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Number of blogs returned: 41 to 50 records of 297

VALE: My friendship with Jack Eden who made certain that Surfabout did it first!

FRANK MORRIS

ONE OF THE CLASSIC SHOTS WAS ‘MIDGET’ WINNING THE FIRST WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP AT MANLY IN 1964. PHOTO: JACK EDEN.

HE LITERALLY, AND PHOTOGRAPHICALLY, OPENED THE DOORS ON A BRIGHTER 1960s.

Jack Eden, Australia’s leading surfing photographer and publisher died on Sunday evening from Parkinson’s disease in a Sydney nursing home. He was 88.

Eden, who infused new life into the sixties, found a new way in this “irrepressible period of our history”.

His Surfabout photos exude a timeless quality that is rarely, if ever, found in collections of this genre.

A leading historian said, “The 60’s was a time when all wrongs of society seemed, for brief moment, to be curable”.
Eden, a photo-journalist, started Surfabout Magazine in 1962 at a time when the new guard of surfers were taking over. It was called the Swinging Sixties.

While it missed being the first by only a few months, Surfabout was the first to set the pace for what Jack Eden euphemistically called “the uniqueness” of being an individual.

Yes, it was the age of being free as a bird.

It was the age of more freedom, rock ‘n roll and less demanding friendships – only when it didn’t interact with anything to do with surfing. This was a time when Australia came of age on the waves.

Eden’s camera captured countless images, which infused the new life for surfers into what can only be described as an irrepressible period of our history.
 

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
‘MIDGET’ FARRELLY, 1997: “LUCKILY JACK EDEN CAUGHT MANY OF THE MAJOR PLAYERS OF THIS ERA ON BLACK AND WHITE FILM. HIS PRECISION TRULY CONVEYS THE UNIQUENESS OF A NEVER TO BE REPEATED PIONEER PERIOD IN AUSTRALIA’S SURFING LIFE”.
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The historic debut issue, Surfabout, emblazoned with aboriginal motifs, sold out as it hit the streets. The first print-run evaporated in a week. A newsagent in Surfers Paradise reported selling 250 copies in sixty minutes.

“They went like hot cakes,” a very proud distributor said.

Where did the name Surfabout spring from? I asked him.

Eden pondered the question for a moment. He replied. “It took many hours of deliberation before we came up with the idea of adapting the aboriginal term ‘walkabout’ for the magazine title.

So Surfabout it became.

This was long before indigenous cultures became the vogue. Then, and in later issues, the cover design was simple, uncluttered and unpretentious – most of the illustration was left in on so that readers can get some true maturity of the action.

Surfabout was first:

TO pioneer surfing photography, attracting the best photographs from all over the world. Jack Eden was among the best.

TO attain not only national readership, but a worldwide audience: America’s West Coast, Japan, New Zealand, South Africa, United Kingdom, and so on.

TO pin-up action spreads in duo-tone, to produce full colour front covers, and to feature an illustrated front cover by Archibald Prize contender Helen Dillon.

TO introduce international coverage, to have its photographs and articles republished in newspapers and magazines in Australia and overseas.

Surfabout sold for four shillings and sixpence, 45 cents in today’s currency.

From its pages, came a permanent reminder of who we are and the way we were.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
THIS IS WHAT SURFABOUT SAID ABOUT ‘MIDGET’ FARRELLY IN THE FIRST WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS: “AUSTRALIA’S ‘MIDGET’ FARRELLY GAVE AN EXCELLENT EXHIBITION OF TIGHT, FUCTIONAL SURFING AND HIS SMOOTH DROPS AND TURNS GAINED HIM MAXIMUM POINTS.”
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Frank Morris comments:

Australia hit the scene as a surfing nation sixty years ago. I joined Jack Eden and the team as editor of Surfabout magazine.

I wrote him a screed and said that with “my experience” that the journal could go far. He didn’t answer my letter, he called to my house. I happened to be in. I got the shock of my life. I got the job.

Jack was first to find out that I wasn’t a surfer; I was a writer and newspapers were my specialty. That is what Jack liked.

“We’ve come of age on the waves,” I opined in the second issue of Surfabout. It was one of the first surfing magazines published in Australia and it attracted the best photographs from the world’s top surfing circles.
In many ways, Surfabout was ahead of its time.

To match my flow of editorial, Jack worked literally around the clock.

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ABOUT JACK EDEN …
JACK EDEN HAS BEEN DESCRIBED AS “THE PHOTOGRAPHIC BIOGRAPER” OF AUSTRALIAN SURFING HISTORY. HE REGARDS THE SIXTIES AS SURFING’S GOLDEN ERA. HE CAPTURED ALL OF THE GREATS FROM THE TIME.
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My opening column, On The Surf-Front, was an editorial on the surf culture, Let’s Keep the Sport Fun.
The second issue, in December 1962, demonstrated a significant number of changes that would be influential in Australian surf magazines.

Inside the thirty-six magazines the masthead carried the sub-heading, ‘Australia’s Premier Surfing Magazine’, and also the features – surfers’ portraits, surfing maps, column from the doyen of overseas surfing writers and a general news spread.

“Jack was now listed as manager and John Morris-Thorne (Frank Morris) was listed as editor.”

With me as editor, I had to make the Surfabout-team happy too. They thought that I had “put the icing on cake”.
When Surfabout was sold in 1965, I did various features for the new publisher. One of the timely articles I penned was on the ‘young’ board industry in Australia and it was going to thrive through “thick and thin”. The rest is history.
And I thank Jack, truly. Our association turned into one of the most joyous friendships – a friendship to last for 57 years.

He was my best mate.

VALE JACK EDEN

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 30 September 19

WALT DISNEY STORY: Part 2. The secret life of Walter

FRANK MORRIS

A SUPER-BIG DREAM COME TO LIFE.

I AM AWAY AT THE MOMENT.  GRAND YEARS WILL RETURN 4 OCTOBER.

THE WALT DISNEY STORY, PART 2, WILL BE PUBLISHED NEXT WEEK.

HERE’S AN INTRODUCTION INTO THE WALT DISNEY STORY, PART 2:

“GIRL’S BORED ME – THEY STILL DO,” SAID WALT DISNEY. “I LOVED MICKEY MOUSE MORE THAN I DO ANY WOMAN WHO EVER LOVED ME.”

WALT COULD NEVER LEARN TO DRAW DONALD DUCK OR PLUTO ... BUT HIS INSIGHT INTO THE AMERCIAN COLLECTIVE UNCONCONCIOUS WAS NOTHING SHORT OF MYSTICAL.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 19 September 19

Walt Disney Story: Part 1. Taking the Mortimer out of Mickey

FRANK MORRIS

IT ALL STARTED WITH A RABBIT …

… AND A MOUSE TOOK ITS PLACE!

On the day his beloved Disneyland amusement park opened in Anaheim, California, in 1955, Walt Disney turned to a group of friends, after he’d taken them on a tour of inspection, and said: “I hope we never lose sight of the fact that this was all started by a mouse.”

But, if it had not been for a dispute over a contract with a film distributor in 1927, Walt’s meal ticket could have been a rabbit instead of a mouse.

Disney at the time was animating a character called Oswald the Rabbit, which was owned by the distributor Charles Mintz.

When the series became successful, Mintz confronted Disney in New York with an ultimatum: accept a new contract at a lower price, or lose the character.

Disney refused to haggle. He and his wife, Lillian, on the train back to Los Angeles, spent night after night trying to come up with another cartoon character to take Oswald’s place.

It was not easy.

Suddenly, Walt recalled his days as a commercial artist in Kansas City, when his studio had been literally a breeding ground for field mice. He only remembered one mouse in particular.

The mouse was a regular intruder, which proved to be quite tame and trusting. Disney and the mouse became the best of friends and he trained it not to stray too far.

The new character, Walt decided, would be a mouse – Mortimer Mouse.

But Lillian thought the name too pretentious, so they both settled on Mickey. From that point, Oswald the Rabbit’s luck had run out, his grave has been dug and would soon be buried and forgotten.

Mickey came on the scene in 1928 in two silent shorts called Plane Crazy and Gallopin’ Gaucho.

