH PERRY WHO WAS DE MILLE BEFORE HIS TIME. THE FILM PORTRAYS THE CHRISTIANS BEING PELTED WITH ROCKS AND STONES AND JUMPING OFF A HIGH PIT INTO BURNING LIME. A POWERFUL POINT IN THE DRAMA IS WHEN OTHER MARTYRS WERE THROWN TO THE LIONS AND THE BURNING OF POLYCARP -- A CHRISTIAN BISHOP -- AT THE STAKE.

<< Background from Eric Reade The Australian Screen.


LATE NEWS …
THE 2020 OLMYPIC GAMES IN TOKYO HAS BEEN POSTPONED UNTIL THE SAME TIME NEXT YEAR. GRAND YEARS WILL KEEP YOU POSTED. ALL FEATURES THAT TIED IN WITH THE GAMES WILL RESUME NEXT YEAR.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 26 March 20

NRMA: Thriving on 100 years of service and moments of profound change!

FORMER PRIME MINISTER BECOMES FIRST PRESIDENT OF NRMA.  

THE FIRST PATROLS, PART OF NRMA’s ORIGINAL FRONTLINE TO HELP STRANDED MOTORISTS. Below: THE 100 YEARS EDITION OF THE OPEN ROAD.

NRMA HAS ASSISTED THE COMMUNITY THROUGH THE DEPRESSION, EMPLOYED VETERANS OF WORLD WAR 1 AND 2, HELPED MOTORISTS WITH PETROL RATIONING DURING THE WAR YEARS, AND BACKED THE NATION’S FIRST ANTI-DRINK DRIVING RULES AND SUPPORTED LAWS THAT MADE SEATBELTS COMPULSORY. AND MANY MORE.

FRANK MORRIS

The first president of the NRMA changed an entire industry and brought kindness and courtesy to the new-found organisation.  His name was John Christian Watson who, at 37, became the Australian Prime Minister. 

“Many values J.C. Watson instilled over his two decades as president remain today,” says an article in the Open Road.

“His organisation was initially all about roads … he broadened its scope to include insurance, road trips, motor camps and tourism. He ended up making the NRMA one of the most powerful motoring clubs in the world”.

In December 1927, a member wrote to Open Road with the idea that J. C. Watson should be dubbed “Good Roads” Watson.

When he died at 74, on November 18, l941, Watson was given a state funeral.

It was when Watson was involved he introduced touring as the ‘must do’ parameter so that during the 1930s, and for this reason, the NRMA set up a touring office to guide people on their road trips.

One person who led the charge was A. W. Scott, who was employed under the NRMA “policy” of hiring returned servicemen.

He was a lieutenant aboard the HMS King George, according to the 1924 Open Road, at the Battle of Jutland. He took up flying and crashed somewhere in France.

In 1924, Scott was hospitalised because of war injuries. After he convalesced, he was “promoted to the touring office where he would manage the expanding market”.

Scott made it a practice to provide a regular feature, made up of weekly road bulletins, and given to the Sydney press. The weekend last minute information was broadcast by all of the radio stations.

……………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................
ABOUT THE OLYMPICS …
IN WINNING THE 80m HURDLES AT 17, THE PETITE MAUREEN CAIRD BECAME THE YOUNGEST OLYMPIC GAMES GOLD MEDALLIST IN TRACK AND FIELD. SHE BECAME THE “GOLDEN BABY” OF THE AUSTRALIAN PRESS. SHE CELEBRATED HER 17TH BIRTHDAY BY DEFEATING THE 80M WORLD RECORD HOLDER IN A PRE-OLYMPICS MEET. MAUREEN CAIRD FINISHED WITH CHEST PUFFED OUT IN THE 80m HURDLES FINAL IN RECORD TIME. PAM KILBORN WAS SECOND.
……………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................

“For motorists itching to explore, the maps and information about roads he traversed were invaluable” the NRMA noted.

As editor at the time, Scott’s occasional driving companion, A.C.C. Stevens, said he … had resourcefulness in all sorts of ticklish situations.”

Scott’s work as a patrol had clearly not been wasted.

Intrepid Scott said, “I have taken the Essex Six over roads on which no car has even been before …”

Taking over from Scott, was a gentleman who made many drivers feel far more comfortable with a Gregory’s street directory tucked away in their glovebox.

Cecil Gregory came from the Daily Telegraph as a journalist to join the NRMA as the touring and publicity manger to cater for members’ demands.

As well as being a cartographer, Gregory was the skilled editor of the Open Road for five years.
The touring office was described in Open Road as “the hub of travel” where staff gave information on the spot. By the late 1930s, the touring office issued more than 400,000 strip maps, 24,000 itineraries and 7000 letters to members a year.

And this was the time when the NRMA’s “love affair” with road trips was only just beginning.

……………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................
ABOUT THE OLYMPICS …
IN 1896, AT THE FIRST MODERN OLYMPIC GAMES AT ATHENS, EDWIN FLACK BECAME AUSTRALIA’S FIRST INTERNATIONALLY “RECOGNISED” ATHLETE. HE WAS OUR ONLY COMPETITOR. FLACK WON THE 800m FINAL AND THE 1500m FINAL. A FEW DAYS LATER, HE ALSO LINED UP FOR THE MARATHON, HIS FIRST ATTEMPT AT A LONG DISTANCE RACE.
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Frank Morris comment: The urbanisation of Australia began in earnest in the 1920s. Population had hit the 5.4 million mark; the capital cities were spreading out; new suburbs were sprouting up – and that meant lots of new streets. The motor car numbers were on the rise, over 22,000 were registered in Australia. People needed some expert guidance on how to negotiate the urban labyrinths. When Cecil Gregory left the NRMA, he decided to use the ‘Gregory’ name on the comprehensive street directory. The first edition was in 1934. It wasn’t the “first of its kind”, but it was the most popular. Hence, ever since Gregory’s became a household name “where’s the Gregory’s” is a familiar catchcry.

THE LEGEND OF THE PATROL. THIS PATROL IS CAUGHT IN THE BOG, A FURTHER STATEMENT ABOUT THE STATE OF ROADS IN NSW.

Material is an adaption of 100 YEARS OF THE NRMA; Frank Morris Comment comes from the Power of the Book, MMS.

……………………………………………………………………………………………….......................................................
IT’S THE OLYMPICS …
1964 AND TOKYO PLAYS HOST TO THE “HAPPY GAMES” AND JAPAN SPENDS $2 BILLION ON MAKING IT ALL HAPPEN. THIS IS THE FIRST GAMES IN AN ASIAN COUNTRY AND ALSO WHERE AUSTRALIA’S DAWN FRASER WINS THE 100m FREESTYLE FOR HER THIRD TIME IN SUCCESSION IN AN OLYMPIC CONTEST. CONTINUED.
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KOALAS: A time for action -- when we think of the grim situation that awaits them!

“THE BUSHFIRES HAVE HIT OUR COMMUNITIES HARD AND WILDLIFE HAS SUFFERED; BUT THERE ARE THINGS YOU CAN DO TO HELP.” THAT IS A STATEMENT FROM NRMA GROUP CEO, ROHAN LUND IN THE CURRENT ISSUE OF OPEN ROAD. SEND YOUR DONATIONS TO WILDLIFE AND OTHER CHARITABLE ORGANISATIONS IN YOUR STATE.


MASON KNIGHT: YOU BE THE REPORTER. DON’T LEAVE MASON KNIGHT TO TAKE ALL THE CREDIT!

EVERYBODY’S FRIEND, UNTIL: MASON KNIGHT, ACE REPORTER HERE. I’M ABOUT TO NAIL THE RUTHLESS GANG! Below: KNIGHT WATCHED FROM THE SIDE AS THE BULLETS FLEW.

FRANK MORRIS

I got in the front door and the phone rang. “It’s Mason Knight here!” Then dead silence. “Bernie Squires, your favourite editor. I just …” Knight coughed. “… I just wanted you to know that four crooks, headed by McCann, are meeting at Towong Shopping Mall early in the morning. So be there!” Squires rang off.

Squires must think the four crooks are going to explode, thought Knight. They just as well might, you know, he thought. Four murderers with guns are down there for a reason, he thought again.

I’ll bet they are going there to gun down someone else, according to my favourite editor. Knight ran the story through his head. He could be a bastard at times, thought Knight.