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DISNEYTOONS …
IN 1928, PLANE CRAZY WAS THE ‘TOON THAT LAUNCHED MICKEY MOUSE ON THE WAY TO MEGA-STARDOM. HE FLEW INTO PEOPLE’S HEARTS ON HIS JERRY BUILT AIRSHIP WITH A RUBBER BAND MADE OUT OF DACHSHUND. MICKEY WAS A SUCCESS.
IN 1928, STEAMBOAT WILLIE, THE ‘TOON THAT A MILLION-PLUS FILMGOERS DECIDED THEY WERE IN LOVE WITH MICKEY MOUSE -- FOREVER. MICKEY TURNED A BUNCH OF PIGS, GOATS AND COWS INTO MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. WHATSMORE, FOR THE FIRST TIME, MICKEY EVEN SANG. – JH AND FM.
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But it wasn’t until he appeared in the sound cartoon Steamboat Willie, which opened in New York on November 18 of the same year that Mickey was on his way to mega-stardom.

The Mickey phenomenon grew. He became a national passion. He helped build an empire.

Today, Mickey might be middle aged, and a little bit grey in the whiskers, but he still bright and perky. He’s changed little since his creation over 90 years ago.

In his book, Mickey Mouse: Fifty Happy Years, David Bain wrote: “There is something most appealing about this mouse.

“There is an intrinsic quality that reaches across time and through artificial, human-made barriers, such as culture and nationality, to enter into the hardest of the hard-hearted and produce a smile.”

American journalist Jim Hokerman, wrote: “When Disneyland opened in 1955, it was with one inescapable stipulation.

“Before being born again within the confines of the Magic Kingdom, each guest had to pass through an idealised version of the Marceline, Missouri, in Main Street, where Walt believed he’d spent his happiest years.”

Disney used to say, “To the people in Marceline, I’m like God”.

SOURCE: The original syndicated story was written in 1988.

Next: His insight into the American collective unconscious was nothing short of mystical.

Below: The crowd hustle into Disneyland on opening day.

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ARTBEAT …
FORMER PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH DISSCUSSED HIS POSTPRESIDENTIAL PORTRAITS OF COURAGE AND SAID, “AS A CHILD I WASN’T ALL THAT INTERESTED IN ART. I HAPPENED TO GET A RECOMMENDATION TO READ WINSTON CHURCHILL’S PAINTING AS A PASTIME, THAT PIQUED MY INTEREST.” SOON.
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Hollywood Murder: Albert Dekker’s hard-to-explain death rocked the movie world!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

In l968, less than a decade after the George Reeves controversy, two more hard-to-explain fatalities – occurring only months apart – rocked the industry.

Albert Dekker, 63, big, shambling Warner Bros. heavy and noted character actor, came to a grotesque end in his Hollywood apartment. There were obscene inscriptions covering Dekker’s body and other oddities.

Two months before, Nick Adams, who played The Rebel in the hit TV series, died in his Coldwater Canyon bachelor quarters.

In the Dekker case, police swarmed over the apartment after the building manager had reported a “horrible sight” of Dekker slumped in the bathroom with two hypodermic needles stuck into him.

When the police arrived they found a length of rope – too loosely rigged to be identified as the sure cause of death – fastened to his left hand around his neck and tied to a shower pipe; and a hand-cuff dangled from the right hand.

Filthy words were written in lipstick and festooned over much of Dekker’s body.

“There was everything but a vampire’s bite”, the deputy coroner remarked. Suicide was ruled out. And “accidental suffocation” was named as the cause of death. It was a terrorising thought.

A rope had been tightened round Dekker’s neck, it loosened and sagged. The whole idea was full of holes to some observers.

Tightened by Dekker himself! His friends thought not.

Dekker served from 1944 to 1946 in the California state legislature as a concerned liberal representing a portion of Hollywood. He quit politics and went into showbusiness. He then won the awards on Broadway in Death of a Salesmen and other weighty plays.

Insiders agreed that Dekker never would have let himself die like that, with grotesque writing all over him.

Someone, they surmised, must have doped and then choked him. If so, police never could lay hands on a rope artist with a lipstick and drug fettish.

Case unsolved.

SOURCE: From Grand Years 13.

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VIETNAM: HOLLYWOOD VIEW …
THE BEST OF THE VIETNAM-THEME FILMS, COMING HOME, TACKLES IN DRAMATIC FORM THE MORAL DILEMMA OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE. THIS MOVIE WAS HIGHLY RATED BY SMH FILM WRITER. SOON.
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YOUR DOG: Virgo. Hi, Mr Terrier speaking, and this is my story!

FRANK MORRIS

MUM GIVES ME A CUDDLE.

I’m a well-bred, well-behaved and diligent little terrier.  Two decently bred terriers got together and produced me, so you can’t deny my bespoke breeding. That was three years ago.

Mum and dad were terrific dogs. They were both playful and frightfully energetic; and so was I. They played with me until I was eight months older. The literally put me in the spotlight.

My love deepened for them.

Then, of course, times must change. While I was having a lovely upbringing, the rug was pulled from under me.

While mum and dad went for their daily stroll, a human came into the kennel, picked me up, and put me in a card-board box.

I caught a glimpse of my new owner. He was 65, upright (you beauty) and had a softly spoken voice. His house was big and was trimmed to treat.

He got me out of the box, clung to me with both hands, and said: “What will we call you?” I almost choked. I’ve got a name and it, and it … Jut.”

“Let’s see, now. I know. I’ll call him Mr Terrier. That’s it, Mr Terrier.” For better or worse, that was my name.
Mum and dad came home they found me gone.

You know something that was strange to me. My relationship drew closer to this person, my new dad. I began to take to him.

Here’s another significant event I’ve been struggling with for a long time: I’m house-bound. I’m going on four-years-old, and have been out on one day a fortnight to go shopping. On a lead.

My owner won’t play with me, ever though I’d bring my ball up to him. He would kick it a fair distance, then turn and go into his house. He would fall asleep until tea-time.

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AUSTRALIAN PLACE NAMES …
BRIAN AND BARBARA KENNEDY WRITE: NEARLY THREE-QUARTERS OF AUSTRALIAN PLACE NAMES ARE OF ABORIGINAL ORIGIN. FOR EXAMPLE, MILDURA, IN VICTORIA, COULD MEAN ‘SORE EYES’ OR ‘RED SAND’.
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“Come on Mr Terrier, its den time. He would follow me and close the hand-engraved gate with “Mr Terrier” on it.
Then he’d take the wrap off Mr Terrier’s dish and push it towards me.

He’s an event that will leave you with a few options. A young man came around the back and knocked on the door. My owner appeared.

“Can I help you,” he said. The lad, who was about 21, spoke first. “I was wondering if we can take your dog for a walk every afternoon. We’d take him down to the park and let run with other dogs …”

The girl, about 20, butted in: “… we’ve moved into a house up the street …” The girl’s voice tails off.

I witness it all. This is the event that I could say yes to without any compunction. Yes, yes and yes. My owner didn’t reply for about 60 seconds, then he spoke.

“Of course you can. Mr Terrier is his name and he is an Australia Terrier. At this moment, my owner started to feel his age.

That was the start of an honest but friendly relationship – Geoff, Margaret and me.

The move showed how good-humoured, how intelligent and tender I could be for a scruffy, multi-brown Australian Terrier.

I ran mad. The dogs who were chasing me dropped before I did. The larger dogs lost interest.

We ate every ice block and ice cream ten times over during my umpteen years of going to the park. What days we all had! There was tomorrow, and the next day, and … You know what I mean.

Then I saw my mum and dad from a distance. They looked very old. I blink and they are gone. My owner went into a nursing home and there he stayed.

I now live with Geoff and Margaret, husband and wife. We still play when we can. My age? That’s not important. All I can say is I am impulsive as ever but I noticed recently that I need more rest during the day.

So, there you are!

Below: Mum and dad together!

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AUSTRALIAN PLACE NAMES …
BRIAN AND BARBARA KENNEDY WRITE IN THEIR VOLUME OF PLACE NAMES: THERE IS SOME DEBATE AS TO THE LONGEST PLACE NAME IN AUSTRALIA. IN THE AUG-SEPT I956 EDITON OF SOUTH AUSTRALIAN MOTOR … IS MENTIONED THE NAME, CARDIVILLAWARRACURRACURRIEAPPALARNDOO. NOBODY COULD SUPPLY ANY OTHER DETAILS.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 13 September 19

HISTORY MAZE: Teach your children to love the tales of the past. That’s if you don’t mind dressing up.

FRANK MORRIS

READY TO FIGHT FOR GLORY AT THE JOUSTING TOURNAMENT.

let your imagination do the rest. And wouldn’t that mean that your family would think the world of you!

Have you ever seen a knight joust? In the movies, maybe, but in real life? How would you like to joust with a Tudor knight, or learn to become a gladiator at the Colosseum? Or fight for glory in a jousting tournament?

Luckily, at Hever Castle, England, there are bespoke, interactive programs designed to both entertain and teach kids about ancient warriors and martial arts.

Kids will never be the same after the summer jousting tournament. Did you know that Henry VIII’s favourite sport was jousting? He initially made it popular in Medieval England as a way for knights to show off their cavalry skills.

Hever Castle was Anne Boleyn’s childhood home and features a tiltyard arena where spectators can view the long-forgotten history of theatrical jousting and exploring the castle’s caverns of antiques and Tudor paintings.

The kids will be captivated by exploring the surrounding woodlands and ornamental gardens; as well as the Water Maze, and the over 100 years old Yew Maze.

Before the tournament is staged, the crowd walks in a procession towards the arena behind Anne Boleyn and Henry V111, impersonators, decked out in Tudor costumes.

Many excited kids are dressed in medieval knight costumes or bedecked in thrilling royal gowns.

In the arena, each jouster has their own colours and performs impressive stunts on horseback.

Onlooking kids and adults watch in awe as two jousters ride to unseat one another; a four-metre-long lance is used in the final act.

Check with Medieval Horse Sports Australia com.au to see when they hold their programs for kids.

SOURCE: Jousting Tournament, Five Star Kids magazine, England; fivestarkidsmagaznine.com.au

A tudor knight comes to life. 

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HISTORICAL HIGHLIGHT …
IT’S BEEN 80 YEARS, 1938, SINCE BRITAIN WENT TO WAR ON GERMANY. GERMANY DIDN’T RESPOND TO THE ULTIMATUM ISSUED BY BRITAIN. THEN THE COUNTRIES WERE AT WAR. AUSTRALIAN PRIME MINISTER, MR MENZIES, ALSO SAID WE WERE AT WAR.
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ROAD CCCCRASHED …
FACT: A STUDY BY AN ORGANISATION COMMITTED TO AGED CARE REVEALED THAT PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA WERE UNSAFE TO DRIVE BUT CONTINUED TO DO SO.


Celebrating Australia: The flying 18s are on in your city water-ways!

FRANK MORRIS

AN ‘OLDIE’ GOING THROUGH ITS PACES.

THE RACING SKIFFS ARE OUT AND ABOUT.

The flying 18-foot racing skiffs, arrayed in amazing state of art finery, make a compelling sight.

If Mark Foy, the father of the 18-footer racing, could have witnessed this spectacular homage he would have cried with joy.

Foy regarded Sydney Harbour as the “world’s leading aquatic playground”.

THE FIRST skiff race was in 1891 with six entries sailing three times round a triangular course on Sydney Harbour. The winner, Lottie, won 30 pounds.

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ROAD CCCCRASHED …
FACT: SOME EFFECTS OF PRESCRIPTION AND OVER-THE-COUNTER DRUGS MAKE IT UNSAFE TO DRIVE.
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THE FATHER of 18-foot racing was Mark Foy who believed racing must be exciting and faster and boats had to colourful and easily identifiable.

QUEENSLAND pioneered interstate competition in 1895, bringing by steamer to Sydney a number of 18-footers and 22-footers for racing.

BEN LEXEN, the man who designed the winged keel on the America’s cup winning Australia II, won the world 18-footer title in 1961.

ONE OF the pioneers of skiff racing was Alf Beashel. His son Ken won the world 18-footer title in 1968 on the Daily Telegraph.

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ROAD CCCCRASHED …
FACT: ANY DRIVER TRAINING PROGRAM IS NOT THE WHOLE ANSWER, BUT IT CAN BE PART OF THE SOLUTION.

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AMERICA’S CUP skipper Iain Murray, Bob Holmes and Trevor Barnabas are the most prolific winners of the world 18-footer titles, winning five each.

ANOTHER PIONEER was rugby league player James J. Giltinan; he was also a major player in 18-footer racing

SINCE the inception of the world titles for the JJ Giltinan Trophy, Australian sailors have won all but eight crowns. These eight were won by seven New Zealand crews and one UK team.

IN the early1900s to 1930s the average speed of an 18-footer (wooden, with 10-15 crewman) over 9nm course 6.45 knots. IN the year 2000, with high, state of the art, carbon fibre, an 18-footer can reach speeds in excess on 30 knots downwind and costs $350,000-$400,000.


Film Great: Gay Seabrook was the first official voice of Minnie Mouse!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

GETTING THE VOICE OF MINNIE SHE HAD TO SPEAK LOUDER.

GAY SEABROOK’S VOICE WAS HER FORTUNE IN THE 1930s. IT IS A LIGHT, YOUNG VOICE WHICH SHE PITCHES A FEW TONES HIGHER FOR MINNIE MOUSE.

Walt Disney, four years ago, heard her in a radio act in a baby-talk part, and invited her to take the part of Minnie in a radio act which was being planned then as a highlight of American programmes.

A grand orchestra was engaged for the act, and everything was in train to make it one of the biggest items being offered to American listeners, but it was never put on.

Without the antics of the little black and white figures Minnie and Mickey just somehow didn’t exist, so instead the radio act was split up and became two Mickey Mouse pictures, one of which was called “The Dentist’s Office.”

Miss Seabrook says she is not the original Minnie. A girl in the studio, one of the staff known as “an inker,” who inks-in the figures in the cartoons, was Minnie in the early pictures when Minnie only said a few words.

She is not an actress, so when Minnie began to play longer parts with more dialogue it was necessary to call in someone with stage training, and so Miss Seabrook took over some of the work.

Walt Disney is, of course, Mickey, and will remain so, and his strongest rival is the man who plays Donald the Duck, whose strange nasal “yap” (for want of a more expressive word) has made him famous.

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ROAD CCCCRASHES …
FACT: PRINCESS DIANA AND DODI FAYED COULD HAVE LIVED IF EACH HAD BEEN WEARING A SEAT BEAT, ACCORDING TO THE UK TRANSPORT ROAD RESEARCH LABORATORY.
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Donald’s leading lady is an engaging chicken, a part which Miss Seabrook has played. “Oh, he’s lovely,” is what Miss Seabrook says when you ask about Walt Disney. He is, she claims, the most generous and genuine of people.

This story bears out her statement.

“When we were signing up a twelve-page contract for the first proposed radio programmes,” she said, “Walt Disney’s lawyer had to turn round to him at last and tell him he was being unfair to himself. He kept saying, ‘Now, this point’s not fair to these kids,’ and so on." He is a grand person.

In the making of the cartoons the timing is of the utmost importance, and each little speech has to be made to the beat of a metronome in a gadget fastened to the orchestra leader’s ears, so that the speech will fit to a certain number of feet of film.

There are several months between the making of the dialogue and the release of the film, but at the beginning the cast is gathered round a table and the plot and the characters are explained to them.

The idea-men and writers and artists who work this out are tremendously keen,” said Miss Seabrook. “The little creatures are all absolutely real people to them, and they go to endless trouble to make their ideas absolutely real to us, too.

“It is most fascinating and delightful work, though it is more or less anonymous and therefore does not offer any promise of a glamorous personal career.”

SOURCE: from Sydney Post, 1930.

NEXT: The Walt Disney story. “I don’t have depressed moods – and I don’t want to have any.

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ROAD CCCCRASHED …
HOT TIP: HEADACHES, FIDGETING, TENSION, NERVOUSNESS, YAWNING OR POOR CONCENTRATION ARE SIGNS OF FATIGUE. DON’T FIGHT IT. LET FRESH AIR CIRCULATE IN THE CAR, SHARE THE DRIVING AND EAT LIGHT FOOD.

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Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 06 September 19

GOLD! Victoria and NSW were two of the richest places on the globe until the discovery of the ‘yellow stuff’

Adapted by Frank Morris

LOTS OF GOLD!

WHAT PART DID THE DISCOVERY OF GOLD PLAY? WERE THE REPONSES EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT?

How could such wealth and an acute level of destitution co-exist, particularly in Victoria? The main sources of economic wealth – gold, commercial agriculture and grazing – reinforced the social inequalities in wealth distribution.

On November 11, 1850, it was announced that the long and sometimes bitter struggle by the residents of the Port Phillip District of NSW for separation had at last borne fruit.

The news was greeted with joy in Melbourne.

Major gold discoveries came within a fortnight of Foundation Day in Victoria. Gold created as many problems as it did benefits.

The discovery of gold in Victoria and NSW during the hectic “roaring fifties” ushered in a decade of unparalleled activity and prosperity. The scope and immensity of these boom years is quickly and graphically demonstrated by a few comparative statistics.