Knight gleefully put his hatted figure on the unmade bed. He then went to sleep. In no time at all, he was awake. Knight lifted his sprawled figure off the bed, gave his face a wash in cold water, and a quick shave. He was already attired.

He marched to the car, a maroon 1936 Buick sedan, and was off. Knight headed straight to Towong Shopping Mall, stopped the car, and ran to an escalator coming in the opposite direction. He rode up and down before he spotted the four bandits.

Earlier on, the four men started a serious argument that resulted in a fatal shooting of one man by the others. All of the others ran away after the shot, but were eventually rounded up by police and brought to headquarters.

Knight took in all the action, including the fatal gunshot. He took in who was killed and by whom. The police brusquely rounded up the gang and an innocent man, not one of the crowd, who was unfortunately among the suspects.

Knight saw who the murderer was, who the victim was, and who the innocent man was.

McCann, the boss of a powerful gang, was an escaped convict. He was the first one found by the police. Evans, who stood behind the murderer when he fired the shot, was sure that Barker had done it. Barker, who had just met the murdered man and knew he controlled a gang, wouldn’t dare tell on the killer.

Carter is a pal of McCann’s and a cousin of the murdered man. He hated the murderer whom he had known for four years. Gates was in Melbourne with his girl the evening of the murder and hadn’t seen Carter for two years. He was arrested in Sydney two days later.

Mason Knight made his presence felt among the police. He introduced himself to Police Inspector McCraddock. They talked for a while, got the nitty gritty of the shootout and even eventually asked Knight for his solution.

Knight then stated: Evans was neither the murderer nor the victim, as he stood behind the murderer when the shot was fired. Barker could be neither, since he had just met the murdered man and wouldn’t dare tell on the murderer.

Gates must have been the killer. He could have been in Melbourne the evening of the murder and still committed the crime and fly from Melbourne to Sydney. There is nothing to indicate Carter’s presence at the scene so he must had been the innocent man.

McCann must have been the victim since all the others are obviously alive.

Knight was happy to receive a “well done” by some of the police. Even the Inspector joined in. “That’s the beauty of these cases,” the Inspector said. “You know what the guys ate for breakfast.” Said Knight: “Better still, you’ll be able to read my account in tonight’s Inquirer.”

.........................................................................................................................................................................................
THE MYSTERY OF THE HANSOM CAB …
THIS MOVIE IN 1911, WAS ADAPTED FROM THE FIRST NOVEL WRITTEN ON CRIME IN 1886. THE INTEREST IN THE CRIME WAS NEVER ALLOWED TO FLAG. THE MYSTERY IS CLEVERLY HIDDEN UNTIL THE LAST FEW MINUTES. DEALING IN MURDER AND A MISSING WITNESS, THE COURT SCENES ARE EXCELLENT. THE MELBOURNE ARGUS REVIEW CUTS RIGHT TO THE POINT, THE MOVIE IS “WELL ACTED AND PHOTOGRAPHED.” THE MELBOURNE HERALD SAID “THIS APTLY DEMONSTRATED A HIGH STANDARD OF FILM-MAKING.”
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MASON KNIGHT’S 1936 BUICK.

<< Grand Years, 10.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 20 March 20

CHESTY BOND: Who were the people that created this “Super Man”?

TWO CHESTY BOND STRIPS. TOP, SHOWS CHESTY IS ALL SET TO WIN THE WOODCHOPPING CONTEST…

 

… HIS SECRET IS OUT!

THEY HELPED CREATE A COMIC AS AN ADVERTISEMENT. BY AND LARGE, IT WAS ONE OF THE BEST-READ “COMICS” OF THE PERIOD!

FRANK MORRIS

Chesty Bond is now 82-years young!

To gaze at him you would swear blind he doesn’t look a day over 30. The square-jawed icon, with his thatch of blond hair, rippling muscles and chiselled chin, had the enterprise of Atlas who had just lifted the world and carried it on his massive shoulders.

The two men responsible for this human dynamo were Ted Maloney, who worked at the ad agency J. Walter Thompson, and Syd Miller, who was one of Australia’s finest commercial artists.

Maloney achieved a lot of success in the advertising business. In his spare time, he was one of Australia’s best-known cooking experts. He received his share of fame as co-author of the cookery book Oh For A French Wife which was published in 1952. The book was a classic soon after its release.