…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS …
IN 1904, THE OLYMPICS WAS STAGED IN ST LOUIS, MISSOURI, TOGETHER WITH THE WORLD FAIR – BUT IT WAS NOT A SUCCESS. WAS IT THE CASE WHERE THE WORLD EVENTS WON’T MIX?
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The stream of immigration, which poured into Australia, doubled the population in five years; from 400,000 in 1850 to 800,000 in 1855.

Three years later, the million mark was reached.

Imports into Victoria jumped from $2 million to $24 million between 1850 and 1855 tells a vivid story. In Victoria alone, gold to the value of $2 million was produced in 1851, increasing to $28 million in 1856.

The total yield for Australia during 1851-1860 was $210 million, of which $186 million came from Victoria. Banking received a tremendous impetus during these exciting years.

At the beginning of the decade ten banks were operating. But during the next few years eight new ones were established, the most important being the English, Scottish and Australian Bank in 1852 and the National Bank in 1858.

By 1860, there were seventy-one branch offices compared with only nine branches at the same time 10 years ago.
The immediate effect of the gold discoveries upon the banks was that huge sums of money were needed to exchange for the gold bought.

To meet this demand, banks began to issue their own bank notes which, up to this time, had not been issued on any large scale.

…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS …
IN 1906, THE OLYMPICS RETURN TO ATHENS. THESE WERE KNOWN AS THE INTERCALATED GAMES – OR INTERIM – BECAUSE THEY WERE CONSIDERED “UNOFFICIAL” BY THE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPICS COMMITTEE (I.O.C).…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…

In Victoria, notes in circulation increased from $282,000 in 1851 to more than $4 million three years later. There was also a great demand for small change, but this could not be met.

The supply of the British coins in use was inadequate; and there were no facilities for minting money. The traders, therefore, began to issue their own copper and bronze token coins, instituting a widely accepted currency, which held public favour for many years.

During the main years of the gold rush the pastoral industry and the agricultural sector suffered. Further expansion and investment in land was forestalled by the gold rush; some runs were even lost as a result of gold finds.

NSW pastoral industry had reached its peak capacity during 1860s, due mainly to land restrictions … New land was opened for settlement during the 1870s, and many people took up selection, hoping to become self-sufficient.

In Victoria, by 1881, there was a dramatic structural shift in the economy. Gold mining, the mainstay of economic life in the 1850s, was no longer the major activity …

But after the gold rush had exhausted itself in both colonies, by 1881, Melbourne population was one-third of Victoria, and Melbourne was recognised as the financial capital of Australia.

SOURCE: From Australian Teachers/Eureka Stockade Package; R.A. Gage, Poverty Abounding Charity Aplenty, Hale & Iremonger, Sydney.

Below: Shapes and sizes … who gives a damn. As long as it’s real!

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RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS …
IT’S 1908, AND THERE WAS BITTER RIVALRY IN STORE BETWEEN BRITISH AND AMERICAN TEAMS AT THE LONDON OLYMPICS. MEANTIME, THE FINNS AND THE RUSSIANS FOUGHT AMONG THEMSELVES. ICE SKATING IS ADDED TO THE GAMES. THE AUSTRALIAN RUGBY FOOTBALL TEAM TOOK OUT AUSSIE’S ONLY GOLD MEDAL.


VALE: Tim Fischer wrote about “an end of steam” in his final book

TIM FISCHER

HUFFING AND PUFFING …

FORMER NATIONAL PARTY POLITICIAN TIM FISCHER, WHO DIED ON AUGUST 22, WILL HAVE A STATE FUNERAL IN ALBURY, NSW.

There is real possibility the ‘through’ steam locomotive operation will end between Brisbane and Toowoomba, with tourist steam trains banned.

Both proposals for the Inland Freight Rail direct from Brisbane to Melbourne, go through a proposed 7.6-kilometre tunnel under the Great Dividing Range near Toowoomba, intended to greatly ease grades and build efficiencies.

It is envisaged this will be a dual-gauge tunnel with plenty of height clearance to allow double stacking of containers.

With this super tunnel opening, the existing steep main line through Helidon and Spring Bluff will most likely close; although there is a strong case to be made for keeping open the section from Toowoomba down as far as Spring Bluff, especially for the annual flower and garden activities each spring.

…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS …
FANNY DURACK BECAME AUSTRALIA’S FIRST FEMALE GOLD MEDALLIST AT THE 1912 STOCKHOLM OLYMPICS. THE 800m RELAY TEAM ALSO GAINED GOLD. MORE THAN 2500 ATHLETES FROM 28 NATIONS WERE TAKING PART.…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…

Owing to ventilation problems, trains will not be permitted to operate under steam through any tunnel more than 7 kilometres long, although they could be towed through at middle-range speeds by diesel-electric locomotives.

Essentially, this signals the end of the occasional steam train special travelling up and down the range between Brisbane and Toowoomba.

It reflects progress, but once again, it will come at the expense of the magnificent sight of a steam locomotive chugging up steep grades and trailing a lovely flume of smoke. – Adapted by Frank Morris.

SOURCE: Steam Australia: Locomotives that Galvanised The Nation.

Below: Tim Fischer gives a full hand of thanks to Ghan on a recent journey.

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RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMICS …
IN 1916, THE GAMES WERE CANCELLED BECAUSE OF WORLD WAR 1. INSTEAD OF NEWS PICTURES OF THE OLYMPIC GAMES, WE HAD FIRST PHOTOGRAPHS OF VICTORY ON THE BATTLEFIELD! – FM.


Ginger Meggs – 97 years young, and is drawing in the fans!

FRANK MORRIS

US FELLERS, THE START OF GINGER MEGGS!

THE INSPIRATION BEHIND GINGER MEGGS’ NAME.

Ross Russell was a social columnist for The Advertiser, and the daughter of Lloyd Dumas and his wife, Daisy Hall.

Russell was once asked by cartoonist Jimmy Bancks, a great friend, what was her name. She told him it was “Rosslyn Ginger Mash”.

Bancks had named the cartoon Ginger Smith. But, after he had detailed conversation with Rosslyn, he changed it to Ginger Meggs.

Ginger Meggs made his debut in the first coloured comic section of the Sunday Sun (Sydney) to appear in an Australian newspaper on November 13, 1921. The strip, known as Us Fellers, was drawn by “a promising young artist” J.C. Bancks.

The strip, currently appearing in Australian papers, is syndicated overseas to more than 120 newspapers in different languages in 34 countries. Featured in the panel is a slightly modified Ginger drawn by James Challfield.

Challfield took over from James Kemsley, who had drawn Ginger since March 18, 1984. Kemsley died of motor neurone disease in 2007. Other artists to have the strip include Vivian (1953-1973) and Piper (1973-1984).

…………………………………………………………………………………………...........................................................…RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS …

BELGIUM, 1920, STAGES THE POSTWAR OLYMPICS AT ANTWERP. THE EFFECTS OF THE WORLD WAR MADE PERFORMANCES ONLY FAIR TO MIDDLING. THERE WERE ABOUT 3000 ATHLETES FROM 29 NATIONS. OLYMPIC FLAG AND MOTTO FLEW FOR THE FIRST TIME. – FM.
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Bancks created the strip at the behest of the great editor, Monty Grover.

The early strips featured the adventures of “a beguiling little girl” called Gladsome Gladys. He was tired of the restriction imposed by the character and decided to develop one of the supporting ‘players’ – a tear-away kid called Ginger. Ginger came into prominence in December 1921.

And in 1922, Gladsome Gladys had vanished from the panel.

The comic was renamed Ginger Meggs in November 1939. In 1951, Bancks decamped from the Sunday Sun after 29 years and transferred to the Sunday Telegraph and later to the Sun-Herald (Sydney).

Bancks died in 1952.

SOURCE: Ross Russel died in 2012.

Below: Ginger Meggs and his ‘family’ of Australia artists.

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HEALTH MATTERS …

SEPTEMBER 1 to 30: DEMENTIA MONTH. JOIN IN THE PROMOTIONS THAT’S HELD BY SPECIAL GROUPS. www.fightdementia.org.au

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 30 August 19

VIETNAM WAR: The End. The living-room war -- television brought new conflict into our lives

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

GETTING READY!

NIGHTLY WE COULD SEE THOUSANDS MARCH FOR “PEACE” IN THE STREETS OF AUSTRALIA AND AMERICA. AUSTRALIA’S INVOLVEMENT BEGAN WITH 30 MEN IN 1962 AND FINISHED IN 1972 AFTER 50,190 AUSTRALIANS HAD SERVED.

By 1972, all Australian combat troops were withdrawn from Vietnam, and after the election of the Labor government in 1972, the last advisers were also discontinued.

Counting the cost of the number of men that were killed was hard for incumbent politicos to take.

Over the ten years, they were involved in Vietnam the Australians lost 424 killed and 2369 wounded. Altogether 50,190 men serves in Vietnam, 15,542 of whom were conscripted.

Many casualties did not emerge until later. Illnesses arising from tropical diseases and the effects of chemical defoliants started to come to the fore.

Given this record, one must ask if it was worth it. In military terms, the whole episode was a failure.

As we all know, the South Vietnamese army proved incapable of turning the tide; and in 1975, Saigon was occupied by the armies of North Vietnam. In social terms the effects of the war were disastrous.

Australian society was divided by the war. One side calling the others ‘commies’ and the other imperialists.
Young men were placed in jail for the refusing to enlist and ‘draft dodging’ became a common offence.

Most importantly, the Vietnam War was the first conflict in its history that Australians felt ambivalent about.
What’s happening in America?

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RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS …
IN THE 1880s, BARON PIERRE DE COUBERTIN INTRODUCES THE IDEA THAT THERE SHOULD BE A WORLD SPORTING FESTIVAL – ALL SPORTS – TO THE PEOPLE OF THE GLOBE LIKE THOSE OF ANCIENT GREECE.  IN THE 1890s, SOME OF EUROPE’S ROYALTY AND A GREEK TYCOON, EXPRESS INTEREST AND MONEY IN THE IDEA. – FM.
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In 1961, reporters W.E. Garrett and Peter White went to Vietnam to report on how “South Viet Nam Fights the Red Tide”.

This piece, published three years before Congress passed the Resolution … authorising presidential action in Vietnam and four years before a large-scale commitment of US troops, accurately and eerily warned of what was in store.

While Garrett’s photographs were of the conventional travelogue variety, White’s text was conspicuously grim.

”Quietly and relentlessly, without the world hardly aware of it yet, the rich country in the south was slipping ever deeper into a calculatedly cruel civil war.

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RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS …
THE FIRST MODERN OLYMPIC GAMES WAS STAGED AT ATHENS IN 1896. THE KING OF GREECE PRESENTS WINNERS WITH A GOLD MEDAL AND AN OLIVE BRANCH. AUSTRALIA’S EDWIN FLACK WAS A MEMBER OF NEARLY 300 ATHLETES FROM 13 NATIONS TAKING PART. FLACK BECOMES THE WORLD’S FIRST DOUBLE GOLD MEDALLIST, WINNING THE 800M AND 1500M FINALS. – FM.
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“From dusk to dawn, the Viet Cong ruled nearly half of South Viet Nam”, wrote White.

Further on in the article, White wrote: “What will happen to Vietnam!” The person replied: “I hope for a miracle to save us.”

White ended his article this way: “As our old primers say: Man is born good, but life makes him bad.”

It is estimated that between August 4, 1964 and January 27, 1973, 8,744,000 Americans saw service in Vietnam.

Nevertheless, on April 30, 1975, South Vietnam surrendered to the communists.

SOURCE: Australian Two Hundred Years; The National Geographic Magazine.


SHAPES & SIZES: The fast clipper ships! They ruled the world with their speed and sailing prowess

This is the Flying Cloud, it was one of the winged messengers of man. The clipper ships from the 1830s through to the 1860s were also the loveliest of them all.

The Flying Cloud made a brilliant run in 1851 from New York to San Francisco in 89 days, sailing 17,597 statute miles at average of 222 miles each day.
 

COMING: Clipper Days – the winged messengers of man!


FLASHBACK: Cabbie was his name, but finding fame was not easy!

FRANK MORRIS

‘CABBIE’ WAS A GRADUATE OF HARD KNOCKS!

"‘CABBIE’ WAS A SPITTING IMAGE OF A MATE OF MINE”

He lived in Mortdale but he moved round a lot. But to set the record straight: I’ll introduce him as Sydney cartoonist John Neal.

Well, Neal is as knockabout as some of the characters that come off his drawing board.

And Cabbie, his latest protégé, is no exception.

In the short time that Cabbie’s weekly adventures have been played out, his popularity has soared.

An RSL driver told Front Lines (a column I used to write for the newspaper) that Cabbie “was the spitting image” of his best mate.

“We’re thinking of starting a fan club,” another driver said.

Neal was amused but not surprised at Cabbie’s new-found fame. “I had an idea he’d make a name for himself someday.”

Neal describes Cabbie as a “street-wise little bloke” who become the victim of situations, no matter what the circumstances.

“But Cabbie is a graduate from the school of hardknock and he keeps bouncing back for another serve,” Neal said, with a slight smile.

Since leaving school at 14, Neal’s occupations have been many and varied – printer, journalist, truckies’ labourer and part-time parrot shooter.

He started taking cartooning seriously during a stint in the Army. His work was soon in demand, and his interpretation of military life began to appear in Army publications throughout Australia and in Vietnam.

In 1970, he won the Bicentenary Award for a cartoon depicting the problems and aims of the Australian Aborigines.

For many years he drew Bert the Boardman for Surcharge, a newspaper published by the NSW Water Board Salaried Officers Union.

Bert’s antics actually averted several industrial disputes and he was finally nominated for a Walkley Award – Australian journalism’s Oscar – before he punched the Bundy clock for the last time in 1980.

In the late 1970s Neal breathed new life into the famous comic-duo Bluey and Curley for the Sydney Telegraph, following in the footsteps and Les Dixon and the late Alex Gurney.

The comic finish when Neal went on strike with the journalist’s on the newspaper. He returned to journalism.

I will always remember my mate, John. My association with John Neal goes back 33 years. 

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AT THE CLUB …
COMING SOON! CLUBS ARE ONE OF THE GREATEST HARBINGERS OF ALL-ROUND SONG AND DANCE TALENT IN AUSTRALIA. I PENNED OVER 2500 AT THE CLUB COLUMNS IN EIGHT YEARS.
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We worked together as journalists on freelance projects as well. Neal was not an only colleague but a friend and good mate too. He was generous to a fault. But Neal preferred to be known as a “knockabout cartoonist” rather than a journalist.

In an interview before he died, he explained himself: “The whole point of the exercise was to gives people a good laugh and at least for a while forget their hassles.”

John Neal’s “new chum” was called Cabbie.

Like Neal, Cabbie was a typical knockabout Aussie. This is one different, though: he’s a taxi driver. You can laugh at him. Laugh with him. It made little difference to the number one standover man.

John drew the popular Bluey and Curley strip during the late 1970s, so he knew what “having a laugh on us” really meant.

The devil has his way, in more than one.

I recall a conversation with John in which told me he experimented with the devil.

He was going to sign his name “O’Neal” -- using the devil’s “6” to form the “O”. He used “the devil’s influence” right through the Cabbie series, but nothing much seemed to happen.

“How’s the devil going in your life,” I asked.

He looked at me. Nothing had happened, so it must be working. We left it at that.

John Neal died in June, 1997. He was aged 54.

Below: Les Dixon, Eric Jolliffe and Jim Russel – all leading cartoonist. John followed Les Dixon in doing Bluey & Curely for the last time.

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RAZZLE DAZZLE OLYMPICS …
IN 1900, THE SECOND OLYMPIAD, DESPITE GREEK PROTESTS, WAS HELD IN PARIS, FRANCE. SWIMMING, FOR THE FIRST TIME, APPEARED ON THE CALENDAR. AUSTRALIA’S FRED LANE TOOK OUT THE GOLD FOR THE 200M OBSTACLE RACE. – FM.
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Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 23 August 19

MEN’S HEALTH: Men ignored doctors’ advice many years ago. It’s a bad decision, say experts!

FRANK MORRIS

MORE MEN THAN WOMEN REFUSE TO GO TO A DOCTOR.

THAT WAS A LONG, LONG TIME AGO. THE POINT IS, IT’S STILL HAPPENING. 

This is what I wrote in 2001:

The first Australian survey by AGB McNair into prostate disease over 10 years ago, showed that one in three men aged over 50 had at least one symptom of the disease.

Hard on the heels of this alarming report, the medical profession issued a stark warning – ignore it at your peril.

The upshot, it seems, the penny didn’t “drop loudly enough”. In 2001, ten thousand of the men will be, nationally, diagnosed with cancer; most of them aged over 50. Twenty-five percent, one in four of this group, will die.