He wrote several other cookery books as well as regular columns on wine and food for newspapers. The other half of the combination was Syd Miller, contributor to some of the leading publications in Australia.

Miller knew of Maloney from way back. The both were acquainted with each other when they worked in the advertising department of Smith’s Weekly. In 1938, when Miller was freelancing he met Maloney, who was now employed at J. Walter Thompson.

To his surprise, Maloney was working on the million pound Bonds account and, after much palaver, Maloney and Miller “were together again.”

Chesty Bond was created by Miller and Maloney and made his debut in the comic section of the Sun newspaper on August 10, 1938. This was Maloney’s dream, to have the newly-charged image character up against the best.

Chesty appeared five times a week and was the first advertising strip of its kind in the world.

But let’s go back to when it all stated.

“Popeye had inspired the idea for Chesty,” recalled Maloney. “Popeye had his spinach so Chesty got his strength from Bond’s singlets.”

……………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................
THIS IS 1970 …
FOR THE FIRST TIME AN ABORIGINAL DANCE COMPANY TOURS AUSTRALIA – PROFESSIONALLY … THE REVIEW, A SERIOUS WEEKLY, IS STARTED BY GORDON BARTON IN MELBOURNE … SYDNEY’S NIMROD THEATRE OPENS … EARTH DAY MARKS THE BEGINNING OF A CONCERN WITH ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES.
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Miller had to forego the history adventures series where Bond’s athletic singlets were being used in ‘historical’ situations. The ‘comic strip’ idea seems to hit the nail on the head. He started scribbling immediately to create a strip that would be successful.

“The true Chesty Bond was strong man, not your lumpy weight-lifting type,” Miller said. “He was kind, likeable and good-looking but he was not a male model. He was definitely Australian but acceptable everywhere. He was the heroic straight man.”

Chesty would be an Australian strong-man. Better still, he was made to feel transcendingly powerful whenever he wore his Bonds singlet. Miller scribbled a few heads and then one with a jaw. Chesty’s eyes changed to slits when he was facing danger.

The official Chesty Bond was born.

“During the war, Chesty battled with Hitler, Hirohito, enemy submarines, planes, spies and ships,” Miller said. “He also gave Bonds cotton cut-offs to ambulances, hospitals and volunteer defence forces.”

A prominent retail executive said “Chesty has widespread appeal right across the community. He is well loved. He represents more than just the blond bronzed Aussie. I think he appeals to all Australians, no matter what race or creed.”

Over the years, he went from tabloid cartoon to real-life TV star.

That’s Chesty Bond.

<< Grand Years 2006.

CHESTY HAS A PRESENT FOR PEGGY. AND CHESTY-LOOK-ALIKES MARCH IN THE STREET WITH CHESTY BOND.

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THIS IS 1971 …
VITAMIN SALES BEGIN TO CLIMB, UP 66 PER CENT … NATIONAL TIMES IS ESTABLISHED … AUSTRALIAN COUNCIL FOR THE ARTS FUNDING DOUBLED BY PRIME MINISTER JOHN GORTON … BRA-LESS FASHION FOLLOWS BRA-BURNING DEMONSTRATION IN THE UNITED STATES … CASSETTE RECORDINGS BECOME COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE … ABC CHILDREN’S PROGRAM, THE ARGONAUTS, GOES INTO DECLINE.


Drivers were greeted as heroes!

THE TALBOT LEFT ADELAIDE IN MARCH 1909 AND REACHED DARWIN 51 DAYS LATER.

FRANK MORRIS

Henry Dutton and Murray Aunger left Adelaide on November 15, 1909. The two men were bound to cross Australia. They were soon to find out that such a drive wasn’t just a pipedream. Dutton could cruise at 70kph. The arrival of the Talbot, the first motor car, in the tiny township of Alice Spring caused an uproar. Horses bolted and Aborigines had to climb the nearest tree to escape the monster. When excitement had calmed down the intrepid motorists were greeted as heroes; and refreshments were served. It took them 51 days to reach Darwin, the end of the odyssey. The faithful old Talbot, rescued from the outback, is still in running order. It’s now in Birdwood Mill Museum, South Australia. – FM; a newspaper report on the drive.