“They had ignored the warning”, experts would say.

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THE GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
WESTERN FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT, WILFRED BURCHETT, IN 1945, WAS THE FIRST NEWSMAN TO ENTER HIROSHIMA AFTER THE ATOMIC BOMB WAS DROPPED. – FM.
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Here is some timely advice from the Men’s Health Week: “In the mental health realm, we encourage men to seek help when something in wrong.”

Men’s Health Week, ACT, recommends that “to improve men’s health is a two-way street involving men, women and their families – and the health services.”

When it comes to mental health problems, research shows men are more likely to die by suicide than women.

With statistics even higher for men living in “rural and remote communities”.

Gerrit Williemse, psychologist at Marathon Health, says “stereotypes that suggest men bottle-up their emotions and handle things alone are completely unrealistic and damaging”.

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THE GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
NATIVE-BORN HORSES WERE SHIPPED TO INDIA FOR USE BY THE BRITISH ARMY IN 1846. THE HORSES, KNOWN AS ‘WALERS’ – A TERM COINED IN CALCUTTA. ORIGINALLY IT MEANT THEY WERE NEW SOUTH WALES BRED, AND WERE CHOSEN BECAUSE OF THEIR STAMINA, PATIENCE AND COURAGE. -- FM.
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He says the real strength “is telling someone you trust that you aren’t doing well; it’s asking your mates if they’re okay.”

“Men aged 18 to 34 with heart problems, are more than twice as likely than their female counterparts to have four or more risk factors of heart disease”.

Tony Stubbs, ACT CEO of the Heart Foundation, says “Over 30 percent of men in Australia have high cholesterol and almost 75 percent are overweight or obese.

”Walking is a great way for men to reduce these risk factors.”

SOURCE: mensheathweek.org.au; prostate Cancer Foundation – prostate.org.au/

Below: Gentleman make an appointment with the receptionist for a check-up.


AUST v. ENGLAND: Star of the past 70 years. They were the nation’s back-stop!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

McCABE AND BRADMAN HEAD OUT IN BRIGHT SUNSHINE FOR THE START OF 1933 TEST SERIES.

Stan McCabe was a genius. McCabe was the brilliant and graceful right-handed batsmen who played three of the most glorious innings in Test cricket.

Without doubt, McCabe was one of Australia’s finest batsman.

In 1932, adventurous by instinct he made a most audacious and classic 187 n.o (25 fours) in Sydney against the blast and fury of Jardine’s English bodyline attack.

Three years later, 1935, in Johannesburg against South Africa, showing his characteristic precision of timing, he made 189 no, in 195 minutes (29 fours); his first 100 in only 91 minutes.

His most enchanting innings displaying skill, power and courage, was in the Nottingham Test in England in 1938.

He saved Australia with an innings of 232, reaching the double century in an amazing 225 minute; his last 127 runs in 80 minutes.

In 39 Tests, Stan scored 2748 runs (6 centuries) at an average of 48.21. He took 36 Test wickets with deceptive medium pacers, and held 42 catches, mainly at second slip.

In 37 Sheffield Shield matches, 24 as Captain of NSW, he made 3031 runs at an average on 55.10. No doubt World War 2 robbed him of more great innings.

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HERE’S A WORLD FIRST …
IN 1968, THE FIRST HUMAN HEART TRANSPLANT WAS PERFORMED IN SOUTH AFRICA. A SECOND TRANSPLANT WAS DONE IN 1974, BOTH PATIENTS DIED. – FM.
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SOURCE: Hall of Champions. Sports House, 157 Gloucester St, Sydney.

BELOW: Stan McCabe. Stood the blast and fury of a Jardine bodyline attack.


Come on? Taste the dried fruits of Australia! Final.

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

FEEL LIKE A DRIED APRICOT, OR DRIED PEARS, OR …

IT REQUIRES 6KG OF FRESH TREE FRUITS TO PRODUCE 1KG OF PRUNES, SUN-DRIED APRICOTS, PEACHES AND PEARS.

APRICOT

Although the botanical name suggests Armenia, it is generally agreed that the apricot originated in China … 2205BC.

Apricots were introduced to Europe via the silk route through the Far East, and then through the Mediterranean area by the Arabs.

In early times, the apricot was grown on a considerable scale in Upper Egypt where the fruits were dried for sale throughout Europe.

Dried apricots have the most concentrated dietary fibre of any fruit.

They are also a valuable source of iron and provide potassium, carotene, niacin and important B complex vitamins.

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GREAT KIWI FIRST …
GO NZ! ANYONE FOR PAVLOVA? THIS RICH SWEET DISH OF MERINGUE AND MARSHMELLOW TOPPED WITH WHIPPED CREAM AND FRUIT, AND ORGINATED IN NZ; NAMED AFTER THE CELEBRATED RUSSIAN BALLERINA ANNA PAVLOVA, WHO TWICE TOURED NZ IN THE 1920s.
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PRUNE

During the reign of Henry VIII, it was advised to ‘gather damson plums and dry them in the sun or a hot oven; in this way they could be kept for a year.’

In earlier centuries, plums were dried on racks in small caves.

The Australian prune is a hybrid of the cherry plum and sloe or blackthorn, probably originating in the Caucasus region where forests of wild plum trees existed thousands of years ago.

Many other species of wild plum grew across Britain, Europe and Asia.

Prunes are an important source of dietary fibre, potassium, iron and carotene. They also contain valuable calcium and B complex vitamins.

Prunes, like all dried fruits, contain absolutely no fat or added sugar.

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HEALTH MATTERS …
AUGUST 1 TO 31: NATIONAL TRADIES MONTH – TIPS HELP YOU YOUR JOB WITHOUT ANY PAIN.
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PEACH

As the Romans found the peach growing in present-day Iran, the former country of Persia, they designated it ‘persica’.

In fact, the peach is a native of China -- like the apricot. It travelled the same silk route, it is recorded that peaches were being cultivated in China as early as 2000 BC.

As a compact and highly nutritious food, dried peaches were chosen as the fruit for Neil Armstrong and his team on their expedition to the moon in 1969.

They are a very good source of dietary fibre, potassium, iron, carotene, niacin and other B complex vitamins.

PEAR

The wild pear originally grew in large forests in Europe and Northern Asia.

There’s historical evidence of hybridisation of several Pyrus species and this may have contributed to the development of the cultivated Pyrus communis.

There is little evidence of use by early man, but the pear’s natural flavour and beauty were recognised in Roman times when they were eaten and painted frequently.

Dried pears are excellent source of dietary fibre and potassium; they contain small quantities of iron, calcium, carotene and B complex vitamins.

SOURCE: Australian Studies Magazine.

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IN THE NEWS – 90 YEARS AGO …
DURING THE PAST FEW YEARS, GAY SEABROOK VOICED MINNIE MOUSE SINCE SHE BECAME THE HIT OF THE TOWN. BUT THE FIRST GIRL WHO DID THE VOICE WAS A STAFFER WHEN MINNIE ONLY SAID A FEW WORDS. WHEN MINNIE BECAME MORE INVOLVED, SHE NEEDED LONGER DIALOGUE, AND MORE FEELING. THAT’S WHERE GAY SEABROOK TOOK OVER. MINNIE MOUSE WAS A SUCCESS. – FM.

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 16 August 19

GRAND YEARS WILL RETURN NEXT WEEK

Stay tuned everyone

Grand Years will return next Friday

Many thanks

Frank Morris

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 09 August 19

1933 Australia v. England: Bodyline Bowling – It’s a menace to the game

FRANK MORRIS

STAN McCABE PUT A MARK ON HIS GLORIOUS INNINGS BY PLAYING A BALL OFF LARWOOD, ENGLAND’S MOST CONTROVERSIAL BODYLINE BOWLER.

ENGLISHMAN JARDINE INTRODUCED SOME OF THE FIERCEST TACTICS THAT HE KNEW THE LAWS OF CRICKET WOULD ALLOW!

English cricketers left nothing to chance when they came to Australia in 1932.

The blue-collar cricketers set out to recover the Ashes after suffering a humiliating defeat in the 1930 Test series in England.

Nothing but nothing was going to stand in their way – not even the magic bat of Don Bradman.

Bradman’s tremendous success during the 1930 tour had convinced the English selectors that new leadership was needed if the Ashes were to be brought back to England.

When the third test got under way in Adelaide in January, 1933, spectators didn’t realise that they were about to witness one of the most controversial sporting events of the century.

Spearheaded by Douglas Jardine, the English introduced some of the fiercest tactics the laws of cricket would allow.
Their main strategy was the infamous ‘bodyline’ bowling – a constant delivery of short-pitched fast balls which aimed at the batman’s head and shoulders.

“The batsman was like a bear in a cage being pelted with stones by naughty children,” writes historian Nic Van Oudtshoorn.

The tactics were not only frightening and difficult for the batsmen, but caused injury.  To play the ball meant the risk of being caught.  Not to play it meant the greater risk of being hit.

The Australian Captain, Bill Woodfull, was felled by a fast ball near the heart.  Bert Oldfield had his skull fractured.

Jardine’s terror tactics erupted in a public outcry.  There was fighting and riots, and Australian dockworkers boycotted British ships.

“Bodyline bowling is a menace to the game…and unsportsmanlike,” protested Australian cricket official, Mr W.Jeanes.

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IN THE NEWS …
IN THE UNITED STATES, RUSSI TAYLOR, THE WOMAN WHO VOICED MINNIE MOUSE FOR MORE THAN THREE DECADES, HAS DIED AT 75. THE CAUSE OF HER DEATH IS NOT YET KNOWN. MISS TAYLOR MARRIED THE MAN WHO SUPPLIED THE VOICE FOR MICKEY MOUSE, WAYNE ALLWINE FROM 1991. HE DIED IN 2009.
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Below: This is not cricket, its war, says Larwood.

Grimmett: There’s hope for the English team now the bodyline is dead, said Neville Cardus

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

CAPTAIN DOUGLAS JARDINE IS OUT AND THE BODYLINE EVENT IS OVER!

“Jardine’s retirement is a great loss,” says Neville Cardus. “Australians know my attitude on bodyline – I do not regret one word I have written or said on that subject.

“I oppose bodyline for two reasons.

“Firstly, because it will not go down with the public, who do not want to watch an attack directed at the batsman’s body.  Australian crowds are not singular in this respect – the Oval, Old Trafford, and other crowds similarly would resent bodyline.

“Secondly, is that bodyline spoils the beauty of cricket as a spectacle; it is an ugly form of attack.  Some pessimists said that bodyline will kill cricket, but cricket, real cricket, has killed bodyline.

“Nevertheless, this does not affect my admiration for Jardine’s cricketing qualities.  He was a great skipper before bodyline was known, and he will remain a great skipper when bodyline has been forgotten.

“It is tragic that a captain of Maclaren’s and Jackson’s class should drop out, for Jardine is a captain worthy of the Australians.

“I disagreed with his tactics, but if his retirement was due to those tactics then it merely adds another damning line in bodyline’s epitaph.

“I believe Wyatt will succeed Jardine as captain.  Valentine is still too young, but Wyatt is Woodfull’s English counterpart.  Perhaps both lack genius and inspiration, but they know cricket on and off the field.

“Woodfull’s personality and character have done much to dissolve bitterness, and I believe that the fact that he opposed bodyline greatly influenced the MCC attitude towards it,” said Cardus.

Apart from the obvious choices amongst the players who visited Australia and India, Mr Cardus believes that J. Iddon (Lancashire) may force his way into the Tests.

Cardus declared that the more he studies the Australian team the more he respects its ability.

AUSTRALIA V. ENGLAND FOR THE ASHES, 2O19. WE WISH ALL THE AUSTRALIAN PLAYERS THE VERY BEST IN THEIR CURRENT BID FOR VICTORY.

Below: Harold Larwood describes himself as “the hangman”.


GREAT KIWI FIRST: America Cup’s – NZ wins classic with “flawless” sailing!

FRANK MORRIS

THIS WAS A DRUBBING.

BY 1995, NEW ZEALAND HAD WORKED THEIR MAGIC.

For 132 years the Americans have proved their invincibility by whipping challenger after challenger to keep one of the world’s oldest and best known international trophies, the America’s Cup.

It seemed that the baroque silver ‘mug’ was to be permanently encased at the New York Yacht club.

Writing in a major publication on the Cup’s history, Sir James Hardy, who helmed two Australian challengers, said “One might have felt that the America’s Cup looked unattainable such was the consistency and thoroughness of the Americans.

After several campaigns beginning in 1967, the Australians struck it lucky. In 1983, Australia II had a four to three victory over Liberty.

The Americans weren’t invincible, after all. Challengers came from near and far. The New Zealanders worked their magic for the first time in 1995, by impressively snatching the Cup in Black Magic I from Dennis Connor’s Young America, 5-0, at San Diego.

The Kiwi victory was described as “a team effort from stern to stern”.

In 1999, the world’s best sailors descended on Auckland Harbour to decide who will challenge Team New Zealand for the 2000 America’s Cup. In the end, Italy’s Prada team proved no match for the Kiwis. The Italian challenger, Luna Rossa, was thrashed by New Zealand 5-0.

Writes Time magazine of the victory: “There were echoes of 1995…the same winning margin and with the same crushing flair”. With their flawless sailing, Team New Zealand made history too.

That win made New Zealand the smallest country ever to compete in the Cup and only the second to take it from the US, Time reported.

Could the Kiwis do the unthinkable again in 2003?

As it turns out, the Kiwis were defeated soundly in the series.
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THE GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
IN 1955, ROBERT TUDAWALI, OF JEDDA FAME, BECAME THE FIRST ABORIGINAL FILM STAR. JEDDA LEAVES HER NICE SAFE EXISTENCE … WHEN KIDNAPPED BY AN OLDER STRANGER. “TADAWALI’S STUNNING PERSONALITY ADDS TO THE FILM ABOUT LIVING FULLY AND TAKING THE CONSEQUENCES”. – FM.
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HOME-CARE A-Z: A case of depression – it slowly gets on top of you!

“LOUISE”    

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

I UNDERSTAND THE SAYING: I WAKE AND FELL INTO DARKNESS.

THIS STORY IS TAKEN FROM HER OWN EXPERIECE WITH DEPRESSION.

Here I am, in my early fifties, living on my own. Never before have I been afraid.

I was aware, at this stage, that my sleep was being interrupted, and it worried me. It was beginning to breakup into short, sleeping modules.

I wake up at 1.30 am; then 3.30 am; And then 5.30am. And the darkness. It was a black cloud pervading my being.

Thing worsen. For a time the darkness lifts by noon, and I can forget those terrible early hours without sleep. I dread going to sleep, to face that wakeful night. Now I understand the saying: “I wake and fell into darkness”.

I visit two different doctors … and I act with preconceived … indignation and horror … at the thought of taking hormones and antidepressants.

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THE GREAT FIRST …
IN 1917, THE SURF WAS AUSTRALIA’S “WORLD FIRST SURFING” MAGAZINE. AFTER 20 ISSUES, IT FOLDED IN 1918. THE GREAT WAR WAS TO BLAME. THE SURF WAS POSSIBLY ONE OF THE FIRST IN THE WORLD TO FOCUS PRIMARILY ON SURF-RIDING AND BEACH ACTIVITIES. – FM.
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Surely, I need to assert – yes -- my will power. And –yes -- my positive thinking!

My decision is to try hormones. But their effect is negative. I become more and more depressed. Each day – darkness. And something new appears: anxiety. I have nothing to worry about specifically, and yet I feel anxious all the time.

Soon, my stomach starts to be painful; burning after every meal. I have not slept through the night for a couple of months. Another trip to the doctor and then to a specialist, but this time they reveal incipient ulcers.

Then follows three months of the elimination of foods. Nothing seems to help. Every day is ridden with pain. Soon I am having almost no variety of foods. My anxiety level increases. I experience some horrible thoughts that cross my mind. Even the house haunted me.

When I looked back over the months, the matter is well and truly out of hand. I feel I am getting worse. But, stubbornly, I still refuse to consider taking medication. My nights are a horror of sleeplessness. People are kind in offering me advice on what to do.

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THE GREAT AUSSIE FIRST …
IN 1934 ACTRESS, JOURNALIST AND NOVELIST MARY MARLOWE, WHO HAD HER OWN SESSION ON RADIO, WAS THE FIRST TO INTRODUCE “INFORMAL” INTERVIEWS ON THE MEDIUM. – FM.
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Now, I go to a psychiatrist. My resistance to antidepressants remains firm. My depression has lifted a little during the early stages of my appointments. The need for antidepressants seems small.

Then, a lot has started to happen. I would wring my hands in agitation. I cannot make a simple decision. I cannot concentrate. Afraid of doing anything, even getting on a bus. Being alone causes complete panic.