HISTORY REPORTED: Ulrich Ellis will be remembered as a founder of Australian Country Party

THE AUSTRALIAN COUNTRY PARTY IS DESIGNED FOR LOOKING AFTER THE COUNTRYITES. Below: ULRICK ELLIS.

AS A JOURNALIST AND HISTORIAN HE WAS A HOUSEHOLD NAME TO A WIDE GENERATION, BUT NEVER FAMOUS!

FRANK MORRIS

Everyone extols and admires fame but too few ever achieve that status. Over the last 150 years or so Australia has produced only a modicum of internationally recognised writers and a handful of Noble Prize winners.

The variety of our literature is quite remarkable for a country that only, a little more than a decade ago, celebrated “the bicentenary of white man’s history.”

Who is Ulrich Ruegg Ellis?

Born in Queensland in 1904, Ellis, a journalist and historian, was neither a household name nor famous. But, he had the privilege of being listed in the Notable Australians Who’s Who for having “achieved a level of expertise which make them notable and respected Australians.”

His older brother, M.H. Ellis, who was born in 1890, was a journalist, author and historian, whose biographies of Macquarie, Greenway and Macarthur, were acclaimed for standard and quality of historical research.

If nothing else, Ellis will be remembered by researchers and other historians as the author of A History of the Australian Country Party, which was published in 1963. It has become a classic in its own right.

His other books, New Australian States (1933) and The Country Party: A social and political history of the party in NSW (1958), were a constant reminder that change was in the air.

Between 1932 and1970, Ellis wrote stringent pamphlets and political, constitutional and development resources and scores of articles on political and water conservation and irrigation in Australia.

He was also a major contributor to the 1958 edition of The Australian Encyclopedia.

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THIS IS 197I …
GORDON BARTON BUYS THE OLDEST AUSTRALIAN PUBLISHER, ANGUS & ROBERTSON … AUSTRALIAN OPERA’S ATTENDANCE FIGURES (PER HEAD OF POPULATION), FOR THEIR FIRST FOURTEEN-WEEK SEASON, EXCEEDS FIGURES FROM OVERSEAS … WILLIAM McMAHON REPLACES JOHN GORTON AS PRIME MINISTER … CINEMA ATTENDANCES BEGIN TO RISE FOR THE FIRST TIME SINCE THE FIFTIES, WHEN TELEVISION WAS INTRODUCED, CAUSED THEM TO DECLINE.
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On the political front Ellis was associated with Sir Earle Page – leader of the Country Party, treasurer and deputy prime minister -- as an adviser for nearly 40 years. He served as Page’s political secretary from 1928 to 1936.

Ellis moved to another government sector when Page took over as Prime Minister as a “temporary arrangement” on the death of Joe Lyons in 1939. There was a great deal of personal vitriol between Page and Menzies at the time.

After three weeks, Page resigned and Menzies formed the UAP ministry and became prime minister.

Ellis was responsible for establishing the first Tourist Bureau in Canberra and served as its founding chairmen from 1937 to 1940.

He then had a stint by joining Sir Arthur Fadden’s department as head of publicity. Fadden, who was described as “a genial man”, was well like by both his political friends and foes. He became leader of the Country Party in 1940.

The next year, he was installed as prime minister for five weeks. He later became Treasurer. He resigned from all political positions and retired from Parliament in 1958.

Ellis, who later went on to spearhead the New England State Movement as chairman and patron successively from 1960, left his mark in his own special way.

He died in 1981.

Fame and celebrity had passed him by.

[Adapted from a lengthier article on Ulrich Ellis which ran in The Australian Book Collector, 2000.]

<< Adapted and rewritten from a lengthier article on Ulrich Ellis.

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THIS IS 1971 …
CANNED BEER TAKES OFF IN PREFERENCE TO BOTTLED BEER … AUSTRALIAN PIANIST, ROGER WOODWARD, IS ACCLAIMED INTERNATIONALLY … END OF REST AND RECREATION LEAVE (R & R) FOR US SERVICEMEN IN AUSTRALIA AS THE VIETNAM WAR WINDS DOWN … CHIPS RAFFERTY HAS DIED. HIS LAST FILM WAS WAKE IN FRIGHT.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 11 March 20

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