I finally decided to try antidepressants, but it takes time to find the right level. There was a lot of grief in the early periods.

Now, my brain is starting to function correctly. My stomach pains lessen; and I can eat a variety of foods again. I have hope that I will be well again.

Depression, I am told, is a chemical imbalance in the brain. For months, I resisted this view. But slowly change occurs. My anxiety lessens.

The psychiatrist, who showed such patience and understanding and compassion, taught me to have tender regard for all with mental health problems.

The experience of depression has brought me a deeper understanding for anxiety, depression and mental illness.
SOURCE: Adapted from the International Mental Health, America.

Below: My condition taught me how to value good health.

COMING: Home Care, A-Z – Australians are sleeping less than they used to; how much sleep do we really need?

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COMING FEATURES …
SURFER PEARL TURTON, FANTASTIC VOYAGE, HEADLINE HUNTER JOHN FROST, ROAD CCCCRASH, CHANGING MEN, HISTORIC HOTELS AND VICTORIA AFTER THE GOLD BOOM.
NEXY WEEK: Come on! Taste some of Australia’s dried fruits!

Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 02 August 19

DONATE AN ORGAN: This occurs only after death!

Adapted by FRANK MORRIS

BEFORE YOU DIE, HAVE YOUR ORGANS PASSED ON TO SOMEONE IN NEED.

BRAIN-DEATH HAPPENS WHEN THE BRAIN STOPS FUNCTIONING.

More than 30,000 Australians have received transplants in the last 60 years.

For people with serious or life threatening illness, organ or tissue donation may mean a second chance at life.

Improved survival rates now mean that most recipients of organs or tissue can look forward to a better quality of life.

Organ and tissue donation can only occur after death.

Usually, organ donation is only considered after several tests have been carried out by two appropriately qualified senior doctors to establish whether brain death has taken place.

Brain-death occurs when the brain stop functioning and there is no possibility of recovery.
The way in which a person dies will generally determine what they are to donate.

In most cases, organs – heart, lungs, liver, pancreas, kidney – can only be donated if a person has died in a intensive can unit under special circumstances. Less than 1% of all people who pass away died this way in hospital.

Generally, organ donation may be possible after a person’s heart has stopped beating; but this is rare.

People are sometimes concerned or confused about the difference between brain death  or coma. Both organs are very different.

A patient in a coma is unconscious because their brain is injured in some way, although their brain continues to function and, in all likehood, may heal.

Medical tests on a patient can clearly show the difference between brain and coma death.

A greater number of people have the chance to donate tissue for transplantation -- eye, heart valves, bone and skin. The reason: tissue donation does not require the same special treatment as organs do for transplantation to be successful.

[The Australian Organ Donor Register 1800 552 152. Email:aodr@medicareaustralia.gov.au/organ
Address: Reply Paid 711 Hobart, TAS 7001]

SOURCE: Contact the Donation Register in your state.

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GREAT KIWI FIRST …
GO NZ! INVENTOR JOHN BRITTEN’S SUPER-BIKE, THE BRITTEN V1000, IS A SYMBOL OF “GREAT KIWI INGENUITY”, CLAIMS HISTORIAN RICHARD WOLFE.
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SHAPES & SIZES: Chinese junk! What our demi-craft grew into becomes a giant of the sea

A JUNK IS A TYPE OF ANCIENT CHINESE CRAFT THAT WAS BUILT DURING THE 2ND CENTURY AND DEVELOPED RAPIDLY DURING THE SONG DYNASTY. SAILORS REFERRED TO THEM AS “JUNKS”. THEY HAVE CLOTH SAILS WHICH ARE “STRENGTHENED WITH BAMBOO POLES”. LARGE JUNKS HAVE FIVE MASTS. JUNKS WERE THE FIRST SHIPS “TO HAVE A RUDDER” FOR SAILORS TO BE ABLE TO STEER THEM.


VALE: Margaret Fulton dies at 94; she “opened the world of flavours”, said a newspaper

FRANK MORRIS

MARGARET AND WOMAN’S DAY WHICH, AFTER SPENDING 19 YEARS AS COOKING EDITOR, LEFT TO JOIN RUPERT MURDOCK ‘S NEW IDEA.

THE FEISTY COOKBOOK QUEEN, MARGARET FULTON, BECAME A LEDGEND OF HER TIME.

The pioneer cookbook writer, Margaret Fulton, who led Australian women to cook meals of great exotic flavours, died on Wednesday, (July 24) aged 94.

It was the end of an era.

Her Margaret Fulton Cookbook inspired generations to cook like they never cooked before, bringing home cooking to a fine art.

The Australian book publishing industry was rocked by revolutionary change in the 1960s. “The swing to paperbacks…powerful new groupings that have emerged through takeovers, and foreign invasions are changing the old order,” reported The Bulletin's Michael Baume in 1966.

A typical invader was Englishman Paul Hamlyn, who “stormed the world, selling to people who had never bought books before.”

Australian publishers were slow to recognise that through creative and imaginative marketing and packaging it was possible to sell books like soap!

The Hamlyn books had a unique “buy-me” appeal.

Hamlyn's approach, says Kevin Weldon, was to exploit high traffic areas in major department stores, impulse buying “and all the modern marketing techniques the book world had studiously ignored.”

Until the Hamlyn Group utilised television in Australia, Weldon says, “nobody in the world had ever promoted a book on TV before.”

And, of course, the legendary Margaret Fulton Cookbook, which ended up selling over 1.5 million copies.
A profile on Margaret Fulton in the Good Weekend magazine, says that “Paul Hamlyn cleverly chose Margaret (Fulton) to write the cookbook.”

According to Kevin Weldon, the first Margaret Fulton Cookbook was a compilation of Fulton's articles from the Woman's Day magazine.

The re-using of such material had been arranged with Tom Farrell, the chief editorial director of the Fairfax Group, who was also responsible for the company's magazine subsidiary, Sungravure.

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GREAT KIWI FIRST …
GO NZ! NEW ZEALAND WON THE AMERICA’S CUP, SAILING’S HOLY GRAIL IN HISTORY-MAKING STYLE IN 1995 AND 1999; WINNING 5-0 ON BOTH OCCASIONS. NZ WAS NOT ONLY THE SMALLEST COUNTRY TO COMPETE, BUT ONLY THE SECOND TO TAKE IT FROM THE US.
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BE ADVENTUROUS: Margaret Fulton Cookbook -- she writes the forward for a run-away bestseller!

Selected by FRANK MORRIS

I have always believed that good food and good cooking are part of all that is best in life, all that is warm, friendly and rewarding; and that love is as essential an ingredient to a good meal as it is to a good marriage.

The most vivid memories of my youth are linked with my mother's kitchen – coming home to the warmth of a log fire and good food, lovingly prepared; the fragrance of freshly-baked shortbread or Dundee cake and, in winter, the pot of welcoming soup.

The highlight of each day was the evening meal, when the family gathered to share not only the food, but the day's happenings. A trying day never seemed so bad at the end of that meal and a good day turned into a celebration.
In my own home I find that a meal, cooked well and with love, works the same magic as it did a generation ago.

Cookery is now accepted as one of the creative arts, and one by which women can express their own individuality.

Never look on this cook book as a set of rigid rules, but rather as a starting point.

Once a dish has been mastered, be adventurous - give it the stamp of your personality by adding your favourite flavours or your choice of garnish.

When preparing this book it was heartwarming to find so many people all over the world wanting to share their recipes and knowledge of food with me. I am very grateful to you all.

I am grateful also to the cooks in Woman's day kitchen who have tested and perfected these recipes with me.

Beginners should not be discouraged from trying out 3-star recipes – just be prepared to give them more time and concentration.

I hope that new cooks will learn these recipes and that experienced cooks will appreciate my interpretation of the classic dishes included in this book.

Bon Appetit

Bonne Cuisine

Margaret Fulton

SOURCE: The Margaret Fulton stories, Grand Years.
Below: Margaret Fulton at the launch.

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AUSTRALIA v. ENGLAND FOR THE ASHES …
FROM AUGUST 1, AUSTRALIA AND ENGLAND WILL BATTLE FOR ONE OF CRICKET’S MOST PRESTIGOUS PRIZES, THE ASHES. IT IS ON THE NINE NETWORK. SEE IT ‘LIVE’ ON ANY DEVICE YOU HAVE AT YOUR FINGERTIPS!
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Posted in: Grand Years with Frank Morris at 26 July 19

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